Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Students may complete a major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Required courses are drawn principally from the Biology and Chemistry Departments and those interested in Biochemistry should consult both Biology and Chemistry web pages. Students may double major in Chemistry and Biology, but are not permitted to double major in Biology and Biochemistry or Chemistry and Biochemistry. There is no minor in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

Research may be a valuable experience for students considering graduate or professional studies or for those planning research or teaching careers. Any Chemistry or Biology professor may be selected as a research adviser, but students are encouraged to consult departmental advisers for information on how to join research groups. Students may select either a one or two semester research experience.

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Requirements and Opportunities

A student may qualify for an A. B. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology by completing courses in Chemistry and Biology with the following distribution. Students must be mindful that some courses have pre-requisites.

Fundamental Courses
  • Biology 110
  • Chemistry 103, 104
  • Chemistry 211, 212

Major Writing Requirement
Students must complete CHEM B251 and CHEM B252 to complete the writing attentive requirement of the major. The writing attentive requirement of the major must be completed by the end of a student's junior year.

Core Biochemistry Courses
  • Chemistry 242 and Chemistry 252 OR Biology 375
  • Chemistry 221 OR Chemistry 222
  • Chemistry/Biology 377
Advanced Biology Courses
  • Biology 201
  • Biology 376
Advanced Electives on Biochemically Related Topics

Two courses that provide depth and breadth are required and one must be at the 300 or 500 level. Suggested courses include, but are not limited to:

  • Biology 215
  • Biology 255
  • Biology 271
  • Biology 216
  • Biology 327
  • Biology 340
  • Chemistry 221 or 222 (if not used as a Core course)
  • Chemistry 231
  • Chemistry 251
  • Chemistry 331
  • Chemistry 345
  • Chemistry 515

Students are encouraged to consider suitable course offerings at Haverford and Swarthmore and all choices must be approved by the major adviser.

Senior Experience

Option 1óRequired for Honors
Biology 403 (2 semesters) OR Chemistry 398, 399 plus all requirements associated with the senior thesis.
Biology 399

Option 2
Chemistry or Biology 403 (Independent Study or Praxis on a Biochemical topic arranged by the student). An additional laboratory course, not counted as an Advanced Elective, chosen from:

  • Biology 255
  • Biology 271
  • Biology 340
  • Chemistry 251
Courses in Allied Fields
  • Mathematics 101, 102
  • Mathematics 201

In consultation with the major adviser, two courses must be selected from the courses listed below. Most students would be expected to take two semesters of Physics.

  • Physics 101, 102 or 121, 122
  • Biology 111, 202, 220, 225, 236, 250
  • Computer Science 110, 206
  • Geology 101, 102, 103, 202, 203

Timetable for Meeting Requirements

There are a variety of ways to meet the major requirements provided that 100 level courses in Chemistry and Mathematics are completed by the end of the freshman year. Note that Mathematics 201 is only required as a pre-requisite for Chemistry 221 or 222 and only one sample program is shown here.

  • Freshman year: Biology 110 , Chemistry 103, 104, Mathematics 101, 102
  • Sophomore year: Chemistry 211, 212, Mathematics 201, Physics 121, 122
  • Junior year: Biology 201, 255, Chemistry 222, 242, 252
  • Senior year: Biology/Chemistry 377, Biology 340, 376, Senior Experience

Honors

Students seeking to complete the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Major must complete two semesters of research (Option 1) and have a GPA of 3.6 in all major and allied courses.

Advanced Placement

Students are instructed to follow the policies described by individual departments.

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COURSES

 

ANTH B236 Evolution

A lecture/discussion course on the development of evolutionary biology. This course will cover the history of evolutionary theory, population genetics, molecular and developmental evolution, paleontology, and phylogenetic analysis. Lecture three hours a week.

Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Crosslisting(s): BIOL-B236; GEOL-B236

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Marenco,P.

(Spring 2015)

 

BIOL B110 Biological Exploration I

This is a topics course, course topic varies. BIOL B110 is an introductory-level courses designed to encourage students to explore the field of biology at multiple levels of organization: molecular, cellular, organismal and ecological. Each course will explore these areas of biology through a unifying theme. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. Prerequisite: Quantitative readiness is required for this course. With permission of instructor, students registered for QUAN B010 may also take this course concurrently.

Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Davis,T., Skirkanich,J., Chander,M., Shapiro,J.

      Fall 2014: Current topic description: This year Biology 110-001 will investigate the relationship between genotype and phenotype through analysis of inheritance patterns in families and populations and examination of the regulation and decoding of genetic information that ultimately produces whose structure/function dictates cellular activity. Current topic description: This course will explore the ways that the genomes of various organisms have been altered by nature and by human interventions, focusing on the mechanisms and effects of those genetic modifications. Current topic description: This course will explore the ways the central dogma of molecular biology relates to the biochemical basis of human disease.

 

BIOL B111 Biological Exploration II

This is a topics course, course topic varies. BIOL 111 is an introductory-level course designed to encourage students to explore the field of biology at multiple levels of organization: molecular, cellular, organismal and ecological. Each course will explore these areas of biology through a unifying theme. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. Prerequisite: Quantitative readiness is required for this course. With permission of instructor, students registered for QUAN B010 may also take this course concurrently.

Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Brodfuehrer,P., Skirkanich,J., Mozdzer,T., Record,S.

      Spring 2015: Current topic description: This course will examine the complex behavior of feeding by examining the various physiological systems involved in controlling the intake of food, its digestion, and how many calories do organisms need to survive. Current topic description: Taking an ecological approach, we will use invasive species as our central theme in order to predict how organisms can affect multiple levels for biological organization from the organismal to the ecosystem level. Current topic description: This course will explore potential responses of how life on earth may respond to global change while reflecting on how such responses may alter the ecosystem services important to human society.

 

BIOL B201 Genetics

An introduction to heredity and variation, focusing on topics such as classical Mendelian genetics, linkage and recombination, chromosome abnormalities, population and developmental genetics. Examples of genetic analyses are drawn from a variety of organisms, including bacteria, Drosophila, C. elegans and humans. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: One semester of BIOL 110-111 and CHEM 103, 104.

Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Health Studies

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Davis,T.

(Fall 2014)

 

BIOL B202 Introduction to Neuroscience

An introduction to the nervous system and its broad contributions to function. The class will explore fundamentals of neural anatomy and signaling, sensory and motor processing and control, nervous system development and examples of complex brain functions. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisites: One semester of BIOL 110-111 or permission of instructor.

Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Neuroscience

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Mietlicki-Baase,E.

(Fall 2014)

 

BIOL B215 Experimental Design and Statistics

An introductory course in designing experiments and analyzing biological data. This course is structured to develop students’ understanding of when to apply different quantitative methods, and how to implement those methods using the R statistics environment. Topics include summary statistics, distributions, randomization, replication, parametric and nonparametric tests, and introductory topics in multivariate and Bayesian statistics. The course is geared around weekly problem sets and interactive learning. Suggested Preparation: BIOL B110 or B111 is highly recommended.

Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM)

Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Health Studies

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Shapiro,J.

(Fall 2014)

 

BIOL B216 Genomics

An introduction to the study of genomes and genomic data. This course will examine the types of biological questions that can be answered using large biological data sets and complete genome sequences as well as the techniques and technologies that make such studies possible. Topics include genome organization and evolution, comparative genomics, and analysis of transcriptomes and proteomes. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111. BIOL 201 highly recommended.

Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Health Studies

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Shapiro,J.

(Spring 2015)

 

BIOL B220 Ecology

A study of the interactions between organisms and their environments. The scientific underpinnings of current environmental issues, with regard to human impacts, are also discussed. Students will also become familiar with ecological principles and with the methods ecologists use. Students will apply these principles through the design and implementation of experiments both in the laboratory and the field. Lecture three hours a week, laboratory/field investigation three hours a week. There will be optional field trips throughout the semester. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL B110 or B111 or permission of instructor.

Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)

Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Environmental Studies

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Mozdzer,T.

(Fall 2014)

 

BIOL B225 Biology of Plants

Plants are critical to numerous contemporary issues, such as ecological sustainability, economic stability, and human health. Students will examine the fundamentals of how plants are structured, how they function, how they interact with other organisms, and how they respond to environmental stimuli. In addition, students will be taught to identify important local species, and will explore the role of plants in human society and ecological systems. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and BIOL 111.

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Environmental Studies

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Caplan,J.

(Spring 2015)

 

BIOL B236 Evolution

A lecture/discussion course on the development of evolutionary biology. This course will cover the history of evolutionary theory, population genetics, molecular and developmental evolution, paleontology, and phylogenetic analysis. Lecture three hours a week.

Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Crosslisting(s): GEOL-B236; ANTH-B236

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Marenco,P.

(Spring 2015)

 

BIOL B250 Computational Methods in the Sciences

A study of how and why modern computation methods are used in scientific inquiry. Students will learn basic principles of visualizing and analyzing scientific data through hands-on programming exercises. The majority of the course will use the R programming language and corresponding open source statistical software. Content will focus on data sets from across the sciences. Six hours of combined lecture/lab per week.

Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)

Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Environmental Studies; Neuroscience

Crosslisting(s): GEOL-B250; CMSC-B250

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Record,S.

(Spring 2015)

 

BIOL B255 Microbiology

Invisible to the naked eye, microbes occupy every niche on the planet. This course will examine how microbes have become successful colonizers; review aspects of interactions between microbes, humans and the environment; and explore practical uses of microbes in industry, medicine and environmental management. The course will combine lecture, discussion of primary literature and student presentations. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110 or permission of the instructor.

Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)

Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Health Studies

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Chander,M.

(Spring 2015)

 

BIOL B271 Developmental Biology

An introduction to embryology and the concepts of developmental biology. Concepts are illustrated by analyzing the experimental observations that support them. Topics include gametogenesis and fertilization, morphogenesis, cell fate specification and differentiation, pattern formation, regulation of gene expression, neural development, and developmental plasticity. The laboratory focuses on observations and experiments on living embryos. Lecture three hours, laboratory three scheduled hours a week; most weeks require additional hours outside of the regularly scheduled lab. Prerequisites: One semester of BIOL 110-111 or permission of instructor.

Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)

Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Health Studies

Units: 1.0

(Not Offered 2014-2015)

 

BIOL B327 Evolutionary Genetics and Genomics

This seminar course will discuss evolution primarily at the level of genes and genomes. Topics will include the roles of selection and drift in molecular evolution, evolution of gene expression, genomic approaches to the study of quantitative variation, evolutionary history of humans, and evolutionary perspectives on the study of human disease. Students will read papers from the primary literature, lead and participate in class discussions and debates, and write reviews of research articles. Quantitative proficiency required. Prerequisites: One semester of BIOL 110-111 and BIOL 201, or BIOL 236, or permission of instructor.

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

(Not Offered 2014-2015)

 

BIOL B340 Cell Biology

A lecture course with laboratory emphasizing current knowledge in cell biology. Among topics discussed are cell membranes, cell surface specializations, cell motility and the cytoskeleton, regulation of cell activity and cell signaling. Laboratory experiments are focused on studies of cell structure, making use of techniques in cell culture and immunocytochemistry. Lecture three hours, laboratory four hours a week. Prerequisites: One semester of Organic Chemistry (CHEM B211/B212), and BIOL B201 or B271, or permission of instructor.

Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

(Not Offered 2014-2015)

 

BIOL B375 Integrated Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I

The first semester of a two-semester course that focuses on the structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids, enzyme kinetics, metabolic pathways, gene regulation and recombinant DNA techniques. Students will explore these topics via lecture, critical reading and discussion of primary literature and laboratory experimentation. Three hours of lecture, three hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL B110 and two semesters of organic chemistry (CHEM B211/B212).

Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Chander,M.

(Fall 2014)

 

BIOL B376 Integrated Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II

This second semester of a two-semester sequence will continue with analysis of nucleic acids and gene regulation through lecture, critical reading and discussion of primary literature and laboratory experimentation. Three hours of lecture, three hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 201, BIOL B375 or permission of instructor.

Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Davis,T.

(Spring 2015)

 

BIOL B399 Senior Seminar in Laboratory Investigations

This seminar provides students with a collaborative forum to facilitate the exchange of ideas and broaden their perspective and understanding of research approaches used in various sub-disciplines of biology. There will be a focus on the presentation, interpretation and discussion of data, and communication of scientific findings to diverse audiences. In addition, students write, defend and publicly present a paper on their supervised research project. Three hours of class discussion each week. Corequisite: Enrollment in BIOL403.

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 0.5

Instructor(s):Shapiro,J.

(Spring 2015)

 

CHEM B103 General Chemistry I

Sections usually have a maximum of 50 students. Topics include aqueous solutions and solubility; the electronic structure of atoms and molecules; chemical reactions and energy; intermolecular forces. Examples discussed in lecture and laboratory workshop include environmental sciences, material sciences and biological chemistry. Lecture three hours and Chemistry workshop three hours a week. The laboratory workshop period will be used for traditional chemical experimentation or related problem solving. The course may include individual conferences, evening problem or peer-led instruction sessions. Prerequisites: Quantitative Readiness required or permission of the instructor.

Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Lukacs,K., Francl,M.

(Fall 2014)

 

CHEM B104 General Chemistry II

A continuation of CHEM B103. Topics include chemical reactions; introduction to thermodynamics and chemical equilibria; acid-base chemistry; electrochemistry; chemical kinetics. Lecture three hours, recitation one hour and laboratory three hours a week. May include individual conferences, evening problem or peer-led instruction sessions. Prerequisite: CHEM B103 with a grade of at least 2.0 or chemistry department placement or permission of the instructor.

Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Lukacs,K., Francl,M., White,S.

(Spring 2015)

 

CHEM B211 Organic Chemistry I

An introduction to the basic concepts of organic chemistry, including acid-base principles; functional groups; alkane and cycloalkane structures; alkene reactions; alkynes; dienes and aromatic structures; substitution and elimination reactions; alcohol reactivity; and radical reactions. The laboratory course introduces basic operations in the organic chemistry lab, spectroscopy, and reactions discussed in lecture. Lecture three hours, recitation one hour and laboratory five hours a week. Prerequisite: CHEM 104 with a grade of at least 2.0.

Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Nerz-Stormes,M., Malachowski,B., Schmink,J.

(Fall 2014)

 

CHEM B212 Organic Chemistry II: Biological Organic Chemistry

The second semester (biological organic chemistry) is broken into two modules. In the first module, the reactivity of carbonyl carbon is discussed, including ketones, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and derivatives, saccharides and enolate chemistry. Traditional biochemistry coverage begins with the second module. Amino acids (pI, electrophoresis, side chain pKa), protein structure (1°, 2°, 3°, 4°), and enzymatic catalysis, kinetics and inhibition are introduced. The reactivity of the co-enzymes (vitamins) is also covered as individual case studies in bio-organic reactivity. Lecture three hours, recitation one hour and laboratory five hours a week. Prerequisite: CHEM 211 with a grade of at least 2.0.

Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Nerz-Stormes,M., Malachowski,B., Schmink,J.

(Spring 2015)

 

CHEM B221 Physical Chemistry I

Introduction to quantum theory and spectroscopy. Atomic and molecular structure; molecular modeling; rotational, vibrational, electronic and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: CHEM B104, PHYS B121 or B101 and MATH B201. May be taken concurrently with CHEM B211 and PHYS B121 or B101.

Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM)

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Francl,M.

(Fall 2014)

 

CHEM B222 Physical Chemistry II

Modern thermodynamics, with application to phase equilibria, interfacial phenomena and chemical equilibria; statistical mechanics; chemical dynamics. Kinetic theory of gases; chemical kinetics. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: CHEM 104, PHYS 122 or 102 and MATH 201. May be taken concurrently with CHEM 212 and PHYS 122 or 102.

Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM)

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Francl,M.

(Spring 2015)

 

CHEM B231 Inorganic Chemistry

Bonding theory; structures and properties of ionic solids; symmetry; crystal field theory; structures, spectroscopy, stereochemistry, reactions and reaction mechanisms of coordination compounds; acid-base concepts; descriptive chemistry of main group elements. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: CHEM 212.

Approach: Course does not meet an Approach

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Burgmayer,S.

(Spring 2015)

 

CHEM B242 Biological Chemistry

The structure, chemistry and function of amino acids, proteins, lipids, polysaccharides and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics; metabolic relationships of carbohydrates, lipids and amino acids, and the control of various pathways; protein synthesis. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: CHEM B212 or CHEM H222.

Approach: Course does not meet an Approach

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Health Studies

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Kung,Y.

(Fall 2014)

 

CHEM B251 Research Methodology in Chemistry I

This laboratory course integrates advanced concepts in chemistry from biological, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry. Students gain experience in the use of departmental research instruments and in scientific literature searches, quantitative data analysis, record-keeping and writing. Attendance at departmental colloquia is expected of all students. Prerequisite: CHEM B212. Corequisite: CHEM B221 or B231 or B242.

Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)

Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):White,S.

(Fall 2014)

 

CHEM B252 Research Methodology II

This laboratory course integrates advanced concepts in chemistry from biological, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry. Students will gain experience in the use of departmental research instruments and in scientific literature searches, quantitative data analysis, record-keeping, and writing. Attendance at departmental colloquia is expected of all students. Prerequisite: CHEM B212. Corequisites: CHEM B222 or CHEM B231 or CHEM B242.

Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)

Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Kung,Y.

(Spring 2015)

 

CHEM B345 Advanced Biological Chemistry

This is a topics course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: Any course in Biochemistry. Prerequisites:CHEM B242 or BIOL B375 or BIOL H200 with instructor permission.

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Kung,Y.

      Fall 2014: Current topic description: Biochemical pathways involved in cellular metabolism and natural product biosynthesis are explored in molecular detail, including fatty acid metabolism and biosynthesis of antibiotics, anticancer agents, vitamins, and other secondary metabolites. Attention paid to biochemical mechanisms employed, the role of cofactors, coenzymes, and metals, and emerging applications to biotechnology and medicine.

 

CHEM B515 Topics in Organic Chemistry

This is a topics course. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: CHEM B242 or equivalent.

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Malachowski,B., Kung,Y.

      Spring 2015: Current topic description: A survey of topics related to drug discovery including lead discovery, target interactions, structural optimization, drug metabolism and drug synthesis, with particular focus on a molecular understanding of drug design and development. Case studies may include OxyContin and related opiate analgesics; aspirin and related NSAIDs; penicillin and other antibacterial agents; Tamiflu and related anti-virals; Alzheimer’s disease drugs; and antidepressants.

 

CMSC B250 Computational Methods in the Sciences

A study of how and why modern computation methods are used in scientific inquiry. Students will learn basic principles of simulation-based programming through hands-on exercises. Content will focus on the development of population models, beginning with simple exponential growth and ending with spatially explicit individual-based simulations. Students will design and implement a final project from their own disciplines. Six hours of combined lecture/lab per week.

Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)

Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Environmental Studies; Neuroscience

Crosslisting(s): BIOL-B250; GEOL-B250

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Record,S.

(Spring 2015)

 

GEOL B236 Evolution

A lecture/discussion course on the development of evolutionary biology. This course will cover the history of evolutionary theory, population genetics, molecular and developmental evolution, paleontology, and phylogenetic analysis. Lecture three hours a week.

Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Crosslisting(s): BIOL-B236; ANTH-B236

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Marenco,P.

(Spring 2015)

 

GEOL B250 Computational Methods in the Sciences

A study of how and why modern computation methods are used in scientific inquiry. Students will learn basic principles of simulation-based programming through hands-on exercises. Content will focus on the development of population models, beginning with simple exponential growth and ending with spatially explicit individual-based simulations. Students will design and implement a final project from their own disciplines. Six hours of combined lecture/lab per week.

Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)

Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive

Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Environmental Studies; Neuroscience

Crosslisting(s): BIOL-B250; CMSC-B250

Units: 1.0

Instructor(s):Record,S.

(Spring 2015)