2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog

Africana Studies

Students may complete a minor in Africana Studies.

Steering Committee

Michael H. Allen, Professor of Political Science
Linda-Susan Beard, Associate Professor of English
Pim Higginson, Associate Professor of French and Francophone Studies (on leave semesters I and II)
Alice Lesnick, Coordinator and Term Professor in the Bryn Mawr/Haverford Education Program and Director
Kalala Ngalamulume, Associate Professor of Africana Studies and History and Co-Director of International Studies
Mary Osirim, Interim Provost and Professor of Sociology
Robert Washington, Professor of Sociology
Susan White, Professor of Chemistry (on leave semester II)

The Africana Studies Program brings a global outlook to the study of Africa its Diasporas. Drawing on analytical perspectives from anthropology, economics, history, literary studies, political science and sociology, the program focuses on peoples of African descent within the context of increasing globalization and dramatic social, economic and political changes.

Bryn Mawr’s Africana Studies Program participates in a U.S. Department of Education-supported consortium with Haverford College, Swarthmore Colleges, and the University of Pennsylvania. Through this consortium, Bryn Mawr students have the opportunity to take a broad range of courses by enrolling in courses offered by all participating institutions. Also, Bryn Mawr’s Africana Studies Program sponsors a study abroad semester at the University of Nairobi, Kenya, and participates in other study abroad programs offered by its consortium partners in Zimbabwe, Ghana, and Senegal.

Students are encouraged to begin their work in the Africana Studies Program by taking “Introduction to African Civilizations” (HIST B102). This required introductory level course, which provides students with a common intellectual experience as well as the foundation for subsequent courses in Africana Studies, should be completed by the end of the student’s junior year.

Minor Requirements

The requirements for a minor in Africana Studies are the following:

  1. One-semester interdisciplinary course Bryn Mawr HIST B102: Introduction to African Civilizations (ICPR 101 at Haverford).
  2. Five additional semester courses from an approved list of courses in Africana studies.
  3. A senior thesis or seminar-length essay in an area of Africana studies.

Students are encouraged to organize their course work along one of several prototypical routes. Such model programs might feature:

  1. Regional or area studies; for example, focusing on blacks in Latin America, the English-speaking Caribbean or North America.
  2. Thematic emphases; for example, exploring class politics, ethnic conflicts and/or economic development in West and East Africa.
  3. Comparative emphases; for example, problems of development, governance, public health or family and gender.

The final requirement for the Africana Studies minor is a senior thesis or its equivalent. If the department in which the student is majoring requires a thesis, she can satisfy the Africana Studies requirement by writing on a topic that is approved by her department and the Africana Studies Program coordinator. If the major department does not require a thesis, an equivalent written exercise—that is, a seminar-length essay—is required. The essay may be written within the framework of a particular course or as an independent study project. The topic must be approved by both the instructor in question and the Africana Studies Program coordinator.

COURSES

ANTH B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800

The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures; International Studies Major; Peace, Conflict, and Social Justice Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B200
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

ANTH B253 Childhood in the African Experience

An overview of cultural contexts and indigenous literatures concerning the richly varied experience and interpretation of infancy and childhood in selected regions of Africa. Cultural practices such as pregnancy customs, naming ceremonies, puberty rituals, sibling relationships, and gender identity are included. Modern concerns such as child abuse, street children, and other social problems of recent origin involving children are considered in terms of theoretical approaches current in the social sciences. Prerequisites: anthropology major, any social sciences introductory course, Africana studies minor, or permission of instructor.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

ANTH B341 Cultural Perspectives on Marriage and Family

This course considers various theoretical perspectives that inform our understanding of cross-cultural constructions of marriage and the family. Sociobiology, deviance, feminism, social constructionism, and cultural evolutionary approaches will be compared using primarily anthropological-ethnographic case examples. Cultural material from Africa and the United States will be emphasized. Applications will emphasize current U.S. socially contested categories such as same-sex marriage, plural marriage, gender diversity, divorce, and the blended family. Prerequisites: any history, biology, or social science major.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

ARCH B101 Introduction to Egyptian and Near Eastern Archaeology: Egypt and Mesopotamia

A historical survey of the archaeology and art of the ancient Near East and Egypt.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

CITY B237 Themes in Modern African History

The course examines the cultural, environmental, economic, political, and social factors that contributed to the expansion and transformation of pre-industrial cities, colonial cities, and cities today. We will examine various themes, such as the relationship between cities and societies; migration and social change; urban space, health problems, city life, and women.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B237
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Ngalamulume,K.
(Spring 2014)

CITY B266 Schools in American Cities
This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal “case” that students investigate through documents and school placements. This is a Praxis II course (weekly fieldwork in a school required)
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Praxis Program
Crosslisting(s): EDUC-B266; SOCL-B266
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Curl,H.
(Fall 2013)

CITY B269 Black America in Sociological Perspective
This course provides sociological perspectives on various issues affecting black America: the legacy of slavery; the formation of urban ghettos; the struggle for civil rights; the continuing significance of discrimination; the problems of crime and criminal justice; educational under-performance; entrepreneurial and business activities; the social roles of black intellectuals, athletes, entertainers, and creative artists.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B229
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Washington,R.
(Fall 2013)

CITY B338 The New African Diaspora: African and Caribbean Immigrants in the United States
An examination of the socioeconomic experiences of immigrants who arrived in the United States since the landmark legislation of 1965. After exploring issues of development and globalization at “home” leading to migration, the course proceeds with the study of immigration theories. Major attention is given to the emergence of transnational identities and the transformation of communities, particularly in the northeastern United States.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B338
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

COML B279 Introduction to African Literature
Taking into account the oral, written, aural and visual forms of African “texts” over several thousand years, this course will explore literary production, translation and audience/critical reception. Representative works to be studied include oral traditions, the Sundiata Epic, Chinua Achebe’s Anthills of the Savannah, Ayi Kwei Armah’s Fragments, Mariama Bâ’s Si Longe une Lettre, Tsitsi Danga-rembga’s Nervous Conditions, Bessie Head’s Maru, Sembène Ousmane’s Xala, plays by Wole Soyinka and his Burden of History, The Muse of Forgiveness and Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s A Grain of Wheat. We will address the “transliteration” of Christian and Muslim languages and theologies in these works.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B279
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

COML B388 Contemporary African Fiction
Noting that the official colonial independence of most African countries dates back only half a century, this course focuses on the fictive experiments of the most recent decade. A few highly controversial works from the 90’s serve as an introduction to very recent work. Most works are in English. To experience depth as well as breadth, there is a small cluster of works from South Africa. With novels and tales from elsewhere on the huge African continent, we will get a glimpse of “living in the present” in history and letters.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B388
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

ECON B324 The Economics of Discrimination and Inequality
Explores the causes and consequences of discrimination and inequality in economic markets. Topics include economic theories of discrimination and inequality, evidence of contemporary race- and gender-based inequality, detecting discrimination, and identifying sources of racial and gender inequality. Additionally, the instructor and students will jointly select supplementary topics of specific interest to the class. Possible topics include: discrimination in historical markets, disparity in legal treatments, issues of family structure, and education gaps. Prerequisites: At least one 200-level applied microeconomics elective; ECON 253 or 304; ECON 200 or 202.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B334
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

EDUC B200 Critical Issues in Education
Designed to be the first course for students interested in pursuing one of the options offered through the Education Program, this course is also open to students who are not yet certain about their career aspirations but are interested in educational issues. The course examines major issues in education in the United States within the conceptual framework of educational reform. Fieldwork in an area school required (eight visits, 1.5-2 hours per visit). Writing intensive.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Lesnick,A.
(Spring 2014)

EDUC B266 Schools in American Cities
This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal “case” that students investigate through documents and school placements. This is a Praxis II course (weekly fieldwork in a school required)
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B266; CITY-B266
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Curl,H.
(Fall 2013)

ENGL B217 Narratives of Latinidad
This course explores how Latina/o writers fashion bicultural and transnational identities and narrate the intertwined histories of the U.S. and Latin America. We will focus on topics of shared concern among Latino groups such as imperialism and annexation, the affective experience of migration, race and gender stereotypes, the politics of Spanglish, and struggles for social justice. By analyzing novels, poetry, performance art, testimonial narratives, films, and essays, we will unpack the complexity of Latinadad in the Americas.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Crosslisting(s): SPAN-B217
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Harford Vargas,J.
(Fall 2013)

ENGL B234 Postcolonial Literature in English
This course will survey a broad range of novels and poems written while countries were breaking free of British colonial rule. Readings will also include cultural theorists interested in defining literary issues that arise from the postcolonial situation.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Crosslisting(s): COML-B234
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Tratner,M.
(Spring 2014)

ENGL B235 Reading Popular Culture: Freaks
This course traces the iconic figure of the “freak” in American culture, from 19th c. sideshows to the present. Featuring literature and films that explore “extraordinary Others”, we will flesh out the ways in which our current understandings of gender, sexuality, normalcy, and race are constituted through images of “abnormality.”
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

ENGL B245 Focus: “I remember Harlem”
A transdisciplinary study of the famous Black metropolis as a historic, geo-political, and cultural center (from the Jazz Age to the Hip Hop revolution) this course acknowledges 400 years of history and analyzes the contemporary gentrification of Harlem. We interrogate closely the seismic changes in “Harlem” as a signifier.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 0.5
(Not Offered 2013-14)

ENGL B262 Survey in African American Literature
Pairing canonical African American fiction with theoretical, popular, and filmic texts from the late-19th Century through to the present day, we will address the ways in which the Black body, as cultural text, has come to be both constructed and consumed within the nation’s imagination and our modern visual regime.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

ENGL B263 Toni Morrison and the Art of Narrative Conjure
All of Morrison’s primary imaginative texts, in publication order, as well as essays by Morrison, with a series of critical lenses that explore several vantages for reading a conjured narration.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

ENGL B264 Focus: Black Bards: Poetry in the Diaspora
An interrogation of poetric utterance in works of the African diaspora, primarily in English, this course addresses a multiplicity of genres, including epic, lyric, sonnet, rap, and mimetic jazz. The development of poetic theories at key moments such as the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement will be explored. Prerequisite: Any course in poetry or African/American literature.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 0.5, 1.0
Instructor(s):Beard,L.
(Spring 2014)

ENGL B279 Introduction to African Literature
Taking into account the oral, written, aural and visual forms of African “texts” over several thousand years, this course will explore literary production, translation and audience/critical reception. Representative works to be studied include oral traditions, the Sundiata Epic, Chinua Achebe’s Anthills of the Savannah, Ayi Kwei Armah’s Fragments, Mariama Bâ’s Si Longe une Lettre, Tsitsi Danga-rembga’s Nervous Conditions, Bessie Head’s Maru, Sembène Ousmane’s Xala, plays by Wole Soyinka and his Burden of History, The Muse of Forgiveness and Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s A Grain of Wheat. We will address the “transliteration” of Christian and Muslim languages and theologies in these works.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Crosslisting(s): COML-B279
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

ENGL B346 Theories of Modernism
This course will investigate a wide range of works that have been labeled “modernist” in order to raise the question, “Was there one modernism or were there many disparate and competing ones?”
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

ENGL B369 Women Poets: Gwendolyn Brooks, Adrienne Rich, Sylvia Plath
In this seminar we will be playing three poets off against each other, all of whom came of age during the 1950s. We will plot each poet’s career in relation to the public and personal crises that shaped it, giving particular attention to how each poet constructed “poethood” for herself.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

ENGL B379 The African Griot(te)
A focused exploration of the multi-genre productions of Southern African writer Bessie Head and the critical responses to such works. Students are asked to help construct a critical-theoretical framework for talking about a writer who defies categorization or reduction.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Beard,L.
(Fall 2013)

ENGL B381 Post-Apartheid Literature
South African texts from several language communities which anticipate a post-apartheid polity and texts by contemporary South African writers (Zoe Wicomb, Mark Behr, Nadine Gordimer, Mongane Serote) are read in tandem with works by Radical Reconstruction and Holocaust writers. Several films are shown that focus on the complexities of post-apartheid reconciliation.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Crosslisting(s): COML-B381
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Beard,L.
(Spring 2014)

ENGL B388 Contemporary African Fiction
Noting that the official colonial independence of most African countries dates back only half a century, this course focuses on the fictive experiments of the most recent decade. A few highly controversial works from the 90’s serve as an introduction to very recent work. Most works are in English. To experience depth as well as breadth, there is a small cluster of works from South Africa. With novels and tales from elsewhere on the huge African continent, we will get a glimpse of “living in the present” in history and letters.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Crosslisting(s): COML-B388
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

FREN B254 Teaching (in) the Postcolony: Schooling in African Fiction
This seminar will examines novels from Francophone and Anglophone Africa, critical essays, and two films, in order to better understand the forces that inform the African child’s experiences of education.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

GNST B103 Introduction to Swahili Language and Culture I
The primary goal of this course is to develop an elementary level ability to speak, read, and write Swahili. The emphasis is on communicative competence in Swahili based on the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning. In the process of acquiring the language, students will also be introduced to East Africa and its cultures. No prior knowledge of Swahili or East Africa is required.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Mshomba,E.
(Fall 2013)

GNST B105 Introduction to Swahili Language and Culture II
The primary goal of this course is to continue working on an elementary level ability to speak, read, and write Swahili. The emphasis is on communicative competence in Swahili based on the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning. Students will also continue learning about East Africa and its cultures. Prerequisite: GNST B103 (Introduction to Swahili Language and Culture I) or permission of the instructor is required.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Mshomba,E.
(Spring 2014)

HART B282 Arts of Sub-Saharan Africa
This course examines the significant artistic and architectural traditions of African cultures south of the Sahara in their religious, philosophical, political, and social aspects.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

HART B362 The African Art Collection
This seminar will introduce students to the African art holdings that are part of the Art and Archaeology Collections.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

HIST B102 Introduction to African Civilizations
The course is designed to introduce students to the history of African and African Diaspora societies, cultures, and political economies. We will discuss the origins, state formation, external contacts, and the structural transformations and continuities of African societies and cultures in the context of the slave trade, colonial rule, capitalist exploitation, urbanization, and westernization, as well as contemporary struggles over authority, autonomy, identity and access to resources. Case studies will be drawn from across the continent.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Ngalamulume,K.
(Spring 2014)

HIST B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800
The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures; International Studies Major; Peace, Conflict, and Social Justice Studies
Crosslisting(s): ANTH-B200
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

HIST B235 Africa to 1800
The course explores the formation and development of African societies, with a special focus on the key processes of hominisation, agricultural revolution, metalworking, the formation of states, the connection of West Africa to the world economy.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

HIST B236 African History since 1800
The course analyzes the history of Africa in the last two hundred years in the context of global political economy. We will examine the major themes in modern African history, including the 19th-century state formation, expansion, or restructuration; partition and resistance; colonial rule; economic, social, political, religious, and cultural developments; nationalism; post-independence politics, economics, and society, as well as conflicts and the burden of disease. The course will also introduce students to the sources and methods of African history.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Ngalamulume,K.
(Fall 2013)

HIST B237 Themes in Modern African History
The course examines the cultural, environmental, economic, political, and social factors that contributed to the expansion and transformation of pre-industrial cities, colonial cities, and cities today. We will examine various themes, such as the relationship between cities and societies; migration and social change; urban space, health problems, city life, and women.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B237
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Ngalamulume,K.
(Spring 2014)

HIST B243 Atlantic Cultures
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

HIST B265 Colonial Encounters in the Americas
The course explores the confrontations, conquests and accommodations that formed the “ground-level” experience of day-to-day colonialism throughout the Americas. The course is comparative in scope, examining events and structures in North, South and Central America, with particular attention paid to indigenous peoples and the nature of indigenous leadership in the colonial world of the 18th century.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

HIST B303 Topics in American History
This is a topics course. Topics vary. Recent topics have included medicine, advertising, and history of sexuality.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0

Fall 2013: Current topic description: History of Medicine in America. This course offers an introduction to the history of medicine, health, and the medical sciences in America from the colonial period to the present. We will discuss the changing role of medicine and medical professionals in America, from the rise of modern medical specialties to the politics of disease and public health today. Particular attention will be paid to how race, class and gender have been factors in the creation of biomedical knowledge and practices, the organization of medical work and objects, and contributed to difference and inequality in society.

Spring 2014: Current topic description: This course investigates the evolution of reproduction in American medicine, science, politics and culture. We will explore changing ideas about reproductive bodies and health, parenthood, sexuality, and the family as well as changing practices of contraception, conception and childbirth. From midwifery in colonial America to contemporary practices of In Vitro Fertilization (IVF), this course focuses on persistent efforts of individuals, organizations, and the state to control reproduction.

HIST B336 Social and Cultural History of Medicine in Africa
The course will focus on the issues of public health history, social and cultural history of disease as well as the issues of the history of medicine. We will explore various themes, such as the indigenous theories of disease and therapies; disease, imperialism and medicine; medical pluralism in contemporary Africa; the emerging diseases, medical education, women in medicine, and differential access to health care. We will also explore the questions regarding the sources of African history and their quality.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Ngalamulume,K.
(Spring 2014)

HIST B337 Topics in African History
This is a topics course. Topics vary. Enrollment limited to 15 students.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

HIST B349 Topics in Comparative History
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

POLS B243 African and Caribbean Perspectives in World Politics
This course makes African and Caribbean voices audible as they create or adopt visions of the world that explain their positions and challenges in world politics. Students learn analytical tools useful in understanding other parts of the world. Prerequisite: POLS 141.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

SOCL B217 The Family in Social Context
A consideration of the family as a social institution in the United States, looking at how societal and cultural characteristics and dynamics influence families; how the family reinforces or changes the society in which it is located; and how the family operates as a social organization. Included is an analysis of family roles and social interaction within the family. Major problems related to contemporary families are addressed, such as domestic violence and divorce. Cross-cultural and subcultural variations in the family are considered.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

SOCL B225 Women in Society
A study of the contemporary experiences of women of color in the Global South. The household, workplace, community, and the nation-state, and the positions of women in the private and public spheres are compared cross-culturally. Topics include feminism, identity and self-esteem; globalization and transnational social movements and tensions and transitions encountered as nations embark upon development.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

SOCL B229 Black America in Sociological Perspective
This course provides sociological perspectives on various issues affecting black America: the legacy of slavery; the formation of urban ghettos; the struggle for civil rights; the continuing significance of discrimination; the problems of crime and criminal justice; educational under-performance; entrepreneurial and business activities; the social roles of black intellectuals, athletes, entertainers, and creative artists.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B269
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Washington,R.
(Fall 2013)

SOCL B266 Schools in American Cities
This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal “case” that students investigate through documents and school placements. This is a Praxis II course (weekly fieldwork in a school required)
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Crosslisting(s): EDUC-B266; CITY-B266
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Curl,H.
(Fall 2013)

SOCL B338 The New African Diaspora: African and Caribbean Immigrants in the United States
An examination of the socioeconomic experiences of immigrants who arrived in the United States since the landmark legislation of 1965. After exploring issues of development and globalization at “home” leading to migration, the course proceeds with the study of immigration theories. Major attention is given to the emergence of transnational identities and the transformation of communities, particularly in the northeastern United States.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B338
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

SPAN B217 Narratives of Latinidad
This course explores how Latina/o writers fashion bicultural and transnational identities and narrate the intertwined histories of the U.S. and Latin America. We will focus on topics of shared concern among Latino groups such as imperialism and annexation, the affective experience of migration, race and gender stereotypes, the politics of Spanglish, and struggles for social justice. By analyzing novels, poetry, performance art, testimonial narratives, films, and essays, we will unpack the complexity of Latinadad in the Americas.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B217
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Harford Vargas,J.
(Fall 2013)