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2004-05 Catalog Home

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2004-05 and 2005-06

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Areas of Study

Africana Studies
Anthropology
Arts Program
Astronomy
Athletics and Physical Education
Biology
Chemistry
Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology
Comparative Literature
Computer Science
East Asian Studies
Economics
Education
English
Environmental Studies
Feminist and Gender Studies
Film Studies
Fine Arts
French and French Studies
General Studies
Geology
German and German Studies
Greek, Latin and Classical Studies
Growth and Structure of Cities
Hebrew and Judaic Studies
Hispanic and Hispanic-American Studies
History
History of Art
Italian
Linguistics
Mathematics
Music
Neural and Behavioral Sciences
Peace and Conflict Studies
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religion
Romance Languages
Russian
Sociology
Spanish

 

 

 
 
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Areas of Study 2004-05

Areas of Study Definitions

Major

In order to ensure that the student’s education involves not simply exposure to many ideas and disciplines but development of competence and some degree of mastery in at least one, she must choose a major subject at the end of sophomore year. With the guidance of the major adviser, students plan an appropriate sequence of courses.

The following is a list of major subjects:

  • Anthropology
  • Astronomy (at Haverford College)
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology
  • Classical Culture and Society
  • Classical Languages
  • Comparative Literature
  • East Asian Studies
  • Economics
  • English
  • Fine Arts (at Haverford College)
  • French and French Studies
  • Geology
  • German and German Studies
  • Greek
  • Growth and Structure of Cities
  • History
  • History of Art
  • Italian
  • Latin
  • Mathematics
  • Music (at Haverford College)
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religion (at Haverford College)
  • Romance Languages
  • Russian
  • Sociology
  • Spanish

Minor

The minor typically consists of six courses, with specific requirements determined by the department or program. A minor is not required for the degree. See Curricular Options for a list of subjects in which students may elect to minor.

Concentration

The concentration is a cluster of classes that overlaps the major to help focus a student’s work on a specific area of interest. A concentration is not required for the degree. See Curricular Options for a list of concentrations.

Key to Course Numbers

001-099
Elementary and intermediate courses. With rare exceptions, these courses are not part of the work in the major.

100-199
First-year courses.

200-299
Second-year courses.

300-399
Advanced courses in the major.

400-499
Special categories of work (e.g., 403 for a unit of supervised work).

Some of the courses listed together (e.g., French 001-002) are full-year courses. Students must complete the second semester of a full-year course in order to receive credit for both semesters. Full-year courses are indicated by the phrase “both semesters are required for credit” in the course description. Other courses listed together (e.g., History 201, 202) are designed as two-semester sequences, but students receive credit for completing either semester without the other.

A semester course usually carries one unit of credit. Students should check the course guide for unit listing. One unit equals four semester hours or six quarter-hours.

Selected Haverford College courses are listed in this catalog when applicable to Bryn Mawr programs. Consult the Haverford catalog for full course descriptions. Students should consult their deans or major advisers for information about Swarthmore College, University of Pennsylvania and Villanova University courses pertinent to their studies. Catalogs and course guides for Swarthmore, Penn and Villanova are available in the Dean’s Office.

Listed in each department or program are courses that have been offered in the last four years, most of them on a regular basis. Whenever possible, courses that will not be offered in the current year are so noted. Additional information, indicating regular scheduling patterns for certain courses, is also provided whenever possible.

For the most up-to-date information on courses, students should consult the College Web site at www.brynmawr.edu/ academics/course_descriptions.shtml or the Bryn Mawr-Haverford Course Guide. Each course description includes information about prerequisites. In parentheses following the description are the name(s) of the instructor(s), the College requirements that the course meets, if any, and information on cross-listing.

Key to Requirement Indicators

Quantitative Skills
Indicates courses that meet the requirement for work in Quantitative Skills.

Division I
Indicates courses that meet part of the divisional requirement for work in the social sciences.

Division IIL
Indicates courses that meet the laboratory science part of the divisional requirement for work in the natural sciences and mathematics.

Division II
Indicates courses that meet part of the divisional requirement for work in the natural sciences or mathematics, but not the laboratory science part of the Division II requirement.

Division III
Indicates courses that meet part of the divisional requirement for work in the humanities.

Division I or III
Indicates courses that can be used to meet part of the divisional requirement for work in either the social sciences or the humanities.

 

 

 
     
 
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