2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog

Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Peoples and Cultures

Students may complete a concentration in Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Peoples and Cultures.

Advisory Committee

Juan Arbona, Chair and Associate Professor of Growth and Structure of Cities
Ignacio Gallup-Diaz, Interim Chair and Associate Professor of History and Director of LALIPC
Jennifer Harford Vargas, Assistant Professor of English
James Krippner, Professor of History, Haverford College
Erika Marquez, Postdoctoral Fellow in Sociology
Gary McDonogh, Professor of Growth and Structure of Cities
Gridley McKim-Smith, Professor of History of Art on the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Professorship in the Humanities
Maria Christina Quintero, Professor of Spanish and Director of Comparative Literature
Roya Rastegar, Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities
Enrique Sacerio-Garí, Dorothy Nepper Marshall Professor of Hispanic and Hispanic-American Studies
H. Rosi Song, Chair and Associate Professor of Spanish
Ayumi Takenaka, Associate Professor of Sociology

Latin American, Latino and Iberian peoples, histories, and cultures have represented both central agents and crucibles of transformations across the entire world for millennia. Global histories and local experiences of colonization, migration, exchange, and revolution allow students and faculty to construct a critical framework of analysis and to explore these dynamic worlds, their peoples and cultures, across many disciplines.

As a concentration, such study must be based in a major in another department, generally Spanish, Cities, History, History of Art, Political Science, or Sociology (exceptions can be made in consultation with the major and concentration adviser). To fulfill requirements, the student must complete the introductory course, GNST 245 Introduction to Latin American, Latino and Iberian Peoples and Culture or the equivalent course at Haverford (SPAN 240). They should then plan advanced courses in language, affiliated fields and the major that lead to a final project in the major that relates closely to themes of the concentration. One semester of study abroad is strongly encouraged in the concentration and students may complete some requirements with appropriately selected courses in many Junior Year Abroad (JYA) programs. The student also must show competence in one of the languages of the peoples of Iberia or Latin America. Students are admitted into the concentration at the end of their sophomore year after submission of a plan of study worked out in consultation with the major department and the LALIPC coordinator. Students should keep in touch with the coordinator as they develop major projects in these areas.

Concentration Requirements

Competence in a language spoken by significant collectives of Iberian or Latin American peoples to be achieved no later than junior year. This competence may be attested by a score of at least 690 on the Spanish Achievement test of the College Entrance Examination Board or by completion of a 200-level course with a merit grade. Faculty will work with students to assess languages not regularly taught in the Tri-Co, including Portuguese, Catalan, and other languages.

GNST B245/ HC SPAN 240 as a gateway course in the first or second year. The student should also take at least five other courses selected in consultation with the program coordinator, at least one of which must be at the 300 level. One of these classes may be cross-listed with the major; up to two may be completed in JYA.

A long paper or an independent project dealing with Iberian, Latin American, or Latina/o issues, to be completed during the junior year in a course in the major or concentration and to be read by the LALIPC coordinator.

A senior essay/long paper dealing with some issue relevant to the concentration should be completed in the major and read by one faculty member participating in the concentration. All senior concentrators will present their research within the context of some LALIPC student-faculty forum as well.

Study Abroad

JYA provides both classes and experience in language, society, and culture that are central to the concentration. Students interested in JYA programs in the Iberian Peninsula, Latin America, and the Caribbean should consult with both their major adviser and the concentration coordinator in order to make informed choices. We will also work with students to identify programs that may allow them to work with languages not regularly taught in the Tri-Co, especially Portuguese.

COURSES

ANTH B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800

The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe, and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward: Africana Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures; International Studies Major; Peace and Conflict Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B200
Units: 1.0

ANTH B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile

This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Julia Alvarez, Anita Desai, Sigmund Freud, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, and others.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures; International Studies Major
Crosslisting(s): GERM-B231; COML-B231
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Seyhan,A.
(Spring 2013)

ANTH B258 Immigrant Experiences

The course will examine the causes and consequences of immigration by looking at various immigrant groups in the United States in comparison with Western Europe, Japan, and other parts of the world. How is immigration induced and perpetuated? How are the types of migration changing (labor migration, refugee flows, return migration, transnationalism)? How do immigrants adapt differently across societies? We will explore scholarly texts, films, and novels to examine what it means to be an immigrant, what generational and cultural conflicts immigrants experience, and how they identify with the new country and the old country.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B246
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

COML B225 Censorship: Historical Contexts, Local Practices and Global Resonance

This course examines the ban on books and art in the US, Latin America, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe through a study of the historical, political, and sociocultural conditions of censorship practices and the rhetorical strategies writers and artists use to translate repression and trauma into idioms of resistance. Prerequisite: EMLY B001 or a 100-level intensive writing course.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures; Middle East Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

COML B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile

This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Julia Alvarez, Anita Desai, Sigmund Freud, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, and others.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures; International Studies Major
Crosslisting(s): GERM-B231; ANTH-B231
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Seyhan,A.
(Spring 2013)

COML B237 The Dictator Novel in the Americas

This course examines representations of dictatorship in Latin American and Latina/o novels. We will explore the relationship between narrative form and absolute power by analyzing the literary techniques writers use to contest authoritarianism. We will compare dictator novels from the United States, the Caribbean, Central America, and the Southern Cone. Prerequisite: only for students wishing to take the course for major/minor credit in SPAN is SPAN B200/B202.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B237; SPAN-B237
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

COML B248 The Reception of Classics in the Hispanic World

A survey of the reception of Classical literature in the Spanish-speaking world. We read select literary works in translation, ranging from Renaissance Spain to contemporary Latin America, side-by-side with their classical models, to examine what is culturally unique about their choice of authors, themes, and adaptation of the material.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): CSTS-B248; SPAN-B248
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

COML B260 Ariel/Caliban y el discurso americano

A study of the transformations of Ariel/Calibán as images of Latin American culture.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): SPAN-B260
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Sacerio-Garí,E.
(Fall 2012)

COML B322 Queens, Nuns, and Other Deviants in the Early Modern Iberian World

The course examines literary, historical, and legal texts from the early modern Iberian world (Spain, Mexico, Peru) through the lens of gender studies. The course is divided around three topics: royal bodies (women in power), cloistered bodies (women in the convent), and delinquent bodies (figures who defy legal and gender normativity). Course is taught in English and is open to all juniors or seniors who have taken at least one 200-level course in a literature department.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): SPAN-B322
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

COML B345 Topics in Narrative Theory

Narrative theory through the lens of a specific genre, period or style of writing. Recent topics include Victorian Novels and Ethnic Novels. Current topic description: This course traces the development of the U.S. ethnic novel. We will examine novels by Native Americans, Chicana/os, and African Americans, focusing on key formal innovations in their respective traditions. In addition, we will become versed in key concepts developed by narrative theorists to understand the genre of the novel.
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B345
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Harford Vargas,J.
(Spring 2013)

CSTS B248 Reception of Classical Literature in the Hispanic World

A survey of the reception of Classical literature in the Spanish-speaking world. We read select literary works in translation, ranging from Renaissance Spain to contemporary Latin America, side-by-side with their classical models, to examine what is culturally unique about their choice of authors, themes, and adaptation of the material.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): COML-B248; SPAN-B248
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

EAST B229 Topics in Comparative Urbanism

This is a topics course. Topics vary. Current topic description: This course will examine different building forms and processes in greater China, including Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan, from the imperial to the contemporary eras. It starts with the concrete buildings (residential houses) to the more abstract building (ethnicity, nation-state, historical narratives). With a comparative perspective and an historical approach, this course seeks to familiarize students with the perception of seeing cities as built environments as well as processes.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward: Environmental Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B229; ANTH-B229; HART-B229; SOCL-B230
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Zhang,J.
(Spring 2013)

ENGL B217 Narratives of Latinidad

This course explores how Latina/o writers fashion bicultural and transnational identities and narrate the intertwined histories of the U.S. and Latin America. We will focus on topics of shared concern among Latino groups such as imperialism and annexation, the affective experience of migration, race and gender stereotypes, the politics of Spanglish, and struggles for social justice. By analyzing novels, poetry, performance art, testimonial narratives, films, and essays, we will unpack the complexity of Latinadad in the Americas.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): SPAN-B217
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Harford Vargas,J.
(Fall 2012)

ENGL B237 The Dictator Novel in the Americas

This course examines representations of dictatorship in Latin American and Latina/o novels. We will explore the relationship between narrative form and absolute power by analyzing the literary techniques writers use to contest authoritarianism. We will compare dictator novels from the United States, the Caribbean, Central America, and the Southern Cone. Prerequisite: only for students wishing to take the course for major/minor credit in SPAN is SPAN B200/B202.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): COML-B237; SPAN-B237
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

ENGL B276 Transnational American Literature

This course asks students to re-imagine “American” literature through a transnational framework. We will explore what paradigms are useful for conceptualizing U.S. literature given shared political histories, aesthetic modes, racial discourses, and patterns of migration in the hemisphere. Reading canonical Anglo American writers alongside ethnic minority writers, we will examine how their aesthetic engagements and cultural entanglements with Latin America transform our understanding of what constitutes a national literary tradition.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Harford Vargas,J.
(Spring 2013)

ENGL B345 Topics in Narrative Theory

Narrative theory through the lens of a specific genre, period or style of writing. Recent topics include Victorian Novels and Ethnic Novels. Current topic description: This course traces the development of the U.S. ethnic novel. We will examine novels by Native Americans, Chicana/os, and African Americans, focusing on key formal innovations in their respective traditions. In addition, we will become versed in key concepts developed by narrative theorists to understand the genre of the novel.
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): COML-B345
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Harford Vargas,J.
(Spring 2013)

GERM B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile

This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Julia Alvarez, Anita Desai, Sigmund Freud, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, and others.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures; International Studies Major
Crosslisting(s): ANTH-B231; COML-B231
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Seyhan,A.
(Spring 2013)

GNST B245 Introduction to Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Peoples and Cultures

A broad, interdisciplinary survey of themes uniting and dividing societies from the Iberian Peninsula through the contemporary New World. The class introduces the methods and interests of all departments in the concentration, posing problems of cultural continuity and change, globalization and struggles within dynamic histories, political economies, and creative expressions.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures; International Studies Major
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

HART B241 New Visual Worlds in the Spanish Empire 1492 - 1820

The events of 1492 changed the world. Visual works made at the time of the Conquest of the Caribbean, Mexico and South America by Spain and Portugal reveal multiple and often conflicting political, racial and ethnic agendas.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):McKim-Smith,G.
(Spring 2013)

HART B242 Material Identities in Latin America 1820 - 2010

Revolutions in Latin America begin around 1810. By the 20th and 21st centuries, there is an international viewership for the works of Latin American artists, and in the 21st century the production of Latina and Latino artists living in the United States becomes particularly important.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

HIST B127 Indigenous Leaders 1492-1750

Studies the experiences of indigenous men and women who exercised local authority in the systems established by European colonizers. In return for places in the colonial administrations, these leaders performed a range of tasks. At the same time they served as imperial officials, they exercised “traditional” forms of authority within their communities, often free of European presence. These figures provide a lens through which early modern colonialism is studied.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures; Peace and Conflict Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Gallup-Diaz,I.
(Fall 2012)

HIST B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800

The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward: Africana Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures; International Studies Major; Peace and Conflict Studies
Crosslisting(s): ANTH-B200
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

HIST B287 Immigration in the U.S.

How we understand the history of immigration to the territory now known as the United States has been transformed by recent explorations of the notion of “whiteness.” This course will be framed by the ways in which this powerful lens for interpretation has helped to recast the meaning of ethnicity as we focus on individual immigrant groups and the context which they both entered and created from the 17th century to the present. The first half of the semester will concentrate largely on the “century of immigration,” from the early 19th through the early 20th century. Together, we will shape the second half of the course, deciding on the topics we will investigate and upon which 20th century groups we will focus.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

HIST B371 Topics in Atlantic History: The Early Modern Pirate in Fact and Fiction

This course will explore piracy in the Americas in the period 1550-1750. We will investigate the historical reality of pirates and what they did, and the manner in which pirates have entered the popular imagination through fiction and films. Pirates have been depicted as lovable rogues, anti-establishment rebels, and enlightened multiculturalists who were skilled in dealing with the indigenous and African peoples of the Americas. The course will examine the facts and the fictions surrounding these important historical actors.
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

HIST B387 Immigration in the United States

Incorporates the current immigration debate in examining the historical causes and consequences of migration. Addresses the perceived benefit and cost of immigration at the national and local levels. Explores the economic, social, cultural and political impact immigrants have on the United States over time. Close attention given to examining the ways immigrants negotiated the pressures of their new surroundings while shaping and redefining American conceptions of national identity and citizenship.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

SOCL B246 Immigrant Experiences: Introduction to International Migration

The course will examine the causes and consequences of immigration by looking at various immigrant groups in the United States in comparison with Western Europe, Japan, and other parts of the world. How is immigration induced and perpetuated? How are the types of migration changing (labor migration, refugee flows, return migration, transnationalism)? How do immigrants adapt differently across societies? We will explore scholarly texts, films, and novels to examine what it means to be an immigrant, what generational and cultural conflicts immigrants experience, and how they identify with the new country and the old country.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): ANTH-B258
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

SOCL B259 Comparative Social Movements in Latin America

An examination of resistance movements to the power of the state and globalization in three Latin American societies: Mexico,Columbia, and Peru. The course explores the political, legal, and socio-economic factors underlying contemporary struggles for human and social rights, and the role of race, ethnicity, and coloniality play in these struggles.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B220; POLS-B259
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Marquez,E.
(Fall 2012)

SOCL B314 Immigrant Experiences

This course is an introduction to the causes and consequences of international migration. It explores the major theories of migration (how migration is induced and perpetuated); the different types of migration (labor migration, refugee flows, return migration) and forms of transnationalism; immigration and emigration policies; and patterns of migrants’ integration around the globe. It also addresses the implications of growing population movements and transnationalism for social relations and nation-states. Prerequisite: At least one prior social science course or permission of the instructor.
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures; Peace and Conflict Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Takenaka,A.
(Fall 2012)

SPAN B200 Estudios culturales de España e Hispanoamérica

An introduction to the history and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world in a global context: art, folklore, geography, literature, sociopolitical issues, and multicultural perspectives. This course does not count toward the major, but may be counted for the minor. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or placement.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Puig-Herz,A., Song,H.
(Spring 2013)

SPAN B203 Tópicos en la literatura hispana

This is a topic course. Topics vary. Current topic description: Full title is: La naturaleza como identidad política. A transatlantic look into how the citizen of newly created nations in Latin America and the diverse regions in Spain have negotiated their surrounding landscape. This course looks into how writing about nature has always been an important part of establishing the identity of groups of people.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Song,H.
(Spring 2013)

SPAN B208 Drama y sociedad en España

A study of the rich dramatic tradition of Spain from the Golden Age (16th and 17th centuries) to the 20th century within specific cultural and social contexts. The course considers a variety of plays as manifestations of specific sociopolitical issues and problems. Topics include theater as a site for fashioning a national identity; the dramatization of gender conflicts; and plays as vehicles of protest in repressive circumstances. Counts toward the Latin American, Latino and Iberian Peoples and Cultures Concentration. Pre-requisite: Spanish 202 or another 200-level course or placement.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Quintero,M.
(Spring 2013)

SPAN B211 Borges y sus lectores

Primary emphasis on Borges and his poetics of reading; other writers are considered to illustrate the semiotics of texts, society, and traditions.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): COML-B212
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

SPAN B217 Narratives of Latinidad

This course explores how Latina/o writers fashion bicultural and transnational identities and narrate the intertwined histories of the U.S. and Latin America. We will focus on topics of shared concern among Latino groups such as imperialism and annexation, the affective experience of migration, race and gender stereotypes, the politics of Spanglish, and struggles for social justice. By analyzing novels, poetry, performance art, testimonial narratives, films, and essays, we will unpack the complexity of Latinadad in the Americas.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B217
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Harford Vargas,J.
(Fall 2012)

SPAN B223 Género y modernidad en la narrativa del siglo XIX

A reading of 19th-century Spanish narrative by both men and women writers, to assess how they come together in configuring new ideas of female identity and its social domains, as the country is facing new challenges in its quest for modernity.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

SPAN B231 El cuento y novela corta en España

Traces the development of the novella and short story in Spain, from its origins in the Middle Ages to our time. The writers will include Pardo Bazán, Cervantes, Clarín, Don Juan Manuel, Matute, María de Zayas, and a number of contemporary writers such as Julián Marías and Soledad Puértolas. Our approach will include formal and thematic considerations, and attention will be given to social and historical contexts.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

SPAN B237 The Dictator Novel in the Americas

This course examines representations of dictatorship in Latin American and Latina/o novels. We will explore the relationship between narrative form and absolute power by analyzing the literary techniques writers use to contest authoritarianism. We will compare dictator novels from the United States, the Caribbean, Central America, and the Southern Cone. Prerequisite: only for students wishing to take the course for major/minor credit in SPAN is SPAN B200/B202.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B237; COML-B237
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

SPAN B248 Reception of Classical Literature in the Hispanic World

A survey of the reception of Classical literature in the Spanish-speaking world. We read select literary works in translation, ranging from Renaissance Spain to contemporary Latin America, side-by-side with their classical models, to examine what is culturally unique about their choice of authors, themes, and adaptation of the material.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): CSTS-B248; COML-B248
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

SPAN B260 Ariel/Calibán y el discurso Americano

A study of the transformations of Ariel/Calibán as images of Latin American culture.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): COML-B260
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Sacerio-Garí,E.
(Fall 2012)

SPAN B265 Escritoras españolas: entre tradición, renovación y migración

Fiction by women writers from Spain in the 20th and 21st century. Breaking the traditional female stereotypes during and after Franco’s dictatorship, the authors explore through their creative writing changing sociopolitical and cultural issues including regional identities and immigration. Topics of discussion include gender marginality, feminist studies and the portrayal of women in contemporary society.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

SPAN B307 Cervantes

A study of themes, structure, and style of Cervantes’ masterpiece Don Quijote and its impact on world literature. In addition to a close reading of the text and a consideration of narrative theory, the course examines the impact of Don Quijote on the visual arts, music, film, and popular culture. Counts toward the Latin American, Latino and Iberian Peoples and Cultures Concentration. Prerequisite: Spanish 202 and another 200-level course.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Quintero,M.
(Spring 2013)

SPAN B309 La mujer en la literatura española del Siglo de Oro

A study of the depiction of women in the fiction, drama, and poetry of 16th- and 17th-century Spain. Topics include the construction of gender; the idealization and codification of women’s bodies; the politics of feminine enclosure (convent, home, brothel, palace); and the performance of honor. The first half of the course will deal with representations of women by male authors (Calderón, Cervantes, Lope, Quevedo) and the second will be dedicated to women writers such as Teresa de Ávila, Ana Caro, Juana Inés de la Cruz, and María de Zayas.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

SPAN B318 Adaptaciones literarias en el cine español

Film adaptations of literary works have been popular since the early years of cinema in Spain. This course examines the relationship between films and literature, focusing on the theory and practice of film adaptation. Attention will be paid to the political and cultural context in which these texts are being published and made into films. Prerequisite: A 200-level course in Spanish, SPAN 208.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Film Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

SPAN B321 Del surrealismo al realismo mágico

Examines artistic texts that trace the development and relationships of surrealism, lo real maravilloso americano, and magic realism. Manifestos, literary and cinematic works by Spanish and Latin American authors will be emphasized. Prerequisite: a 200-level Spanish course.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Sacerio-Garí,E.
(Spring 2013)

SPAN B322 Queens, Nuns, and Other Deviants in the Early Modern Iberian World

The course examines literary, historical, and legal texts from the early modern Iberian world (Spain, Mexico, Peru) through the lens of gender studies. The course is divided around three topics: royal bodies (women in power), cloistered bodies (women in the convent), and delinquent bodies (figures who defy legal and gender normativity). Course is taught in English and is open to all juniors or seniors who have taken at least one 200-level course in a literature department. Students seeking Spanish credit must have taken BMC Spanish 202 and at least one other Spanish course beyond 202, or received permission from instructor.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): COML-B322
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

SPAN B323 Memoria y Guerra Civil

A look into the Spanish Civil War and its wide-ranging international significance as both the military and ideological testing ground for World War II. This course examines the endurance of myths related to this conflict and the cultural memory it has produced along with the current negotiations of the past that is taking place in democratic Spain. Prerequisites: SPAN 200/202 and another 200-level course in Spanish.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B323
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Song,H.
(Fall 2012)

SPAN B351 Tradición y revolución: Cuba y su literature

An examination of Cuba, its history and its literature with emphasis on the analysis of the changing cultural policies since 1959. Major topics include slavery and resistance; Cuba’s struggles for freedom; the literature and film of the Revolution; and literature in exile.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples and Cultures
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)