2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog

Comparative Literature

Students may complete a major or minor in Comparative Literature.

Coordinator

Maria Christina Quintero, Comparative Literature

Steering Committee

Elizabeth Allen, Russian
Francis Higginson, French and Francophone Studies
Pauline Lin, East Asian Studies
Hoang Nguyen, English
Maria Christina Quintero, Spanish
Roberta Ricci, Italian
Azade Seyhan, German and German Studies

The study of Comparative Literature situates literature in an international perspective; examines transnational cultural connections through literary history, literary criticism, critical theory, and poetics; and works toward a nuanced understanding of the socio-cultural functions of literature. The structure of the program allows students to engage in such diverse areas of critical inquiry as East-West cultural relations, global censorship and human rights, diaspora studies, film history and theory, and aesthetics of modernity. Therefore, interpretive methods from other disciplines also play a role in the comparative study of literature; among these are anthropology, ethnology, philosophy, history, history of art, religion, classical studies, area studies (Africana studies, Middle Eastern studies, Latin American studies, among others), gender studies, and other arts.

Comparative Literature students are required to have a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language adequate to the advanced study of literature in that language. Some Comparative Literature courses may require reading knowledge of a foreign language as a prerequisite for admission. Students considering graduate work in Comparative Literature should also study a second foreign language.

Major Requirements

Requirements for the Comparative Literature major are COML 200: Introduction to Comparative Literature (normally taken in the sophomore year); six literature courses at the 200 level or above, balanced between two literature departments (of which English may be one)—at least two of these (one in each national literature) must be at the 300 level or above, or its equivalent as approved in advance by the adviser; one course in critical theory; two electives; COML 398: Theories and Methods in Comparative Literature and 399: Senior Seminar in Comparative Literature.

Honors

Students who, in the judgment of the advisory committee, have done distinguished work in their courses and in the senior seminar will be considered for departmental honors.

Minor Requirements

Requirements for the minor are COML 200 and 398, plus four additional courses—two each in the literature of two languages. At least one of these four courses must be at the 300 level. Students who minor in comparative literature are encouraged to choose their national literature courses from those with a comparative component.

Both majors and minors are encouraged to work closely with the chairs and members of the advisory committee in shaping their programs.

NOTE: Please note that not all topics courses (B223, 299, 321, 325, 326, 340) count toward COML elective requirements. See adviser.

COML B200 Introduction to Comparative Literature

This course explores a variety of approaches to the comparative or transnational study of literature through readings of several kinds: texts from different cultural traditions that raise questions about the nature and function of storytelling and literature; texts that comment on, respond to, and rewrite other texts from different historical periods and nations; translations; and readings in critical theory.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Seyhan,A.

COML B209 Introduction to Literary Analysis: Philosophical Approaches to Criticism

Designated theory course. An introduction to various methods of reading the literary text from the perspective of critical methods informed by philosophical ideas. In their quest for self-understanding and knowledge, literature and philosophy share similar forms of inquiry and imaginative modeling. Selected literary texts and critical essays focus on questions of language, translation, understanding, and identity in their relation to history, epistemology, ethics, and aesthetics. One of the main objectives of the course is to provide students with the critical tools necessary for an informed reading of texts.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS GERM-B209
CROSS-LISTED AS PHIL-B209
1.0 units
Seyhan,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B211 Primo Levi, the Holocaust and Its Aftermath

A consideration, through analysis and appreciation of his major works, of how the horrific experience of the Holocaust awakened in Primo Levi a growing awareness of his Jewish heritage and led him to become one of the dominant voices of that tragic historical event, as well as one of the most original new literary figures of post-World War II Italy. Always in relation to Levi and his works, attention will also be given to other Italian women writers whose works are also connected with the Holocaust.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ITAL-B211
CROSS-LISTED AS HEBR-B211
Counts toward International Studies minor
1.0 units
Patruno,N.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B212 Borges y sus lectores

Primary emphasis on Borges and his poetics of reading; other writers are considered to illustrate the semiotics of texts, society, and traditions.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS SPAN-B211
1.0 units
Sacerio-Gari,E.

COML B213 Theory in Practice: Critical Discourses in the Humanities

Designated COML theory course. This seminar provides exposure to influential 20th-century French thinkers. It will examine three major currents: Postcolonial Theory; Feminist Theory; Post-Structuralist Theory. The primary goal here is to introduce students to exciting and difficult critical thought that will prove useful to their future studies and will begin to develop necessary critical skills. While the materials covered are primarily grounded in French intellectual history, the course will also spend time situating these intellectual currents in broader transnational and transdisciplinary contexts. This is a required course for the French major. Course taught in English and serving the humanities.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS PHIL-B253
CROSS-LISTED AS FREN-B213
CROSS-LISTED AS GERM-B213
1.0 units
Dostal,R.

COML B220 Writing the Self

What leads people to write about their lives? Do women and men present themselves differently? Do they think different issues are important? How do they claim authority for their thoughts and experiences? Readings will include Abelard and Heloise's Letters, Augustine's Confessions, Guibert de Nogent's A Monk's Confession, Patrick's Confession, Perpetua's Passion, Radegund's Fall of Thuringia, and a collection, Medieval Writings on Female Spirituality.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS CSTS-B220
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies concentration
1.0 units
Conybeare,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B222 Aesthetics: The Nature and Experience of Art

Designated theory course. Here are some questions we will discuss in this course: What sort of thing is a work of art? Can criticism in the arts be objective? Do such cultural entities answer to more than one admissible interpretation? What is the role of a creator's intentions in fixing upon admissible interpretations? What is the nature of aesthetic experience? What is creativity in the arts? Readings will be drawn from contemporary sources from the analytic and continental traditions, including John Dewey's Art as Experience, and works in Gary Iseminger, ed., Intention and Interpretation. Prerequisite: One introductory course in philosophy.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS PHIL-B222
1.0 units
Krausz,M.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML M223 Topics In German Cultural Studies

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Current topic description: Topic for Spring 2011: Kafka's Prague. German and European Writing from the Czech Metropolis. Prague of the late 19th century became for some European writers an icon of modernizing Europe. In this course, we will explore the representations of the spaces of Prague from 1890 until 1920 to trace how German-speaking Jewish and gentile artists and thinkers attempted to negotiate the cultural, linguistic and political contradictions of a city undergoing rapid transformations.
Division I or Division III
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS GERM-B223
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B223
1.0 units
Kenosian,D.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B229 Movies and Mass Politics

This course will trace in the history of movie forms a series of debates about the ways that nations can become mass societies, focusing mostly on the ways that Hollywood movies countered the appeals of Communism and Fascism
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B229
1.0 units
Tratner,M.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile

This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Julia Alvarez, Anita Desai, Sigmund Freud, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, and others.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS GERM-B231
CROSS-LISTED AS ANTH-B231
Counts toward Latin American, Latino and Iberian Peoples and Cultures concentration
1.0 units
Seyhan,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B234 Postcolonial Literature in English

This course will survey a broad range of novels and poems written while countries were breaking free of British colonial rule. Readings will also include cultural theorists interested in defining literary issues that arise from the postcolonial situation.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B234
1.0 units
Tratner,M.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B237 The Dictator Novel in the Americas

This course examines representations of dictatorship in Latin American and Latina/o novels. We will explore the relationship between narrative form and absolute power by analyzing the literary techniques writers use to contest authoritarianism. We will compare dictator novels from the United States, the Caribbean, Central America, and the Southern Cone. Prerequisite: only for students wishing to take the course for major/minor credit in SPAN is SPAN B200/B202
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B237
CROSS-LISTED AS SPAN-B237
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies concentration
Counts toward Latin American, Latino and Iberian Peoples and Cultures concentration
1.0 units
Harford Vargas,J.

COML B238 History of Cinema: 1895-1945 Silent Film: From United States to Soviet Russia and Beyond

This course will explore cinema from its earliest, most primitive beginnings up to the end of the silent era. While the course will focus on a variety of historical and theoretical aspects of cinema, the primary aim is to look at films analytically. Emphasis will be on the various artistic methods that went into the direction and production of a variety of celebrated silent films from around the world. These films will be considered in many contexts: artistic, historical, social, and even philosophical, so that students can develop a deeper understanding of silent cinema's rapid evolution.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B238
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B238
CROSS-LISTED AS RUSS-B238
Counts toward Film Studies minor
1.0 units
Harte,T.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B240 Literary Translation Workshop

Open to creative writing students and students of literature, the syllabus includes some theoretical readings, but the emphasis is practical and analytical, considering parallel translations of certain enduring literary texts as well as books and essays about the art of translation. Literary translation will be considered as a spectrum ranging from Dryden's "metaphrase" (word-for-word translation) all the way through imitation and adaptation. The course will include class visits by working literary translators. The Italian verbs for "to translate" and "to betray" are neighbors; throughout, the course concerns the impossibility and importance of literary translation.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ARTW-B240
1.0 units
Kirchwey,K.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture

This is a topics course. The syllabus will include some theoretical readings, but the emphasis is practical and analytical, considering parallel translations of certain enduring literary texts as well as books and essays about the art of translation. Literary translation will be considered as a spectrum ranging from Dryden's "metaphrase" (word-for-word translation) all the way through imitation and adaptation. The course will include class visits by working literary translators. The Italian verbs for "to translate" and "to betray" are neighbors; throughout, the course concerns the impossibility and importance of literary translation. Open to creative writing students and students of literature.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS GERM-B245
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies concentration
1.0 units
Meyer,I.

COML B248 Reception of Classical Literature in the Hispanic World

A survey of the reception of Classical literature in the Spanish-speaking world. We read select literary works in translation, ranging from Renaissance Spain to contemporary Latin America, side-by-side with their classical models, to examine what is culturally unique about their choice of authors, themes, and adaptation of the material.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS CSTS-B248
CROSS-LISTED AS SPAN-B248
Counts toward Latin American, Latino and Iberian Peoples and Cultures concentration
1.0 units
Staff
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B251 Romantic Prose Fiction

This seminar studies representative works of Romantic poetry's "poor relation"—prose fiction. Readings include novels from England, France, Germany and Russia, such as Frankenstein, A Hero of Our Time, The Red and the Black, The Sorrows of Young Werther and Wuthering Heights, as well as short stories. Discussions include such topics as national varieties of Romanticism, the Romantic ideals of nature, love and the self, and the impact of the revolutionary era on art. Illustrative examples of Romantic painting and music are also considered. All readings and discussions in English.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Allen,E.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B257 The Realist Novel Revisited

This seminar undertakes the study of a deceptively simple cultural and literary historical concept—realism—by closely reading well-known 19th-century novels by George Eliot, Gustave Flaubert, Theodor Fontane, Henry James, Stendhal, Leo Tolstoy and Ivan Turgenev, all of which have traditionally been placed within realism's parameters. Critical essays exploring the nature of realism, either in general or in a particular author's works, are also discussed. The ethical implications of the realist enterprise and, more broadly, the possible relations between art and life receive special scrutiny.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Allen,E.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B260 Ariel/Caliban y el discurso americano

A study of the transformations of Ariel/Calibán as images of Latin American culture.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS SPAN-B260
Counts toward Latin American, Latino and Iberian Peoples and Cultures concentration
1.0 units
Sacerio-Gari,E.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B261 The Russian Anti-Novel

A study of 19th- and 20th-century Russian novels focusing on their strategies of opposing or circumventing European literary conventions. Works by Bulgakov, Dostoevsky, Nabokov, Pushkin, and Tolstoy, are compared to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice and other exemplars of the Western novelistic tradition. All readings, lectures, and discussions in English.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS RUSS-B261
1.0 units
Allen,E.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B265 The Islamic Literary Tradition

This course surveys the major genres of the Islamic literary tradition, with emphasis on premodern works. We will consider the aesthetic principles that informed the tradition as well as questions of continuities and ruptures. Texts in English translation.
Division III: Humanities
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
CROSS-LISTED AS GNST-B265
1.0 units
Staff
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B274 From Myth to Modern Cinema: From Dionysus to the Silver Screen

Explores how contemporary film, which is, like Greek drama, a creative medium appealing to the entire demographic spectrum, looks back to the ancient origins. In addition to literary-historical interpretation, the course will involve various methodological approaches such as film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist theory.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS CSTS-B274
1.0 units
Baertschi,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B278 Reading the Middle East

This course examines major themes in modern Middle Eastern literatures through selected prose works by prominent modern writers in translation from Arabic, Hebrew, Persian and Turkish. Topics include tradition versus modernity, gender and the family, the individual and the state, and the impact of regional conflict.
Division III: Humanities
1.0 units
Staff
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B279 Introduction to African Literature

This course examines major themes in modern Middle Eastern literatures through selected prose works by prominent modern writers in translation from Arabic, Hebrew, Persian and Turkish. Topics include tradition versus modernity, gender and the family, the individual and the state, and the impact of regional conflict.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B279
Counts toward Africana Studies concentration
1.0 units
Beard,L.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B293 The Play of Interpretation

Designated theory course. A study of the methodologies and regimes of interpretation in the arts, humanistic sciences, and media and cultural studies, this course focuses on common problems of text, authorship, reader/spectator, and translation in their historical and formal contexts. Literary, oral, and visual texts from different cultural traditions and histories will be studied through interpretive approaches informed by modern critical theories. Readings in literature, philosophy, popular culture, and film will illustrate how theory enhances our understanding of the complexities of history, memory, identity, and the trials of modernity.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B292
CROSS-LISTED AS PHIL-B293
1.0 units
Seyhan,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B299 Cultural Diversity and Its Representations

This is a topics course. It will focus on representations of "foreignness" and "others" in selected German works since the 18th century, including works of art, social texts, and film, and on the cultural productions of non-German writers and artists living in Germany today. Topics vary.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS GERM-B299
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B299
1.0 units
Seyhan,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B302 Le printemps de la parole féminine: femmes écrivains des débuts

This study of selected women authors from the French Middle Ages, Renaissance and Classical periods—among them, Marie de France, the trobairitz, Christine de Pisan, Louise Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, and Madame de Lafayette—examines the way in which they appropriate and transform the male writing tradition and define themselves as self-conscious artists within or outside it. Particular attention will be paid to identifying recurring concerns and structures in their works, and to assessing their importance to female writing: among them, the poetics of silence, reproduction as a metaphor for artistic creation, and sociopolitical engagement.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS FREN-B302
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies concentration
1.0 units
Armstrong,G.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B310 Genres of Italian Popular Fiction in a Comparative Context

This course explores the Italian "giallo" (detective fiction), today one of the most successful literary genres among Italian readers and authors alike. Through a comparative perspective, the course will analyze not only the inter-relationship between this popular genre and "high literature," but also the role of detective fiction as a mirror of social anxieties. In Spring 2011, ITAL B310 will be offered in English. Italian majors taking this course for Italian credit will be required to meet for an additional hour with the instructor and to do the readings and writing in Italian. Prerequisites: one literature course at the 200 level.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ITAL-B310
1.0 units
Perco,G.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B312 Crimen y detectives en la narrativa hispánica contemporánea

An analysis of the rise of the hardboiled genre in contemporary Hispanic narrative and its contrast to classic detective fiction, as a context for understanding contemporary Spanish and Latin American culture. Discussion of pertinent theoretical implications and the social and political factors that contributed to the genre's evolution and popularity.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS SPAN-B311
1.0 units
Song,H.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B313 Classical Bodies

An examination of the conceptions of the human body evidenced in Greek and Roman art and literature, with emphasis on issues that have persisted in the Western tradition. Topics include the fashioning of concepts of male and female standards of beauty and their implications; conventions of visual representation; the nude; clothing and its symbolism; the athletic ideal; physiognomy; medical theory and practice; the visible expression of character and emotions; and the formulation of the "classical ideal" in antiquity and later times.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ARCH-B303
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B305
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies concentration
1.0 units
Donohue,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B314 Troilus and Criseyde

Examines Chaucer's magisterial Troilus and Criseyde, his epic romance of love, loss, and betrayal. We will supplement sustained analysis of the poem with primary readings on free will and courtly love as well as theoretical readings on gender and sexuality and translation. We will also read Boccaccio's Il Filostrato, Robert Henryson's Testament of Cresseid and Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida.
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B314
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies concentration
1.0 units
Taylor,J.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B321 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Topic for 2011-12 is The Transnational Cosmopolitanism of Swiss Literature.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS GERM-B321
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B319
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B348
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies concentration
1.0 units
Meyer,I.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B322 Queens, Nuns, and Other Deviants in the Early Modern Iberian World

The course examines literary, historical, and legal texts from the early modern Iberian world (Spain, Mexico, Peru) through the lens of gender studies. The course is divided around three topics: royal bodies (women in power), cloistered bodies (women in the convent), and delinquent bodies (figures who defy legal and gender normativity). Course is taught in English and is open to all juniors or seniors who have taken at least one 200-level course in a literature department. Students seeking Spanish credit must have taken BMC Spanish 202 and at least one other Spanish course beyond 202, or received permission from instructor.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS SPAN-B322
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies concentration
Counts toward Latin American, Latino and Iberian Peoples and Cultures concentration
1.0 units
Quintero,M.

COML B323 Culture and Interpretation

Designated theory course. This course will pursue such questions as the following. For all objects of interpretation—including works of art, music, literature, persons or cultures—must there be a single right interpretation? If not, what is to prevent one from sliding into an interpretive anarchism? Does interpretation affect the nature or the number of an object of interpretation? Does the singularity or multiplicity of interpretations mandate such ontologies as realism or constructivism? Discussions will be based on contemporary readings.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS PHIL-B323
1.0 units
Krausz,M.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B325 Etudes avancées: Crimes et criminalité

An in-depth study of a particular topic, event or historical figure in French civilisation. The seminar topic rotates among many subjects: La Révolution française: histoire, littérature et culture; L'Environnement naturel dans la culture française; Mal et valeurs éthiques; Le Cinéma et la politique, 1940-1968; Le Nationalisme en France et dans les pays francophones; Etude socio-culturelle des arts du manger en France du Moyen Age à nos jours.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS FREN-B325
1.0 units
Le Menthéour,R., Mahuzier,B.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B326 Etudes avancées

An in-depth study of a particular topic, event or historical figure in French civilisation. The seminar topic rotates among many subjects: La Révolution française: histoire, littérature et culture; L'Environnement naturel dans la culture française; Mal et valeurs éthiques; Le Cinéma et la politique, 1940-1968; Le Nationalisme en France et dans les pays francophones; Etude socio-culturelle des arts du manger en France du Moyen Age à nos jours.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS FREN-B326
1.0 units
Mahuzier,B.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B340 Topics in Baroque Art

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B340
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies concentration
1.0 units
McKim-Smith,G.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B350 Voix médiévales et échos modernes

A study of selected 19th- and 20th-century works inspired by medieval subjects, such as the Grail and Arthurian legends and the Tristan and Yseut stories, and by medieval genres, such as the roman, saints' lives, or the miracle play. Included are works by Bonnefoy, Cocteau, Flaubert, Genevoix, Giono, Gracq, Hugo, and Yourcenar.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS FREN-B350
1.0 units
Armstrong,G.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B351 Medieval Encounters in Contemporary Fiction

Muslim, Christian and Jewish relations, particularly in the medieval period, have occupied a number of recent works of fiction in English and other languages. Why that subject has so captured the literary imagination and how individual authors treat it are the central issues the course aims to ad-dress. Selected works of fiction will serve as entry points into questions of how different religious communities interacted with and perceived one another before modern times. Another goal of the course is to make students think about how works of historical fiction serve to shape as well as to challenge current religious sensibilities.
Division III: Humanities
1.0 units
Staff
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B375 Interpreting Mythology

The myths of the Greeks have provoked outrage and fascination, interpretation and retelling, censorship and elaboration, beginning with the Greeks themselves. We will see how some of these stories have been read and understood, recounted and revised, in various cultures and eras, from ancient tellings to modern movies. We will also explore some of the interpretive theories by which these tales have been understood, from ancient allegory to modern structural and semiotic theories.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS CSTS-B375
1.0 units
Edmonds,R.

COML B387 Allegory in Theory & Practice

Allegory and allegories, from The Play of Everyman to The Crying of Lot 49. A working knowledge of several different theories of allegory is developed; Renaissance allegories include The Faerie Queene and Pilgrim's Progress, 19th- and 20th-century allegories include The Scarlet Letter and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man.
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B387
1.0 units
Hedley,J.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B388 Contemporary African Fiction

Noting that the official colonial independence of most African countries dates back only half a century, this course focuses on the fictive experiments of the most recent decade. A few highly controversial works from the 90's serve as an introduction to very recent work. Most works are in English. To experience depth as well as breadth, there is a small cluster of works from South Africa. With novels and tales from elsewhere on the huge African continent, we will get a glimpse of "living in the present" in history and letters.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B388
Counts toward Africana Studies concentration
1.0 units
Beard,L.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B398 Theories and Methods in Comparative Literature

This course, required of all senior comparative literature majors in preparation for writing the senior thesis in the spring semester, has a twofold purpose: to review interpretive approaches informed by critical theories that enhance our understanding of literary and cultural texts; and to help students prepare a preliminary outline of their senior theses. Throughout the semester, students research theoretical paradigms that bear on their own comparative thesis topics in order to situate those topics in an appropriate critical context.
1.0 units
Seyhan,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B399 Senior Seminar in Comparative Literature

1.0 units
Staff, Quintero,M.

COML B403 Supervised Work

1.0 units
Seyhan,A.

Haverford College currently offers the following courses in Comparative Literature:

Fall 2011

COML H205 Legends of Arthur
COML H214 Writing the Nation: 19th-Century Literature in Latin America
COML H223 Working Through the Holocaust Past in German Drama & Film
COML H228 The Logos and the Tao
COML H248 The Quran
COML H293 Translation and other Transformations: Theory and Practice
COML H301 Topics in Middle English: Sex & Gender in the Middle Ages
COML H312 Advanced Topics: Pascal entre les disciplines
COML H321 Literature & Media: From Print Culture to Web 2.0
COML H322 Politics of Memory in Latin America
COML H351 Writing and Social Construction of Subjectivity
COML H377 Problems in Postcolonial Literature
COML H398 Theories and Methods in Comparative Literature

Spring 2012

COML H200 Introduction to Comparative Literature
COML H215 Tales of Troy
COML H222 Rethinking Latin America in Contemporary Narrative
COML H224 Political Action in Greek and Latin Literature
COML H229 Topics in Rhetorical Theory: Roland Barthes and the Image
COML H235 Spanish American Theater
COML H250 Words and Music
COML H262 European Film
COML H278 Christian Thought from Modernity to Post- modernity
COML H312 La revolution haitienne: Historiographie et imaginaire
COML H321 Topics in German Literature
COML H357 Topics in Aesthetics: The Apolline and the Dionysiac Creative Drives