2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog

Biology

Students may complete a major or minor in Biology. Within the major, students may complete a minor in computational methods, or a concentration in environmental studies or neural and behavioral sciences.

Faculty

Peter D. Brodfuehrer, Professor and Chair, semester II
Monica Chander, Assistant Professor (on leave semesters I and II)
Gregory Keith Davis, Assistant Professor
Tamara L. Davis, Associate Professor and Chair, semester I (on leave semester II)
Wilfred A. Franklin, Instructor and Lab Coordinator
Stephen L. Gardiner, Senior Lecturer
Karen F. Greif, Professor
Paul Grobstein, Professor
Michael W. Sears, Assistant Professor
Michelle W Wien, Lecturer
Rebecca Marie Vandiver, Postdoctoral Fellow in Mathematics and Biology

The programs of the department are designed to introduce students to unifying concepts and broad issues in biology, and to provide the opportunity for in-depth inquiry into topics of particular interest through coursework and independent study. Introductory- and intermediate-level courses examine the structures and functions of living systems at all levels of organization, from molecules, cells and organisms to populations. Advanced courses encourage the student to gain proficiency in the critical reading of research literature, leading to the development, defense and presentation of a senior paper. In addition, there are opportunities for independent research projects with faculty.

Major Requirements

Course requirements for a major in Biology include four quarters of introductory biology, BIOL110-113, six courses at the 200 and 300 level (excluding BIOL 390-398), of which at least three must be laboratory courses; and one senior seminar course (BIOL 390-395, or 398-399). Two semesters of supervised laboratory research, BIOL 401 or 403, may be substituted for one of the required laboratory courses. In addition, two semester courses in general chemistry and three additional semester courses in allied sciences, to be selected from Anthropology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geology, Mathematics, Physics or Psychology are required for all majors. Selection of the three additional allied science courses must be done in consultation with the student’s major adviser and be approved by the department. Students interested in pursuing graduate studies or medical school are encouraged to take two semesters each of physics and organic chemistry.

Students with a score of 4 or 5 on their Advanced Placement examinations, or equivalent International Baccalaureate scores, will receive divisional credit only; they may not be used for the major in biology. A student wishing to enter biology courses at the 200 level without having taken BIOL 110-113 must pass the departmental placement exam.

Honors

Departmental honors are awarded to students who have distinguished themselves academically or via their participation in departmental activities. Final selection for honors is made by the Biology faculty.

Minor Requirements

A minor in Biology consists of six semester courses in Biology.

Minor in Computational Methods;
Concentrations in Environmental Studies and Neural and Behavioral Sciences


The Department of Biology participates with other departments in offering two concentrations within the major: environmental studies and neural and behavioral sciences. A minor in computational methods is available for students interested in computational methods and their applications to biology.

Teacher Certification

The College offers a certification program in secondary teacher education.

Animal Experimentation Policy

Students who object to participating directly in laboratory activities involving the use of animals in a course required for the major are required to notify the faculty member of her or his objections at the beginning of the course. If alternative activities are available and deemed consistent with the pedagogical objectives of the course by the faculty member, then a student will be allowed to pursue alternative laboratory activities without penalty.

BIOL B101 Introduction to Biology I: Molecules to Cells
For post-baccalaureate premedical students only. A comprehensive examination of topics in Mendelian and molecular genetics, development and evolution. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week.
(Wien, Division II with Lab)

BIOL B102 Introduction to Biology II: Organisms to Populations
For post-baccalaureate premedical students only. A comprehensive examination of topics in biochemistry, cell biology and physiology. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. BIOL 101 is strongly recommended.
(Wien, Division II with Lab)

BIOL B103 Biology: Basic Concepts
An introduction to the major concepts of modern biology that both underlie and emerge from exploration of living systems at levels of organization ranging from the molecular and biochemical through the cellular and organismal to the ecological. Emphasis is placed on the observational and experimental bases for ideas that are both common to diverse areas of biology and represent important contributions of biology to more general intellectual and social discourse. Topics include the chemical and physical bases of life, cell theory, energetics, genetics, development, physiology, behavior, ecology and evolution. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week.
(Grobstein, Franklin, Division II with Lab)
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B110 Biological Exploration I
BIOL 110-113 are introductory-level courses, designed to encourage students to explore the field of biology at multiple levels of organization: molecular, cellular, organismal and ecological. Each course will explore these areas of biology through a unifying theme. This year, BIOL 110 will center on the reading of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, and will examine its biological concepts and issues. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. There are no prerequisites for this course.
(Greif, Franklin, Division II with Lab)

BIOL B111 Biological Exploration II
BIOL 110-113 are introductory-level courses, designed to encourage students to explore the field of biology at multiple levels of organization: molecular, cellular, organismal and ecological. Each course will explore these areas of biology through a unifying theme. This year, BIOL 111 will investigate the molecular and cellular basis of cystic fibrosis, its inheritance in families and populations, and associated epidemiological and public policy implications. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. There are no prerequisites for this course.
(T. Davis, Franklin, Division II with Lab)

BIOL B112 Biological Exploration III
BIOL 110-113 are introductory-level courses, designed to encourage students to explore the field of biology at multiple levels of organization: molecular, cellular, organismal, and ecological. Each course will explore these areas of biology through a unifying theme. This year, Biology 112 will cover aspects of the genetics, biochemistry, development, physiology, ecology and evolution of skin, along with its associated diseases. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. There are no prerequisites for this course.
(G. Davis, Franklin, Division II with Lab)

BIOL B110-113 Biological Exploration IV
BIOL 110-113 are introductory-level courses, designed to encourage students to explore the field of biology at multiple levels of organization: molecular, cellular, organismal, and ecological. Each course will explore these areas of biology through a unifying theme. This year, Biology 113 will examine the proximate and ultimate explanations of ecological case studies that every biologist should know. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. There are no prerequisites for this course.
(Sears, Franklin, Division II with Lab)

BIOL B201 Genetics
An introduction to heredity and variation, focusing on topics such as classical Mendelian genetics, linkage, and recombination, chromosome abnormalities, population and developmental genetics. Examples of genetic analyses are drawn from a variety of organisms, including bacteria, Drosophila, C. elegans and humans. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: two quarters of BIOL 110-113 and CHEM 103, 104.
(T. Davis, Division II with Lab)

BIOL B202 Neurobiology and Behavior
An introduction to the attempt to understand behavior in terms of the nervous system. A brief overview of fundamental principles of nervous system structure is followed by consideration of several topics chosen to illustrate how studies of the nervous system illuminate behavior and how studies of behavior contribute to better understanding of the nervous system. Examples cover a wide variety of invertebrate and vertebrate species, including humans. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisites: two quarters of BIOL 110-113 or permission of instructor.
(Grobstein, Division II: Natural Science)

BIOL B205 Brain, Education and Behavior
A lecture/discussion course exploring intersections between the neural and cognitive sciences and the theory and practice of education, with the aim of generating useful new insights and productive lines of inquiry in both realms. Prerequisite: Some college-level course work in Biology, Psychology or Education; permission of the instructor.
(Grobstein, Division II: Natural Science)
Cross-listed as EDUC B205

BIOL B210 Biology and Public Policy
A lecture/discussion course on major issues and advances in biology and their implications for public policy decisions. Topics discussed include reproductive technologies, genetic screening and gene therapy, environmental health hazards, and euthanasia and organ transplantation. Readings include scientific articles, public policy and ethical considerations, and lay publications. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: two quarters of BIOL 110-113 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
(Greif, Division II: Natural Science)

BIOL B214 The Historical Roots of Women in Genetics and Embryology
As a more focused version of the course from previous years, we will examine the role that women scientists and technicians played in the development of genetics and embryology from the late-19th to the mid-20th century. The course will look at the work and lives of well known and lesser known individuals, asking how factors such as their educational experiences and mentor relationships played a role in their contributions. One facet of the course will be to look at the Bryn Mawr Biology Department from the founding of the College into the mid-20th century.
(G. Davis, Division II: Natural Science)

BIOL B215 Experimental Design and Statistics
An introductory course in designing experiments and analyzing data. This course is structured to develop students’ understanding of when and how to use different quantitative methods rather than the theory of specific tests. Topics include summary statistics, sampling distributions, randomization, replication, parametric and nonparametric tests, and introductory topics in multivariate and spatial statistics. The course is geared around weekly problem sets and interactive learning. Three hours of lecture/laboratory a week. Prerequisites: two quarters of BIOL 110-113, introductory geology or permission of instructor.
(Staff, Division II and Quantitative Skills)
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B220 Ecology
A study of the interactions between organisms and their environments. The scientific underpinnings of current environmental issues, with regard to human impacts, are also discussed. Students become familiar with ecological principles and with the methods ecologists use to address tricky ecological issues. Students apply these principles through the design and implementation of experiments both in the laboratory and the field. Lecture three hours a week, laboratory/field investigation three hours a week. There will be optional field trips throughout the semester. Prerequisite: two quarters of BIOL 110-113 or GEOL 103.
(Sears, Division II with Lab)

BIOL B223 The Story of Evolution and the Evolution of Stories
(Dalke, Grobstein, Division II or Division III)
Cross-listed as ENGL B223.

BIOL B225 Biology of Plants
In-depth examination of the structures and processes underlying survival, growth, reproduction, competition and diversity in plants. Three hours of lecture a week. Prerequisites: two quarters of BIOL 110-113.
(Staff, Division II and Quantitative Skills)
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B236 Evolution
A lecture/discussion course on the development of evolutionary thought, generally regarded as the most profound scientific event of the 19th century; its foundations in biology and geology; and the extent of its implications to many disciplines. Emphasis is placed on the nature of evolution in terms of process, product, patterns, historical development of the theory, and its applications to interpretations of organic history. Lecture three hours a week.
(Gardiner, Marenco, Division II: Natural Science)
Cross-listed as ANTH B236
Cross-listed as GEOL B236

BIOL B244 Behavioral Endocrinology
An interdisciplinary-based analysis of the nature of hormones, how hormones affect cells and systems, and how these effects alter the behavior of animals. Topics will be covered from a research perspective using a combination of lectures, discussions and student presentations. Prerequisites: two quarters of BIOL 110-113 or one of the following courses: B202, PSYC B218 or PSYC H217.
(Brodfuehrer, Division II: Natural Science)

BIOL B245 The Brain and Mental Health
A seminar course exploring implications of brain research for thinking about the nature of mental health and existing therapeutic approaches to mental health problems. Participants will read and discuss papers from the professional and semi-popular literature, and write papers that help others make sense of aspects of the brain/mental health interface.
(Grobstein, Division II: Natural Science)
Cross-listed as GNST B245
Cross-listed as PSYC B245
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B250 Computational Methods in the Sciences
A study of how and why modern computation methods are used in scientific inquiry. Students will learn basic principles of simulation-based programming through hands-on exercises. Content will focus on the development of population models, beginning with simple exponential growth and ending with spatially-explicit individual-based simulations. Students will design and implement a final project from their own disciplines. Six hours of combined lecture/lab per week.
(Sears, Division II and Quantitative Skills)
Cross-listed as CMSC B250
Cross-listed as GEOL B250

BIOL B255 Microbiology
Invisible to the naked eye, microbes occupy every niche on the planet. This course will examine how microbes have become successful colonizers; review aspects of interactions between microbes, humans and the environment; and explore practical uses of microbes in industry, medicine and environmental management. The course will combine lecture, discussion of primary literature and student presentations. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: two quarters of BIOL 110-113 or permission of the instructor.
(Chander, Division II: Natural Science)
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B271 Developmental Biology
An introduction to embryology and the concepts of developmental biology. Concepts are illustrated by analyzing the experimental observations that support them. Topics include gametogenesis and fertilization, morphogenesis, cell fate specification and differentiation, pattern formation, regulation of gene expression, neural development, and developmental plasticity. The laboratory focuses on observations and experiments on living embryos. Lecture three hours, laboratory three scheduled hours a week; most weeks require additional hours outside of the regularly scheduled lab. Prerequisites: two quarters of BIOL 110-113 or permission of instructor.
(G. Davis, Division II with Lab)

BIOL B301 Organismal Biology: Vertebrate Structure
A comparative study of major organ systems in different vertebrate groups. Similarities and differences are considered in relation to organ system function and in connection with evolutionary relationships among vertebrate classes. Laboratory activities emphasize dissection of several vertebrate representatives, but also include examination of prepared microscope slides and demonstrations. Two three-hour lecture/laboratory meetings a week. Prerequisites: two quarters of BIOL 110-113 or equivalent, one 200-level Biology course, and permission of instructor.
(Gardiner)
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B303 Animal Physiology
A comprehensive study of the physical and chemical processes in tissues, organs and organ systems that form the basis of animal function. Homeostasis, control systems and the structural bases of function are emphasized. Laboratories are designed to introduce basic physiological techniques and the practice of scientific inquiry. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. Prerequisites: two quarters of BIOL 110-113, CHEM 103, 104 and one 200-level biology course.
(Brodfuehrer)
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B304 Cell and Molelcular Neurobiology
A problem-based laboratory course in which students investigate cellular and molecular properties of neurons and small networks of neurons using neuron simulations and animal experiments, and through critical reading of the primary literature. Two four-hour laboratory sessions per week. Prerequisites: two quarters of BIOL 110-113, 202, PSYC 218 or PSYC 217 at Haverford.
(Brodfuehrer)
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B309 Biological Oceanography
A comprehensive examination of the principal ecosystems of the world’s oceans, emphasizing the biotic and abiotic factors that contribute to the distribution of marine organisms. A variety of marine ecosystems are examined, including rocky intertidal, and hydrocarbon seeps, with an emphasis on the distinctive characteristics of each system and the assemblage of organisms associated with each system. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. One required three-day field trip, for which an extra fee is collected, and other occasional field trips as allowed for by scheduling. Prerequisites: two quarters of BIOL 110-113 and one 200-level science course, or permission of instructor.
(Gardiner)

BIOL B310 Philosophy of Science
(Krausz, Grobstein, Division III: Humanities)
Cross-listed as PHIL B310
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B313 Integrative Organismal Biology I
The first semester of a two-semester course focusing on how organisms cope with environmental challenges by investigating the requirements for life at the level of individual cells and multi-cellular organisms, the anatomical and physiological properties of cells, tissues and organ systems, and how these properties allow organisms to interact successfully with their environment. Two three-hour lecture/laboratory sessions per week. Prerequisites: two quarters of BIOL 110-113 and general chemistry.
(Brodfuehrer, Gardiner)

BIOL B314 Integrative Organismal Biology II
The second semester of Integrative Organismal Biology. Two three-hour lecture/laboratory sessions per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 313 or permission of instructor.
(Brodfuehrer, Gardiner)

BIOL B321 Neuroethology
This course provides an opportunity for students to understand the neuronal basis of behavior through the examination of how particular animals have evolved neural solutions to specific problems posed to them by their environments. The topics will be covered from a research perspective using a combination of lectures, discussions and student presentations. Prerequisite: BIOL 202, PSYC 218 or PSYC 217 at Haverford.
(Brodfuehrer)
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B326 From Channels to Behavior
Introduces the principles, research approaches, and methodologies of cellular and behavioral neuroscience. The first half of the course will cover the cellular properties of neurons using current and voltage clamp techniques along with neuron simulations. The second half of the course will introduce students to state-of-the-art techniques for acquiring and analyzing data in a variety of rodent models linking brain and behavior. Prerequisites: two quarters of BIOL 110-113 and one of the following: PSYC 218, PSYC 217 at Haverford, or BIOL 202.
(Thomas, Brodfuehrer)
Cross-listed as PSYC B326

BIOL B328 Analysis of Geospatial Data Using GIS
(Fitz-Patrick, Reese)
Cross-listed as GEOL B328
Cross-listed as ARCH B328
Cross-listed as CITY B328
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B340 Cell Biology
A lecture course with laboratory emphasizing current knowledge in cell biology. Among topics discussed are cell membranes, cell surface specializations, cell motility and the cytoskeleton, regulation of cell activity, energy generation and protein synthesis. Laboratory experiments are focused on studies of cell structure, making use of techniques in cell culture and immunocytochemistry. Lecture three hours, laboratory four hours a week. Prerequisites: BIOL 201 or 271, CHEM 211, 212 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor. One semester of biochemistry is recommended.
(Greif)

BIOL B354 Basic Concepts and Special Topics in Biochemistry
For postbaccalaureate premedical students only.
(Staff)

BIOL B361 Emergence
(Blank, Grobstein, Allen)
Cross-listed as CMSC B361
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B375 Integrated Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I
The first semester of a two-semester course that focuses on the structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids, enzyme kinetics, metabolic pathways, gene regulation and recombinant DNA techniques. Students will explore these topics via lecture, critical reading and discussion of primary literature and laboratory experimentation. Three hours of lecture, three hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: two quarters of BIOL 110-113 and two semesters of organic chemistry.
(Staff, Division II with Lab)

BIOL B376 Integrated Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II
This second semester of a two-semester sequence will continue with analysis of nucleic acids and gene regulation through lecture, critical reading and discussion of primary literature and laboratory experimentation. Three hours of lecture, three hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL B375 or permission of instructor.
(T. Davis, Division II with Lab)
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B390 Senior Seminar in Ecology
A focus on the interactions among organisms and their environments. Students read and discuss current and classic papers from the primary literature. Topics may include biogeographic patterns, population and community dynamics, and ecosystem functioning. We may explore current issues such as global warming, habitat degradation and fragmentation, loss of biodiversity and the introduction of alien species. The effects of these human induced changes on the biota are examined. Students write, defend and publicly present one long research paper. Three hours of class lecture and discussion a week, supplemented by frequent meetings with individual students. Prerequisite: BIOL 220 or permission of instructor.
(Sears)
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B391 Senior Seminar in Biochemistry
Topics of current interest and significance in biochemistry are examined with critical readings and oral presentations of work from the research literature. In addition, students write, defend and publicly present one long research paper. Three hours of class lecture and discussion a week, supplemented by frequent meetings with individual students. Prerequisites: BIOL 341, 375 or permission of instructor.
(Staff)

BIOL B392 Senior Seminar
An advanced course in the study of the organization and function of physiological systems from the molecular level to the organismal level. Specific topics related to the organization and function of physiological systems are examined in detail using the primary literature. In addition, students write, defend and publicly present one long research paper. Three hours of class lecture and discussion a week, supplemented by frequent meetings with individual students.
(Staff)
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B393 Senior Seminar in Molecular Genetics
This course focuses on topics of current interest and significance in molecular genetics, such as chromatin structure and mechanisms of gene regulation. Students critically read, present and discuss in detail primary literature relevant to the selected topic. In addition, students write, defend and publicly present one long research paper. Three hours of class lecture and discussion a week, supplemented by frequent meetings with individual students. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 or 376, or permission of instructor.
(T. Davis)
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B394 Senior Seminar in Evolutionary Developmental Biology
Topics of current interest and significance in evolutionary developmental biology are examined with critical readings and oral presentations of work from the research literature. In addition, students write, defend and publicly present a research paper based on their readings. Three hours of class lecture and discussion a week, supplemented by frequent meetings with individual students. Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 236 or 271, or permission of instructor.
(G. Davis)

BIOL B395 Senior Seminar: Cellular Biology
Topics focus on the current understanding of the mechanisms of cancer, with emphasis on cell signaling pathways and tumor suppressors. Students read and make critical presentations of papers from the current research literature. In addition, students write, defend and publicly present one long research paper or proposal. Three hours of class lecture and discussion a week, supplemented by frequent meetings with individual students. Prerequisite: BIOL 340 or
BIOL 376 or permission of instructor.
(Greif)
Not offered in 2010-11.

BIOL B396 Topics in Neural and Behavioral Science
A seminar course dealing with current issues in the neural and behavioral sciences. It provides advanced students concentrating in neural and behavioral sciences with an opportunity to read and discuss in depth seminal papers that represent emerging thought in the field. In addition, students are expected to make presentations of their own research. Required for those with the concentration.
(Brodfuehrer)
Cross-listed as PSYC B396

BIOL B397 Senior Seminar in Environmental Studies
(Barber, Stroud)
Cross-listed as GEOL B397
Cross-listed as ANTH B397

BIOL B398 Senior Seminar in Science in Society
A seminar that addresses a variety of topics at the interface of biology and society. Students prepare and present a major scholarly work at the end of the semester. Three hours of discussion per week.
(Grobstein)

BIOL B399 Senior Seminar
This seminar provides students with a collaborative forum to facilitate the exchange of ideas and broaden their perspective and understanding of research approaches used in various sub-disciplines of biology. There will be a focus on the presentation, interpretation and discussion of data, and communication of scientific findings to diverse audiences. In addition, students write, defend and publicly present a paper on their supervised research project. Three hours of class discussion each week. Co-requisite: enrollment in the second semester of BIOL403.
(Greif)

BIOL B401 Supervised Research in Neural and Behavioral Sciences
Laboratory or library research under the supervision of a member of the Neural and Behavioral Sciences committee. Required for those with the concentration. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
(Greif, Grobstein, Brodfuehrer)

BIOL B403 Supervised Laboratory Research in Biology
Laboratory research under the supervision of a member of the department. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
(Staff)

BIOL B425 Praxis III
(Staff)