Tri-Co Environmental Studies Minor with The Johanna Alderfer Harris Environmental Studies Program

Students may complete a minor in Environmental Studies as an adjunct to any major at Bryn Mawr, Haverford, or Swarthmore pending approval of the student’s coursework plan by the home department and the home-campus Environmental Studies director.

Faculty

Bryn Mawr College
Victor Donnay, William R. Kenan, Jr. Chair, Professor of Mathematics and Director of Environmental Studies
Don Barber, Associate Professor of Geology on the Harold Alderfer Chair in Environmental Studies
Peter Briggs, Professor of English (on leave semester II)
Joshua Caplan, Bucher-Jackson Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Sciences, Biology and Environmental Studies
Jonas Goldsmith, Associate Professor of Chemistry (on leave semesters I and II)
Karen Greif, Professor of Biology (on leave semesters I and II)
Carol Hager, Professor of Political Science
Thomas Mozdzer, Assistant Professor of Biology
Michael Rock, Samuel and Etta Wexler Professor of Economic History (on leave semester I)
David Ross, Chair and Associate Professor of Economics
Bethany Schneider, Associate Professor of English
Ellen Stroud, Associate Professor of Growth and Structure of Cities on the Johanna Alderfer Harris and William H. Harris, M.D. Professorship in Environmental Studies
Nathan Wright, Associate Professor of Sociology

Haverford College
Helen White, Chemistry, Environmental Studies Director
Kim Benston, English
Radika Bhaskar, Biology (Visiting 2014-15)
Craig Borowiak, Political Science
Thomas Donahue, Political Science (Visiting 2014-16)
Kaye Edwards, Interdisciplinary Programs
Steve Finley, English
Andrew Friedman, History
Darin Hayton, History
Karl Johnson, Biology
Joshua Moses, Anthropology
Iruka Okeke, Biology
Rob Scarrow, Chemistry
Steven Smith, Economics
Jonathan Wilson, Biology (on leave)

Swarthmore College
Elizabeth Bolton, English Literature, Environmental Studies Coordinator
Timothy Burke, History
Peter Collings, Physics and Astronomy
Giovanna DiChiro, Political Science
Erich Carr Everbach, Engineering
Eric Jensen, Physics and Astronomy
José-Luis Machado, Biology
Arthur McGarity, Engineering
Rachel Merz, Biology
Carol Nackenoff, Political Science
Jennifer Peck, Economics, Environmental Studies
Christine Schuetze, Sociology and Anthropology
Mark Wallace, Religion

The Johanna Alderfer Harris Environmental Studies Program

The Johanna Alderfer Harris Environmental Studies Program at Bryn Mawr College enables students and faculty to come together to explore academic interests in the environment. The program sponsors speakers, special events, and field trips, and offers support for student work during the summer, in the form of the college’s competitive Green Grants. In addition, The Harris Environmental Studies Program is the Bryn Mawr campus home for the Tri-College Environmental Studies Minor. The program benefits from two endowed chairs in Environmental Studies, The Johanna Alderfer Harris and William H. Harris, M.D. Chair in Environmental Studies, currently held by Growth and Structure of Cities Associate Professor Ellen Stroud, and the Harold Alderfer Chair in Environmental Studies, currently held by Geology Associate Professor Donald Barber.

The Tri-Co Environmental Studies Minor

Bryn Mawr, Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges offer Tri-College Environmental Studies Interdisciplinary Minor, involving departments and faculty from the natural sciences, mathematics, engineering, the social sciences, the humanities, and the arts on all three campuses. The Tri-College Environmental Studies Minor aims to bring students and faculty together to explore interactions among earth systems, human societies, and local and global environments.

The Tri-Co ENVS Minor aims to cultivate in students the capacity to identify and confront key environmental issues through a blend of multiple disciplines, encompassing historical, cultural, economic, political, scientific, and ethical modes of inquiry. Acknowledging the reciprocal dimensions of materiality and culture in the historical formation of “the” environment, this program is broadly framed by a series of interlocking dialogues: between the “natural” and the “built”; between the local and the global; and between the human and the nonhuman.

The minor consists of six courses, including an introductory course and capstone course, and the courses may be completed at any of the three campuses (or any combination thereof). To declare the minor, students should contact the Environmental Studies director at their home campus.

Minor Requirements

The Environmental Studies Interdisciplinary Minor consists of six courses, as follows:

  • A required introductory course to be taken prior to the senior year. This may be ENVS 101 at Bryn Mawr or Haverford or the parallel course at Swarthmore College (ENVS 001). Any one of these courses will satisfy the requirement, and students may take no more than one such course for credit toward the minor.
  • Four elective course credits from approved lists of core and cognate courses, including two credits in each of the following two categories (A and B). No more than one cognate course credit may be used for each category (see course list below for more information about core and cognate courses).

A) Environmental Science, Engineering and Math: courses that build understanding and knowledge of scientific methods and theories, and that explore how these can be applied in identifying and addressing environmental questions. At least one of the courses in this category must have a laboratory component.
B) Environmental Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts: courses that build understanding and knowledge of social and political structures as well as ethical considerations, and how these inform our individual and collective understandings of and responses to human and built environments.

  • A senior seminar with culminating work that reflects tangible research design and inquiry, but which might materialize in any number of project forms. Bryn Mawr College’s ENVS 397 (Environmental Studies Senior Seminar, co-taught by faculty members from Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges) and Swarthmore College’s ENVS 091 (Environmental Studies Capstone Seminar) satisfy the requirement.

Core Courses for the Environmental Studies Minor

  • Every student should take an introductory course (101 or 001) before the senior year
  • Every student should take a capstone course (397 or 091) during the senior year

Bryn Mawr
ENVS 101 Introduction to Environmental Studies
ENVS 397 Environmental Studies Senior Seminar

Haverford
ENVS 101 Case Studies in Environmental Issues
ENVS 397 Environmental Studies Senior Seminar

Swarthmore
ENVS 001 Introduction to Environmental Studies
ENVS 091 Environmental Studies Capstone Seminar

Approved Electives for the Environmental Studies Minor

  • Two courses are required from each category (A and B).
  • At least one course in Category A should have a lab.
  • Only one course in each category may be a “cognate” course. Cognate courses, marked with an asterisk, are valuable for minor but are not as centrally focused on environmental studies methodologies and materials as other courses on the list.
  • Pay close attention to “double-counting” rules for your major. You are encouraged to choose electives outside of your major.

Category A) Environmental Science, Math and Engineering

Bryn Mawr
BIOL 210 Biology and Public Policy
BIOL 220 (L) Ecology
BIOL 225* Biology of Plants
BIOL 250* Computational Methods
BIOL 262 Urban Ecosystems
BIOL 309 (L) Biological Oceanography
BIOL 320 (L) Evolutionary Ecology
CHEM 206 Chemistry of Renewable Energy
GEOL 101 (L) How the Earth Works
GEOL 103 (L) Earth Systems and the Environment
GEOL 130* Life in Earth’s Future Climate (half-credit)
GEOL 203 Paleobiology
GEOL 206* Energy Resources and Sustainability
GEOL 209 Natural Hazards and Human Populations
GEOL 230* The Science of Soils
GEOL 255 Problem Solving in the Environmental Sciences
GEOL 298 Applied Environmental Science
GEOL 302 Low Temperature Geochemistry
GEOL 314 Marine Geology
GEOL 328* Geographic Information Systems
MATH 210* Differential Equations w/ Apps (Environmental Problems)
MATH 295 Topics in Mathematics: Mathematical Modeling

Haverford
BIOL 123* Perspectives in Biology: Scientific Literacy (half-credit)
BIOL 124* Perspectives in Biology: Tropical Infectious Disease (half-credit)
BIOL 310* Molecular Microbiology (half-credit)
BIOL 314* Photosynthesis (half-credit)
CHEM 112*(L) Chemical Dynamics
CHEM 358 Topics in Environmental Chemistry (half-credit)
PHYS 111b Energy Options and Science Policy

Swarthmore
BIOL 002 Organismal and Population Biology
BIOL 016*(L) Microbiology
BIOL 017*(L) Microbial Pathogenesis and Immune Response
BIOL 020*(L) Animal Physiology
BIOL 025*(L) Plant Biology
BIOL 026*(L) Invertebrate Zoology
BIOL 031* History and Evolution of Human Food
BIOL 034*(L) Evolution
BIOL 036 (L) Ecology
BIOL 037* Conservation Genetics
BIOL 039 (L) Marine Biology
BIOL 115E Plant Molecular Genetics - Biotechnology
BIOL 116* Microbial Processes and Biotechnology
BIOL 130* Behavioral Ecology
BIOL 137 Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function
CHEM 001*(L) Chemistry in the Human Environment
CHEM 043*(L) Analytical Methods and Instrumentation
CHEM 103 Topics in Environmental Chemistry
ENGR 003* Problems in Technology
ENGR 004A Environmental Protection
ENGR 004B * Swarthmore and the Biosphere
ENGR 004E Introduction to Sustainable Systems Analysis
ENGR 035*(L) Solar Energy Systems
ENGR 057*(L) Operations Research (also ECON 032)
ENGR 063 (L) Water Quality and Pollution Control
ENGR 066 (L) Environmental Systems
ENVS 090* Directed Reading in Environmental Studies
MATH 056* Modeling
PHYS 002E* FYS: Energy
PHYS 020*(L) Principles of the Earth Sciences
PHYS 024 (L) The Earth’s Climate and Global Warming

Category B) Environmental Humanities, Social Sciences and Arts

Bryn Mawr
ANTH 203 Human Ecology
ANTH 210 Medical Anthropology
ANTH 237 Environmental Health
ANTH 263* Anthropology and Architecture
ARCH 245 The Archaeology of Water
CITY 175 Environment and Society
CITY 201 Introduction to GIS for Social and Environmental Analysis
CITY 241 Building Green
CITY 250* U.S. Urban Environmental History
CITY 278 American Environmental History
CITY 279 Global Environmental Change
CITY 304 Disaster, War, Rebuilding in the Japanese City (part of 360°)
CITY 329 Advanced Topics in Urban Environments: Sensing the City
CITY 345 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society - Environmental Studies
CITY 360 Brazil: City, Nature, Identity
CITY 377 Global Architecture of Oil
EAST 352 China’s Environment: History, Policy, and Rights
EAST 362 Environment in Contemporary East Asia
ECON 225* Economics of Development
ECON 234 Environmental Economics
ECON 242 Economics of Local Environmental Programs
EDUC 268 Educating for Environmental Literacy
ENGL 204* Literatures of American Expansion
ENGL 268 Native Soil: Indian Land and American Lit 1588-1840
ENGL 275 Food Revolutions
ENGL 251 Food For Thought
ENGL 313 Ecological Imaginings
HIST 212 Pirates, Travelers and Natural Historians
HIST 237* Urbanization in Africa
PHIL 240 Environmental Ethics
POLS 222 Introduction to Environmental Issues
POLS 278* Oil, Politics, Society and Economy
POLS 310* Comparative Public Policy
POLS 321* Technology and Politics
POLS 339* The Policy-making Process
POLS 354* Comparative Social Movements
SOCL 165 Problems in the Natural and Built Environment
SOCL 247 Environmental Social Problems
SOCL 316* Science, Culture and Society
SPAN 203 La Naturaleza Como Identidad Politica

Haverford
ANTH 252* State and Development in South Asia
ANTH 263* Anthropology of Space: Housing and Society
ANTH 281 Nature/Culture: Introduction to Environmental Anthropology
ENGL 217* Humanimality
ENGL 257* British Topographies
ENGL 356 Studies in American Environment and Place
HIST 119* International History of the United States
HIST 227* Geographies of the Occult and Witchcraft
HIST 253 History of the US Built Environment
POLS 260 Environmental Political Theory (temporary course 2011/2012)
POLS 261* Global Civil Society
POLS 360 Global Environmental Politics (temporary course 2011/2012)
POLS 370 Environmental Political Thought

Swarthmore
ARTH 035* Pictured Environments: Japanese Landscapes and Cityscapes (part of 360°)
CHIN 088 Governance and Environmental Issues in China (also POLS 088)
ECON 032* Operations Research (also ENGR 057)
ECON 076 Environmental Economics
ENGL 009C FYS: Imagining Natural History
ENGL 070G Writing Nature
ENVS 001 Introduction to Environmental Studies
ENVS 002 Human Nature, Technology, and the Environment
ENVS 090 Directed Readings in Environmental Studies
ENVS 092 Research Project
HIST 089 Environmental History of Africa
JPNS 035 Narratives of Disaster and Rebuilding in Japan (part of 360°)
LING 120* Anthropological Linguistics: Endangered Languages
LITR 022G* Food Revolutions: History, Politics, Culture
PHIL 035 Environmental Ethics
POLS 037 Introduction to GIS for Social Environmental Analysis
POLS 043 Environmental Policy and Politics
POLS 043B Environmental Justice: Theory and Action
POLS 048* The Politics of Population
POLS 071 Applied Spacial Analysis with GIS (prereqs)
RELG 022 Religion and Ecology
SOAN 020M Race, Gender and Environment
SOAN 023C Anthropological Perspectives on Conservation

COURSES

ANTH B203 Human Ecology
The relationship of humans with their environment; culture as an adaptive mechanism and a dynamic component in ecological systems. Human ecological perspectives are compared with other theoretical orientations in anthropology. Prerequisites: ANTH 101, 102, or permission of instructor.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

ANTH B237 Environmental Health
This course introduces principles and methods in environmental anthropology and public health used to analyze global environmental health problems globally and develop health and disease control programs. Topics covered include risk; health and environment; food production and consumption; human health and agriculture; meat and poultry production; and culture, urbanization, and disease. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or permission of instructor.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Pashigian,M.
(Fall 2014)

BIOL B210 Biology and Public Policy
A lecture/discussion course on major issues and advances in biology and their implications for public policy decisions. Topics discussed include reproductive technologies, the Human Genome project, environmental health hazards, bioterrorism, and euthanasia and organ transplantation. Readings include scientific articles, public policy and ethical considerations, and lay publications. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111, or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

BIOL B220 Ecology
A study of the interactions between organisms and their environments. The scientific underpinnings of current environmental issues, with regard to human impacts, are also discussed. Students will also become familiar with ecological principles and with the methods ecologists use. Students will apply these principles through the design and implementation of experiments both in the laboratory and the field. Lecture three hours a week, laboratory/field investigation three hours a week. There will be optional field trips throughout the semester. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL B110 or B111 or permission of instructor.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Mozdzer,T.
(Fall 2014)

BIOL B225 Biology of Plants
Plants are critical to numerous contemporary issues, such as ecological sustainability, economic stability, and human health. Students will examine the fundamentals of how plants are structured, how they function, how they interact with other organisms, and how they respond to environmental stimuli. In addition, students will be taught to identify important local species, and will explore the role of plants in human society and ecological systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 110 and BIOL 111.
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Caplan,J.
(Spring 2015)

BIOL B250 Computational Methods in the Sciences
A study of how and why modern computation methods are used in scientific inquiry. Students will learn basic principles of visualizing and analyzing scientific data through hands-on programming exercises. The majority of the course will use the R programming language and corresponding open source statistical software. Content will focus on data sets from across the sciences. Six hours of combined lecture/lab per week.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Environmental Studies; Neuroscience
Crosslisting(s): GEOL-B250; CMSC-B250
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Record,S.
(Spring 2015)

BIOL B262 Urban Ecosystems
Cities can be considered ecosystems whose functions are highly influenced by human activity. This course will address many of the living and non-living components of urban ecosystems, as well as their unique processes. Using an approach focused on case studies, the course will explore the ecological and environmental problems that arise from urbanization, and also examine solutions that have been attempted. Prerequisite: BIOL B110 or B111 or ENVS B101.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B262
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Caplan,J.
(Fall 2014)

BIOL B320 Evolutionary Ecology
This course will examine how phenotypic variation in organisms is optimized and constrained by ecological and evolutionary factors. We will cover concepts and case studies in life history evolution, behavioral ecology, and population ecology with an emphasis on both mathematical and experimental approaches. Recommended Prerequisites: One semester of BIOL B110-111 or BIOL 220.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

BIOL B323 Coastal and Marine Ecology
An interdisciplinary course exploring the ecological, biogeochemical, and physical aspects of coastal and marine ecosystems. We will compare intertidal habitats in both temperate and tropical environments, with a specific emphasis on global change impacts on coastal systems (e.g. sea level rise, warming, and species shifts). In 2015 the course will have a mandatory field trip to a tropical marine field station and an overnight field trip to a temperate field station in the mid-Atlantic. Prerequisite: BIOL B220 (Ecology)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Mozdzer,T.
(Spring 2015)

BIOL B332 Global Change Biology
Global changes to our environment present omnipresent environmental challenges. We are only beginning to understand the complex interactions between organisms and the rapidly changing environment. Students will explore the effects of global change in depth using the primary literature. Prerequisites: BIOL B220 (Ecology) or BIOL B262 (Urban Ecology) or permission of instructor.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Mozdzer,T.
(Fall 2014)

CHEM B206 The Science of Renewable Energy
In this course the chemistry and physics of renewable energy, including solar, wind, geothermal and others, will be explored. Methodologies for energy storage will also be discussed. Quantitative tools will be developed to enable students to make effective and accurate comparisons between various types of energy generation processes. Prerequisites: Completion of CHEM 103 and CHEM 104 with merit grades in both, or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

CITY B103 Earth System Science and the Environment
This integrated approach to studying the Earth focuses on interactions among geology, oceanography, and biology. Also discussed are the consequences of population growth, industrial development, and human land use. Two lectures and one afternoon of laboratory or fieldwork per week. A required two-day (Fri.-Sat.) field trip is taken in April.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): GEOL-B103
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Marenco,K., Barber,D.
(Spring 2015)

CITY B201 Introduction to GIS for Social and Environmental Analysis
This course is designed to introduce the foundations of GIS with emphasis on applications for social and environmental analysis. It deals with basic principles of GIS and its use in spatial analysis and information management. Ultimately, students will design and carry out research projects on topics of their own choosing.
Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2014)

CITY B204 Economics of Local Environmental Programs
Considers the determinants of human impact on the environment at the neighborhood or community level and policy responses available to local government. How can economics help solve and learn from the problems facing rural and suburban communities? The instructor was a local township supervisor who will share the day-to-day challenges of coping with land use planning, waste disposal, dispute resolution, and the provision of basis services. Prerequisite: ECON B105.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): ECON-B242
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Ross,D.
(Spring 2015)

CITY B210 Natural Hazards
A quantitative approach to understanding the earth processes that impact human societies. We consider the past, current, and future hazards presented by geologic processes, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, and hurricanes. The course includes discussion of the social, economic, and policy contexts within which natural geologic processes become hazards. Case studies are drawn from contemporary and ancient societies. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: One semester of college science or permission of instructor.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): GEOL-B209
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

CITY B222 Environmental Issues: Movements and Policy Making in Comparative Perspective
An exploration of the ways in which different cultural, economic, and political settings have shaped issue emergence and policy making. We examine the politics of particular environmental issues in selected countries and regions, paying special attention to the impact of environmental movements. We also assess the prospects for international cooperation in addressing global environmental problems such as climate change.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B222
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Hager,C.
(Spring 2015)

CITY B237 Themes in Modern African History
The course examines the cultural, environmental, economic, political, and social factors that contributed to the expansion and transformation of pre-industrial cities, colonial cities, and cities today. We will examine various themes, such as the relationship between cities and societies; migration and social change; urban space, health problems, city life, and women.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B237
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Ngalamulume,K.
Fall 2014: Current topic description: A seminar exploring indigenous societies and cultures of the Americas through interdisciplinary scholarship. The course’s aim is to explore the evolution of several indigenous societies and cultures in order to frame Native peoples as actors on historical playing fields that were as rich, complex, and subject to change as those that the European intruders and their descendants later occupied.

CITY B241 Building Green: Sustainable Design Past and Present
At a time when more than half of the human population lives in cities, the design of the built environment is of key importance. This course is designed for students to investigate issues of sustainability in architecture. A close reading of texts and careful analysis of buildings and cities will help us understand the terms and practices of architectural design and the importance of ecological, economic, political, cultural, social sustainability over time and through space.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

CITY B250 Topics: Growth and Spatial Organization of the City
An introduction to growth and spatial organization of cities. Topics vary.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B251
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

CITY B262 Urban Ecosystems
Cities can be considered ecosystems whose functions are highly influenced by human activity. This course will address many of the living and non-living components of urban ecosystems, as well as their unique processes. Using an approach focused on case studies, the course will explore the ecological and environmental problems that arise from urbanization, and also examine solutions that have been attempted. Prerequisite: BIOL B110 or B111 or ENVS B101.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): BIOL-B262
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Caplan,J.
(Fall 2014)

CITY B278 American Environmental History
This course explores major themes of American environmental history, examining changes in the American landscape, the history of ideas about nature and the interaction between the two. Students will study definitions of nature, environment, and environmental history while investigating interactions between Americans and their physical worlds.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B278
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Stroud,E.
(Spring 2015)

CITY B279 Cities and the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change
In this course, we focus on the human dimensions of global environmental change, especially as it relates to urban sustainability. While sustainability has often narrowly been viewed in environmental terms, we will analyze social and environmental justice as integral components of urban sustainability.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

CITY B321 Technology and Politics
An multi-media analysis of the complex role of technology in political and social life. We focus on the relationship between technological change and democratic governance. We begin with historical and contemporary Luddism as well as pro-technology movements around the world. Substantive issue areas include security and surveillance, electoral politics, warfare, social media, internet freedom, GMO foods and industrial agriculture, climate change and energy politics.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B321
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

CITY B329 Advanced Topics in Urban Environments
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Stroud,E.
Spring 2015: Current topic description: Many important sites in American cities are illegible to those who do not already know their significance. In this seminar, we will be learning to read, interpret, and document such landscapes of power, loss, violence, connection, division, and celebration.

CITY B345 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B346; HIST-B345
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

CMSC B250 Computational Methods in the Sciences
A study of how and why modern computation methods are used in scientific inquiry. Students will learn basic principles of simulation-based programming through hands-on exercises. Content will focus on the development of population models, beginning with simple exponential growth and ending with spatially explicit individual-based simulations. Students will design and implement a final project from their own disciplines. Six hours of combined lecture/lab per week.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Environmental Studies; Neuroscience
Crosslisting(s): BIOL-B250; GEOL-B250
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Record,S.
(Spring 2015)

EAST B352 China’s Environment
This seminar explores China’s environmental issues from a historical perspective. It begins by considering a range of analytical approaches , and then explores three general periods in China’s environmental changes, imperial times, Mao’s socialist experiments during the first thirty years of the People’s Republic, and the post-Mao reforms. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B352
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

EAST B362 Environment in Contemporary East Asia: China and Japan
This seminar explores environmental issues in contemporary East Asia from a historical perspective. It will explore the common and different environmental problems in Japan and China, and explain and interpret their causal factors and solving measures in cultural traditions, social movements, economic growth, political and legal institutions and practices, international cooperation and changing perceptions. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Jiang,Y.
(Spring 2015)

ECON B225 Economic Development
Examination of the issues related to and the policies designed to promote economic development in the developing economies of Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Focus is on why some developing economies grow faster than others and why some growth paths are more equitable, poverty reducing, and environmentally sustainable than others. Includes consideration of the impact of international trade and investment policy, macroeconomic policies (exchange rate, monetary and fiscal policy) and sector policies (industry, agriculture, education, population, and environment) on development outcomes in a wide range of political and institutional contexts. Prerequisite: ECON B105.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; International Studies Major
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B225
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Rock,M., Dominguez,C.
(Fall 2014, Spring 2015)

ECON B234 Environmental Economics
Introduction to the use of economic analysis explain the underlying behavioral causes of environmental and natural resource problems and to evaluate policy responses to them. Topics may include air and water pollution; the economic theory of externalities, public goods and the depletion of resources; cost-benefit analysis; valuing non-market benefits and costs; economic justice; and sustainable development. Prerequisites: ECON B105.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B234
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

ECON B242 Economics of Local Environmental Programs
Considers the determinants of human impact on the environment at the neighborhood or community level and policy responses available to local government. How can economics help solve and learn from the problems facing rural and suburban communities? The instructor was a local township supervisor who will share the day-to-day challenges of coping with land use planning, waste disposal, dispute resolution, and the provision of basis services. Prerequisite: ECON B105.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Praxis Program
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B204
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Ross,D.
(Spring 2015)

EDUC B285 Ecologies of Minds and Communities
This course will attend to students’ distinctive ways of seeing and being in the world, in the context of communitarian questions of identity, access, and power. How can we re-imagine ecological literacy more deeply and fruitfully with and for diverse students and communities?
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

ENGL B216 Re-creating Our World: Vision, Voice, Value
To this shared project, the discipline of English literary studies will contribute an awareness of the limits and possibilities of representation, asking what is foregrounded, what backgrounded or omitted, in each verbal, visual, aural or tactile re-presentation of the world. Asking, too, what might be imagined that has not yet been experienced, “Re-creating Our World” invites students both to create their own multi-modal representations of the spaces they occupy, and to re-create, in some way, the space that is Bryn Mawr. This course offers a shared exploration of imaginative images and texts, with a global reach and in a range of genres (photography, film, poetry, as well as multiple narratives, in forms that will vary from satire to science fiction, from apocalypse to utopia). On field trips to local sites, we will also study “representations” of the world in the form of various “shaped spaces,” including The Center for Environmental Transformation in Camden, the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum, John James Audubon’s house @ Mill Grove, Wissahickon Valley Park, Chanticleer (a pleasure garden in Wayne), and the Laurel Hill Cemetery.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

ENGL B218 Ecological Imaginings
Re-thinking the evolving nature of representation, with a focus on language as a link between natural and cultural ecosystems. We will observe the world; read classical and cutting edge ecolinguistic, ecoliterary, ecofeminist, and ecocritical theory, along with a wide range of exploratory, speculative, and imaginative essays and stories; and seek a variety of ways of expressing our own ecological interests.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Dalke,A.
(Spring 2015)

ENGL B251 Food for Thought: Gastronomic Literatures and Philosophies
Through the lens of “food and text,” this course will trace the philosophy of food and the history of food writing. We will study how food has been written about and how food writing has responded to and played a role in cultural change.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

ENGL B268 Native Soil and American Literature: 1492-1900
This course will consider the literature of contact and conflict between English-speaking whites and Native Americans between the years 1492 and 1920. We will focus on how these cultures understood the meaning and uses of land, and the effects of these literatures of encounter upon American land and ecology and vice versa. Texts will include works by Native, European- and African-American writers, and may include texts by Christopher Columbus, John Smith, William Bradford, Handsome Lake, Samson Occom, Lydia Maria Child, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins, John Rollin Ridge, Mark Twain, Mourning Dove, Ella Deloria and Willa Cather.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

ENGL B313 Ecological Imaginings
Re-thinking the evolving nature of representation, with a focus on language as a link between natural and cultural ecosystems. We will observe the world; read classical and cutting edge ecolinguistic, ecoliterary, ecofeminist, and ecocritical theory, along with a wide range of exploratory, speculative, and imaginative essays and stories; and seek a variety of ways of expressing our own ecological interests. Prerequisites: Environmental Studies minors, Gender Studies concentrators, or English majors.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

ENVS B101 Introduction to Environmental Studies
This interdisciplinary introduction to Environmental Studies Minor examines the ideas, themes and methodologies of humanists, social scientists, and natural scientists in order to understand what they have to offer each other in the study of the environment, and how their inquiries can be strengthened when working in concert.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Hager,C., Barber,D.
(Fall 2014)

ENVS B397 Senior Seminar in Environmental Studies
In this capstone course, senior Environmental Studies minors from across the disciplines will draw on the perspectives and skills gained from their majors and from their preparatory work in the minor to collaboratively engage high-level questions of environmental inquiry. Prerequisite: Open only to Environmental Studies minors who have completed all introductory work for the minor.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Stroud,E.
(Spring 2015)

ENVS B403 Independent Study
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2014)

ENVS B415 Teaching Assistant
An exploration of course planning, pedagogy and creative thinking as students work to help others understand pathways they have already explored in introductory and writing classes. This opportunity is available only to advanced students of highest standing by professorial invitation.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

GEOL B101 How the Earth Works
An introduction to the study of planet Earth—the materials of which it is made, the forces that shape its surface and interior, the relationship of geological processes to people, and the application of geological knowledge to the search for useful materials. Laboratory and fieldwork focus on learning the tools for geological investigations and applying them to the local area and selected areas around the world. Three lectures and one afternoon of laboratory or fieldwork a week. One required one-day field trip on a weekend.
Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Elkins,L., Weil,A.
(Fall 2014)

GEOL B103 Earth Systems and the Environment
This integrated approach to studying the Earth focuses on interactions among geology, oceanography, and biology. Also discussed are the consequences of population growth, industrial development, and human land use. Two lectures and one afternoon of laboratory or fieldwork per week. A required two-day (Fri.-Sat.) field trip is taken in April.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B103
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Marenco,K., Barber,D.
(Spring 2015)

GEOL B203 Invertebrate Paleobiology
Biology, evolution, ecology, and morphology of the major marine invertebrate fossil groups. Lecture three hours and laboratory three hours a week. A semester-long research project culminating in a scientific manuscript will be based on material collected on a two-day trip to the Tertiary deposits of the Chesapeake Bay.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Marenco,K.
(Fall 2014)

GEOL B206 Energy Resources and Sustainability
An examination of issues concerning the supply of energy and raw materials required by humanity. This includes an investigation of the geological framework that determines resource availability, and of the social, economic, and political considerations related to energy production and resource development. Two 90-minute lectures a week. Prerequisite: One year of college science.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

GEOL B209 Natural Hazards
A quantitative approach to understanding the earth processes that impact human societies. We consider the past, current, and future hazards presented by geologic processes, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, and hurricanes. The course includes discussion of the social, economic, and policy contexts within which natural geologic processes become hazards. Case studies are drawn from contemporary and ancient societies. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: One semester of college science or permission of instructor.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B210
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

GEOL B250 Computational Methods in the Sciences
A study of how and why modern computation methods are used in scientific inquiry. Students will learn basic principles of simulation-based programming through hands-on exercises. Content will focus on the development of population models, beginning with simple exponential growth and ending with spatially explicit individual-based simulations. Students will design and implement a final project from their own disciplines. Six hours of combined lecture/lab per week.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Environmental Studies; Neuroscience
Crosslisting(s): BIOL-B250; CMSC-B250
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Record,S.
(Spring 2015)

GEOL B302 Low-Temperature Geochemistry
Stable isotope geochemistry is one of the most important subfields of the Earth sciences for understanding environmental and climatic change. In this course, we will explore stable isotopic fundamentals and applications including a number of important case studies from the recent and deep time dealing with important biotic events in the fossil record and major climate changes. Prerequisites: GEOL 101 or GEOL 102, and at least one semester of chemistry or physics, or professor approval.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Marenco,P.
(Spring 2015)

GEOL B314 Marine Geology
An introduction to oceanography, coastal processes, and the geomorphology of temperate and tropical shorelines. Includes an overview of the many parameters, including sea level change, that shape coastal environments. Meets twice weekly for a combination of lecture, discussion and hands-on exercises, including a mandatory multi-day field trip to investigate developed and pristine sections of the Mid-Atlantic US coast. Prerequisite: One 200-level GEOL course OR one GEOL course AND one BIOL course (any level), OR advanced BIOL major standing (junior or senior).
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Barber,D.
(Fall 2014)

GEOL B328 Analysis of Geospatial Data Using GIS
Analysis of geospatial data, theory, and the practice of geospatial reasoning.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B328; BIOL-B328; ARCH-B328
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

HIST B212 Pirates, Travelers, and Natural Historians: 1492-1750
In the early modern period, conquistadors, missionaries, travelers, pirates, and natural historians wrote interesting texts in which they tried to integrate the New World into their existing frameworks of knowledge. This intellectual endeavor was an adjunct to the physical conquest of American space, and provides a framework though which we will explore the processes of imperial competition, state formation, and indigenous and African resistance to colonialism.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

HIST B251 Topics: Growth and Spatial Organization of the City
An introduction to growth and spatial organization of cities. Topics vary.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B250
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

HIST B278 American Environmental History
This course explores major themes of American environmental history, examining changes in the American landscape, the history of ideas about nature and the interaction between the two. Students will study definitions of nature, environment, and environmental history while investigating interactions between Americans and their physical worlds.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B278
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Stroud,E.
(Spring 2015)

HIST B352 China’s Environment
This seminar explores China’s environmental issues from a historical perspective. It begins by considering a range of analytical approaches , and then explores three general periods in China’s environmental changes, imperial times, Mao’s socialist experiments during the first thirty years of the People’s Republic, and the post-Mao reforms. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): EAST-B352
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

PHIL B240 Environmental Ethics
This course surveys rights- and justice-based justifications for ethical positions on the environment. It examines approaches such as stewardship, intrinsic value, land ethic, deep ecology, ecofeminism, Asian and aboriginal. It explores issues such as obligations to future generations, to nonhumans and to the biosphere.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B240
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

POLS B222 Environmental Issues: Movements and Policy Making in Comparative Perspective
An exploration of the ways in which different cultural, economic, and political settings have shaped issue emergence and policy making. We examine the politics of particular environmental issues in selected countries and regions, paying special attention to the impact of environmental movements. We also assess the prospects for international cooperation in addressing global environmental problems such as climate change.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B222
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Hager,C.
(Spring 2015)

POLS B240 Environmental Ethics
This course surveys rights- and justice-based justifications for ethical positions on the environment. It examines approaches such as stewardship, intrinsic value, land ethic, deep ecology, ecofeminism, Asian and aboriginal. It explores issues such as obligations to future generations, to nonhumans and to the biosphere.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): PHIL-B240
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

POLS B310 Comparative Public Policy
A comparison of policy processes and outcomes across space and time. Focusing on particular issues such as health care, domestic security, water and land use, we identify institutional, historical, and cultural factors that shape policies. We also examine the growing importance of international-level policy making and the interplay between international and domestic pressures on policy makers. Prerequisite: One course in Political Science or public policy.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

POLS B321 Technology and Politics
An multi-media analysis of the complex role of technology in political and social life. We focus on the relationship between technological change and democratic governance. We begin with historical and contemporary Luddism as well as pro-technology movements around the world. Substantive issue areas include security and surveillance, electoral politics, warfare, social media, internet freedom, GMO foods and industrial agriculture, climate change and energy politics.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B321
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

POLS B354 Comparative Social Movements: Power and Mobilization
A consideration of the conceptualizations of power and “legitimate” and “illegitimate” participation, the political opportunity structure facing potential activists, the mobilizing resources available to them, and the cultural framing within which these processes occur. Specific attention is paid to recent movements within and across countries, such as feminist, environmental, and anti-globalization movements, and to emerging forms of citizen mobilization, including transnational and global networks, electronic mobilization, and collaborative policymaking institutions. Prerequisite: One course in POLS or SOCL or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B354
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Hager,C.
(Spring 2015)

SOCL B165 Problems in the Natural and Built Environment
This course situates the development of sociology as responding to major social problems in the natural and built environment. It demonstrates why the key theoretical developments and empirical findings of sociology are crucial in understanding how these problems develop, persist and are addressed or fail to be addressed.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Wright,N.
(Spring 2015)

SOCL B346 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B345; HIST-B345
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

SOCL B354 Comparative Social Movements
A consideration of the conceptualizations of power and “legitimate” and “illegitimate” participation, the political opportunity structure facing potential activists, the mobilizing resources available to them, and the cultural framing within which these processes occur. Specific attention is paid to recent movements within and across countries, such as feminist, environmental, and anti-globalization movements, and to emerging forms of citizen mobilization, including transnational and global networks, electronic mobilization, and collaborative policymaking institutions.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B354
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Hager,C.
(Spring 2015)