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Department of Anthropology
Bryn Mawr College
101 N. Merion Avenue
Bryn Mawr, PA 19010

610-526-5030
Fax: 610-526-5655

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Spring 2015

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ANTH B102-001 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWF Dalton Hall 119 Fioratta,S.
ANTH B102-002 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Semester / 1 LEC: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Thomas Hall 224 Weidman,A.
ANTH B200-001 The Atlantic World 1492-1800 Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Dalton Hall 119 Gallup-Diaz,I.
ANTH B204-001 North American Archaeology Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Dalton Hall 1 Barrier,C.
ANTH B208-001 Human Biology Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Taylor Hall D Seselj,M.
ANTH B220-001 Methods and Theory in Archaeology Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Dalton Hall 315 Barrier,C.
ANTH B229-001 Topics in Comparative Urbanism: Colonial & Post Colonial Reflections Semester / 1 LEC: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Taylor Hall B McDonogh,G.
ANTH B236-001 Evolution Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Park 243 Marenco,P.
ANTH B238-001 Chinese Culture and Society Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Dalton Hall 6 Miller,C.
ANTH B268-001 Cultural Perspectives on Marriage and Family Semester / 1 LEC: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Dalton Hall 2 Merritt,C.
ANTH B359-001 Topics in Urban Culture and Society: Global Borderlands Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM W Dalton Hall 10 Reyes,V.
ANTH B399-001 Senior Conference Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM M Dalton Hall 25 Dept. staff, TBA
LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM M Dalton Hall 212A
ANTH B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
ANTH B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
ANTH B425-001 Praxis III: Independent Study Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA

Fall 2015

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ANTH B101-001 Introduction to Anthropology: Prehistoric Archaeology and Biological Anthropology Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Barrier,C., Seselj,M.
ANTH B101-00A Introduction to Anthropology: Prehistoric Archaeology and Biological Anthropology Semester / 1 Laboratory: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM T Dalton Hall 315 Seselj,M.
ANTH B101-00B Introduction to Anthropology: Prehistoric Archaeology and Biological Anthropology Semester / 1 Laboratory: 4:10 PM- 5:30 PM T Dalton Hall 315 Seselj,M.
ANTH B101-00C Introduction to Anthropology: Prehistoric Archaeology and Biological Anthropology Semester / 1 Laboratory: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM W Dalton Hall 315 Seselj,M.
ANTH B101-00D Introduction to Anthropology: Prehistoric Archaeology and Biological Anthropology Semester / 1 Laboratory: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM W Dalton Hall 315 Seselj,M.
ANTH B185-001 Urban Culture and Society Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW McDonogh,G., Reyes,V.
Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW
ANTH B202-001 Africa in the World Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Fioratta,S.
ANTH B281-001 Language in Social Context Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Weidman,A.
ANTH B301-001 Anthropology of Globalization: Wealth, Mobility, Insecurity Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM F Fioratta,S.
ANTH B303-001 History of Anthropological Theory Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM TH Weidman,A.
ANTH B316-001 Media, Performance, and Gender in South Asia Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM W Weidman,A.
ANTH B325-001 Mobility, Movement, and Migration in the Past Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM T Barrier,C.
ANTH B331-001 Advanced Topics in Medical Anthropology Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM T Pashigian,M.
ANTH B398-001 Senior Conference Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM M Dept. staff, TBA
ANTH B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
ANTH B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA

Spring 2016

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ANTH B102-001 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWF Interim,R.
ANTH B102-002 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Fioratta,S.
ANTH B229-001 Topics in Comparative Urbanism: Global Suburbia Semester / 1 LEC: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH McDonogh,G.
ANTH B234-001 Forensic Anthropology Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Seselj,M.
ANTH B236-001 Evolution Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Davis,G.
ANTH B259-001 The Creation of Early Complex Societies Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Barrier,C.
ANTH B305-001 Archaeology of the Precolumbian Southeastern United States Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM F Barrier,C.
ANTH B317-001 Disease and Human Evolution Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TH Seselj,M.
ANTH B354-001 Identity, Ritual and Cultural Practice in Contemporary Vietnam Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM T Pashigian,M.
ANTH B359-001 Topics in Urban Culture and Society: Mobility and Territory Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:00 PM- 4:00 PM TH Siddiqi,A.
ANTH B399-001 Senior Conference Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM M Dept. staff, TBA
ANTH B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
ANTH B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA

2015-16 Catalog Data

ANTH B101 Introduction to Anthropology: Prehistoric Archaeology and Biological Anthropology Fall 2015 An introduction to the place of humans in nature, primates, the fossil record for human evolution, human variation and the issue of race, and the archaeological investigation of culture change from the Old Stone Age to the rise of early civilizations in the Americas, Eurasia and Africa. In addition to the lecture/discussion classes, students must select and sign up for one lab section. Scientific Investigation (SI)

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ANTH B102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Spring 2016 An introduction to the methods and theories of cultural anthropology in order to understand and explain cultural similarities and differences among contemporary societies . Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward International Studies

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ANTH B185 Urban Culture and Society Fall 2015 Examines techniques and questions of the social sciences as tools for studying historical and contemporary cities. Topics include political-economic organization, conflict and social differentiation (class, ethnicity and gender), and cultural production and representation. Philadelphia features prominently in discussion, reading and exploration as do global metropolitan comparisons through papers involving fieldwork, critical reading and planning/problem solving using qualitative and quantitative methods. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as CITY B185

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ANTH B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800 Not offered 2015-16 The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history. Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as HIST B200 Counts toward Africana Studies Counts toward Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures Counts toward International Studies

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ANTH B202 Africa in the World Fall 2015 In this course, we will approach Africa with an emphasis on the many interconnections that link the continent with the rest of the world, through both time and space. Much popular talk about Africa in the U.S. is overwhelmingly negative--focusing on poverty, violence, and failed states--and often portrays Africa as something "other," both different from and unrelated to the United States and much of the rest of the world. But such preconceptions blatantly overlook what we know about historical and contemporary movements of people, ideas, materials, and money around the globe. Rather than regarding Africa as separate or apart, in this course we will examine the centrality of African engagements with these global movements. Rather than attempting a survey of particular, bounded African "peoples" or "cultures," we will explore complex issues and processes through interconnected topics including colonial and postcolonial politics, urban life, gender and sexuality, religion, economic networks, development, and transnational migration. We will use these themes as guides for exploring larger, interlinked questions of social life in Africa and around the world. Prerequisite: at least Sophomore Standing Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Africana Studies

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ANTH B204 North American Archaeology Not offered 2015-16 For millennia, the North American continent has been home to a vast diversity of Native Americans. From the initial migration of big game hunters who spread throughout the continent more than 12,000 years ago to the high civilizations of the Maya, Teotihuacan, and Aztec, there remains a rich archaeological record that reflects the ways of life of these cultures. This course will introduce the culture history of North America as well as explanations for culture change and diversification. The class will include laboratory study of North American archaeological and ethnographic artifacts from the College's Art and Archaeology collections. Prerequisites: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor. Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ANTH B208 Human Biology Not offered 2015-16 This course will be a survey of modern human biological variation. We will examine the patterns of morphological and genetic variation in modern human populations and discuss the evolutionary explanations for the observed patterns. A major component of the class will be the discussion of the social implications of these patterns of biological variation, particularly in the construction and application of the concept of race. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor. Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B209 Human Evolution Not offered 2015-16 The position of humans among the primates, processes of biocultural evolution, the fossil record and contemporary human variation. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor. Scientific Investigation (SI)

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ANTH B211 The Archaeology and Anthropology of Rubbish and Recycling Not offered 2015-16 This course serves as an introduction to a range of approaches to the study of waste and dirt as well as practices and processes of disposal and recycling in past and present societies. Particular attention will be paid to the interpretation of spatial disposal patterns, the power of dirt(y waste) to create boundaries and difference, and types of recycling. Critical Interpretation (CI) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as ARCH B211

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ANTH B219 Visual Anthropology, Latin America and Social Movements Not offered 2015-16 Focusing on indigenous communities and social movements, this course examines the cultural uses of visual art, photography, film, and new media in Latin America. Students will analyze a variety of materials to reconsider western conceptions of art. As well, students will explore how anthropologists employ visual methods in ethnographic research. Prerequisites: ANTH B102 or permission of instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures

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ANTH B220 Methods and Theory in Archaeology Not offered 2015-16 An examination of techniques and theories archaeologists use to transform archaeological data into statements about patterns of prehistoric cultural behavior, adaptation and culture change. Theory development, hypothesis formulation, gathering of archaeological data and their interpretation and evaluation are discussed and illustrated by examples. Theoretical debates current in American archaeology are reviewed and the place of archaeology in the general field of anthropology is discussed. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor. Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ANTH B221 Performance in Latin America Not offered 2015-16 This course examines performance in Latin America, addressing performances that range from the everyday to the staged. Topics include: self-presentation and gender; food and sports; political ceremonies, personalities, and protest; religion, ritual, and rites of passage; literature, music, theater, dance, and performance art. In particular, students will attend to the situation of local practices within a global context, and to the relationship between culture, politics, and aesthetics. Prerequisites: ANTH B102, or permission of instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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ANTH B223 Anthropology of Dance Not offered 2015-16 This course surveys ethnographic approaches to the study of global dance in a variety of contemporary and historical contexts, including contact improvisation, Argentinian tango, Kathak dance in Indian modernity, a range of traditional dances from Japan and China, capoeira in today's Brazil, and social dances in North America and Europe. Recognizing dance as a kind of shared cultural knowledge and drawing on theories and literature in anthropology, dance and related fields such as history, and ethnomusicology, we will examine dance's relationship to social structure, ethnicity, gender, spirituality and politics. Lectures, discussion, media, and fieldwork are included. Prerequisite: a course in anthropology or related discipline, or a dance lecture/seminar course, or permission of the instructor. Writing Attentive Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as ARTD B223

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ANTH B229 Topics in Comparative Urbanism
Section 001 (Spring 2015): Colonial & Post Colonial Reflections
Section 001 (Spring 2016): Global Suburbia Spring 2016 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Writing Intensive Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as CITY B229 Cross-listed as SOCL B230 Cross-listed as HART B229 Counts toward Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures

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ANTH B230 Religion in the Pacific Rim Not offered 2015-16 Using ethnography as the foundation for study, this course provides an introduction to religious beliefs throughout the Asia-Pacific region, including shamanism, sorcery, and the advent of Christianity. The role of ritual and religion in forming identity, enforcing social structures, and managing cultural change will be examined. We also will explore the difficulties anthropologists have had in understanding and interpreting the rich religious heritage of the Pacific Rim. Students will consider how the interpretation and representation of religious practices in the Pacific Rim have influenced anthropological approaches to perceptions of reality, power, and difference. Prerequisite: ANTH B101 or B102 or H103, or permission of instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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ANTH B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile Not offered 2015-16 This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Felipe Alfau, Julia Alvarez,, Sigmund Freud, Eva Hoffman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, W. G. Sebald, and others. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as GERM B231 Cross-listed as COML B231 Counts toward Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures Counts toward International Studies

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ANTH B233 Battle of the Sexes? Cooperation and Conflict in Primates Not offered 2015-16 Using the framework provided by evolutionary biology, this course examines the behavior and underlying biology of primate males and females as they pursue strategies for survival and reproduction. Particular attention will be given to the conflicts that emerge between males and females in gregarious species, including humans. Prerequisites: ANTH B101 or equivalent is required. One additional course in biological anthropology is strongly recommended.

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ANTH B234 Forensic Anthropology Spring 2016 Introduces the forensic subfield of biological anthropology, which applies techniques of osteology and biomechanics to questions of forensic science, with practical applications for criminal justice. Examines the challenges of human skeletal identification and trauma analysis, as well as the broader ethical considerations and implications of the field. Topics will include: human osteology; search and recovery of human remains; taphonomy; trauma analysis; and the development and application of innovative and specialized techniques. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor. Scientific Investigation (SI)

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ANTH B236 Evolution Spring 2016 A lecture/discussion course on the development of evolutionary biology. This course will cover the history of evolutionary theory, population genetics, molecular and developmental evolution, paleontology, and phylogenetic analysis. Lecture three hours a week. Scientific Investigation (SI) Cross-listed as BIOL B236 Cross-listed as GEOL B236 Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

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ANTH B237 Environmental Health Not offered 2015-16 This course introduces principles and methods in environmental anthropology and public health used to analyze global environmental health problems globally and develop health and disease control programs. Topics covered include risk; health and environment; food production and consumption; human health and agriculture; meat and poultry production; and culture, urbanization, and disease. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or permission of instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Environmental Studies Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B238 Chinese Culture and Society Not offered 2015-16 This course encourages students to think critically about major developments in Chinese culture and society that have occurred during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, with an emphasis on understanding both cultural change and continuity in China. Drawing on ethnographic material and case studies from rural and urban China over the traditional, revolutionary, and reform periods, this course examines a variety of topics including family and kinship; marriage, reproduction, and death; popular religion; women and gender; the Cultural Revolution; social and economic reforms and development; gift exchange and guanxi networks; changing perceptions of space and place; as well as globalization and modernity. Prerequisite: ANTH102 or permission of instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward International Studies

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ANTH B239 Anthropology of Media Not offered 2015-16 This course examines the impact of non-print media such as films, television, sound recordings, radio, cell phones, the internet and social media on contemporary life from an anthropological perspective. The course will focus on the constitutive power of media at two interlinked levels: first, in the construction of subjectivity, senses of self, and the production of affect; and second, in collective social and political projects, such as building national identity, resisting state power, or giving voice to indigenous claims. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 or ANTH H103, or permission of instructor Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ANTH B242 Urban Field Research Methods Not offered 2015-16 This Praxis course intends to provide students with hands-on research practice in field methods. In collaboration with the instructor and the Praxis Office, students will choose an organization or other group activity in which they will conduct participant observation for several weeks. Through this practice, students will learn how to conduct field-based primary research and analyze sociological issues. Cross-listed as SOCL B242 Cross-listed as CITY B242 Counts toward Praxis Program

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ANTH B244 Archaeology of Early Farmers, Agriculture, and Social Change Not offered 2015-16 Throughout most of human history our ancestors practiced lifestyles focused upon the gathering and hunting of wild plants and animals. Today, however, a globalized agricultural economy supports a population of over seven billion individuals. This course utilizes information produced by archaeologists to examine this major historical transition while asking big questions like: What impact did the adoption of agriculture have on communities in the past, and how does the current farming system influence our own society? How does farming still affects our lives today, and how the history of agricultural change continues into the future. Prerequisite: ANTH B101, or permission of instructor. Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ANTH B248 Race, Power and Culture Not offered 2015-16 This course examines race and power through a variety of topics including colonialism, nation-state formation, genocide, systems of oppression/privilege, and immigration. Students will examine how class, gender, and other social variables intersect to affect individual and collective experiences of race, as well as the consequences of racism in various cultural contexts. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 or permission of instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ANTH B249 Asian American Communities Not offered 2015-16 This course is an introduction to the study of Asian American communities that provides comparative analysis of major social issues confronting Asian Americans. Encompassing the varied experiences of Asian Americans and Asians in the Americas, the course examines a broad range of topics--community, migration, race and ethnicity, and identities--as well as what it means to be Asian American and what that teaches us about American society. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as SOCL B249 Cross-listed as CITY B249

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ANTH B257 Ethnographic Writing Not offered 2015-16 This course explores the differences between ethnographic and other forms of writing, focusing on what makes ethnography unique, the forms it may take, and the features that make it most effective. Students will analyze different forms of argumentation and writing (quantitative vs. ethnographic, inductive vs. deductive, interpretive vs. casual), explore their varying degree of efficacy, and produce one final research paper. Although the end goal of this course is a mini-ethnography, the structure of the course is writing intensive with regular short writing exercises and assignments, review sessions, and drafts that build up to the final paper. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 or permission of instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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ANTH B258 Immigrant Experiences Not offered 2015-16 The course will examine the causes and consequences of immigration by looking at various immigrant groups in the United States in comparison with Western Europe, Japan, and other parts of the world. How is immigration induced and perpetuated? How are the types of migration changing (labor migration, refugee flows, return migration, transnationalism)? How do immigrants adapt differently across societies? We will explore scholarly texts, films, and novels to examine what it means to be an immigrant, what generational and cultural conflicts immigrants experience, and how they identify with the new country and the old country. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as SOCL B246 Counts toward Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures

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ANTH B259 The Creation of Early Complex Societies Spring 2016 In the last 10,000 years, humans around the world have transitioned from organizing themselves through small, egalitarian social networks to living within large and socially complex societies. This archaeology course takes an anthropological perspective to seek to understand the ways that human groups created these complex societies. We will explore the archaeological evidence for the development of complexity in the past, including the development of villages and early cities, the institutionalization of social and political-economic inequalities, and the rise of states and empires. Alongside discussion of current theoretical ideas about complexity, the course will compare and contrast the evolutionary trajectories of complex societies in different world regions. Case studies will emphasize the pre-Columbian histories of complex societies in the Americas as well as some of the early complex societies of the Old World. Prerequisite: ANTH B101, or permission of instructor. Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ANTH B260 Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome Not offered 2015-16 The often-praised achievements of the classical cultures arose from the realities of day-to-day life. This course surveys the rich body of material and textual evidence pertaining to how ancient Greeks and Romans -- famous and obscure alike -- lived and died. Topics include housing, food, clothing, work, leisure, and family and social life. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as ARCH B260 Cross-listed as CSTS B260 Cross-listed as CITY B259

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ANTH B265 Dance, Migration and Exile Not offered 2015-16 Highlighting aesthetic, political, social and spiritual powers of dance as it travels, transforms, and is accorded meaning both domestically and transnationally, especially in situations of war and social and political upheaval, this course investigates the re-creation of heritage and the production of new traditions in refugee camps and in diaspora. Prerequisite: a Dance lecture/seminar course or a course in a relevant discipline such as anthropology, sociology, or Peace and Conflict Studies, or permission of the instructor. Writing Attentive Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as ARTD B265

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ANTH B267 The Development of the Modern Japanese Nation Not offered 2015-16 An introduction to the main social dimensions central to an understanding of contemporary Japanese society and nationhood in comparison to other societies. The course also aims to provide students with training in comparative analysis in sociology. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as SOCL B267

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ANTH B268 Cultural Perspectives on Marriage and Family Not offered 2015-16 This course explores the family and marriage as basic social institutions in cultures around the world. We will consider various topics including: kinship systems in social organization; dating and courtship; parenting and childhood; cohabitation and changing family formations; family planning and reproductive technologies; and gender and the division of household labor. In addition to thinking about individuals in families, we will consider the relationship between society, the state, and marriage and family. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 or permission of instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ANTH B270 Geoarchaeology Not offered 2015-16 Societies in the past depended on our human ancestors' ability to interact with their environment. Geoarchaeology analyzes these interactions by combining archaeological and geological techniques to document human behavior while also reconstructing the past environment. Course meets twice weekly for lecture, discussion of readings and hands on exercises. Prerequisite: one course in anthropology, archaeology or geology. Inquiry into the Past (IP) Scientific Investigation (SI) Cross-listed as ARCH B270 Cross-listed as GEOL B270

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ANTH B281 Language in Social Context Fall 2015 Studies of language in society have moved from the idea that language reflects social position/identity to the idea that language plays an active role in shaping and negotiating social position, identity, and experience. This course will explore the implications of this shift by providing an introduction to the fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. We will be particularly concerned with the ways in which language is implicated in the social construction of gender, race, class, and cultural/national identity. The course will develop students' skills in the ethnographic analysis of communication through several short ethnographic projects. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or permission of instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as LING B281 Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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ANTH B287 Sex, Gender and Culture Not offered 2015-16 Introduces students to core concepts and topics of the cultural anthropological study of gender, sexuality difference and power in today's world. Focusing on the body as a site of lived experience, the course explores the varied intersections of gender, race, ethnicity, economics, class, location and sexual preference that produce different experiences for people both within and across nations. Particular attention will be paid to how gender and other forms of difference are shaped and transformed by global forces, and how these processes are gendered and raced. Topics include: scientific discourses, femininity/masculinity, marriage and intimacy, media and childhood, gender and variance, systems of inequality, race and ethnicity, sexuality, queer theory, labor, globalization and social change, and others. Prerequisites: ANTH 102 or permission of instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ANTH B290 The Prehistory of Iberia Not offered 2015-16 During the past million years, the Iberian Peninsula has served as a crossroads for many waves of human and hominid migration. In this course, we will examine the traces that these peoples have left behind as well as fluctuations and changes in their environment that shape where they settle and how they make their living. We will look at Pre-Neandertal and Neandertal sites (Atapuerca, Gibraltar, Lagar Velho, Zafarraya), Upper Paleolithic tool cultures and art, later migrations of cultures into the region via the Mediterranean and the Atlantic during the Neolithic, Chalcolithic and Bronze Ages (Bell-Beaker phenomenon, Celts, Phoenicians, and Greeks), the origin of the Basques, and finally the coalescence of Iberian cultures recorded by the Romans. Prerequisites: ANTH B101 or permission of the instructor Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ANTH B294 Culture, Power, and Politics Not offered 2015-16 This course provides an overview of theoretical approaches and thematic concerns in political anthropology. Drawing on both classic and contemporary ethnographic studies, we will examine how anthropological understandings of political formations have changed over time and in relation to different world regions. Topics will include political systems, the state, nationalism, ethnicity, citizenship, violence, rumor, and neoliberal forms of global governance. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or permission of the instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward International Studies

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ANTH B301 Anthropology of Globalization: Wealth, Mobility, Insecurity Fall 2015 This course explores economic globalization from an anthropological perspective. With a focus on the social, cultural, and historical aspects of global connections, we seek to understand not only large-scale change in the world, but also how the growing integration of different countries and economic systems shapes everyday life experience. Conversely, we will also explore how individuals actively engage with, and sometimes help shape, changing global processes. We will examine the meanings and motivations that guide some people to accumulate capital, and we will consider the structural inequalities and barriers that prevent others from doing so. We will study the paths of mobile individuals around the world--those who cross borders "legally" as well as those whose movements are deemed "illegal"--and think critically about what exclusion and forced immobility means for people socially as well as economically. Finally, we will investigate patterns of economic, political, and social insecurity that often accompany processes of globalization. Working through a series of ethnographic analyses and conducting our own research, we will gain a better understanding of how people around the world experience and actively make "the global." Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or permission of the instructor.

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ANTH B303 History of Anthropological Theory Fall 2015 A consideration of the history of anthropological theories and the discipline of anthropology as an academic discipline that seeks to understand and explain society and culture as its subjects of study. Several vantage points on the history of anthropological theory are engaged to enact an historically charged anthropology of a disciplinary history. Anthropological theories are considered not only as a series of models, paradigms, or orientations, but as configurations of thought, technique, knowledge, and power that reflect the ever-changing relationships among the societies and cultures of the world. Prerequisite: at least one additional anthropology course at the 200 or 300 level. This course is for Anthropology majors and minors. Writing Intensive

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ANTH B305 Archaeology of the Precolumbian Southeastern United States Spring 2016 The history of Native American occupation of the southeastern United States is one that is long, rich, and varied. This rich history stretches back to the earliest colonization of the region during the late Pleistocene period more than 12,000 years ago, and continues on today. The course will serve two main purposes. First, students will gain knowledge of the culture history and archaeology of the pre-Columbian Southeast. Second, students will be exposed to problem-oriented research in anthropological archaeology. Each semester the course will examine recent archaeological studies from the region that are situated within the broad scope of current anthropological inquiry. Potential topics might include the archaeology of hunter-gatherer social complexity, the development of towns and proto-urban settlements, gender and identity, ideology and religion, culture-contact, and early Native-European relations. Prerequisite: ANTH B101, or permission of the instructor.

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ANTH B312 Anthropology of Reproduction Not offered 2015-16 An examination of social and cultural constructions of reproduction, and how power in everyday life shapes reproductive behavior and its meaning in Western and non-Western cultures. The influence of competing interests within households, communities, states, and institutions on reproduction is considered. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or permission of instructor. Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B316 Media, Performance, and Gender in South Asia Fall 2015 Examines gender as a culturally and historically constructed category in the modern South Asian context, focusing on the ways in which everyday experiences of and practices relating to gender are informed by media, performance, and political events. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ANTH B317 Disease and Human Evolution Spring 2016 Pathogens and humans have been having an "evolutionary arms race" since the beginning of our species. In this course, we will look at methods for tracing diseases in our distant past through skeletal and genetic analyses as well as tracing the paths and impacts of epidemics that occurred during the historic past. We will also address how concepts of Darwinian medicine impact our understanding of how people might be treated most effectively. There will be a midterm, a final, and an essay and short presentation on a topic developed by the student relating to the class. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 or permission of the instructor. Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B318 Argentine Tango Not offered 2015-16 This course examines Argentine tango in anthropological perspective, from its origins among disenfranchised populations in late 19th century Río de la Plata society, its journey to the dance salons of Europe and New York, and ultimate transformation into local/ national symbol. Topics include: the performance of gender roles in tango lyrics, movement vocabulary, advertising images, stage performances, and films; the impact of globalization, fusion, and improvisation upon the development of tango music and dance; debates surrounding authenticity and cultural ownership; the commodification of memory and nostalgia in Argentine government, tourism, and industry promotional campaigns. Students will be introduced to basic tango dance vocabulary and etiquette in class, as well as through participant observation at Argentine tango events in the Philadelphia area. Prerequisites: ANTH B102, or permission of the instructor. Cross-listed as ARTD B318 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ANTH B320 Culture Change, Heritage and Tourism Not offered 2015-16 This course will examine change among individuals and groups in various cultural contexts, with a focus on heritage and tourism, and the tensions between preservation and evolution in the survival of cultural phenomena and practice. Readings will address topics including: identity construction; public celebrations such as festivals, parades, and processions; religious belief and ritual practices; transformations in food, music, dance, and performance; the commodification of "ethnic" arts and crafts and "untouched" landscapes; debates over public space and historic preservation; and economic and cultural arguments surrounding tourism and heritage programs. Special attention will be directed towards the impact of migration, colonialism, nationalism, and global capitalism upon cultural change. Prerequisite: ANTH B102, or permission of instructor.

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ANTH B325 Mobility, Movement, and Migration in the Past Fall 2015 The movement of human social groups across landscapes, borders, and boundaries is a dominant feature of today's world as well as of the recent historic past. Archaeological research has demonstrated that migration, movement, and mobility were also common features of human life in the more distant past. From examining cases of small-scale groups that were largely defined by constant movements across their social landscapes, to the study of the spread of complex societies and early political states, this course will consider the role of migration in the formation, reproduction, and alteration of human societies. Attention will be paid to how archaeologists recognize and study movement, as well as to how knowledge of the past contributes to a broader anthropological understanding of human migration. Prerequisite: ANTH B101, or permission of instructor

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ANTH B331 Advanced Topics in Medical Anthropology Fall 2015 The purpose of the course is to provide a survey of theoretical frameworks used in medical anthropology, coupled with topical subjects and ethnographic examples. The course will highlight a number of sub-specializations in the field of Medical Anthropology including genomics, science and technology studies, ethnomedicine, cross-cultural psychiatry/psychology, cross-cultural bioethics, ecological approaches to studying health and behavior, and more. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B338 Applied Anthropology: Ethics, Methods & Rights Not offered 2015-16 This course will explore anthropology and social change, specifically how anthropologists challenge forms of oppression and injustice. Through readings, discussions, and practice, we will examine and radically reconsider what anthropology has been, what it is, and what it can be as a tool for engaging the world outside academia. We will read a variety of examples of how public anthropologists have used ethnographic methods to address social inequalities both in the United States and globally. We will discuss both the process and product of such research and myriad ways that insight from ethnographic fieldwork and qualitative analysis lends visibility and public voice to a variety of issues including human rights, health, poverty and inequality, homelessness, humanitarian aid, and war. Prerequisites: ANTH B102 or permission of the instructor.

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ANTH B343 Human Growth and Development and Life History Not offered 2015-16 In this seminar we will examine various aspects of the human life history pattern, highly unusual among mammals, from a comparative evolutionary perspective. First, we will survey the fundamentals of life history theory, with an emphasis on primate life histories and socioecological pressures that influence them. Secondly, we will focus on unique aspects of human life history, including secondary altriciality of human infants, the inclusion of childhood and pubertal life stages in our pattern of growth and development, and the presence of a post-reproductive life span. Finally, we will examine fossil evidence from the hominin lineage used in reconstructing the evolution of the modern human life history pattern. Prerequisite: ANTH B101 or permission of instructor.

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ANTH B351 Transnationalism, Culture and Globalization Not offered 2015-16 Introduces students to transnationalism, globalization and what it means to live in culturally diverse societies. Through media, art, technology, fashion, food, and music this course examines the sociopolitical contours of contemporary multiculturalism in our globalizing world. The course will examine the impact of global forces such as immigration, media, and labor markets on cultural diversity. We will look critically at the concept of multiculturalism as it differs across the world, and consider the power of culture as a means of oppression as well as a tool for social change. We will consider how people create and deploy culture through art production, visual media, social movements and other phenomena. Prerequisites: ANTH B102 or permission of the instructor

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ANTH B354 Identity, Ritual and Cultural Practice in Contemporary Vietnam Spring 2016 This course focuses on the ways in which recent economic and political changes in Vietnam influence and shape everyday lives, meanings and practices there. It explores construction of identity in Vietnam through topics including ritual and marriage practices, gendered socialization, social reproduction and memory. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 or permission of the instructor. Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ANTH B359 Topics in Urban Culture and Society
Section 001 (Spring 2015): Global Borderlands
Section 001 (Spring 2016): Mobility and Territory Spring 2016 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: In the early twenty-first century, the problematics of mobility and territory are the water in which we swim. This course uses these concepts as categories for theoretical and historical study of the spatial, material, and aesthetic, examining issues in architecture, urbanism, geography, visual arts, design, and technology.
Cross-listed as CITY B360 Cross-listed as SOCL B360 Cross-listed as HART B359

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ANTH B398 Senior Conference The topic of each seminar is determined in advance in discussion with seniors. Sections normally run through the entire year and have an emphasis on empirical research techniques and analysis of original material. Class discussions of work in progress and oral and written presentations of the analysis and results of research are important. A senior's thesis is the most significant writing experience in the seminar.

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ANTH B399 Senior Conference The topic of each seminar is determined in advance in discussion with seniors. Sections normally run through the entire year and have an emphasis on empirical research techniques and analysis of original material. Class discussions of work in progress and oral and written presentations of the analysis and results of research are important. A senior's thesis is the most significant writing experience in the seminar.

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ANTH B403 Supervised Work Independent work is usually open to junior and senior majors who wish to work in a special area under the supervision of a member of the faculty and is subject to faculty time and interest.

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ANTH B403 Supervised Work Independent work is usually open to junior and senior majors who wish to work in a special area under the supervision of a member of the faculty and is subject to faculty time and interest.

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ANTH B425 Praxis III: Independent Study Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community. Counts toward Praxis Program

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