2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog

German and German Studies

Students may complete a major or minor in German and German Studies.

Chairs

Imke Meyer, Professor and Co-Chair
Ulrich Schönherr, Associate Professor and Co-Chair

Faculty at Bryn Mawr College

David Kenosian, Lecturer
Imke Meyer, Professor and Co-Chair
Azade Seyhan, Professor

Faculty at Haverford College

Imke Brust, Assistant Professor
Ulrich Schönherr, Associate Professor and Co-Chair (on leave semesters I and II)
Henning Wrage, Visiting Assistant Professor

The Bryn Mawr-Haverford Bi-College Department of German draws upon the expertise of the German faculty at both Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges to offer a broadly conceived German Studies program, incorporating a variety of courses and major options. The purpose of the major in German and German Studies is to lay the foundation for a critical understanding of German culture in its contemporary global context and its larger political, social, and intellectual history. To this end we encourage a thorough and comparative study of the German language and culture through its linguistic and literary history, systems of thought, institutions, political configurations, and arts and sciences.

The German program aims, by means of various methodological approaches to the study of another language, to foster critical thinking, expository writing skills, understanding of the diversity of culture(s), and the ability to respond creatively to the challenges posed by cultural difference in an increasingly global world. Course offerings are intended to serve both students with particular interests in German literature and literary theory and criticism, and those interested in studying German and German-speaking cultures from the perspective of communication arts, film, history, history of ideas, history of art and architecture, history of religion, institutions, linguistics, mass media, philosophy, politics, and urban anthropology and folklore.

A thorough knowledge of German is a goal for both major concentrations. The objective of our language instruction is to teach students communicative skills that enable them to function effectively in authentic conditions of language use and to speak and write in idiomatic German. A major component of all German courses is the examination of issues that underline the cosmopolitanism as well as the specificity and complexity of contemporary German culture. German majors can and are encouraged to take courses in interdisciplinary areas, such as comparative literature, film, gender and sexuality studies, growth and structure of cities, history, history of art, music, philosophy, and political science, where they read works of criticism in these areas in the original German. Courses relating to any aspect of German culture, history, and politics given in other departments can count toward requirements for the major or minor.

College Foreign Language Requirement

The College's foreign language requirement may be satisfied by completing GERM 101 and 102 with an average grade of at least 2.0 or with a grade of 2.0 or better in GERM 102.

Major Requirements

The German and German studies major consists of 10 units. All courses at the 200 or 300 level count toward the major requirements, either in a literature concentration or in a German studies concentration. A literature concentration normally follows the sequence 201 and/or 202; 209 or 212, or 214, 215; plus additional courses to complete the 10 units, two of them at the 300 level; and finally one semester of Senior Conference. A German studies major normally includes 223 and/or 224 or 245; one 200- and one 300-level course in German literature; three courses (at least one at the 300 level) in subjects central to aspects of German culture, history, or politics; and one semester of GERM 321 (Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies). Within each concentration, courses need to be selected so as to achieve a reasonable breadth, but also a degree of disciplinary coherence. Within departmental offerings, GERM 201 and 202 (Advanced Training) strongly emphasize the development of conversational, writing, and interpretive skills. German majors are encouraged, when possible, to take work in at least one foreign language other than German.

Honors

Any student who has completed a senior thesis and whose grade point average in the major at the end of the senior year is 3.8 or higher qualifies for departmental honors. Students who have completed a thesis and whose major grade point average at the end of the senior year is 3.6 or higher, but not 3.8, are eligible to be discussed as candidates for departmental honors. A student in this range of eligibility must be sponsored by at least one faculty member with whom she has done coursework, and at least one other faculty member must read some of the student's advanced work and agree on the excellence of the work in order for departmental honors to be awarded. If there is a sharp difference of opinion, additional readers will serve as needed.

Minor Requirements

A minor in German and German studies consists of seven units of work. To earn a minor, students are normally required to take GERM 201 or 202, and four additional units covering a reasonable range of study topics, of which at least one unit is at the 300 level. Additional upper-level courses in the broader area of German studies may be counted toward the seven units with the approval of the department.

Study Abroad

Students majoring in German are encouraged to spend some time in German-speaking countries in the course of their undergraduate studies. Various possibilities are available: summer work programs, DAAD (German Academic Exchange) scholarships for summer courses at German universities, and selected junior year abroad Programs.

GERM B001 Elementary German

Meets five hours a week with the individual class instructor, two hours with student drill instructors. Strong emphasis on communicative competence both in spoken and written German in a larger cultural context.
Language Level 1
1.0 units
Kenosian,D.

GERM H001 Elementary German

Henning, Wrage

GERM B002 Elementary German

Meets five hours a week with the individual class instructor, two hours with student drill instructors. Strong emphasis on communicative competence both in spoken and written German in a larger cultural context.
Language Level 1
1.0 units
Kenosian,D.

GERM H002 Elementary German

Wrage

GERM B101 Intermediate German

Thorough review of grammar, exercises in composition and conversation. Enforcement of correct grammatical patterns and idiomatic use of language. Study of selected literary and cultural texts and films from German-speaking countries.
Language Level 2
1.0 units
Kenosian,D.

GERM H101 Intermediate German

Brust

GERM B102 Intermediate German

Thorough review of grammar, exercises in composition and conversation. Enforcement of correct grammatical patterns and idiomatic use of language. Study of selected literary and cultural texts and films from German-speaking countries. Two semesters.
Language Level 2
1.0 units
Meyer,I.

GERM H102 Intermediate German

Brust

GERM H201 Advanced Training: Language, Text and Context

This course is intended for students who wish to refine their speaking, writing, and reading skills beyond the intermediate level. Designed as a comprehensive introduction to modern German culture, we will discuss a variety of literary, political, and philosophical texts, including feature films and video materials. In addition, students have the opportunity to enrich the curriculum, by giving class reports on current events of their choice. Weekly grammar reviews will complement these activities.
Brust

GERM B202 Introduction to German Studies

Interdisciplinary and historical approaches to the study of German language and culture. Selected texts for study are drawn from autobiography, Märchen, satire, philosophical essays and fables, art and film criticism, discourses of gender, travel writing, cultural productions of minority groups, and scientific and journalistic writings. Emphasis is on a critical understanding of issues such as linguistic imperialism and exclusion, language and power, gender and language, and ideology and language.
Division I or Division III
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
1.0 units
Meyer,I.

GERM B209 Introduction to Literary Analysis: Philosophical Approaches to Criticism

Designated theory course. An introduction to various methods of reading the literary text from the perspective of critical methods informed by philosophical ideas. In their quest for self-understanding and knowledge, literature and philosophy share similar forms of inquiry and imaginative modeling. Selected literary texts and critical essays focus on questions of language, translation, understanding, and identity in their relation to history, epistemology, ethics, and aesthetics. One of the main objectives of the course is to provide students with the critical tools necessary for an informed reading of texts.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B209
CROSS-LISTED AS PHIL-B209
1.0 units
Seyhan,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

GERM B212 Readings in German Intellectual History: Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and the Rhetoric of Modernity

Study of selected texts of German intellectual history, introducing representative works of Theodor W. Adorno, Hannah Arendt, Walter Benjamin, Sigmund Freud, Jürgen Habermas, Georg W. F. Hegel, Martin Heidegger, Werner Heisenberg, Immanuel Kant, G. E. Lessing, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Friedrich Schiller, and Ludwig Wittgenstein. The course aims to introduce students to an advanced cultural reading range and the languages and terminology of humanistic disciplines in German-speaking countries, and seeks to develop their critical and interpretive skills.
Division III: Humanities
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
CROSS-LISTED AS PHIL-B204
1.0 units
Seyhan,A.

GERM B213 Theory in Practice: Critical Discourses in the Humanities

This seminar provides exposure to influential 20th-century French thinkers. It will examine three major currents: Postcolonial Theory; Feminist Theory; Post-Structuralist Theory. The primary goal here is to introduce students to exciting and difficult critical thought that will prove useful to their future studies and will begin to develop necessary critical skills. While the materials covered are primarily grounded in French intellectual history, the course will also spend time situating these intellectual currents in broader transnational and transdisciplinary contexts. This is a required course for the French major. Course taught in English and serving the humanities.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS PHIL-B253
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B213
CROSS-LISTED AS FREN-B213
1.0 units
Dostal,R.

GERM B223 Topics in German Cultural Studies

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Current topic description: Topic for Spring 2011: Kafka's Prague. German and European Writing from the Czech Metropolis. Prague of the late 19th century became for some European writers an icon of modernizing Europe. In this course, we will explore the representations of the spaces of Prague from 1890 until 1920 to trace how German-speaking Jewish and gentile artists and thinkers attempted to negotiate the cultural, linguistic and political contradictions of a city undergoing rapid transformations.
Division I or Division III
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B247
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B223
1.0 units
Kenosian,D.

GERM H223 Working Through the Holocaust Past in German Drama and Film

This course will provide an historical overview of the Holocaust, its origins, process, and outcomes, and how it has served as a mental map for the construction of contemporary German national identity. In this context, we will explore such topics as notions of memory, collective guilt, trauma, and mourning.The course will critically engage issues of portrayal and representation of historical memory within the context of Holocaust commemoration. This course will also explore the tragedy and remembrance of the Holocaust as a transnational phenomenon in the contemporary world. The course is taught in English with an extra session in German.
Brust

GERM H224 Books and Media for Children: From Enlightenment to Cyberspace

Wir werden uns mit der Geschichte der deutschen Kinder—und Jugendliteratur seit der „Entdeckung der Kindheit" (Philippe Aries) im 18. Jahrhundert beschäftigen. Wir werden über die „Lesesucht"—Debatte und die moralischen Fabeln in der Aufklärung diskutieren und über die Kunst—und Volksmärchen in der Romantik. Wir werden einige Höhepunkte der Kinder—und Jugendliteratur der Weimarer Republik analysieren und uns mit Jugendbüchern aus Ost—und Westdeutschland beschäftigen. Einen besonderen Schwerpunkt bilden die deutschen Filme über „Halbstarke" (yobs) und Teenager und ihre internationalen Vorbilder. Das letzte Viertel des Seminars wird sich intensiv mit der Veränderung der Jugendkultur durch digitale Medien bis hin zum Computerspiel beschäftigen.
(Wrage)

GERM B227 Topics in Modern Planning

This course examines topics in planning as defined by specific areas (modern European metropoles) or themes (the impact of oil). It is a writing intensive course.
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B227
CROSS-LISTED AS FREN-B227
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B227
1.0 units
Hein,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

GERM B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile

This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Julia Alvarez, Anita Desai, Sigmund Freud, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, and others.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS ANTH-B231
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B231
Counts toward Latin American, Latino and Iberian Peoples and Cultures concentration
1.0 units
Seyhan,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

GERM B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture: Sexualities and Gender in Literature and Film

This seminar examines discourses on sexualities and gender advanced by German and Austrian literature and film in the 20th century. Our analyses of the visual and narrative construction of sexuality and of masculinity and femininity will be framed by discussion of theoretical texts by authors such as Sigmund Freud, Michel Foucault, Adrienne Rich, Laura Mulvey, and Judith Butler. We will screen films by Leontine Sagan, Liliana Cavani, and Rainer Werner Fassbinder. We'll read literary texts by Arthur Schnitzler, Hermann Hesse, and Ingeborg Bachmann. Class discussions will be held in English. For German speakers, additional sessions in German will be conducted on a regular basis.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B245
Counts toward Film Studies minor
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies concentration
1.0 units
Meyer,I.

GERM B262 Film and the German Literary Imagination

Course content varies. Topic for Fall 2010: "Austrian Cinema: From the Silent Era to the Present." This course offers an overview of Austrian cinema from the silent era to the present. We will trace the ways in which Austrian film grapples with the fall of the Habsburg Empire, World War I and its aftermath, Austro-Fascism, the Annexation of Austria by Nazi Germany, World War II, Austria's relation to the Holocaust, shifting notions of national identity after 1945, and Austria's entrance into the European Union. Previous topics include: Travel in Post-War German and Austrian Film; Global Masculinities: The Male Body in Contemporary Cinema.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Film Studies minor
Counts toward International Studies minor
1.0 units
Meyer,I.
Offered at Haverford in 2011-12.

GERM H262 Film and the German Literary Imagination

Course content varies. Topic for spring 2012: European Film
Brust

GERM B299 Cultural Diversity and Its Representations

This is a topics course. It will focus on representations of "foreignness" and "others" in selected German works since the 18th century, including works of art, social texts, and film, and on the cultural productions of non-German writers and artists living in Germany today. Topics vary.
Division I or Division III
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B299
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B299
1.0 units
Seyhan,A.
Not offered in 2011-12.

GERM B303 Modern German Prose

Division III: Humanities
1.0 units
Meyer,I.
Not offered in 2011-12.

GERM B305 Modern German Drama

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Taught in German.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B305
1.0 units
Meyer,I.
Not offered in 2011-12.

GERM B310 Topics in German Literature

This is a topics course. Course content varies. One additional hour of target language instruction TBA.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS HEBR-B310
1.0 units
Meyer,I., Kenosian,D.
Not offered in 2011-12.

GERM B320 Topics in German Literature and Culture

This is a topics course. Course content varies. The topic for 2011-12 is "No Child Left Behind: Education in German Literature and Culture." Current topic description: What conceptualizations of education emerged in the German Enlightenment and during the 19th and 20th centuries in German-speaking countries? Does education support specific goals shared across a nation, support the status quo, or question dominant paradigms? How are notions of religion, gender, sexuality, class, race, and national identity reflected in education? And how do adult and children's literature, as well as film, grapple with these issues? Language of instruction: English.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS EDUC-B320
Counts toward Film Studies minor
1.0 units
Meyer,I.

GERM B321 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Topic for 2011-12 is The Transnational Cosmopolitanism of Swiss Literature.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B321
1.0 units
Seyhan,A., Werlen,H.

GERM H321 Literature and Media: From Print Culture to Web 2.0

This course will deal with a number of major media theories (Luhmann, McLuhan, Baudrillard, Elsaesser et.al.), that will help us to understand what media are and how they work. Starting with the book as the first and most important storage system of the modern world, we will reconstruct main thresholds where "old" and "new" media compete with each other. We will investigate the synergies and functional differentiations between literature and film and between film and television. Last not least we will take a closer look at some of the latest developments in media history.
Wrage

GERM H321 East German Media History: Literature—Film—Television

We all have heard about the Cold War, and we have seen pictures of John F. Kennedy or Ronald Reagan standing in front on the Berlin Wall demanding to tear it down. But what was behind the Iron Curtain? What are the characteristics of East German culture? This course will survey the complex and fascinating interaction of culture, media and politics in the GDR (the German Democratic Republic), discuss influential theoretical concepts such as censorship, "socialist realism" and the "antifascist founding myth" (Antonia Grunenberg) and give an overview of the main stages of literature, film and television history.
Wrage

GERM B329 Wittgenstein

Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS PHIL-B329
1.0 units
Koggel,C.

GERM B380 Topics in Contemporary Art

This is a topic course. Course content varies.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS HART-B380
1.0 units
Saltzman,L.
Not offered in 2011-12.

GERM B399 Senior Seminar

1.0 units
Kenosian,D.
GERM H399 Senior Seminar
Brust

GERM B403 Supervised Work

1.0 units

GERM B421 German for Reading Knowledge

This course will provide graduate and undergraduate students with the skills to read and translate challenging academic texts from German into English. We will quickly cover the essentials of German grammar and focus on vocabulary and constructions that one can encounter in scholarly writing from a variety of disciplines. Does not fulfill the Language Requirement.
1.0 units
Seyhan,A.