2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog

International Studies

Students may complete a minor in International Studies.

Directors

Cynthia Bisman, Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research
Christine Koggel, Philosophy

Steering Committee

Michael Allen, Political Science
Grace Armstrong, French and Francophone Studies
Cynthia Bisman, Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research
Carola Hein, Growth and Structure of Cities
Yonglin Jiang, East Asian Studies
Madhavi Kale, History
Toba Kerson, Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research
Philip Kilbride, Anthropology
Christine Koggel, Philosophy
Imke Meyer, German and German Studies
Kalala Ngalamulume, History
Mary Osirim, Sociology
Melissa Pashigian, Anthropology
Michael Rock, Economics

International studies is the study of relationships among people and states affected by increasingly permeable borders and facing global issues. The minor in international studies aims to prepare students to be responsible citizens by introducing them to issues of importance in an increasingly interdependent world of global dynamics in politics, economics, ideas, language, and culture. Around the world, international studies programs are preparing students for productive roles in transnational or intergovernmental institutions and in the areas of public policy, governance, business, diplomacy, development, and cultural studies. A goal of the minor is to provide a foundation for students interested in pursuing career opportunities in these areas or in entering graduate programs in international studies.

The minor combines applied and theoretical approaches to international studies and draws from an increasing number of disciplines that are now exploring the descriptive and normative aspects of living in a world impacted by features of globalization. The minor allows students to use the disciplinary methods and materials acquired in their major as a base from which to engage in the necessarily inter- and multidisciplinary course work of international studies. Finally, the minor employs a broad conception of international studies by incorporating the study of politics, economics, philosophy, and political theory (as captured in the core courses) with the complementary study of specific themes (as captured by each of the five tracks).

Although language study is not required per se for the minor, students intending to undertake graduate work in international studies should plan to acquire proficiency in a foreign language, which is a requirement (at the time of admission or graduation) in the most selective programs here and abroad.

Minor Requirements

Students minoring in International Studies must complete a total of seven courses. Four of these are core courses. Three of these courses form a coherent group coming (one each) from political science, economics, and philosophy and the fourth provides critical inquiry into cultural differences. The core courses form the base from which students can then concentrate their additional study in one of five tracks: international politics, international economics, social justice, area studies, or language and arts. Within a track, students can choose three electives from among a range of courses drawn from the social sciences and humanities. The three electives should demonstrate coherence and be approved by an adviser from the Center for International Studies.

Core courses

There are a total of four core courses. All students are required to take three courses, one from each of political science, economics, and philosophy. These disciplines have become central to international studies programs. Each of the two sets identified below form a coherent group of three courses designed to introduce students to the field as a whole by providing them with resources for studying the most basic elements of globalization in the context of international relations, economics and politics. If one of the core courses from a set is not offered in a given year, substitutions will be made with another allied course, offered at Bryn Mawr or Haverford, with the approval of an adviser from the Center for International Studies.

POLS B141 Introduction to International Politics
ECON B225 Economic Development
PHIL B344 Development Ethics

or

PHIL B225 Global Ethical Issues
ECON B206 International Trade
POLS B391 International Political Economy

To complete the core requirements, students must take one course on cultural differences. This requirement allows students to acquire a greater appreciation of the significance of culture in the global context by providing an awareness of how different values, norms, beliefs, and practices affect possibilities for understanding different cultures and for cross-cultural dialogue and consensus. The course may be selected from (but is not limited to) the following:

ANTH B102 Introduction to Anthropology: Cultural Anthropology
COML/PHIL B202 or B323 Culture and Interpretation ITAL/COML/HEBR B211 Primo Levi, the Holocaust, and Its Aftermath
ANTH/COML/GERM/CITY B245 Women's Narratives on Modern Migrancy, Exile and Diaspora
FREN B251 La Mosaïque France

Electives

In addition to the four core courses listed above, three electives are required. Each of the five tracks identifies a major topic or theme in international studies that builds on or develops the core. Students should choose the three electives from the approved lists under one of the tracks identified below. Electives should demonstrate coherence and be approved by an adviser. At least one of the courses must be a 300-level course. Please refer to the International Studies Web site for detailed information regarding approved electives: http://www.brynmawr.edu/internationalstudies.

International Politics

This track allows students to focus on the dynamics and structures of intergovernmental and transnational relationships from the perspective of the discipline of political science. Through engagement with the most salient theoretical and policy debates, students may focus upon such themes as globalization and resistance to it, development and sustainability, nationalism and sovereignty, human rights, conflict and peace, public international law and institutions, and nongovernmental or civil society organizations and movements at regional, transregional, and global levels.

The three elective courses are to be selected from an approved list or be approved by an adviser from the Center for International Studies.

International Economics

This track allows students to focus on various theoretical, empirical, and policy issues in international economics. Each of the courses in the track—trade, open-economy macroeconomics, development, and environmental economics—focuses on different economic aspects of the international or global economy. International trade looks at the major theories offered to explain trade and examines the effects of trade barriers and trade liberalization on welfare. International macroeconomics and international finance examines policy-making in open economies, exchange rate systems, exchange rate behavior, and financial integration and financial crises.

Development economics is concerned, among other things, with understanding how developing countries can structure their participation in the global economy so as to benefit their development. Environmental economics uses economic analysis to examine the behavioral causes of local, regional, and global environmental and natural resource problems and to evaluate policy responses to them.

The three elective courses are to be selected from an approved list or be approved by a faculty member in Economics affiliated with the Center for International Studies.

Social Justice

This track allows students to explore issues of social and political change in the context of economic and political transition in the global context. Students gain insight into how global issues affect relationships among people and cultures within and across national boundaries and how global issues are in turn affected by these relationships. Major themes include: a) migration, imperialism, and colonialism; b) international/ethnic conflict and cooperation; c) culture and values; d) justice and global issues; e) globalization and urban development; and f) social movements and change in the global context.

A coherent set of courses can be achieved by selecting the three electives from approved lists within one of the thematic groupings or be approved by an adviser from the Center for International Studies.

Area Studies

This track allows students to situate and apply the economic, political, and social theory provided in the core to the study of a particular geopolitical area. It provides students with a global frame of reference from which to examine issues of history, migration, colonization, modernization, social change, and development through an area study.

A coherent set of courses can be achieved by selecting the three electives from approved lists within an area study or be approved by an adviser from the Center for International Studies.

Language and Arts

This track allows students to explore human interaction at the global level through language, literature, music, and arts. Students in this track focus their studies on the forms of language and the arts that are generated through global processes and in turn affect the generation and exchange of ideas in and between different societies and cultures.

A coherent set of courses can be achieved by selecting the three electives from approved lists within a language study or be approved by an adviser from the Center for International Studies.

ANTH B102 Introduction to Anthropology: Cultural Anthropology

An introduction to the methods and theories of cultural anthropology in order to understand and explain cultural similarities and differences among contemporary societies.
Division I: Social Science
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
1.0 units
Pashigian,M., Weidman,A.

CITY B251 La Mosaïque France

A study that opposes the discourse of exclusion, xenophobia, racism and the existence of a mythical, unique French identity by examining 20th-century French people and culture in their richness and variety, based on factors such as gender, class, region, colonization and decolonization, immigration and ethnic background. Films and texts by Begag, Beauvoir, Cardinal, Carles, Duras, Ernaux, Jakez Helias, Modiano, and Zobel.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS FREN-B251
1.0 units
Cherel,B.
Not offered in 2011-12.

COML B211 Primo Levi, the Holocaust and Its Aftermath

A consideration, through analysis and appreciation of his major works, of how the horrific experience of the Holocaust awakened in Primo Levi a growing awareness of his Jewish heritage and led him to become one of the dominant voices of that tragic historical event, as well as one of the most original new literary figures of post-World War II Italy. Always in relation to Levi and his works, attention will also be given to other Italian women writers whose works are also connected with the Holocaust.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS ITAL-B211
CROSS-LISTED AS HEBR-B211
1.0 units
Patruno,N.
Not offered in 2011-12.

ECON B348 International Trade

Study of the major theories offered to explain international trade. Includes analyses of the effects of trade barriers (tariffs, quotas, nontariff barriers), trade liberalization, and foreign investment by multinational corporations on growth, poverty, inequality, and the environment. Prerequisite: ECON B200.
Division I: Social Science
1.0 units
Stahnke,R.
Not offered in 2011-12.

FREN B251 La Mosaïque France

A study that opposes the discourse of exclusion, xenophobia, racism and the existence of a mythical, unique French identity by examining 20th-century French people and culture in their richness and variety, based on factors such as gender, class, region, colonization and decolonization, immigration and ethnic background. Films and texts by Begag, Beauvoir, Cardinal, Carles, Duras, Ernaux, Jakez Helias, Modiano, and Zobel.
Division III: Humanities
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS CITY-B251
1.0 units
Cherel,B.
Not offered in 2011-12.

GERM B262 Film and the German Literary Imagination

Course content varies. Topic for Fall 2010:"Austrian Cinema: From the Silent Era to the Present." This course offers an overview of Austrian cinema from the silent era to the present. We will trace the ways in which Austrian film grapples with the fall of the Habsburg Empire, World War I and its aftermath, Austro-Fascism, the Annexation of Austria by Nazi Germany, World War II, Austria's relation to the Holocaust, shifting notions of national identity after 1945, and Austria's entrance into the European Union. Previous topics include: Travel in Post-War German and Austrian Film; Global Masculinities: The Male Body in Contemporary Cinema.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
1.0 units
Meyer,I.
Not offered in 2011-12.

HIST B288 The Political Economy of the Middle East and North Africa

Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS POLS-B288
1.0 units
Harrold,D.
Not offered in 2011-12.

PHIL B225 Global Ethical Issues

The need for a critical analysis of what justice is and requires has become urgent in a context of increasing globalization, the emergence of new forms of conflict and war, high rates of poverty within and across borders and the prospect of environmental devastation. This course examines prevailing theories and issues of justice as well as approaches and challenges by non-western, post-colonial, feminist, race, class, and disability theorists.
Division III: Humanities
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
CROSS-LISTED AS POLS-B225
1.0 units
Koggel,C.

PHIL B323 Culture and Interpretation

This course will pursue such questions as the following. For all objects of interpretation—including works of art, music, literature, persons or cultures—must there be a single right interpretation? If not, what is to prevent one from sliding into an interpretive anarchism? Does interpretation affect the nature or the number of an object of interpretation? Does the singularity or multiplicity of interpretations mandate such ontologies as realism or constructivism? Discussions will be based on contemporary readings.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS COML-B323
1.0 units
Krausz,M.

PHIL B344 Development Ethics

This course explores the meaning of and moral issues raised by development. In what direction and by what means should a society"develop"? What role, if any, does the globalization of markets and capitalism play in processes of development and in systems of discrimination on the basis of factors such as race and gender? Answers to these sorts of questions will be explored through an examination of some of the most prominent theorists and recent literature. Prerequisites: a philosophy, political theory or economics course or permission of the instructor.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS POLS-B344
1.0 units
Koggel,C.
Not offered in 2011-12.

POLS B225 Global Ethical Issues

The need for a critical analysis of what justice is and requires has become urgent in a context of increasing globalization, conflict and war, poverty and environmental devastation. This course examines prevailing theories and issues of justice as well as approaches by non-western, post-colonial, feminist, race, class, and disability theorists.
Division III: Humanities
CROSS-LISTED AS PHIL-B225
1.0 units
Koggel,C.

POLS B250 International Politics

An introduction to international relations, exploring its main subdivisions and theoretical approaches. Phenomena and problems in world politics examined include systems of power management, imperialism, globalization, war, bargaining, and peace. Problems and institutions of international economy and international law are also addressed. This course assumes a reasonable knowledge of modern world history. Enrollment is limited to 30 students.
Division I: Social Science
1.0 units
Allen,M.

POLS B287 Media and Politics: The Middle East Transformed

The events of 2011 transformed the Middle East, overthrowing or threatening regimes across the region. The course will focus on the media technologies, the political actors, and international events that produced these changes, as well as examine works on political transitions, revolutions, and social movements. Prerequisite: A previous social science or history course is strongly recommended, or a previous course on media.
Division I: Social Science
1.0 units
Harrold,D.

POLS B288 The Political Economy of the Middle East and North Africa

This comparative approach considers historical constructions, the power of economic ideas, domestic politics and resources, and international regimes. Specific areas of focus include theories that seek to explain the economic/political conditions, left, nationalist and liberal, as well as the exceptional growth of the Gulf economies. Prerequisite: at least one other course on the Middle East or a strong area expertise in another region such as Latin America or China with permission of the instructor.
Division I: Social Science
CROSS-LISTED AS HIST-B288
1.0 units
Harrold,D.
Not offered in 2011-12.