Giving to
Bryn Mawr

Katharine Houghton Hepburn Center

Greece: The Jewels of the Cyclades
Aboard the M/S Galileo

APRIL 23 TO MAY 4, 2013

Witness the splendor of the Greek Isles on this exciting cruise through the Cyclades in the Agean Sea. Dip your feet into the warm, blue waters as you move from island to island in comfort aboard the charming motor-sailer, the M/S Galileo (26 cabins). Our adventure begins in the ancient city of Athens with visits to the Acropolis and all the monuments that have adorned Athens through the millennia. On an off-the-beaten track cruise, discover less visited pristine islands with quaint villages and blue-domed churches and enjoy a night out in town on the Bohemian island of Mykonos and a full-day in scenic Santorini. Along the way, find yourself surrounded by classic Greek hospitality and distinctive cuisine!!

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Preliminary Itinerary
(please click on location to reveal details)

FULL ITINERARY

DAY 1~ TUESDAY ~ APRIL 23 NEW YORK/ATHENS

This afternoon your journey begins as you board your overnight flight. (Meals Aloft)

DAY 2~ WEDNESDAY ~ APRIL 24 ATHENS

Arrive in Athens, named after Athena – the goddess of wisdom – who, according to legend, won the city after defeating Poseidon in a duel. The goddess’ victory was celebrated by the construction of a temple on the Acropolis, the site of the city’s earliest settlement in Attica. As a city state, the coastal capital of Athens reached its heyday in the fifth century BC. The office of the statesman, Pericles – between 461BC and his death in 429BC – saw an unprecedented spate of construction resulting in many of the great classical buildings – the Parthenon, Erechtheion, Hephaisteion and the temple at Sounion – now regarded as icons of ancient Greece. Physical evidence of the city’s success was matched by achievements in the intellectual arts. Democracy was born, drama flourished and Socrates conceived the foundations of Western philosophy. Remarkably, although the cultural legacy of this period has influenced Western civilization ever since, the classical age in Athens only lasted for five decades. Under the Macedonians and Romans, the city retained a privileged cultural and political position but became a prestigious backwater of the Empire rather than a major player. The birth of Christianity heralded a long period of occupation and decline, culminating in 1456 and four centuries of Turkish domination, which has left an indelible cultural mark on the city. Modern Athens was born in 1834, when the city was restored as the capital of a newly independent Greece. To understand the essence of Greece one must experience Athens, ancient monuments surviving in a sea of cement, startling beauty amid squalor, tradition and modernity side by side. Athens is an intriguing crossroads, blending elements of Middle Eastern and Western cultures.

Tonight your welcome dinner is at a traditional taverna in the Psiri area. After 6:00 p.m. Psiri undergoes the transformation from working-class-light-industrial, to a Mecca of cafes, bars, restaurants and ouzeries in a setting that reminds you of a scaled down version of New York's Soho district with the East Village tossed in. Each restaurant has its own style, from traditional Greek taverna or ouzerie-mezedopouleon to 60's style cafes that may remind you of a luncheonette in an old movie. Many are decorated with historic photos of Athens and some with relics of Greek modern society.

The St. George Lycabettus is a landmark in Greek hospitality with modern facilities and warm service. Byzantine, Victorian and Modern Greek art is displayed in the Saint George Lycabettus Hotel celebrating the rich history of its Athens location. The sublime views of the Acropolis and the tiny, picturesque church of Saint George are visible throughout the hotel. The hotel has 154 bedrooms and suites, two restaurants, five bars, a breakfast room, outside swimming pool, spa, gym, express overnight laundry and one-hour pressing.

Overnight at SAINT GEORGE LYCABETTUS. (Meals Aloft, D)

DAY 3~THURSDAY~APRIL 25 ATHENS

Your day is spent exploring the wonderful highlights of Athens including the Parthenon and Acropolis Museum, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Royal Palace, temple of Olympian Zeus, the Panathenian Stadium and the flea market.

The Acropolis still dominates the Athenian skyline, and seems to rise above the human realm. It was an important site as early as the Bronze Age, when it housed a Mycenaean citadel. In the 6th century BC, the Athenian tyrants used the Acropolis as a base, but they were the last of the ancients to live there. By the Classical Age, it was home to the gods, not mortals. Further, the burning of the Acropolis during the second Persian invasion (480 BC) left the site almost barren. It would not be until after the middle of the 5th century BC, at Athens's Golden Age, that reconstruction, urged by Pericles to express the power and glory of Athens. These messages can still be seen as the monuments on the Acropolis reflect the successive phases of the city's history. Some of them were converted into Christian churches, houses of the Franks and later on, of the Turks. After the liberation of Athens from the Turks, the protection, restoration and conservation of the monuments was one of the first tasks of the newly-founded Greek state. This major effort is continued until today, with the large-scale restoration and support of the monuments, which started in the 1970's and is still in progress.

The most famous of the remaining monuments is the Parthenon. Built under Pericles between 447 BC and 432 BC, it is the culminating masterpiece of Greek architecture. The temple is peripteral, with eight Doric columns at each end and 17 on the flanks (46 in all); it stands upon a stylobate three steps high. The body of the building comprised a cella and behind it an inner chamber (the Parthenon proper), which gave the temple its name.

Also visit the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the Royal Palace in Syntagma Square. At the top of Syntagma (Constitution) Square is the Parliament Building, formerly the King's Palace, built between 1836 and 1840 by King Otto and financed by his father Ludwig I of Bavaria. The original idea was to put the king's palace on the Acropolis but luckily this never happened. Underneath the palace you’ll see the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. The sculpture on the Tomb shows a Greek soldier lying down and the inscriptions scattered around the tomb quote fragments from Pericles' Funeral Oration of 430 BC, delivered after the first year of the Peloponnesian War to honor the fallen Athenians. The tomb is guarded by Evzones, the elite soldiers who also guard the Palace and are chosen for their height and strength. Several times a day, one may witness the Changing of the Guard performed by these soldiers in their traditional pleated skirt uniform and shoes with toes tipped by a red or black ball called a ”foonda”.

Today lunch will be at a local restaurant in Plaka, the unique old section of Athens dotted with shops and taverns (cars are not allowed in this area of town).

Ample time will be spent exploring the new Acropolis Museum, located in Athens’s historic area of Makryianni. The Museum stands less than 1,000 feet southeast of the Parthenon, at the entrance of a network of pedestrian walkways that link the key archaeological sites and monuments of the Acropolis. This location was carefully selected to enable a dialogue between the Museum’s exhibition spaces and the Acropolis buildings.

Overnight at the SAINT GEORGE LYCABETTUS. (B,L)

DAY 4~ FRIDAY ~ APRIL 26 ATHENS~ PIRAEUS, CRUISE EMBARKATION/POROS

Your morning is at leisure, giving you ample time to do some sightseeing on your own or just relax and enjoy the amenities of your hotel

Depart this afternoon (embarkation time 2-3 pm) for your short drive to the port town of Piraeus, where you will board your elegant vessel, poised for a splendid 8-day exploration of the glorious Greek islands. Your home will be the beautiful Galileo, a classic vessel navigating classic waters. With a cruising speed of 11.00 knots, this 153-foot ship is an artful combination of strength and stability. There are 26 outside cabins all with air-conditioning and fitted with central music, internal telephone, safe deposit boxes, hair dryer and en suite bathroom with shower. At the main deck, a lounge area with an American bar leads into a warm and elegant dining room finished with wood and leather. Guests on Galileo enjoy the most a shaded outdoor deck area with an outdoor bar and the ship’s sun deck equipped with sun beds, deckchairs and a Jacuzzi (filled with sea water.)

After the welcome briefing, cocktail and safety drill, set sail for the island of Poros, a small island in the Saronic Gulf to the west of Athens. You will disembark at Poros for a short three hour visit. The isle of Poros is one of the most popular and unspoiled of the smaller Greek Islands. You are free to go ashore and explore on your own. Stroll the narrow cobbled streets or find a table on the waterfront and bask in the serenity of a glorious sunset over its picturesque harbor. Your overnight sailing takes you to Poliegos in the south of the Cyclades.

Overnight on board the M/S GALILEO. (B,D) www.varietycruises.com

DAY 5~SATURDAY~APRIL 27 POLIEGOS/FOLEGANDROS

Arrive at the island of Poliegos this morning, a very small island known for its unblemished beaches and calm seas. Poliegos (meaning island with lots of goats), or Ypolivos as otherwise known, or Polivos, with an area of approximately 6.9 square miles is the largest uninhabited island of the Aegean and one of the largest in the Mediterranean. The terrain of the island is rough and has a small plain at its center. It has great geological and ecological importance since it is considered the best preserved, environmentally speaking, Mediterranean island and hosts rare or even endangered endemic species of fauna and flora, like the Mediterranean seal Monachus monachus, the endemic adder Microvipera schweizeri (which lives only in Kimolos, Poliegos, Milos and Sifnos), the endemic blue lizard Podarcis milensis, the falcon Falco eleonore (75% of the world population lives on the Aegean islands), Spizaetos (Hieraaetus fasciatus), 32 endemic, rare or even endangered species of plants and a lot of wild goats. For its significant ecological value Poliegos has been incorporated to the network of Natura. You will visit private beaches for swimming and snorkeling .A delicious barbeque lunch is prepared on deck.

This afternoon, sail for Folegandros, named for Minos’ son, one of the most amazing and less known islands in the Aegean Sea. This tiny island has just 600 inhabitants from three small villages – Karavostasi, the Chora and Ano Meria, which are connected by a paved road. Ancients used to call it "Sidira" (iron) due to its hard ground. Walk the amazing Ano Meria (Upper City) and since you’re free to dine on your own tonight, try one of the traditional Greek tavernas. Try matsaka, handmade spaghetti with rabbit, as well as kaltsounia, a type of local cheese pie.

Overnight on board the M/S GALILEO. (B,L)

DAY 6~SUNDAY~APRIL 28 SANTORINI

Morning arrival on the island of Santorini, perhaps the most breathtaking of all the Greek Islands. The town of Thira provides a backdrop of white-washed houses, narrow streets, open-air cafes and glittering boutiques clinging to steep cliffs. Your shore excursion takes you to Fira, Pyrgos & Oia Villages (about 4 hours including one way cable car, bus, and local guide):

Disembark by tender and board the cable car to Fira, a typical Cycladic village made of charming white houses with blue windows and doors, separated from each other by small paved streets. Many of its beautiful buildings were constructed back in the times of the Venetian invasion, including some blue domed churches and sun-bathed verandahs that offer an incredible view of the volcano and the sunset. Visit the Archaeological Museum with its fascinating collection, models and wall paintings from the Acrotiri excavations. Continue with your drive to Oia and enroute visit the village of Pyrgos which has a population of 500 inhabitants, and used to be the capital of the island until the early 1800s.The village is formed by traditional houses built all around the Venetian castle, and the small streets follow the shape of the hill

Admire the panoramic view of the Aegean Sea and the neighboring islands en route to Oia. A unique sight is the various layers of lava that can be seen on the face of the rock, each layer being another phase of the activity of the volcano. Built on the Caldera rim, Oia Village is an excellent example of Cycladic architecture. Accompanied by your guide, explore the village walking along the cobblestone streets and the white washed houses with blue shutters where one gets the impression that they are a beautiful travel poster. Your excursion will end in Oia where you re-board the bus for your way back to the pier to rejoin the ship for a late afternoon departure. Overnight on board the M/S GALILEO. (B,L or D)

DAY 7~MONDAY ~ APRIL 29 ANTIPAROS/PAROS

Start your day with a refreshing swim in an enchanting bay of Antiparos. Early noon arrive at Parikia, the island’s capital and port also known as Paros Town or Chora. Paros is an island of fertile valleys, hills dotted with small churches, picturesque villages and sandy beaches. More precisely, you can find numerous beaches with crystal clear waters, including Chrissi Akti, Pounda, Pisso Livadi, Parikia etc. The constant strong wind makes the place a favored windsurfing location.

Your excursion here takes you southeast of Parikia to Lefkes in the central part of Paros. The village is built amphitheatrically on the hills and it is considered one of the most beautiful and traditional settlements on the island. During the Middle Ages, it was the capital of Paros. With a population of approximately 500 inhabitants, the village is covered in olive trees and eucalyptus. The visitor here can admire the small white houses, the ruined windmills and the excellent pigeon-lofts.

Continue on to the lovely fishing village of Naoussa and its famous tiny port. Here you will visit its narrow streets, the whitewashed houses, the colorful harbor and its many beautiful shops. Return to Parikia following a different route passing by seaside villages, where weather permitted you may stop for a refreshing swim or leisure time at a beach. Lastly visit the famous Byzantine Church of Ekatondapiliani, one of the greatest early Christian monuments in Greece. Your tour ends with a walk through the narrow streets. Stroll around, find a taverna, practice your dancing skills, and have some fun tonight on your own.

Overnight on board the M/S GALILEO. (B,L)

DAY 8~TUESDAY~APRIL 30 MYKONOS/DELOS

Arrive Mykonos with its treasure of natural beauty and rich history, famous for its cosmopolitan atmosphere, its exciting nightlife, its picturesque Cycladic capital full of whitewashed houses and blue-domed churches and its magnificent sandy beaches. The main town in the island is Chora, an architectural landmark where you can admire the nice Alefkandra area, called the “Little Venice”. Enjoy carefree walks on the maze of alleys, as motorized traffic is prohibited in Chora. In Mykonos, freedom of expression is visible in every corner, and the combination of such a tranquil setting with a vibrant social scene has elevated the island to a premier destination for travelers from around the world. The nightlife is an essential Mykonian attraction, made of numerous clubs and tavernas, like the beach bars of Paradise and Paranga.

A highlight will be your visit to tiny Delos, an island-museum in the Cyclades, about half an hour by boat from Mykonos; small enough, it only takes three or four hours toe explore it. According to mythology, Delos is where Leto gave birth to Artemis and Apollo after Zeus had impregnated her and cast her off, fearing reprisal from his wife Hera. Leto happened upon the island, which was floating and shrouded in mist, after being denied sanctuary elsewhere. In order to stop the island from floating, Leto swore by the river Styx that no harm would come about as a result of her rearing children there. The island, normally quite stubborn, obliged to stop floating and Leto bore Artemis and Apollo, but not before having her childbirth prolonged nine days after Hera tricked the goddess of birth, Eilythia. After the birth of the twins, the mist disappeared and the island basked in the sun. The name of the sacred place thus changed from Adelos (invisible) to Delos (visible) and the sanctity and prominence of the island quickly developed thereafter.

Rocky and barren, in this small island light dominates from the first moments of the breaking day until dusk, as neither high mountain masses nor silhouettes of trees shut out its perfect reflection. The ruins of the settlement, spread about all over the island, the surviving marble columns, the theater, the gymnasium, as well as the pieces of the most important creations of mosaic art are witnesses to the island’s glorious history. The complex of buildings of Delos compares with those of Delphi and Olympia. Among Delos’ most noted sculptural artifacts are fragments of a colossal Apollo and nine marble lions. Four main groups of ruins are distinguishable on the west coast: the commercial port and small sanctuaries; the religious city of Apollo, a sanctuary; the sanctuaries of Mount Cynthosand the theatre, and the region of the Sacred Lake. Behind the Sacred Harbor begins the paved Sacred, or Processional, Way, 42 feet wide. To the west stood a sacred precinct, or shrine, and on the east a terrace with three important temples. The Doric temple of Apollo (mid-5th to 3rd century BC) has plain frieze motifs, scant sculptural decoration, and no interior colonnade. Adjoining it is a Doric Athenian temple (425-417 BC); the third is the Porinos Naos. Beyond this complex is a sanctuary, an unusual elongated structure in two sections. At the north end was an altar built of the horns of animal sacrifices. To the east was the temple of Dionysus, on the other side a large commercial exchange that had a temple of Aphrodite and Hermes. Behind the commercial harbor were docks and warehouses; behind them lay the private houses of the 3rd and 2nd centuries BC, each featuring a court surrounded by columns and many paved with mosaic. The theatre (early 3rd century BC) lay beyond the commercial harbor, on the lower slope of Mount Cynthus; its summit has remains of ancient Cycladic dwellings (3rd millennium BC) and a small precinct of Kynthios Zeus (Cynthian Zeus) and Athena.

We suggest ending your evening as the Mykonians do and enjoy a glass of ouzo and traditional “mezedes” appetizers or enjoy Mykonos’ world famous night life.

Overnight on board the M/S GALILEO. (B,D)

DAY 9~WEDNESDAY~MAY 1 MYKONOS/SYROS

At daybreak you leave Mykonos to reach the hilly island of Syros, a small island with about 26,000 habitants. Its central location makes it the principal administrative center for the Cyclades and its beautiful capital, Ermoupolis is the capital not only of Syros, but of all the Cyclades Islands. Admire the neo-classical buildings and Cycladic style whitewashed houses which line the hills down to the harbor below. The town’s main Miaouli square is among the most beautiful in Greece with coffee shops and restaurants sitting amongst palm trees. Make the effort to climb the steps up to the settlement of Ano Syros, the first Catholic village of the Aegean with its narrow alleys and natural fortress – you will have a fantastic view to the harbor of Ermoupolis. With narrow lanes and a wonderfully medieval atmosphere, the town has been built in the style of an amphitheatre, with houses built on top of each other to form a defensive fortress– a throwback to the days when seaside towns needed protection from hostile enemies. Winding steps take you past houses with colored doors and up to the 13th-century Catholic Cathedral of St. George, perched on the hilltop. Enjoy the panoramic views out across the neighboring islands of Tinos, Delos, Mykonos and Naxos.

Overnight on board the M/S GALILEO. (B,D)

DAY 10~THURSDAY~ MAY 2 KYTHNOS/MARINA ZEAS/ATHENS

Your last island to visit is Kythnos for a swim in Kolona Bay, the most famous and characteristic beach of Kythnos. The beach of Kolona is basically a narrow strip of land that connects Kythnos to the islet of Agios Loukas. However, it has a particular charm, partly due to its fine, golden sand and the sea lapping at both sides. Many yachts moor there in summer, giving a slightly cosmopolitan atmosphere to this secluded beach. Kythnos is unspoiled by tourism and very ‘Greek’ in every aspect. Attracting mostly Greek tourists due to its lack of commercialism, the locals here are very friendly and hospitable and the pace of life is slow. While the landscape is largely rocky and barren, the summer months bring out an abundance of colorful flowers and there's a stark beauty in the harsh mountainous terrain peppered with figs, vines and goats. There are lovely sandy beaches, some only accessible by boat so this is the perfect place to get away from the crowds and find a beach to yourself. If you wander ashore you will find whitewashed houses, windmills, blue-domed churches and a way of life which seems to have remained unchanged for centuries. Kythnos is where you will find a taste of the ‘real Greece’, untouched by mass tourism and un-crowded even at the height of the season.

Your ship sets sail for Marina Zea passing Cape Sounion in a distance, where the white marble pillars of the Temple of Poseidon stand on a high promontory and are illuminated at night. You will be able to see the majestic Temple of Poseidon built in 444 BC, ideally situated as a landmark for mariners of the past and present. Its sunsets and panoramic views put it high on the list of visual Greek feasts. Although there are better preserved temples in Greece, this temple is easier to reach and its setting is unparalleled.

Overnight on board the M/S GALILEO. (B,L)

DAY 11~FRIDAY~MAY 3 ATHENS

Sadly find yourself at the port of Marina Zea and disembark your ship. You will be transferred to your hotel where the rest of the day is free for you to relax and enjoy the amenities of your hotel or do some sightseeing of your own.

A walk through the oldest neighborhood in Athens is a must and one of the most pleasurable activities especially in the early evening. There are hundreds of shops from kitschy tourist to the workshops of some really great artisans. There are several good restaurants where you can sit outside almost year round.

Towering over Athens, Lycabettus Hill offers a spectacular view of Athens, the Acropolis, and, on a clear day, the Aegean Sea. Reached by foot or by funicular, Lycabettus Hill will reward your journey with a stunning sunset view. A snack bar and picnic benches are available at the top for visitors to rest and relax.

Overnight at the SAINT GEORGE LYCABETTUS. (B)

DAY 12~SATURDAY~MAY 4 ATHENS/ NEW YORK

This morning your journey comes to an end as you are transferred to the airport for your return flights home. You have just experienced a unique world, one that combines the thrill of ancient civilizations, warm hospitality and amazing natural beauty. (B, Meals Aloft)

Optional Extension to Classical Greece
Preliminary Itinerary
May 3 – 7, 2013

DAY 11~FRIDAY~MAY 3 ATHENS/METEORA

This morning, bid farewell to the rest of the group returning to the USA as you continue with your drive to Kalambaka. Though it was destroyed by the Nazis in WWII, it is now a modern city close to Meteora and its rock-top monasteries. In the northwest corner of Thessaly, the wide bed of the Pinios River emerges from the mighty canyons of the Eastern Pindus Mountains that plummet abruptly onto the Thessalian plain. Here, in the shadow of the mountains and just beyond the town of Kalambaka, massive gray colored pinnacles rise towards the sky. It is a strange but breathtaking landscape that has been sculpted by wind and water over thousands of years. These smooth, vertical rocks have become a favorite destination for rock climbers who are, perhaps, the only ones today who can truly appreciate the feat of the 9th century hermits who first climbed them to settle in the caves and fissures of the rocks. Meaning ‘suspended in air’ the name Meteora soon came to encompass the entire rock community of 24 monasteries. There were no steps and the main access to the monasteries was by means of a net that was hitched over a hook and hoisted up by rope and a hand cranked windlass to winch towers overhanging the chasm. Monks descended in the nets or on retractable wooden ladders up to 40m long to the fertile valleys below to grow grapes, corn and potatoes. Each community developed its own resources and by the end of the 14th century, the Grand Meteoron emerged as the dominant community. Today, seven monasteries remain, two of which you will visit. Within the monasteries, apart from portable icons, miniatures, ecclesiastical robes, utensils and crosses, all of them excellent examples of Byzantine and post-Byzantine art, you will also see rare editions and manuscripts. Overnight at the METEORA HOTEL. (B)

DAYS 12/13~SATURDAY/SUNDAY ~ MAY 4/5 METEORA/DELPHI

Enjoy your visit further this morning at Meteora, and then head through graphic villages to Delphi, one of the most important sites of the ancient world. Built on Mt. Parnassos, overlooking the Gulf of Corinth, Delphi's setting is stunning. At the Archaeological Museum, discover one of the most famous statues of ancient Greece, the Charioteer, the statue of Antinoos and the Naxian Sphinx.

You will have two days to discover Delphi’s magnificence. It has everything: a long and glorious history, spectacular ancient remains, a superb museum, and a heartbreakingly beautiful location on the slopes of Mount Parnassus. Look up and you see the cliffs and crags of Parnassus; look down and you see Greece's most beautiful plain of olive trees stretching as far as the eye can see. In ancient times, Delphi was considered the center of the known world, the place where heaven and earth met. According to legend it was the all powerful Zeus who declared Delphi to be the center of the world after he released two eagles from different ends of the earth and they met on the spot where the Temple of Apollo was subsequently built. Delphi is known as the center of worship for the god Apollo, son of Zeus, who embodied moral discipline and spiritual clarity.

Visit the Archaeological Museum, a must as it houses one of the finest collections in the whole of Greece. The star attraction is the larger than life bronze charioteer from the 5th century BC, an extraordinarily well preserved figure which was part of a group that included a four-horse chariot. The museum's 13 galleries are a fabulous treasure trove of sculptures, artwork and priceless gifts offered to the sanctuary by wealthy devotees of the Greek gods. Overnights at HOTEL ARACHOVA SANTA MARINA. (B Daily)

DAY 14~MONDAY~MAY 6 DELPHI/ATHENS

This morning, after breakfast, depart Delphi for Athens and to your accommodation where the rest of the day is at leisure to relax or do some sightseeing on your own. Tonight’s farewell dinner is at a traditional taverna in Plaka. Overnight at the SAINT GEORGE LYCABETTUS. (B,D)

DAY 15~TUESDAY ~ MAY 7 ATHENS/NEW YORK

This morning your journey comes to an end as you are transferred to the airport for your return flights home. You have just experienced a unique world, one that combines the thrill of ancient civilizations, warm hospitality and amazing natural beauty. (B, Meals Aloft)


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Cost & Program Inclusions:

COSTS: PER PERSON, BASED ON DOUBLE OCCUPANCYMAIN PROGRAMPOST EXTENSION
DOUBLE OCCUPANCY COST – LAND ONLY $4,395 PER PERSON $1,495 PER PERSON
SINGLE ROOM SUPPLEMENT, ADDITIONAL*$995 PER PERSON ADDITIONAL$495 PER PERSON ADDITIONAL
UPGRADE TO CATEGORY A CABIN***$1,045 PER PERSON, ADDITIONALN/A
UPGRADE TO CATEGORY B CABIN***$380 PER PERSON, ADDITIONAL $380 PER PERSON, ADDITIONAL
*SINGLE SUPPLEMENT: RATES ARE VALID FOR FIRST TWO SINGLE ROOMS BOOKED. IF MORE THAN TWO SINGLE ROOMS, ADDITIONAL SUPPLEMENT WILL APPLY. SINGLES ARE ASSIGNED ON A FIRST COME/FIRST SERVE BASIS.

**ALL INTERNATIONAL AIRFARES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AND BASED ON MINIMUM NUMBER OF TRAVELERS. TAXES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE UNTIL TICKETED.

***CABINS ARE ASSIGNED ON A FIRST-COME/FIRST-SERVED BASIS. IF CABIN SELECTION IS NOT AVAILABLE, NEXT CABIN CATEGORY WILL BE OFFERED.
TRIP INCLUSIONS
  • All transfers by air-conditioned motorcoach.
  • Superior accommodations throughout as indicated or similar.
  • Services of English-speaking cultural guide throughout the tour, including the cruise.
  • 7-night/8-day cruise aboard the M/S Galileo in cabin category C. Upgrades to Category A and B are available at additional cost - $1,045 per person & $380 per person, respectively. Single cabins are limited.
  • Meals Included: Welcome dinner, breakfast daily and a fare well dinner on the extension; all other meals as specified above. Typically, on the cruise either lunch or dinner will be included and the other meal will be taken on the islands, at the guest’s choice.
  • All admission fees.
  • All shore excursions.
  • Port taxes.
  • Gratuities for baggage handling, hotel tips and taxes.
  • Passport wallet and baggage tags.
EXCLUSIONS
  • Round trip air transportation between New York and Athens, including fuel surcharges and airline taxes (quoted separately).
  • Gratuities to driver, guide and other conveyance attendants.
  • Any applicable departure taxes from Greece.
  • Excess baggage charges levied by airlines.
  • Meals and beverages, other than specified.
  • Laundry and other items of a personal nature.
  • Personal and baggage insurance.
  • Cost for anything not specifically mentioned in the listing above.
  • Optional insurance coverage is available for Baggage, Accident and Trip Cancellation/Interruption at special low cost group rates.
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Faculty Study Leader

Dr. Mary K. Dabney'76, Classical & Near Eastern Archaeology

Dr. Mary K. Dabney is a Research Associate in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology at Bryn Mawr College and has taught at Widener University and Chestnut Hill College. As Co-Director of the Nemea Valley Archaeological Project sponsored by Bryn Mawr College in Greece, she is publishing the Late Mycenaean settlement on Tsoungiza and co-publishing the Mycenaean cemetery excavations. Dr. Dabney has also directed museums and historic sites in the Philadelphia area.

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Accommodations

M/S GALILEO

M/S Galileo is a 46-passenger, 167-foot classic steel hull motor-sailer with spacious and well appointed interiors renovated in 2007. Experience a harmonious balance between conventional cruising and private yachting, along with an exciting voyage of discovery, unraveling the wonders of the Aegean Islands. Each day you will discover a new port of call, a hidden cove with crystal blue waters to cool you, a glimpse of ancient history to amaze you and rich cultural diversity to intrigue you.

Lounge Area:
The Lounge area is located on the main deck and has large windows providing for magnificent views. The lounge is a spacious, warm and cozy area with an American bar.

Sundeck:
The spacious Sun Deck is equipped with Sun Beds, deckchairs, shaded areas and a large JACUZZI which is the ideal place to bask under the sun, read a good book or just gaze at the scenery.

Outside sitting area:
Guests on Galileo enjoy the most the shaded outdoor deck area with and outdoor bar were they can just relax enjoying the most breathtaking sea views.

The Cabins:
The M/S Galileo’s 26 outside guest cabins are located on the Lower and the Upper Deck all with large windows or portholes.

Elegantly decorated, they have either twin or queen sized beds and bathrooms with showers en suite. All cabins are fully air-conditioned and offer storage space, radio music controls and telephones.

Launched: 1992
Rebuilt: 2007
Length: 167 feet
Breadth: 32.8 feet9.18 feet 2.80 meters
Crew: 16 - 18 persons
Cruising speed: 11.00 knots
Cabins: 26

INCLUSIONS
  • All transfers by air-conditioned motorcoach.
  • Superior accommodations throughout as indicated or similar.
  • Services of English-speaking cultural guide throughout the tour, including the cruise.
  • 7-night/8-day cruise aboard the M/S Galileo in cabin category C. Upgrades to Category A and B are available at additional cost - $1,045 per person & $380 per person, respectively. Single cabins are limited.
  • An escort from Bryn Mawr will accompany the group with a minimum of 15 travelers on the main tour and 10 on the extension.
  • Meals Included: Welcome dinner, breakfast daily and a fare well dinner on the extension; all other meals as specified above. Typically, on the cruise either lunch or dinner will be included and the other meal will be taken on the islands, at the guest’s choice.
  • All admission fees.
  • All shore excursions.
  • Port taxes.
  • Gratuities for baggage handling, hotel tips and taxes.
  • Passport wallet and baggage tags.
EXCLUSIONS
  • Round trip air transportation between New York and Athens, including fuel surcharges and airline taxes (quoted separately).
  • Gratuities to driver, guide and other conveyance attendants.
  • Any applicable departure taxes from Greece.
  • Excess baggage charges levied by airlines.
  • Meals and beverages, other than specified.
  • Laundry and other items of a personal nature.
  • Personal and baggage insurance.
  • Cost for anything not specifically mentioned in the listing above.
  • Optional insurance coverage is available for Baggage, Accident and Trip Cancellation/Interruption at special low cost group rates.
THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CRUISING THE GREEK ISLANDS

Mainland Greece

  • Visiting the archaeological sites requires walking on uneven terrain, often on cobblestone, and often climbing or descending steps. Sites can be crowded.
  • Museums are generally temperature controlled and well maintained, but can be crowded, particularly during high season.
  • It can be quite warm during the Summer months, particularly June, July & August.

Greek Islands

  • The itinerary supplied is only indicative. Weather conditions, choppy seas, or a variety of reasons might necessitate itinerary changes, spending less time in an island, substituting one island with another, or altering the meal plan.
  • Participants must be able to climb in and out of vehicles and boats unassisted. Bear in mind that some landings are wet, and others are dry, so you need to be able to get in and out of the boats easily enough and proper footwear is essential.
  • You should also be able to tolerate walks at an easy pace on uneven terrain, sometimes uphill, for perhaps a few hours at a time in heat and humidity. The islands are dry and the ground in many cases is uneven. You should have good stability as falling can cause injury.
  • To enjoy this destination to its fullest, travelers must be in good physical health.

General

  • True adventure in travel can sometimes be accompanied by unexpected changes in conditions, itineraries and occasionally your accommodations. Participants should travel with a spirit of adventure and flexibility. Remember to pack your patience and sense of humor! Although Greece is a modern Western country with all amenities available, be willing to look past self-imposed ideals and do not compare these new experiences with your life back home.
  • Travel often includes visiting destinations with modest infrastructures and a bending definition of comfort. That being said, you will find that most of your accommodations are nestled in absolute luxury where pampering is the norm.
  • Participants should generally be in good health and prepared to travel in locations where medical facilities might require air-lifting to Athens.

Air Schedules

Choosing the best possible air arrangements for our travelers is always a challenge. We work with many airlines that offer the best level of service, routings and value for our programs. While there may indeed be more direct routings available with another airline, the cost of these flights may not be within the budget that allows us to give you the best value possible. If you prefer to purchase your own international air, please feel free to choose the “land only” rate for this program. The start and end city for the main program is Athens.

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