2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog

Philosophy

Students may complete a major or minor in Philosophy.

Faculty

Robert Dostal, Professor and Interim Co-Chair (semester I)
Christine Koggel, Harvey Wexler Chair in Philosophy, and Co-Director of International Studies (on leave semester I)
Michael Krausz, Professor and Interim Co-Chair (semester I)
Sarah Vitale, Instructor
Morgan Wallhagen, Lecturer

The Department of Philosophy introduces students to some of the most compelling answers to questions of human existence and knowledge. It also grooms students for a variety of fields that require analysis, conceptual precision, argumentative skill, and clarity of thought and expression. These include administration, the arts, business, computer science, health professions, law, and social services. The major in Philosophy also prepares students for graduate-level study leading to careers in teaching and research in the discipline.

The curriculum focuses on three major areas: the systematic areas of philosophy, such as logic, theory of knowledge, metaphysics, ethics, and aesthetics; the history of philosophy through the study of key philosophers and philosophical periods; and the philosophical explication of methods in such domains as art, history, religion, and science.

The department is a member of the Greater Philadelphia Philosophy Consortium comprising 13 member institutions in the Delaware Valley. It sponsors conferences on various topics in philosophy and an annual undergraduate student philosophy conference.

Major Requirements

Students majoring in Philosophy must take a minimum of 11 semester courses in the discipline and attend the monthly noncredit departmental colloquia which feature leading visiting scholars. The following five courses are required for the major: the two-semester Historical Introduction (PHIL 101 and 102); Ethics (PHIL 221); Theory of Knowledge (PHIL 211), Metaphysics (PHIL 212), or Logic (PHIL 103); and Senior Conference (PHIL 398 and PHIL 399). At least three other courses at the 300 level are required, one of which must concentrate on the work of a single philosopher or a period of philosophy.

Philosophy majors are encouraged to supplement their philosophical interests by taking advantage of courses offered in related areas, such as anthropology, history, history of art, languages, literature, mathematics, political science, psychology, and sociology.

Honors

Honors will be awarded by the department based on the senior thesis and other work completed in the department. The Milton C. Nahm Prize in Philosophy is a cash award presented to the graduating senior major whose senior thesis the department judges to be of outstanding caliber. This prize need not be granted every year.

Minor Requirements

Students may minor in Philosophy by taking six courses in the discipline at any level. They must also attend the monthly noncredit department colloquia.

Cross-Registration

Students may take advantage of cross-registration arrangements with Haverford College, Swarthmore College, and the University of Pennsylvania. Courses at these institutions may satisfy Bryn Mawr requirements, but students should check with the chair of the department to make sure specific courses meet requirements.

Prerequisites

No introductory-level course carries a prerequisite. However, most courses at both the intermediate and advanced levels carry prerequisites. Unless stated otherwise in the course description, any introductory course satisfies the prerequisite for an intermediate-level course, and any intermediate course satisfies the prerequisite for an advanced-level course.

COURSES

PHIL B101 Happiness and Reality in Ancient Thought

What makes us happy? The wisdom of the ancient world has importantly shaped the tradition of Western thought but in some important respects it has been rejected or forgotten. What is the nature of reality? Can we have knowledge about the world and ourselves, and, if so, how? In this course we explore answers to these sorts of metaphysical, epistemological, ethical, and political questions by examining the works of the two central Greek philosophers: Plato and Aristotle. We will consider earlier Greek religious and dramatic writings, a few Presocratic philosophers, and the person of Socrates who never wrote a word.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Dostal,R.
(Spring 2013)

PHIL B102 Science and Morality in Modernity

In this course, we explore answers to fundamental questions about the nature of the world and our place in it by examining the works of some of the central figures in modern western philosophy. Can we obtain knowledge of the world and, if so, how? Does God exist? What is the nature of the self? How do we determine morally right answers? What sorts of policies and political structures can best promote justice and equality? These questions were addressed in “modern” Europe in the context of the development of modern science and the religious wars. In a time of globalization we are all, more or less, heirs of the Enlightenment which sees its legacy to be modern science and the mastery of nature together with democracy and human rights. This course explores the above questions and considers them in their historical context. Some of the philosophers considered include Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, and Wollstonecraft.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Spring 2013)

PHIL B103 Introduction to Logic

Logic is the study of formal reasoning, which concerns the nature of valid arguments and inferential fallacies. In everyday life our arguments tend to be informal and sometimes imprecise. The study of logic concerns the structure and nature of arguments, and so helps to analyze them more precisely. Topics will include: valid and invalid arguments, determining the logical structure of ordinary sentences, reasoning with truth-functional connectives, and inferences involving quantifiers and predicates. This course does not presuppose any background knowledge in logic.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B204 Readings in German Intellectual History

Course content varies. Study of selected texts of German intellectual history, introducing representative works of Theodor W. Adorno, Hannah Arendt, Walter Benjamin, Sigmund Freud, Jürgen Habermas, Georg W. F. Hegel, Martin Heidegger, Werner Heisenberg, Immanuel Kant, G. E. Lessing, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Friedrich Schiller, and Ludwig Wittgenstein. The course aims to introduce students to an advanced cultural reading range and the languages and terminology of humanistic disciplines in German-speaking countries, and seeks to develop their critical and interpretive skills.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Crosslisting(s): GERM-B212
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B209 Introduction to Literary Analysis: Philosophical Approaches to Criticism

Designated theory course. An introduction to various methods of reading the literary text from the perspective of critical methods informed by philosophical ideas. In their quest for self-understanding and knowledge, literature and philosophy share similar forms of inquiry and imaginative modeling. Selected literary texts and critical essays focus on questions of language, translation, understanding, and identity in their relation to history, epistemology, ethics, and aesthetics. One of the main objectives of the course is to provide students with the critical tools necessary for an informed reading of texts.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Crosslisting(s): GERM-B209; COML-B209
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B211 Theory of Knowledge

Varieties of realism and relativism address questions about what sorts of things exist and the constraints on our knowledge of them. The aim of this course is to develop a sense of how these theories interrelate, and to instill philosophical skills in the critical evaluation of them. Discussions will be based on contemporary readings.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Krausz,M.
(Spring 2013)

PHIL B212 Metaphysics

Metaphysics is inquiry into basic features of the world and ourselves. This course considers two topics of metaphysics, free will and personal identity, and their relationship. What is free will and are we free? Is freedom compatible with determinism? Does moral responsibility require free will? What makes someone the same person over time? Can a person survive without their body? Is the recognition of others required to be a person?
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Wallhagen,M.
(Fall 2012)

PHIL B221 Ethics

An introduction to ethics by way of an examination of moral theories and a discussion of important ancient, modern, and contemporary texts which established theories such as virtue ethics, deontology, utilitarianism, relativism, emotivism, care ethics. This course considers questions concerning freedom, responsibility, and obligation. How should we live our lives and interact with others? How should we think about ethics in a global context? Is ethics independent of culture? A variety of practical issues such as reproductive rights, euthanasia, animal rights and the environment will be considered.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2012)

PHIL B222 Aesthetics Nature and Experience of Art

Prerequisite: One introductory course in philosophy. Here are some questions we will discuss in this course: What sort of thing is a work of art? Can criticism in the arts be objective? Do such cultural entities answer to more than one admissible interpretation? What is the role of a creator’s intentions in fixing upon admissible interpretations? What is the nature of aesthetic experience? What is creativity in the arts? Readings will be drawn from contemporary sources.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Crosslisting(s): COML-B222
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B225 Global Ethical Issues

The need for a critical analysis of what justice is and requires has become urgent in a context of increasing globalization, the emergence of new forms of conflict and war, high rates of poverty within and across borders and the prospect of environmental devastation. This course examines prevailing theories and issues of justice as well as approaches and challenges by non-western, post-colonial, feminist, race, class, and disability theorists.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies; International Studies Major; International Studies Minor
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B225
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B228 Introduction to Political Philosophy: Ancient and Early Modern

An introduction to the fundamental problems of political philosophy, especially the relationship between political life and the human good or goods. Readings from Aristotle, Hobbes, Machiavelli, Plato, and Rousseau.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B228
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Salkever,S.
(Fall 2012)

PHIL B231 Introduction to Political Philosophy: Modern

A continuation of POLS 228, although 228 is not a prerequisite. Particular attention is given to the various ways in which the concept of freedom is used in explaining political life. Readings from Hegel, Locke, Marx, J.S. Mill, and Nietzsche.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B231
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Salkever,S.
(Fall 2012)

PHIL B238 Science, Technology and the Good Life

This course considers questions concerning what is science, what is technology, and what is their relationship to each other and to the domains of ethics and politics. We will consider how modern science defined itself in its opposition to Aristotelian science. We will examine the Cartesian and Baconian scientific models and the self-understanding of these models with regard to ethics and politics. Developments in the philosophy of science will be considered, e.g., positivism, phenomenology, feminism, sociology of science. Biotechnology and information technology illustrate fundamental questions. The “science wars” of the 1990s provide debates concerning science, technology, and the good life.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B238
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B240 Environmental Ethics

This course surveys rights- and justice-based justifications for ethical positions on the environment. It examines approaches such as stewardship, intrinsic value, land ethic, deep ecology, ecofeminism, Asian and aboriginal. It explores issues such as obligations to future generations, to nonhumans and to the biosphere.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B240
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B244 Philosophy and Cognitive Science

Cognitive science is a multidisciplinary approach to the study of human cognition. It goes from the abstract study of concepts of cognition at one end to well-defined empirical research into language and cognition and the specifics of cognitive modeling on computers at the other. Philosophy, linguistics, psychology, computer science, and neuroscience are the major contributors to cognitive science. Philosophy both contributes to and examines cognitive science.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B245 Philosophy of Law

Introduces students to a variety of questions in the philosophy of law. Readings will be concerned with the nature of law, the character of law as a system, the ethical character of law, and the relationship of law to politics, power, authority, and society. Readings will include abstract philosophical arguments about the concept of law, as well as theoretical arguments about the nature of law as they arise within specific contexts, and judicial cases. Most or all of the specific issues discussed will be taken from Anglo-American law, although the general issues considered are not limited to those legal systems.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B245
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B252 Feminist Theory

Beliefs that gender discrimination has been eliminated and women have achieved equality have become commonplace. We challenge these assumptions examining the concepts of patriarchy, sexism, and oppression. Exploring concepts central to feminist theory, we attend to the history of feminist theory and contemporary accounts of women’s place and status in different societies, varied experiences, and the impact of the phenomenon of globalization. We then explore the relevance of gender to philosophical questions about identity and agency with respect to moral, social and political theory. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or permission of instructor.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B253
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Koggel,C.
(Spring 2013)

PHIL B253 Theory in Practice: Critical Discourses in the Humanities

An examination in English of leading theories of interpretation from Classical Tradition to Modern and Post-Modern Time.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Crosslisting(s): ITAL-B213; COML-B213; ENGL-B213; FREN-B213; GERM-B213; HART-B253; RUSS-B253
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B254 Philosophy of Religion

An introduction to principle topics in the philosophy of religion: Does God exist? Is belief in God compatible with reason and science? Is God’s existence compatible with deep suffering and pain? Does the fact that there are many religions show that there is no religious truth? Includes readings eastern and western traditions and from analytic and continental philosophy. Authors will include Aquinas, Aurobindo, Dalai Lama, Dennett, James, Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B259 Philosophy, Modern Physics and Ideals of Interpretation

In the modern era, interpretive ideals like objectivity, certainty and causality have been intensely scrutinized. Must there be a fact of the matter independently of all interpretive practices? Must there be a single right interpretation for all physical and cultural phenomena? Various readings will explore these and other questions. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Physics or permission of an instructor. Sophomore standing.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B293 The Play of Interpretation

Designated theory course. A study of the methodologies and regimes of interpretation in the arts, humanistic sciences, and media and cultural studies, this course focuses on common problems of text, authorship, reader/spectator, and translation in their historical and formal contexts. Literary, oral, and visual texts from different cultural traditions and histories will be studied through interpretive approaches informed by modern critical theories. Readings in literature, philosophy, popular culture, and film will illustrate how theory enhances our understanding of the complexities of history, memory, identity, and the trials of modernity.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward: International Studies Major
Crosslisting(s): COML-B293; ENGL-B292
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Seyhan,A.
(Fall 2012)

PHIL B310 Philosophy of Science

An examination of positivistic science and its critics. Topics include the possibility and nature of scientific progress from relativistic perspectives.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Crosslisting(s): BIOL-B310
Units: 1.0
(Spring 2013)

PHIL B317 Philosophy of Creativity

This course will address the following questions: What are the criteria of creativity? Is explaining creativity possible? Should we understand creativity in terms of persons, processes or products? What is the relation between creativity and skill? What is genius? What is creative imagination? Is there a difference between creativity in the arts and creativity in the sciences? What is the relation between the context of discovery and the context of justification? What is the relation between tradition and creativity? Is there a significant relationship between creativity and self-transformation?
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B319 Philosophy of Mind

This seminar focuses on contemporary analytic philosophy of mind. The exact topics will vary from year to year. Possible topics include: consciousness and the unity of consciousness, personal identity, emotions, psychological explanation, mental illness, neurophilosophy, externalism and the extended mind hypothesis, embodied cognition, artificial minds, philosophy and cognitive science, philosophy of psychology, and philosophy and psychoanalysis.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Crosslisting(s): CMSC-B319
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B321 Greek Political Philosophy Aristotle: Ethics and Politics

Topics in Greek Political Philosophy. Topic for Fall 2012: Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and Politics A careful reading of the Nicomachean Ethics and the Politics, treated as a single series of lectures designed to lead its immediate Greek audience (the equivalent of Socrates’ interlocutors in Plato)—and perhaps us as well--more deeply into the questions and problems that are Aristotle’s theoretical basis for the paradigmatically human activities of practical reason (phronêsis) and thoughtful choice (prohairesis—see NE 6.1, 1139b). There will be some additional readings from Aristotle, from Aristotle’s Greek contemporaries and predecessors (including Plato and Thucydides), and from recent work designed to bring Aristotelian perspectives to bear on the moral and political issues of our own time. Prerequisites: At least two semesters of philosophy or political theory, including some work with Greek texts, or consent of the instructor.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B320
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Salkever,S.
(Fall 2012)

PHIL B323 Culture and Interpretation

This course will pursue such questions as the following. For all objects of interpretation—including works of art, music, literature, persons or cultures—must there be a single right interpretation? If not, what is to prevent one from sliding into an interpretive anarchism? Does interpretation affect the nature or the number of an object of interpretation? Does the singularity or multiplicity of interpretations mandate such ontologies as realism or constructivism? Discussions will be based on contemporary readings.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: International Studies Major; International Studies Minor
Crosslisting(s): COML-B323
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Krausz,M.
(Fall 2012)

PHIL B324 Computational Linguistics

Introduction to computational models of understanding and processing human languages. How elements of linguistics, computer science, and artificial intelligence can be combined to help computers process human language and to help linguists understand language through computer models. Topics covered: syntax, semantics, pragmatics, generation and knowledge representation techniques. Prerequisite: some background in linguistics or computer science.
Crosslisting(s): CMSC-B325; LING-B325
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B326 Relativism: Cognitive and Moral

Cognitive relativists believe that truth is relative to particular cultures or conceptual schemes. In an analogous way, moral relativists believe that moral rightness is relative to particular cultures or conceptual schemes. Relativistic theories of truth and morality are widely embraced in the current intellectual climate, and they are as perplexing as they are provocative. This course will examine varieties of relativism and their absolutistic counterparts. Readings will be drawn from contemporary sources.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: International Studies Minor
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B327 Political Philosophy in the 20th Century

A study of 20th- and 21st-century extensions of three traditions in Western political philosophy: the adherents of the German and English ideas of freedom and the founders of classical naturalism. Authors read include Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault, Jurgen Habermas, and John Rawls. Topics include the relationship of individual rationality and political authority, the “crisis of modernity,” and the debate concerning contemporary democratic citizenship. Prerequisites: POLS 228 and 231, or PHIL 101 and 201. Enrollment is limited to 18 students.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B327
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B329 Wittgenstein

Wittgenstein is notable for developing two philosophical systems. In the first, he attempted to show that there is a single common structure underlying all language, thought and being. In the second, he denied the idea of such a structure and claimed that the job of philosophy was to free philosophers from bewitchments due to misunderstandings of ordinary concepts in language. The course begins by sketching the first system. We then turn to his rejection of the earlier ideas as outlined in Philosophical Investigations and On Certainty. We also examine contemporary interpretations of Wittgenstein’s later work.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Crosslisting(s): GERM-B329
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B330 Kant

The significance of Kant’s transcendental philosophy for thought in the 19th and 20th centuries cannot be overstated. His work is profoundly important for both the analytical and the so-called “continental” schools of thought. This course will provide a close study of Kant’s breakthrough work: The Critique of Pure Reason. We will read and discuss the text with reference to its historical context and with respect to its impact on developments in epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, philosophy of science, philosophy of religion as well as developments in German Idealism, 20th-century phenomenology., and contemporary analytic philosophy. Prerequisite: PHIL 102 or at least one 200 level Philosophy course.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Dostal,R.
(Fall 2012)

PHIL B338 Phenomenology: Heidegger and Husserl

This upper-level seminar will consider the two main proponents of phenomenology—a movement in philosophy in the 20th century that attempted to restart philosophy in a radical way. Its concerns are philosophically comprehensive: ontology, epistemology, philosophy of science, ethics, and so on. Phenomenology provides the important background for other later developments in 20th-century philosophy and beyond: existentialism, deconstruction, post-modernism. This seminar will focus primarily on Edmund Husserl’s Crisis of the European Sciences and Martin Heidegger’s Being and Time. Other writings to be considered include some of Heidegger’s later work and Merleau-Ponty’s preface to his Phenomenology of Perception.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B344 Development Ethics

This course explores the meaning of and moral issues raised by development. In what direction and by what means should a society “develop”? What role, if any, does the globalization of markets and capitalism play in processes of development and in systems of discrimination on the basis of factors such as race and gender? Answers to these sorts of questions will be explored through an examination of some of the most prominent theorists and recent literature. Prerequisites: a philosophy, political theory or economics course or permission of the instructor.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies; International Studies Major; International Studies Minor
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B344
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Koggel,C.
(Spring 2013)

PHIL B352 Feminism and Philosophy

It has been said that one of the most important feminist contributions to theory is its uncovering of the ways in which theory in the Western tradition, whether of knowledge, morality, or politics has a hidden male bias. This course will explore feminist critiques of traditional moral theory by examining early accounts of an ethic of care that challenge the ethic of justice that has dominated moral theory in the liberal tradition. We then turn to feminist revisions to and expansions of these early accounts of care ethics -- including contemporary work exploring the implications and applications of feminist ethics for issues in the contemporary global context.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B352
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B365 Erotica: Love and Art in Plato and Shakespeare

The course explores the relationship between love and art, “eros” and “poesis,” through in-depth study of Plato’s Phaedus and Symposium, Shakespeare’s As You Like It and Antony and Cleopatra, and essays by modern commentators (including David Halperin, Anne Carson, Martha Nussbaum, Marjorie Garber, and Stanley Cavell). We will also read Shakespeare’s Sonnets and Romeo and Juliet.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts toward: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B365; COML-B365; POLS-B365
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Hedley,J., Salkever,S.
(Spring 2013)

PHIL B371 Topics in Legal and Political Philosophy

This is a topic course. Topics vary.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B371
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B372 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

Survey of Artificial Intelligence (AI), the study of how to program computers to behave in ways normally attributed to “intelligence” when observed in humans. Topics include heuristic versus algorithmic programming; cognitive simulation versus machine intelligence; problem-solving; inference; natural language understanding; scene analysis; learning; decision-making. Topics are illustrated by programs from literature, programming projects in appropriate languages and building small robots.
Requirement(s): Division II and Quantitive
Crosslisting(s): CMSC-B372
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B380 Persons, Morality and Modernity

What demands does the modern world impose on those who live in it? What kinds of persons does the modern world bring into being? What kinds of ethical claims can that world make on us? What is the relationship between public and private morality, and between each of us as public citizens and private persons? This course explores such questions through an examination of a variety of texts in political theory and philosophy.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B380
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B381 Nietzsche, Self and Morality

This course examines Nietzsche’s thought, with particular focus on questions concerning the nature of the self and morality. The texts for the course are drawn mostly from Nietzsche’s own writing, but these are complemented by some contemporary work in moral philosophy and philosophy of mind that has a Nietzschean influence.
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B381
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2012-13)

PHIL B395 Origins of Political Philosophy

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Topic for Fall 2012 is Historical Perspectives and Contemporary Political Philosophy.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Vitale,S.
(Fall 2012)

PHIL B398 Senior Seminar

Senior majors are required to write an undergraduate thesis on an approved topic. The senior seminar is a two-semester course in which research and writing are directed. Seniors will meet collectively and individually with the supervising instructor.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Krausz,M.
(Fall 2012)

PHIL B399 Senior Seminar

The senior seminar is a required course for majors in Philosophy. It is the course in which the research and writing of an undergraduate thesis is directed both in and outside of the class time. Students will meet sometimes with the class as a whole and sometimes with the professor separately to present and discuss drafts of their theses.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Krausz,M.
(Spring 2013)

PHIL B403 Supervised Work

Units: 1.0
(Fall 2012, Spring 2013

PHIL B416 Discussion Leader

Units: 0.5
(Fall 2012, Spring 2013)