2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog

East Asian Studies

Students may complete a major in East Asian Studies, a minor in Chinese language or Japanese language, or a (non-language) minor in East Asian Studies.

Faculty

Tz’u Chiang, Senior Lecturer
Robert Dostal, Rufus M. Jones Professor and Chair of Philosophy
Yonglin Jiang, Chair and Associate Professor of East Asian Studies on the Jye Chu Lectureship in Chinese Studies
Shiamin Kwa, Assistant Professor
Changchun Zhang, Instructor of Chinese

The Bi-College Department of East Asian Studies links rigorous language training to the study of East Asian culture and society. In addition to our intensive programs in Chinese and Japanese languages, the departmental faculty offers courses in East Asian philosophy, linguistics, literature, religion, social and intellectual history. The East Asian Studies program also incorporates courses by affiliated Bi-College faculty on East Asian anthropology, cities, economics, philosophy, and sociology, as well as additional courses on East Asian culture and society by faculty at Swarthmore.

The intellectual orientation of the East Asian Studies Department is primarily historical and text-based; that is, we focus on East Asia’s rich cultural traditions as a way to understand its present, through the study of primary sources (in translation and in the vernacular) and scholarly books and articles. All students wishing to specialize in this humanistic approach to the study of China, Japan, and (with special approval) Korea are encouraged to consider the East Asian Studies major.

But we also work closely with affiliated faculty in the Bi-Co and Tri-Co community who approach East Asia from the perspective of such social science disciplines as Anthropology, Economics, Political Science, Sociology, and the Growth and Structure of Cities, as well as with faculty in History, Music, Religion, and Philosophy. EAS majors are encouraged to take advantage of these programs to supplement their EAS coursework. Please consult the course guide, online or in print, for details on this year’s offerings.

Major Requirements

  • Completion of at least the third-year level of (Mandarin) Chinese or Japanese (i.e. 101-102). Students who entered college with native fluency in one East Asian language (including Korean) must complete this requirement with another East Asian language.
  • EAST 200B (Major Seminar: Methods and Approaches to East Asian Studies), which highlights the emergence of East Asia as a coherent cultural region and introduces students to basic bibliographic skills and research approaches.
  • Five additional courses in East Asian cultures, as follows: one 100-level Introduction (from among EAST 120, 129, 131, or 132); two 200-level courses; and two 300-level seminars.
  • A senior seminar (EAST 398, 399, culminating in the completion of a senior thesis early in the spring semester.)
Minor Requirements

The Department of East Asian Studies offers minors in both Chinese and Japanese. The requirement is six courses in either language. The department also offers a minor in East Asian Studies, requiring any six courses in EAS exclusive of languages but including cross-listed courses taught in other departments. Of the six courses taken in fulfillment of the EAS non-language minor, at least two must be at the 200 level and at least one must be at the 300 level.

Language Placement Tests

Placement tests for first-time students at all levels are conducted in the week before classes start in the fall semester. To qualify for third-year language courses students need to finish Second-year courses with a score of 3.0 or above in all four areas of training: Listening, speaking, reading, and writing. In the event that students do not meet the minimum grade at the conclusion of Second-year language study, they must consult with the director of the respective language program and work out a summer study plan that may include taking summer courses or studying on their own under supervision. They must take a placement test before starting Third-year language study in the fall. (Similarly, students who finish Third-year with a score of less than 3.0 in any of the four areas must also take a placement exam before entering Fourth-year.)

Requirements for Honors

Honors in East Asian studies will be awarded by the departmental faculty on the basis of superior performance in two areas: coursework in major-related courses (including language classes), and the senior thesis. A 3.7 average in major-related coursework is considered the minimum necessary for consideration for honors.

Study Abroad

The East Asian Studies Department strongly recommends study abroad to maximize language proficiency and cultural familiarity. Formal approval is required by the study abroad advisor prior to the student’s travel. Without this approval, credit for courses taken abroad will not be accepted by the East Asian studies department. Also, since procedures for study abroad are different for Bryn Mawr and Haverford, students should contact the relevant deans at their own colleges. Students majoring in EAS are discouraged from studying abroad during the spring of their junior year, since the Methods and Approaches Seminar EAST200, meets then and it is best to take it as a junior. Minors and other students may go abroad fall or spring semester or for the whole year.

If studying abroad is not practical, students may consider attending certain intensive summer schools approved by the East Asian studies department. These plans must be worked out in concert with the program’s study abroad advisor and the student’s dean.

COURSES

EAST B110 Intro to Chinese Literature (in English)
Students will study a wide range of texts from the beginnings through the Qing dynasty. The course focuses on the genres of poetry, prose, fiction and drama, and considers how both the forms and their content overlap and interact. No knowlege of Chinese is assumed or expected.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Kwa,S.
(Spring 2014)

EAST B131 Chinese Civilization
A broad chronological survey of Chinese culture and society from the Bronze Age to the 1800s, with special reference to such topics as belief, family, language, the arts and sociopolitical organization. Readings include primary sources in English translation and secondary studies.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B131
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Jiang,Y.
(Fall 2013)

EAST B200 Major Seminar: Methods and Approaches in East Asian Studies
This course introduces current and prospective majors to the scope and methods of East Asian Studies. It employs readings on East Asian history and culture as a platform for exercises in critical analysis, bibliography, cartography and the formulation of research topics and approaches. It culminates in a substantial research essay. Required of East Asian Studies majors, but open to others by permission, the course should be taken before the senior year. Prerequisite: One year of Chinese or Japanese.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

EAST B210 Topics in Chinese Cultural History
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): HART-B209
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

EAST B212 Introduction to Chinese Literature
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Kwa,S.

Fall 2013: Current topic description: This semester, the course will focus on all of the full-length feature films of Hong Kong director Wong Karwai, beginning with the 1988 film As Tears Go By and ending with the 2013 film The Grandmaster. Some topics that will be discussed include translation; brotherhoods, violence and criminality; nostalgia; the use of music; dystopia; translingualism; post-colonialism; and post-humanism.

EAST B216 China and the World: Implications of China’s Rise
In the 20th Century, China’s rise has been one of the most distinctive political affairs changing the landscape of regional and world politics. Especially, China’s breathtaking growth has challenged the foundations and limits of the market economy and political liberalization theoretically and empirically. This course examines the Chinese economic and political development and its implications for other Asian countries and the world. This course has three aims: 1) to facilitate an in-depth understanding of the Chinese Economic development model in comparison to other development models, 2) to conduct a comprehensive analysis of political and socio-economic exchanges of China and its relations with other major countries in East Asia, and 3) to construct a thorough understanding of challenges and opportunities for China from its extraordinary economic growth.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B216
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Oh,S.
(Fall 2013)

EAST B218 Topics in World Cities
This is a topics course. Topics vary. An introduction to contemporary issues related to the urban environment.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B218
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Zhang,J.

Spring 2014: Current topic description: This course surveys a wide range of issues in urban China. We explore family and gender relations, economic activities, people at the margins, urban spatial and architectural transformation, and political activities that contest the reproduction of the state.

EAST B225 Topics in Modern Chinese Literature
This a topics course. Topics vary. This course explores modern China from the early 20th century to the present through its literature, art and films, reading them as commentaries of their own time.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Kwa,S.

Spring 2014: Current topic description: This course explores fiction from Mainland China in the twentieth-century, from the novels and short stories of the Republican era into the years after Tiananmen. Through an exploration of modern and contemporary Chinese fiction, we will consider the rapid cultural and literary transformations undergone during this incredibly eventful century.

EAST B229 Topics in Comparative Urbanism
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B229; SOCL-B230; HART-B229; EAST-B229
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): McDonogh,G.

Spring 2014: Current topic description: Comparative Urbanism insists that our understanding of cities must incorporate systematic analysis, testing theory and practice. This year, the class explores questions raised about cities through crime literature, ranging from depictions of criminality (across race, class and gender) to visions of form and movement. The key cities for comparison this year will be Barcelona, Los Angeles, Havana, Buenos Aires and Shanghai. Readings will include literary sources, films and social histories.

EAST B250 Topics: GrowthOrg of Cities
An introduction to growth & spatial organization of cities. Topics vary.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B250
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

EAST B260 The History and Rhetoric of Buddhist Meditation
While Buddhist meditation is often seen as a neutral technology, free of ties to any one spiritual path or worldview, we will examine the practice through the cosmological and soteriological contexts that gave rise to it. This course examines a great variety of discourses surrounding meditation in traditional Buddhist texts.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Glassman,H.
(Fall 2013)

EAST B263 The Chinese Revolution
Places the causes and consequences of the 20th century revolutions in historical perspective, by examining its late-imperial antecedents and tracing how the revolution has (and has not) transformed China, including the lives of such key revolutionary supporters as the peasantry, women, and intellectuals.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B262
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Jiang,Y.
(Fall 2013)

EAST B264 Human Rights in China
This course will examine China’s human rights issues from a historical perspective. The topics include diverse perspectives on human rights, historical background, civil rights, religious practice, justice system, education, as well as the problems concerning some social groups such as migrant laborers, women, ethnic minorities and peasants.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B260
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Jiang,Y.
(Spring 2014)

EAST B267 The Development of the Modern Japanese Nation
An introduction to the main social dimensions central to an understanding of contemporary Japanese society and nationhood in comparison to other societies. The course also aims to provide students with training in comparative analysis in sociology.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B267; ANTH-B267
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Takenaka,A.
(Spring 2014)

EAST B304 Disaster, War and Rebuilding in the Japanese City
Natural and man-made disasters have destroyed Japanese cities regularly. Rebuilding generally ensued at a very rapid pace, often as a continuation of the past. Following a brief examination of literature on disaster and rebuilding and a historical overview of architectural and urban history in Japan, this course explores the reasons for historical transformations large and small. It specifically argues that rebuilding was mostly the result of traditions, whereas transformation of urban space occurred primarily as a result of political and socio-economic change. Focusing on the period since the Meiji restoration of 1868, we ask: How did reconstruction after natural and man-made disasters shape the contemporary Japanese landscape? We will explore specifically the destruction and rebuilding after the 1891 Nobi earthquake, the 1923 Great Kanto earthquake that leveled Tokyo and Yokohama, the bombing of more than 200 cities in World War II and their rebuilding, as well as the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake that destroyed Kobe and its reconstruction. In the context of the long history of destruction and rebuilding we will finally explore the recent disaster in Fukushima 2011. Through the story of disaster and rebuilding emerge different approaches to permanence and change, to urban livability, the environment and sustainability.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B304
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Hein,C.
(Fall 2013)

EAST B315 Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & Film
This interdisciplinary course focuses on a critical survey of literary and visual texts by and about Chinese women. We will begin by focusing on the cultural norms that defined women’s lives beginning in early China, and consider how those tropes are reflected and rejected over time and geographical borders (in Japan, Hong Kong and the United States). No prior knowledge of Chinese culture or language necessary.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Film Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

EAST B325 Topics in Chinese History and Culture
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B326
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

EAST B334 Three Faces of Chinese Power: Money, Might, and Minds
China’s extraordinary growth for the past 30 years has confirmed the power of free markets, while simultaneously challenging our thoughts on the foundations and limits of the market economy. Moreover, China’s ever-increasing economic freedom and prosperity have been accompanied by only limited steps toward greater political freedom and political liberalization, running counter to one of the most consistent patterns of political economic development in recent history. This course examines China’s unique economic and political development path, and the opportunities and challenges it accompanies. This course has three aims: 1) to facilitate an in-depth understanding of the political and economic development with Chinese characteristics, 2) to conduct a comprehensive analysis of three dimensions of Chinese economic, political and cultural power, and 3) to construct a thorough understanding of challenges and opportunities for China from its extraordinary developmental path.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B334
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Oh,S.
(Spring 2014)

EAST B336 Topics in City and Media
This is a topics course. Topics vary. Mass media raises ever-changing global issues in study and praxis in Cities. This advanced seminar looks closely at media through a limited lens - the mediation of a single city (Hong Kong, Philadelphia, Los Angeles), questions of genre (cinema, television, web) or around particular theoreticians and questions (Barthes and myth; Marxism and media).
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Crosslisting(s): ANTH-B335; CITY-B335
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Zhang,J.

Fall 2013: Current topic description: Looking at TV drama, animation, pop music, fashion and fast food, this course investigates how popular culture works and how it shapes people’s lives in East Asian countries. Seeing popular culture as terrains of power struggles and articulation, we explore how class, gender and national identities are constructed and contested through pop culture that is in turn shaped by these social relationships in specific political and historical context.

EAST B352 China’s Environment
This seminar explores China’s environmental issues from a historical perspective. It begins by considering a range of analytical approaches , and then explores three general periods in China’s environmental changes, imperial times, Mao’s socialist experiments during the first thirty years of the People’s Republic, and the post-Mao reforms. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Requirement(s): Division I: Social Science
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B352
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Jiang,Y.
(Spring 2014)

EAST B362 Environment in Contemporary East Asia: China and Japan
This seminar explores environmental issues in contemporary East Asia from a historical perspective. It will explore the common and different environmental problems in Japan and China, and explain and interpret their causal factors and solving measures in cultural traditions, social movements, economic growth, political and legal institutions and practices, international cooperation and changing perceptions. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above.
Requirement(s): Division I or Division III
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

EAST B380 Readings in Advanced Chinese
This is a topics course. Topics vary. This course prepares advanced readers of Chinese for the practice of reading, translating and analyzing primary source texts in early-modern and modern Chinese literature. This class is conducted in English, and all readings and screenings are in the original language. The course assumes advanced reading knowledge of Chinese and requires successful completion of 3rd year Chinese or equivalent as a prerequisite. Majors are strongly encouraged to take this course.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Crosslisting(s): CNSE-B380
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Kwa,S.

Fall 2013: Current topic description: The May Fourth and New Culture Movements. This semester we will be reading the essays, short stories and novels written around the May 4th Movement, a period that revolutionized and transformed literature in Chinese. We will address questions of freedom and democracy, modernity and native folk tradition, cosmopolitanism and nationalism, and how they relate to changes political, literary, social and otherwise.

EAST B398 Senior Seminar
A research workshop culminating in the writing and presentation of a senior thesis. Required of all majors; open to concentrators and others by permission.
Units: 0.5
Instructor(s): Glassman,H., Jiang,Y.
(Fall 2013)

EAST B399 Senior Seminar
A research workshop culminating in the writing and presentation of a senior thesis. Required of all majors; open to concentrators and others by permission.
Units: 0.5
Instructor(s): Glassman,H., Jiang,Y.
(Spring 2014)

EAST B403 Supervised Work
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Dept. staff, TBA
(Fall 2013)

EAST B403 Supervised Work
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Dept. staff, TBA
(Spring 2014)

East Asian Languages

The East Asian Studies Program welcomes students who wish to combine their interests in East Asian languages with the study of an East Asian culture. These students are urged to consult the Co-Chair of East Asian studies on either campus, who will advise them on creating individual plans of study in appropriate departments.

CHINESE LANGUAGE

The Bi-Co Chinese Program offers five years of instruction in Mandarin Chinese. In addition to First-Year, Second-Year, and Third-Year Chinese, we offer Advanced Chinese, which is a two-year, four-course series, covering topics such as food, music, and language in Chinese culture, as well as other contemporary topics. This curricular design maximizes our teaching resources to meet the needs of our students who, in increasing numbers, either arrive at college with multiple years of Chinese in secondary schools or who have accelerated their Chinese training by studying abroad in their junior year. We also offer a year-long course for those who have facility in speaking Chinese, but have had no or limited training in reading and writing (CNSE007-008).

The faculty in our program are seasoned and hard-working professionals dedicated to providing rigorous training in all four areas of Chinese language studies--speaking, listening, reading, and writing, in a caring and individually tailored environment. (Both First-Year and Second-Year Chinese have mandatory weekly one-on-one sessions between students and their teachers.) We take pride in our students, as our students take pride in their achievements. One indication of their level of proficiency is that we have trained true beginners (students with no prior training or knowledge of Chinese when they enter our program) who, in their senior year, can serve as peer tutors to our lower level students in various aspects of Chinese learning.

The Bi-Co Chinese program is nested within the Bi-Co East Asian Studies Department. We serve EAS majors, Chinese minors, and any student who wishes to study the Chinese language. The Chinese minor is currently very robust with many students coming from other departments, such as Economics, History, Linguistics, Anthropology, Growth and Structure of Cities, Psychology, Sociology, and other majors. We have students from the Natural Science departments in our classes and we would like to welcome more such students into our Minor.

Chinese Minor

Students who major in East Asian Studies or any other discipline may consider minoring in Chinese. A Chinese minor must do the following:

  • Take six semesters of Chinese language courses in our program.
  • Receive a minimum grade of 3.0 for each course.
  • Attain the minimum proficiency level of Third-Year Chinese.

Language credits from the approved Study-Abroad programs such as CET are acceptable if prior approval by the director of the Chinese program is obtained. Students who have prior knowledge of the language and are placed into Second-Year or higher level Chinese courses when they enter college still have enough courses to take to complete the minor since our Advanced Chinese (200-level topic courses) can be repeated for credits as topics vary from semester to semester.

Study Abroad

Our approved Study Abroad program is CET, which has a language programs in four cities in China: Beijing, which also has a Chinese Studies program, Harbin, Shanghai, and Kunming. CET is well-known for its language pledge and its rigorous implementation of this requirement. Our students have a strong reputation at CET for honoring their language pledge and therefore benefiting enormously from this practice.

Other highly regarded and rigorous study abroad programs in other Chinese speaking regions might be considered but prior approval by the director of the program is required.

COURSES

CNSE B001 Intensive First-Year Chinese
An intensive introductory course in modern spoken and written Chinese. The development of oral-aural skills is integrated through grammar explanations and drill sessions designed to reinforce new material through active practice. Six hours a week of lecture and oral practice plus one-on-one sessions with the instructor. This is a year-long course; both semesters are required for credit. (Offered at Haverford)
Requirement(s): Language Level 1
Units: 1.5
(Not Offered 2013-14)

CNSE B002 Intensive First Year Chinese
An intensive introductory course in modern spoken and written Chinese. The development of oral-aural skills is integrated through grammar explanations and drill sessions designed to reinforce new material through active practice. Six hours a week of lecture and oral practice plus one-on-one sessions with the instructor. This is a year-long course; both semesters are required for credit. (Offered at Haverford)
Requirement(s): Language Level 1
Units: 1.5
(Not Offered 2013-14)

CNSE B003 Second-year Chinese
Second-year Chinese aims for further development of language skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Five hours of class plus individual conference. This is a year-long course; both semesters (CNSE 003 and 004) are required for credit. Prerequisite: First-year Chinese or a passing score on the Placement Exam.
Requirement(s): Language Level 2
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Chiang,T.
(Fall 2013)

CNSE B004 Second-Year Chinese
Second-year Chinese aims for further development of language skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Five hours of class plus individual conference. This is a year-long course; both semesters (CNSE 003 and 004) are required for credit. Prerequisite: First-year Chinese or a passing score on the Placement Exam.
Requirement(s): Language Level 2
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Chiang,T.
(Spring 2014)

CNSE B007 First-Year Chinese Non-Intensive
This course is designed for students who have some facility in listening, speaking, reading and writing Chinese but have not yet achieved sufficient proficiency to take Second Year Chinese. It is a year-long course that covers the same lessons as the intensive First Year Chinese, but the class meets only three hours a week. Prerequisite: Chinese Language Placement exam.
Requirement(s): Language Level 1
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Chiang,T.
(Fall 2013)

CNSE B008 First Year Chinese (Non-intensive)
This course is designed for students who have some facility in listening, speaking, reading and writing Chinese but have not yet achieved sufficient proficiency to take Second Year Chinese. It is a year-long course that covers the same lessons as the intensive First Year Chinese, but the class meets only three hours a week. Prerequisite: CNSE B007
Requirement(s): Language Level 1
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Chiang,T.
(Spring 2014)

CNSE B101 Third-Year Chinese: Readings in the Modern Chinese Short Story and Theater
A focus on overall language skills through reading and discussion of modern short stories, as well as on students facility in written and oral expression through readings in modern drama and screenplays. Readings include representative works from the May Fourth Period (1919-27) to the present. Audio- and videotapes of drama and films are used as study aids. Prerequisite: Second-Year Chinese or consent of instructor. (Offered at Haverford)
Requirement(s): Language Level 2
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

CNSE B102 Third-Year Chinese: Readings in the Modern Chinese Short Story and Theater
A focus on overall language skills through reading and discussion of modern short stories, as well as on students facility in written and oral expression through readings in modern drama and screenplays. Readings include representative works from the May Fourth Period (1919-27) to the present. Audio- and videotapes of drama and films are used as study aids. Prerequisite: Second-Year Chinese or consent of instructor. (Offered at Haverford)
Requirement(s): Language Level 2
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

CNSE B201 Advanced Chinese
Development of language ability by readings in modern Chinese literature, history and/or philosophy. Speaking and reading skills are equally emphasized through a consideration of the intellectual, historical and social significance of representative works. May be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisite: Third-year Chinese or permission of instructor. (Offered at Haverford)
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

CNSE B380 Readings in Advanced Chinese
This is a topics course. Topics vary. This course prepares advanced readers of Chinese for the practice of reading, translating and analyzing primary source texts in early-modern and modern Chinese literature. This class is conducted in English, and all readings and screenings are in the original language. The course assumes advanced reading knowledge of Chinese and requires successful completion of 3rd year Chinese or equivalent as a prerequisite. Majors are strongly encouraged to take this course.
Requirement(s): Division III: Humanities
Crosslisting(s): EAST-B380
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Kwa,S.

Fall 2013: Current topic description: The May Fourth and New Culture Movements. This semester we will be reading the essays, short stories and novels written around the May 4th Movement, a period that revolutionized and transformed literature in Chinese. We will address questions of freedom and democracy, modernity and native folk tradition, cosmopolitanism and nationalism, and how they relate to changes political, literary, social and otherwise.

CNSE B403 Supervised Work
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2013-14)

JAPANESE LANGUAGE

The East Asian Studies Program welcomes students who wish to combine their interests in East Asian languages with the study of an East Asian culture. These students are urged to consult the Co-Chair of East Asian studies on either campus, who will advise them on creating individual plans of study in appropriate departments.

The Japanese Language Program offers a full undergraduate curriculum of courses in Modern Japanese. Students who will combine language study with focused work on East Asian society and culture may wish to consider the major in East Asian Studies. Information about specific study abroad opportunities can be obtained from the director.

College Foreign Language Requirement

The College’s foreign language requirement may be satisfied by completing JNSE 003 and 004 with an average grade of at least 2.0 or with a grade of 2.0 or better in JNSE 004.