2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog

Gender and Sexuality

Students may complete a minor or concentration in Gender and Sexuality. Students may submit an application to major in Gender and Sexuality through the independent major program.

Coordinator

Sharon Ullman, History

Steering Committee

Dana Becker, Social Work (on leave semester I)
Gregory Davis, Biology (on leave semesters I and II)
Hoang Nguyen, English (on leave semesters I and II)
Sharon Ullman, History

The Program in Gender and Sexuality is an interdisciplinary, Bi-College program that can be integrated with any major or pursued independently. Students graduate from the program with a high level of fluency and rigor in their understanding of the different ways issues of gender and sexuality shape our lives as individuals and as members of larger communities, both local and global.

Students choosing a concentration, minor or independent major in gender and sexuality plan their programs in consultation with the Gender and Sexuality coordinator on their home campus. Members of the Gender and Sexuality steering committee serve as their individual mentors. All students in the program take the core course, "Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Sex and Gender." Other courses in the program allow them to explore a range of approaches to gender and sexual difference: critical feminist theory; women's studies; transnational and third-world feminisms; the experiences of women of color; gender and science; the construction of masculinity; gay, lesbian, queer, transgender, and transsexual studies; the history and representation of gender and sexuality in Western and non-Western cultures.

Minor and Concentration Requirements

Six courses distributed as follows are required for the concentration:

  1. An introductory course (including equivalent offerings at Swarthmore College or the University of Pennsylvania).
  2. The junior seminar: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Sex and Gender (alternating fall semesters between Bryn Mawr and Haverford).
  3. Four additional approved courses from at least two different departments, two of which are normally at the 300 level. Units of Independent Study (480) may be used to fulfill this requirement.
  4. Of the six courses, no fewer than two and no more than three will also form part of the student's major.

Requirements for the minor are identical to those for the concentration, with the stipulation that no courses in gender and sexuality will overlap with courses taken to fulfill requirements in the student's major.

Neither a senior seminar nor a senior thesis is required for the concentration or minor; however, with the permission of the major department, a student may choose to count toward the concentration a senior thesis with significant content in gender and sexuality. Students wishing to construct an independent major in gender and sexuality should make a proposal to the Committee on Independent Majors.

ANTH B101 Introduction to Anthropology

An introduction to the place of humans in nature, primates, the fossil record for human evolution, human variation and the issue of race, and the archaeological investigation of culture change from the Old Stone Age to the rise of early civilizations in the Americas, Eurasia and Africa. In addition to the lecture/discussion classes, there is a one-hour weekly lab.
Division I: Social Science
Scientific Investigation (SI)
1.0 units
Davis,R., Su,D.

ANTH B102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

An introduction to the methods and theories of cultural anthropology in order to understand and explain cultural similarities and differences among contemporary societies.
Division I: Social Science
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
1.0 units
Pashigian,M., Weidman,A.

ANTH B214 Third World Feminisms

The course focuses on the figure of the "exploited Filipina body" as a locus for analyzing the politics of gendered transnational labor within contemporary capitalist globalization. We will examine gendered migrant labor, the international sex trade, the "traffic in women" discourse, feminist and women's movements, and transnational feminist theory.
Division I: Social Science
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
1.0 units
Velasco,G.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ANTH B247 Gender, Nation, Diaspora

This course examines the relationship of gender to both the nation and the diaspora, within a context of globalization. We will study the co-constitutive relationship of gender, sexuality, race/ethnicity, and class in national and transnational contexts. Although focused primarily on Filipino American/Philippine cultural production, we examine multiple geopolitical sites.
Division I: Social Science
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
1.0 units
Velasco,G.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ANTH B312 Anthropology of Reproduction

An examination of social and cultural constructions of reproduction, and how power in everyday life shapes reproductive behavior and its meaning in Western and non-Western cultures. The influence of competing interests within households, communities, states, and institutions on reproduction is considered. Prerequisite: at least one 200-level ethnographic area course or permission of instructor.
Division I: Social Science
1.0 units
Pashigian,M.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ANTH B316 Gender in South Asia

Examines gender as a culturally and historically constructed category in the modern South Asian context, focusing on the ways in which everyday experiences of and practices relating to gender are informed by media, performance, and political events. Prerequisite: One 200-level course including material on a non-Western society and permission of the instructor.
Division I: Social Science
1.0 units
Weidman,A.

ANTH B322 Anthropology of the Body

This course examines a diversity of meanings and interpretations of the body in anthropology. It explores anthropological theories and methods of studying the body and social difference via a series of topics including the construction of the body in medicine, identity, race, gender, sexuality and as explored through cross-cultural comparison. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 and preferably a 200 level cultural anthropology course.
Division I: Social Science
1.0 units
Pashigian,M.

ANTH B350 Advanced Topics in Gender Studies

This is a topics course on the gendered perspective. Life stories, case studies, and ethnographic methodology will be featured. Topics vary.
Division I: Social Science
1.0 units
Kilbride,P.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ARCH B234 Picturing Women in Classical Antiquity

We investigate representations of women in different media in ancient Greece and Rome, examining the cultural stereotypes of women and the gender roles that they reinforce. We also study the daily life of women in the ancient world, the objects that they were associated with in life and death and their occupations.
Division III: Humanities
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
CROSS-LISTED AS CSTS-B234
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B234
1.0 units
Lindenlauf,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ARCH B303 Classical Bodies

An examination of the conceptions of the human body evidenced in Greek and Roman art and literature, with emphasis on issues that have persisted in the Western tradition. Topics include the fashioning of concepts of male and female standards of beauty and their implications; conventions of visual representation; the nude; clothing and its symbolism; the athletic ideal; physiognomy; medical theory and practice; the visible expression of character and emotions; and the formulation of the "classical ideal" in antiquity and later times.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B313
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B305
1.0 units
Donohue,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ARTD B240 Dance History I: Roots of Western Theater Dance

This course investigates the historic and cultural forces affecting the development and functions of pre-20th-century dance as well as its relationship to and impact on the development of Western culture. It will consider nontheatrical forms and applications, but will give special emphasis to the development of theatre dance forms. It will also introduce students to the varied forms of historic research and the changing modes of documenting dance and to a view of history not only as a linear progression of events but also as process, change and cultural shift. Lecture, discussion, and audiovisual materials.
Division III: Humanities
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Caruso Haviland,L.
Not offered in 2011-12.

BIOL B214 The Historical Roots of Women in Genetics and Embryology

As a more focused version of the course from previous years, we will examine the role that women scientists and technicians played in the development of genetics and embryology from the late-19th to the mid-20th century. The course will look at the work and lives of well known and lesser known individuals, asking how factors such as their educational experiences and mentor relationships played a role in their contributions. One facet of the course will be to look at the Bryn Mawr Biology Department from the founding of the College into the mid-20th century.
Division II: Natural Science
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
CROSS-LISTED AS HIST-B214
1.0 units
Davis,G.
Not offered in 2011-12.

CITY B205 Social Inequality

Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS SOCL-B205
1.0 units
Osirim,M.

CMSC B257 Gender and Technology

Explores the historical role technology has played in the production of gender; the historical role gender has played in the evolution of various technologies; how the co-construction of gender and technology has been represented in a range of on-line, filmic, fictional, and critical media; and what all of the above suggest for the technological engagement of everyone in today's world.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B257
1.0 units
Dalke,A., McCormack,E., Blankenship,L.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B220 Writing the Self

A consideration, through analysis and appreciation of his major works, of how the horrific experience of the Holocaust awakened in Primo Levi a growing awareness of his Jewish heritage and led him to become one of the dominant voices of that tragic historical event, as well as one of the most original new literary figures of post-World War II Italy. Always in relation to Levi and his works, attention will also be given to other Italian women writers whose works are also connected with the Holocaust.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS CSTS-B220
1.0 units
Conybeare,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture

This is a topics course. The syllabus will include some theoretical readings, but the emphasis is practical and analytical, considering parallel translations of certain enduring literary texts as well as books and essays about the art of translation. Literary translation will be considered as a spectrum ranging from Dryden's "metaphrase" (word-for-word translation) all the way through imitation and adaptation. The course will include class visits by working literary translators. The Italian verbs for "to translate" and "to betray" are neighbors; throughout, the course concerns the impossibility and importance of literary translation. Open to creative writing students and students of literature.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS GERM-B245
1.0 units
Meyer,I.

COML B302 Le printemps de la parole féminine: femmes écrivains des débuts

This study of selected women authors from the French Middle Ages, Renaissance and Classical periods—among them, Marie de France, the trobairitz, Christine de Pisan, Louise Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, and Madame de Lafayette—examines the way in which they appropriate and transform the male writing tradition and define themselves as self-conscious artists within or outside it. Particular attention will be paid to identifying recurring concerns and structures in their works, and to assessing their importance to female writing: among them, the poetics of silence, reproduction as a metaphor for artistic creation, and sociopolitical engagement.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS FREN-B302
1.0 units
Armstrong,G.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B313 Classical Bodies

An examination of the conceptions of the human body evidenced in Greek and Roman art and literature, with emphasis on issues that have persisted in the Western tradition. Topics include the fashioning of concepts of male and female standards of beauty and their implications; conventions of visual representation; the nude; clothing and its symbolism; the athletic ideal; physiognomy; medical theory and practice; the visible expression of character and emotions; and the formulation of the "classical ideal" in antiquity and later times.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ARCH-B303
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B305
1.0 units
Donohue,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B314 Troilus and Criseyde

Examines Chaucer's magisterial Troilus and Criseyde, his epic romance of love, loss, and betrayal. We will supplement sustained analysis of the poem with primary readings on free will and courtly love as well as theoretical readings on gender and sexuality and translation. We will also read Boccaccio's Il Filostrato, Robert Henryson's Testament of Cresseid and Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida.
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B314
1.0 units
Taylor,J.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B321 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS GERM-B321
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B319
1.0 units
Meyer,I.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B322 Queens, Nuns, and Other Deviants in the Early Modern Iberian World

Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS SPAN-B322
1.0 units
Quintero,M.

COML B340 Topics in Baroque Art

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B340
1.0 units
McKim-Smith,G.
Not offered in 2011-12.

CSTS B220 Writing the Self

What leads people to write about their lives? Do women and men present themselves differently? Do they think different issues are important? How do they claim authority for their thoughts and experiences? Readings will include Abelard and Heloise's Letters, Augustine's Confessions, Guibert de Nogent's A Monk's Confession, Patrick's Confession, Perpetua's Passion, Radegund's Fall of Thuringia, and a collection, Medieval Writings on Female Spirituality.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B220
1.0 units
Conybeare,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

CSTS B234 Picturing Women in Classical Antiquity

We investigate representations of women in different media in ancient Greece and Rome, examining the cultural stereotypes of women and the gender roles that they reinforce. We also study the daily life of women in the ancient world, the objects that they were associated with in life and death and their occupations.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ARCH-B234
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B234
1.0 units
Lindenlauf,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

EDUC B280 Gender, Sex and Education: Intersections and Conflict

This course explores the intersections and conflict between gender and education through focus on science/mathematics education and related academic domains. It investigates how gender complicates disciplinary knowledge (and vice-versa), the (de)constructing and reinforcing of genders (via science and schooling), and ways gender troubles negotiation of disciplines. Implications for teaching, society, and social justice, as well as relationships among different cultural categories, will be explored.
Division I: Social Science
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
1.0 units
Glasser,H.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B210 Renaissance Literature: Performances of Gender

Readings chosen to highlight the construction and performance of gender identity during the period from 1550 to 1650 and the ways in which the gender anxieties of 16th- and 17th-century men and women differ from, yet speak to, our own. Texts will include plays, poems, prose fiction, diaries, and polemical writing of the period.
Division III: Humanities
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
1.0 units
Hedley,J.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B235 Reading Popular Culture: Freaks

This course traces the iconic figure of the "freak" in American culture, from 19th c. sideshows to the present. Featuring literature and films that explore "extraordinary Others", we will flesh out the ways in which our current understandings of gender, sexuality, normalcy, and race are constituted through images of "abnormality."
Division III: Humanities
1.0 units
Schneider,S.

ENGL B237 The Dictator Novel in the Americas

This course examines representations of dictatorship in Latin American and Latina/o novels. We will explore the relationship between narrative form and absolute power by analyzing the literary techniques writers use to contest authoritarianism. We will compare dictator novels from the United States, the Caribbean, Central America, and the Southern Cone. Prerequisite: only for students wishing to take the course for major/minor credit in SPAN is SPAN B200/B202
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B237
CROSS-LISTED AS SPAN-B237
1.0 units
Harford Vargas,J.

ENGL B239 Women and Cinema

This course will examine the particular challenges that women filmmakers face, as well as the unique and innovative contributions they have made to film aesthetics and narrative form. The class will address central debates within feminism from the 1970s to the present, in particular, feminism's influence on women's independent film production and the question of female authorship.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B239
1.0 units
Gorfinkel,E.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B254 American Literature 1750-1900

This course explores the subject, subjection, and subjectivity of women and female sexualities in U.S. literatures between the signing of the Constitution and the ratification of the 19th Amendment. While the representation of women in fiction grew and the number of female authors soared, the culture found itself at pains to define the appropriate moments for female speech and silence, action and passivity. We will engage a variety of pre-suffrage literatures that place women at the nexus of national narratives of slavery and freedom, foreignness and domesticity, wealth and power, masculinity and citizenship, and sex and race "purity."
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Schneider,B.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B257 Gender and Technology

Explores the historical role technology has played in the production of gender; the historical role gender has played in the evolution of various technologies; how the co-construction of gender and technology has been represented in a range of on-line, filmic, fictional, and critical media; and what all of the above suggest for the technological engagement of everyone in today's world.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
CROSS-LISTED AS CMSC-B257
1.0 units
Dalke,A., McCormack,E., Blankenship,L.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B263 Toni Morrison and the Art of Narrative Conjure

All of Morrison's primary imaginative texts, in publication order, as well as essays by Morrison, with a series of critical lenses that explore several vantages for reading a conjured narration.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Beard,L.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B269 Vile Bodies in Medieval Literature

The Middle Ages imagined the physical body as the site of moral triumph and failure and as the canvas to expose social ills. The course examines medical tracts, saint's lives, poetry, theological texts, and representations of the Passion. Discussion topics range from plague and mercantilism to the legal and religious depiction of torture. Texts by Boccaccio, Chaucer, Dante, and Kempe will be supplemented with contemporary readings on trauma theory and embodiment.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Taylor,J.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B270 American Girl: Childhood in U.S. Literatures, 1690-1935

This course will focus on the "American Girl" as a particularly contested model for the nascent American. Through examination of religious tracts, slave and captivity narratives, literatures for children and adult literatures about childhood, we will analyze U. S. investments in girlhood as a site for national self-fashioning.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Schneider,B.

ENGL B280 Video Practices: From Analog to Digital

This course explores the history and theory of video art from the late 1960's to the present. The units include: aesthetics; activisim; access; performance; and institutional critique. We will reflect on early video's "utopian moment" and its manifestation in the current new media revolution. Feminist, people of color and queer productions will constitute the majority of our corpus. Prerequisite: ENGL/HART B205 Intro to Film or consent of the instructor.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B280
1.0 units
Nguyen,H.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B293 Critical Feminist Studies: An Introduction

Combines the study of specific literary texts with larger questions about feminist forms of theorizing. A course reader will be supplemented with three fictional texts to be selected by the class. Students will review current scholarship, identify their own stake in the conversation and define a critical question they want to pursue at length.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Dalke,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B314 Troilus and Criseyde

Examines Chaucer's magisterial Troilus and Criseyde, his epic romance of love, loss, and betrayal. We will supplement sustained analysis of the poem with primary readings on free will and courtly love as well as theoretical readings on gender and sexuality and translation. We will also read Boccaccio's Il Filostrato, Robert Henryson's Testament of Cresseid and Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida.
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B314
1.0 units
Taylor,J.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B333 Lesbian Immortal

Lesbian literature has repeatedly figured itself in alliance with tropes of immortality and eternity. Using recent queer theory on temporality, and 19th and 20th century primary texts, we will explore topics such as: fame and noteriety; feminism and mythology; epistemes, erotics and sexual seasonality; the death drive and the uncanny; fin de siecle manias for mummies and seances.
Division III: Humanities
1.0 units
Thomas,K.

ENGL B334 Topics in Film Studies

This is a topics course. Content varies. Current topic description: In what ways do film, photography, and digital media shape the space of public appearance? To what extent are political, social, and cultural recognition predicated on the capacity to appear in photographs, on film, on television, on the internet, and in classrooms and musuems? We will explore topics such as 1) how invisible and marginal subjects are to be pictured, 2) how existing repertoires of images affect who and what can appear, 3) how the censorship, circulation, and exhibition of images factor into public visibility.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B334
1.0 units
King,H.

ENGL B341 Cult Genres: Camp, Kitsch, and Trash Cinema

Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B341
1.0 units
Gorfinkel,E.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B344 After Beloved: Black Women Writers in the 21st Century

This course focuses on fiction, poetry and drama by Black women (African and Caribbean American) published since 2000. Attendant to the diversity of aesthetic and thematic approaches in this body of literature, we will explore exploding notions of racial identity and allegiance, as well as challenges to the boundaries of genre. Prerequisites: one African or African-American literature course at the 200-level or permission of the instructor.
Division III: Humanities
1.0 units
Solomon,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B345 Topics in Narrative Theory

Narrative theory through the lens of a specific genre, period or style of writing. Recent topics include Victorian Novels and Ethnic Novels. Current topic description: This course traces the development of the U.S. ethnic novel. We will examine novels by Native Americans, Chicana/os, and African Americans, focusing on key formal innovations in their respective traditions. We will be using—and testing—core concepts developed by narrative theorists to understand the genre of the novel.1.0 units
Harford Vargas,J.

ENGL B360 Women and Law in the Middle Ages

Studies the development of legal issues that affect women, such as marriage contracts, rape legislation, prostitution regulation, and sumptuary law, including the prosecution of witches in the 14th and 15th centuries in official documents and imaginative fictions that deploy such legislation in surprising ways. Asks how texts construct and interrogate discourses of gender, sexuality, criminality, and discipline. Broadly views the overlap between legal and literary modes of analysis. Examines differences between "fact" and "fiction" and explores blurred distinctions.
Division III: Humanities
1.0 units
Taylor,J.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B367 Asian American Film Video and New Media

The course explores the role of pleasure in the production, reception, and performance of Asian American identities in film, video, and the internet, taking as its focus the sexual representation of Asian Americans in works produced by Asian American artists from 1915 to present. In several units of the course, we will study graphic sexual representations, including pornographic images and sex acts some may find objectionable. Students should be prepared to engage analytically with all class material. To maintain an atmosphere of mutual respect and solidarity among the participants in the class, no auditors will be allowed.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B367
1.0 units
Nguyen,H.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B369 Women Poets: Gwendolyn Brooks, Adrienne Rich, Sylvia Plath

In this seminar we will be playing three poets off against each other, all of whom came of age during the 1950s. We will plot each poet's career in relation to the public and personal crises that shaped it, giving particular attention to how each poet constructed "poethood" for herself.
Division III: Humanities
1.0 units
Hedley,J.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ENGL B372 Composing a Self: American Women's Life Writing

Beginning with Rowlandson's 1682 captivity narrative and concluding with Kingston's The Woman Warrior, we examine how American women have constructed themselves in print. Gender, ethnicity, spirituality and sexuality inform public narratives; while letters and diaries serve as a counterweight, revealing private selves and prompting exploration of authority, authorship, history, citizenship and identity. Course includes personal life-writing and archival research in the College's Special Collections.
Division III: Humanities
1.0 units Bruder,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

FREN B201 Le Chevalier, la dame et le prêtre: littérature et publics du Moyen Age

Using literary texts, historical documents and letters as a mirror of the social classes that they address, this interdisciplinary course studies the principal preoccupations of secular and religious women and men in France from the Carolingian period through 1500. Selected works from epic, lai, roman courtois, fabliau, theater, letters, and contemporary biography are read in modern French translation.
Division III: Humanities
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Armstrong,G.

FREN B302 Le printemps de la parole féminine: femmes écrivains des débuts

This study of selected women authors from the French Middle Ages, Renaissance and Classical periods—among them, Marie de France, the trobairitz, Christine de Pisan, Louise Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, and Madame de Lafayette—examines the way in which they appropriate and transform the male writing tradition and define themselves as self-conscious artists within or outside it. Particular attention will be paid to identifying recurring concerns and structures in their works, and to assessing their importance to female writing: among them, the poetics of silence, reproduction as a metaphor for artistic creation, and sociopolitical engagement.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B302
1.0 units
Armstrong,G.
Not offered in 2011-12.

GERM B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B245
1.0 units
Meyer,I.

GERM B321 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Topic for 2011-12 is The Transnational Cosmopolitanism of Swiss Literature.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B319
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B321
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B348
1.0 units
Seyhan,A., Werlen,H.

GNST B290 Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

This course offers a rigorous grounding for students interested in questions of gender and sexuality. Bringing together intellectual resources from multiple disciplines, it also explores what it means to think across and between disciplinary boundaries. Team-taught by Bryn Mawr and Haverford professors from different disciplines, this course is offered yearly on alternate campuses.
Division III: Humanities
1.0 units
Dalke,A., Edwards,K.

HART B108 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Women, Feminism, and History of Art

An investigation of the history of art since the Renaissance organized around the practice of women artists, the representation of women in art, and the visual economy of the gaze.
Division III: Humanities
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Saltzman,L., Teaching Assistant,T.

HART B234 Picturing Women in Classical Antiquity

We investigate representations of women in different media in ancient Greece and Rome, examining the cultural stereotypes of women and the gender roles that they reinforce. We also study the daily life of women in the ancient world, the objects that they were associated with in life and death and their occupations.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ARCH-B234
CROSS-LISTED AS CSTS-B234
1.0 units
Lindenlauf,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

HART B239 Women and Cinema

This course will examine the particular challenges that women filmmakers face, as well as the unique and innovative contributions they have made to film aesthetics and narrative form. The class will address central debates within feminism from the 1970s to the present, in particular, feminism's influence on women's independent film production and the question of female authorship.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B239
1.0 units
Gorfinkel,E.
Not offered in 2011-12.

HART B280 Video Practices: Analog to Digital

Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B280
1.0 units
Nguyen,H.
Not offered in 2011-12.

HART B305 Classical Bodies

An examination of the conceptions of the human body evidenced in Greek and Roman art and literature, with emphasis on issues that have persisted in the Western tradition. Topics include the fashioning of concepts of male and female standards of beauty and their implications; conventions of visual representation; the nude; clothing and its symbolism; the athletic ideal; physiognomy; medical theory and practice; the visible expression of character and emotions; and the formulation of the "classical ideal" in antiquity and later times.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ARCH-B303
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B313
1.0 units
Donohue,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

HART B334 Topics in Film Studies

This is a topics course. Content varies. Current topic description: In what ways do film, photography, and digital media shape the space of public appearance? To what extent are political, social, and cultural recognition predicated on the capacity to appear in photographs, on film, on television, on the internet, and in classrooms and musuems? We will explore topics such as 1) how invisible and marginal subjects are to be pictured, 2) how existing repertoires of images affect who and what can appear, 3) how the censorship, circulation, and exhibition of images factor into public visibility.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B334
1.0 units
King,H.

HART B340 Topics in Baroque Art:

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B340
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B340
1.0 units
McKim-Smith,G.
Not offered in 2011-12.

HART B341 Cult Genres

Serving to theorize and historicize cult film and questions of the aesthetic and cultural value, this class will examine conceptual issues of taste, reception, and mass culture as they have accrued around cult film phenomena such as the midnight movie, the cult horror film, exploitation film, underground, and camp cinema. Prerequisite: One course from: ENGL/HART B205; HART B110; HART/ENGL B299; or consent of instructor.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B341
1.0 units
Gorfinkel,E.
Not offered in 2011-12.

HART B348 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS GERM-B321
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B319
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B321
1.0 units
Hertel,C., Meyer,I.
Not offered in 2011-12.

HART B367 Asian American Film, Video and New Media

The course explores the role of pleasure in the production, reception, and performance of Asian American identities in film, video, and the internet, taking as its focus the sexual representation of Asian Americans in works produced by Asian American artists from 1915 to present. In several units of the course, we will study graphic sexual representations, including pornographic images and sex acts some may find objectionable. Students should be prepared to engage analytically with all class material. To maintain an atmosphere of mutual respect and solidarity among the participants in the class, no auditors will be allowed.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B367
1.0 units
Nguyen,H.
Not offered in 2011-12.

HIST B214 The Historical Roots of Women in Genetics and Embryology

Division II: Natural Science
CROSS-LISTED AS BIOL-B214
1.0 units
Davis,G.
Not offered in 2011-12.

HIST B292 Women in Britain since 1750

Focusing on contemporary and historical narratives, this course explores the ongoing production, circulation and refraction of discourses on gender and nation as well as race, empire and modernity since the mid-18th century. Texts will incorporate visual material as well as literary evidence and culture and consider the crystallization of the discipline of history itself.
Division III: Humanities
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Kale,M.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ITAL B235 The Italian Women's Movement

Emphasis will be put on Italian women writers and film directors, who are often left out of syllabi adhering to traditional canons. Particular attention will be paid to: a) women writers who have found their voices (through writing) as a means of psychological survival in a patriarchal world; b) women engaged in the women's movement of the 70's and who continue to look at, and rewrite, women's stories of empowerment and solidarity; c) "divaism", fame, via beauty and sex with a particular emphasis on the ‘60s (i.e. Gina Lollobrigida, Sofia Loren, Claudia Cardinale).
Division III: Humanities
1.0 units
McAuliffe,D., Ricci,R.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ITAL B299 Grief, Sexuality, Identity: Emerging Adulthood

Adolescence is an important time of personality development as a result of changes in the self-concept and the formation of a new moral system of values. Emphasis will be placed on issues confronting the role of the family and peer relationships, prostitution, drugs, youth criminality/gangsters/violence, cultural diversity, pregnancy, gender identity, mental/moral/religious development, emotional growth, alcoholism, homosexuality, sexual behavior. Prerequisite: ITAL B102 or ITAL B105.
Division III: Humanities
1.0 units
Ricci,R.

PHIL B221 Ethics

An introduction to ethics by way of an examination of moral theories and a discussion of important ancient, modern, and contemporary texts which established theories such as virtue ethics, deontology, utilitarianism, relativism, emotivism, care ethics. This course considers questions concerning freedom, responsibility, and obligation. How should we live our lives and interact with others? How should we think about ethics in a global context? Is ethics independent of culture? A variety of practical issues such as reproductive rights, euthanasia, animal rights and the environment will be considered.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
1.0 units
Koggel,C.

PHIL B225 Global Ethical Issues

The need for a critical analysis of what justice is and requires has become urgent in a context of increasing globalization, the emergence of new forms of conflict and war, high rates of poverty within and across borders and the prospect of environmental devastation. This course examines prevailing theories and issues of justice as well as approaches and challenges by non-western, post-colonial, feminist, race, class, and disability theorists.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS POLS-B225
1.0 units
Koggel,C.

PHIL B252 Feminist Theory

Beliefs that gender discrimination has been eliminated and women have achieved equality have become commonplace. We challenge these assumptions examining the concepts of patriarchy, sexism, and oppression. Exploring concepts central to feminist theory, we attend to the history of feminist theory and contemporary accounts of women's place and status in different societies, varied experiences, and the impact of the phenomenon of globalization. We then explore the relevance of gender to philosophical questions about identity and agency with respect to moral, social and political theory. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or permission of instructor.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS POLS-B253
1.0 units
Koggel,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

PHIL B344 Development Ethics

This course explores the meaning of and moral issues raised by development. In what direction and by what means should a society "develop"? What role, if any, does the globalization of markets and capitalism play in processes of development and in systems of discrimination on the basis of factors such as race and gender? Answers to these sorts of questions will be explored through an examination of some of the most prominent theorists and recent literature. Prerequisites: a philosophy, political theory or economics course or permission of the instructor.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS POLS-B344
1.0 units
Koggel,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

POLS B253 Feminist Theory

Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS PHIL-B252
1.0 units
Koggel,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

POLS B262 Who Believes What and Why: the Sociology of Public Opinion

Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS SOCL-B262
1.0 units
Wright,N.
Not offered in 2011-12.

POLS B282 The Exotic Other: Gender and Sexuality in the Middle East

This course is concerned with the meanings of gender and sexuality in the Middle East, with particular attention to the construction of tradition, its performance, reinscription, and transformation, and to Western interpretations and interactions. Prerequisite: one course in social science or humanities. Previous gender or Middle East course is a plus.
Division I: Social Science
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
1.0 units
Harrold,D.

POLS B344 Development Ethics

This course explores the meaning of and moral issues raised by development. In what direction and by what means should a society "develop"? What role, if any, does the globalization of markets and capitalism play in processes of development and in systems of discrimination on the basis of factors such as race and gender? Answers to these sorts of questions will be explored through an examination of some of the most prominent theorists and recent literature. Prerequisites: a philosophy, political theory or economics course or permission of the instructor.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS PHIL-B344
1.0 units
Koggel,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

POLS B375 Women, Work, and Family

As the number of women participating in the paid workforce who are also mothers exceeds 50 percent, it becomes increasingly important to study the issues raised by these dual roles. This seminar will examine the experiences of working and nonworking mothers in the United States, the roles of fathers, the impact of working mothers on children, and the policy implications of women, work, and family.
CROSS-LISTED AS SOCL-B375
1.0 units
Golden,M.

PSYC B340 Women's Mental Health

This course will provide an overview of current research and theory related to women's mental health. We will discuss psychological phenomena and disorders that are particularly salient to and prevalent among women, why these phenomena/disorders affect women disproportionately over men, and how they may impact women's psychological and physical well-being. Psychological disorders covered will include: depression, eating disorders, dissociative identity disorder, borderline personality disorder, and chronic pain disorders. Other topics discussed will include work-family conflict for working mothers, the role of sociocultural influences on women's mental health, and mental health issues particular to women of color and to lesbian women. Prerequisite: PSYC B209 or PSYC B351.
Division I: Social Science
1.0 units
Rosenfeld,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

SOCL B201 The Study of Gender in Society

The definition of male and female social roles and sociological approaches to the study of gender in the United States, with attention to gender in the economy and work place, the division of labor in families and households, and analysis of class and ethnic differences in gender roles. Of particular interest in this course is the comparative exploration of the experiences of women of color in the United States.
Division I: Social Science
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
1.0 units
Osirim,M.
Not offered in 2011-12.

SOCL B205 Social Inequality

Introduction to the major sociological theories of gender, racial-ethnic, and class inequality with emphasis on the relationships among these forms of stratification in the contemporary United States, including the role of the upper class(es), inequality between and within families, in the work place, and in the educational system.
Division I: Social Science
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B205
1.0 units
Osirim,M.

SOCL B225 Women in Society

A study of the contemporary experiences of women of color in the Global South. The household, workplace, community, and the nation-state, and the positions of women in the private and public spheres are compared cross-culturally. Topics include feminism, identity and self-esteem; globalization and transnational social movements and tensions and transitions encountered as nations embark upon development.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Division I: Social Science
1.0 units
Osirim,M.
Not offered in 2011-12.

SOCL B262 Who Believes What and Why: The Sociology of Public Opinion

This course explores public opinion: what it is, how it is measured, how it is shaped, and how it changes over time. Specific attention is given to the role of elites, the mass media, and religion in shaping public opinion. Examples include racial/ethnic civil rights, abortion, gay/lesbian/transgendered sexuality, and inequalities.
Division I: Social Science
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS POLS-B262
1.0 units
Wright,N.

SOCL B350 Movements for Social Justice

Throughout human history, powerless groups of people have organized social movements to improve their lives and their societies. Powerful groups and institutions have resisted these efforts in order to maintain their own privilege. Some periods of history have been more likely than others to spawn protest movements. What factors seem most likely to lead to social movements? What determines their success/failure? We will examine 20th-century social movements in the United States to answer these questions. Includes a film series. Prerequisite: At least one prior social science course or permission of the instructor.
Division I: Social Science
1.0 units
Karen,D.
Not offered in 2011-12.

SOCL B375 Women, Work and Family

As the number of women participating in the paid workforce who are also mothers exceeds 50 percent, it becomes increasingly important to study the issues raised by these dual roles. This seminar will examine the experiences of working and nonworking mothers in the United States, the roles of fathers, the impact of working mothers on children, and the policy implications of women, work, and family.
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS POLS-B375
1.0 units
Golden,M.

SPAN B218 Border Crossing Narratives and Films

Our view of Latin American and U.S. Latino immigration and migration has affected film and literature. Studies border crossing and (im)migration and the debates about the nature of national affiliation for the Latino "minority" and the borders these groups transgress. Examines stereotypes about border-crossers in mainstream media and literature, and how Latino and Latin-American filmmakers have attempted to subvert these images by presenting a more complex representations and experiences. Prerequisite: Spanish B202 or equivalent.
Division III: Humanities
1.0 units
Staff
Not offered in 2011-12.

SPAN B223 Género y modernidad en la narrativa del siglo XIX

A reading of 19th-century Spanish narrative by both men and women writers, to assess how they come together in configuring new ideas of female identity and its social domains, as the country is facing new challenges in its quest for modernity.
Division III: Humanities
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
1.0 units
Song,H.
Not offered in 2011-12.

SPAN B265 Escritoras españolas: entre tradición, renovación y migración

Fiction by women writers from Spain in the 20th and 21st century. Breaking the traditional female stereotypes during and after Franco's dictatorship, the authors explore through their creative writing changing sociopolitical and cultural issues including regional identities and immigration. Topics of discussion include gender marginality, feminist studies and the portrayal of women in contemporary society.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
1.0 units
Song,H.
Not offered in 2011-12.

SPAN B309 La mujer en la literatura española del Siglo de Oro

A study of the depiction of women in the fiction, drama, and poetry of 16th- and 17th-century Spain. Topics include the construction of gender; the idealization and codification of women's bodies; the politics of feminine enclosure (convent, home, brothel, palace); and the performance of honor. The first half of the course will deal with representations of women by male authors (Calderón, Cervantes, Lope, Quevedo) and the second will be dedicated to women writers such as Teresa de Ávila, Ana Caro, Juana Inés de la Cruz, and María de Zayas.
Division III: Humanities
1.0 units
Quintero,M.
Not offered in 2011-12.

SPAN B322 Queens, Nuns, and Other Deviants in the Early Modern Iberian World

The course examines literary, historical, and legal texts from the early modern Iberian world (Spain, Mexico, Peru) through the lens of gender studies. The course is divided around three topics: royal bodies (women in power), cloistered bodies (women in the convent), and delinquent bodies (figures who defy legal and gender normativity). Course is taught in English and is open to all juniors or seniors who have taken at least one 200-level course in a literature department. Students seeking Spanish credit must have taken BMC Spanish 202 and at least one other Spanish course beyond 202, or received permission from instructor.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B322
1.0 units
Quintero,M.

SPAN B329 Brown Affect: Narrating Latina and Latino Lives

This course studies the construction of Latino lives in and through autobiographies and autobiographical fiction in the context of the civil rights movement and the rise of Latino nationalism. The course will focus on the Latino subversion of genre from the bildungsroman to its more recent (post)modernist traditions to its more culturally specific grounding in the Latin American crónica. We will study how "feeling brown" has made Latino life-writing a political and literary act of self-creation. Course is taught in English. Students seeking major credit in Spanish must do appropriate assignments in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 220, ENGL 250 or equivalent.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ENGL-B340
1.0 units
Staff

SPAN B331 TransNation: U.S. Latino and Latin American Queer Diasporas

This course engages the vanguard of U.S. Latino and Latin American theoretical debates about state formation in the construction of citizenship from the perspective of queer and transgender studies. Explores recent theoretical and cultural works that challenge traditional understandings of gender, sexuality, ethnic identity, nationalism, state-formation, citizenship, and the body. Analyzes the limits of cultural and theoretical interface between U.S. Latino, Latin American and Anglo-American cultural theory.
Division III: Humanities
1.0 units
Staff
Not offered in 2011-12.