Child and Family Studies

Students may complete a Child and Family Studies minor as an adjunct to any major at Bryn Mawr, Haverford or Swarthmore pending approval of the student’s coursework plan by the Director of Child and Family Studies, Leslie Rescorla.

Affiliated Faculty

Marissa Golden, Associate Professor of Political Science on the Joan Coward Chair in Political Economics (on leave semester I)
Alice Lesnick, Director and Term Professor in the Bryn Mawr/Haverford Education Program and Director of Africana Studies (on leave semester I)
Mary Osirim, Interim Provost and Professor of Sociology
Leslie Rescorla, Professor of Psychology on the Class of 1897 Professorship of Science and Director of Child Study Institute
Janet Shapiro, Professor of Social Work and Director for the Center for Child and Family Wellbeing

The Child and Family Studies (CFS) minor provides a curricular mechanism for inter-disciplinary work focused on the contributions of biological, familial, psychological, socioeconomic, political, and educational factors to child and family well-being. The minor will not only address the life stages and cultural contexts of infancy through adolescence but will also includes issues of parenting; child and family well-being; gender; schooling and informal education; risk and resilience; and the place, representation, and voice of children in society and culture.

Requirements for the Child and Family Studies Minor

The minor comprises six courses: one gateway course (PSYCH 206 Developmental Psychology, PSYCH 203 Educational Psychology, EDUC 200 Critical Issues in Education, or SOCL 201 Study of Gender in Society), plus five additional courses, at least two of which must be outside of the major department and at least one of which must be at the 300 level. Advanced Haverford and Swarthmore courses typically taken by juniors and seniors that are more specific than introductory and survey courses will count as 300 level courses. No more than two courses may be double-counted with each major, minor, or other degree credential.

Students will craft a pathway in the minor as they engage in course selection through ongoing discussions with their CFS Director. Sample pathways might include: political science/child and family law; sociology/educational policy; child and family mental health; depictions of children/families in literature and film; child and family public health issues; social work/child welfare; anthropology/cross-cultural child and family issues; gender issues affecting children and families; social justice/diversity issues affecting children and families; or economic factors affecting children and families.

The minor also requires participation in at least one semester or summer of volunteer, practicum, praxis, community-based work study, or internship experience related to Child and Family Studies, with reflections to be recorded in a journal, which will be part of the student’s portfolio. Students are expected to discuss their placement choices with the CFS Director. For further information about field-based experiences, consult the Child and Family Studies website: www.brynmawr.edu/tricochildfamily/minor.html.

Information about Child and Family Studies is also posted on Serendip Studio: www.serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/child-family-studies.

To foster the inter-disciplinary nature of Child and Family Studies, students enrolled in the minor must also complete the following requirements:

  • Attendance at a minimum of two semesters at a “brown bag” 1-hour seminar, comprised of individual workshop/discussion sessions facilitated by a range of individuals, including the students themselves, affiliated faculty and staff, and guest speakers.
  • Participation during senior year in an annual CFS Poster Session during which students will share highlights of their CFS campus and field-based experiences.

Courses that can be counted toward the Child and Family Studies Minor

(Note: it is important to check the Trico course guide for updated course information as not every course is taught every year. In some cases, courses relevant to the CFS minor will have changed, or been added. Students should explore freely and consult with their advisor on curricular choices).

Bryn Mawr
ANTH 212 Primate Evolution and Behavior
ANTH 253 Childhood in the African Experience
ANTH 281 Language in the Social Context
ANTH 312 Anthropology of Reproduction
ANTH 341 Cultural Perspectives on Marriage Family
EDUC 200 Critical Issues in Education
EDUC 210 Perspectives on Special Education
EDUC 250 Literacies and Education
EDUC 266 Schools in American Cities
EDUC 301 Curriculum and Pedagogy
EDUC 302 Practice Teaching Seminar
EDUC 310 Defining Educational Practice
EDUC 311 Fieldwork Seminar
POLS 375 Gender, Work and Family
PSYC 203 Educational Psychology
PSYC 206 Developmental Psychology
PSYC 209 Abnormal Psychology
PSYC 250 Autism Spectrum Disorders
PSYC 256 Culture and Development
PSYC 322 Culture and Development
PSYC 340 Women’s Mental Health
PSYC 346 Pediatric Psychology
PSYC 350 Developmental Cognitive Disorders
PSYC 351 Developmental Psychopathology
PSYC 352 Advanced Topics Developmental Psychology
SOCL 217 The Family in Social Context
SOCL 225 Women in Contemporary Society
SOCL 258 Sociology of Education
SOCL 266 Schools in American Cities
SOWK 554 Social Determinants of Health
SOWK 559 Family Therapy: Theory and Practice
SOWK 569 Clinical Social Work Practice with Children and Adolescents
SOWK 571 Education Law for Social Workers
SOWK 574 Child Welfare Policy, Practice, and Research
SOWK 575 Global Public Health
SOWK 580 Adolescents in Family Therapy

Haverford
ANTH 209 Anthropology of Education
ANTH 263 Anthropology of Space and Architecture
BIOL 217 Biological Psychology
COML 289 Children’s Literature
EDUC 200 Critical Issues in Education
EDUC 210 Special Education
EDUC 260 Multicultural Education
EDUC 275 English Learners in the U.S.
PSYC 213 Memory and Cognition
PSYC 215 Introduction to Personality Psychology
PSYC 217 Biological Psychology
PSYC 224 Social Psychology
PSYC 238 Psychology of Language

Swarthmore
ED 14 Introduction to Education
ED 17 Curriculum and Methods Seminar
ED 21/Psych 21 Educational Psychology
ED 23/Psych 23 Adolescence
ED 23A Adolescents and Special Education
ED 26/Psych 26 Special Education
ED 41 Educational Policy
ED 42 Teaching Diverse Young Learners
ED 45 Literacies and Social Identities
ED 53 Language Minority Education
ED 61 Gender and Education
ED 64 Comparative Education
ED 68 Urban Education
ED 70 Outreach Practicum
ED 121 Psychology and Practice Honors Seminar
ED 131 Social and Cultural Perspectives Honors Seminar
ED 151 Literacies Research Honors Seminar
ED 162 Sociology of Education
ED 167 Identities and Education Honors Seminar
HIST 079 Women, Family, and the State in China
PSYC 27 Language Acquisition and Development
PSYC 35 Social Psychology
PSYC 39 Developmental Psychology
PSYC 41 Children at Risk
PSYC 42 Human Intelligence
PSYC 43 Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
PSYC 50 Developmental Psychopathology
PSYC 55 Family Systems Theory and Psychological Change
PSYC 135 Advanced Topics in Social and Cultural Psychology

COURSES

ANTH B281 Language in Social Context
Studies of language in society have moved from the idea that language reflects social position/identity to the idea that language plays an active role in shaping and negotiating social position, identity, and experience. This course will explore the implications of this shift by providing an introduction to the fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. We will be particularly concerned with the ways in which language is implicated in the social construction of gender, race, class, and cultural/national identity. The course will develop students’ skills in the ethnographic analysis of communication through several short ethnographic projects. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or permission of instructor.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Peace and Conflict Studies
Crosslisting(s): LING-B281
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

ANTH B312 Anthropology of Reproduction
An examination of social and cultural constructions of reproduction, and how power in everyday life shapes reproductive behavior and its meaning in Western and non-Western cultures. The influence of competing interests within households, communities, states, and institutions on reproduction is considered. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

EDUC B200 Critical Issues in Education
Designed to be the first course for students interested in pursuing one of the options offered through the Education Program, this course is also open to students exploring an interest in educational issues. The course examines major issues in education in the United States within the conceptual framework of educational transformation. Fieldwork in an area school required (eight visits, 1.5-2 hours per visit).
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Lesnick,A.
(Spring 2015)

EDUC B210 Perspectives on Special Education
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a range of topics, challenges, dilemmas, and strategies in understanding and educating all learners—those considered typical learners as well as those considered “special” learners. Students will learn more about: how students’ learning profiles affect their learning in school from a functional perspective; how and why students’ educational experience is affected by special education law; major issues in the field of special education; and a-typical learners, students with disabilities, and how to meet diverse student needs in a classroom. Two hours of fieldwork per week required.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Flaks,D.
(Fall 2014)

EDUC B250 Literacies and Education
A critical exploration of what counts as literacy, who decides, and what the implications are for teaching and learning. Students explore both their own and others experiences of literacy through reading and writing about power, privilege, access and responsibility around issues of adult, ESL, cultural, multicultural, gendered, academic and critical literacies. Fieldwork required. Priority given first to those pursuing certification or a minor in educational studies.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

EDUC B266 Schools in American Cities
This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal “case” that students investigate through documents and school placements. This is a Praxis II course (weekly fieldwork in a school required)
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B266; CITY-B266
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Cohen,J.
(Spring 2015)

EDUC B301 Curriculum and Pedagogy Seminar
A consideration of theoretical and applied issues related to effective curriculum design, pedagogical approaches and related issues of teaching and learning. Fieldwork is required. Enrollment is limited to 15 with priority given first to students pursuing certification and second to seniors planning to teach.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

EDUC B302 Practice Teaching Seminar
Drawing on participants’ diverse student teaching placements, this seminar invites exploration and analysis of ideas, perspectives and approaches to teaching at the middle and secondary levels. Taken concurrently with Practice Teaching. Open only to students engaged in practice teaching.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2014)

EDUC B311 Fieldwork Seminar
Drawing on the diverse contexts in which participants complete their fieldwork, this seminar invites exploration and analysis of ideas, perspectives and different ways of understanding his/her ongoing fieldwork and associated issues of educational practice, reform, and innovation. Five hours of fieldwork are required per week.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

POLS B375 Gender, Work and Family
As the number of women participating in the paid workforce who are also mothers exceeds 50 percent, it becomes increasingly important to study the issues raised by these dual roles. This seminar will examine the experiences of working and nonworking mothers in the United States, the roles of fathers, the impact of working mothers on children, and the policy implications of women, work, and family.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B375
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Golden,M.
(Spring 2015)

PSYC B203 Educational Psychology
Topics in the psychology of human cognitive, social, and affective behavior are examined and related to educational practice. Issues covered include learning theories, memory, attention, thinking, motivation, social/emotional issues in adolescence, and assessment/learning disabilities. This course provides a Praxis Level I opportunity. Classroom observation is required. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 (Introductory Psychology)
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Cassidy,K.
(Fall 2014)

PSYC B206 Developmental Psychology
A topical survey of psychological development from infancy through adolescence, focusing on the interaction of personal and environmental factors in the ontogeny of perception, language, cognition, and social interactions within the family and with peers. Topics include developmental theories; infant perception; attachment; language development; theory of mind; memory development; peer relations, schools and the family as contexts of development; and identity and the adolescent transition. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 or PSYC H100
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Egan Brad,L.
(Spring 2015)

PSYC B209 Abnormal Psychology
This course will cover the main psychological disorders manifested by individuals as they develop across the life span. The semester will begin with an historical overview of how psychopathology has been conceptualized and treated across many centuries of Western history. The course will then review the assumptions of the major models which have been formulated to explain psychopathology: the biological, the psychodynamic, the behavioral, and the cognitive. We will begin with childhood and adolescent disorders and then cover the main disorders of adults. Among the disorders covered will be: attention deficit disorder, anorexia/bulimia, conduct disorder/antisocial personality, borderline personality disorder, anxiety disorders, psychophysiological disorders, substance abuse, depression, and schizophrenia. For each disorder, we will explore issues of classification, theories of etiology, risk and prevention factors, research on prognosis, and studies of treatment. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC B105 or H100).
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Schulz,M.
(Fall 2014)

PSYC B250 Autism Spectrum Disorders
Focuses on theory of and research on Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Topics include the history of autism; classification and diagnosis; epidemiology and etiology; major theories; investigations of sensory and motor atypicalities, early social communicative skills, affective, cognitive, symbolic and social factors; the neuropsychology of ASD; and current approaches to intervention. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 105).
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Wozniak,R.
(Fall 2014)

PSYC B322 Culture and Development
This course focuses on development and enculturation within nested sets of interacting contexts (e.g. family, village, classroom/work group, peer group, culture). Topics include the nature of culture, human narrativity, acquisition of multiple literacies, and the way in which developing mind, multiple contexts, cultures, narrativity, and literacies help forge identities. Prerequisites: PSYC 105 and PSYC 206, or Permission of the Instructor
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Wozniak,R.
(Spring 2015)

PSYC B340 Women’s Mental Health
This course will provide an overview of current research and theory related to women’s mental health. We will discuss psychological phenomena and disorders that are particularly salient to and prevalent among women, why these phenomena/disorders affect women disproportionately over men, and how they may impact women’s psychological and physical well-being. Psychological disorders covered will include: depression, eating disorders, dissociative identity disorder, borderline personality disorder, and chronic pain disorders. Other topics discussed will include work-family conflict for working mothers, the role of sociocultural influences on women’s mental health, and mental health issues particular to women of color and to lesbian women. Prerequisite: PSYC B209 or PSYC B351 (or equivalent 200-level course).
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

PSYC B346 Pediatric Psychology
This course uses a developmental-ecological perspective to understand the psychological challenges associated with physical health issues in children. The course explores how different environments support the development of children who sustain illness or injury and will cover topics including: prevention, coping, adherence to medical regimens, and pain management. The course will consider the ways in which cultural beliefs and values shape medical experiences. Suggested Preparation: PSYC B206 highly recommended.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

PSYC B350 Developmental Cognitive Disorders
This course uses a developmental and neuropsychological framework to study major development cognitive disorders manifested by children and adolescents, such as language delay/impairment, specific reading disability, math disability, nonverbal learning disability, intellectual disability, executive function disorder, autism, and traumatic brain injury. Cognitive disorders are viewed in the context of the normal development of language, memory, attention, reading, quantitative abilities, and executive functions. Students enrolled in the course will learn about the assessment, classification, outcome, remediation, and education of the major cognitive disorders manifested by children and adolescents. Students will participate in a course-related Praxis placement approximately 3 - 4 hours a week.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Neuroscience; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

PSYC B351 Developmental Psychopathology
This course will examine emotional and behavioral disorders of children and adolescents, including autism, attention deficit disorder, conduct disorder, phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, anorexia, and schizophrenia. Major topics covered will include: contrasting models of psychopathology; empirical and categorical approaches to assessment and diagnosis; outcome of childhood disorders; risk, resilience, and prevention; and therapeutic approaches and their efficacy. Prerequisite: PSYC 206 or 209.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Health Studies; Neuroscience
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Rescorla,L.
(Spring 2015)

SOCL B217 The Family in Social Context
A consideration of the family as a social institution in the United States, looking at how societal and cultural characteristics and dynamics influence families; how the family reinforces or changes the society in which it is located; and how the family operates as a social organization. Included is an analysis of family roles and social interaction within the family. Major problems related to contemporary families are addressed, such as domestic violence and divorce. Cross-cultural and subcultural variations in the family are considered.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Wright,N.
(Fall 2014)

SOCL B225 Women in Society
A study of the contemporary experiences of women of color in the Global South. The household, workplace, community, and the nation-state, and the positions of women in the private and public spheres are compared cross-culturally. Topics include feminism, identity and self-esteem; globalization and transnational social movements and tensions and transitions encountered as nations embark upon development.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

SOCL B258 Sociology of Education
Major sociological theories of the relationships between education and society, focusing on the effects of education on inequality in the United States and the historical development of primary, secondary, and post-secondary education in the United States. Other topics include education and social selection, testing and tracking, and micro- and macro-explanations of differences in educational outcomes. This is a Praxis I course; placements are in local schools.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)

SOCL B266 Schools in American Cities
This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal “case” that students investigate through documents and school placements. This is a Praxis II course (weekly fieldwork in a school required)
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Crosslisting(s): EDUC-B266; CITY-B266
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Cohen,J.
(Spring 2015)

SOWK B575 Global Public Health
This course will use three overarching concepts of globalization, social justice and community to help students to define and explore the idea of public health and to decide for themselves where responsibilities for the public health lie. The first half of the course will have a global focus with an exploration of the evolution of some public health policy infrastructures in parts of Africa, India, the former Soviet Union and the United States. The second half will focus on the attempts of the United States to manage the public health through an exploration of examples of federal health legislation and the populations that they are intended to address. Major health legislation includes: soldiers’ and veterans’ benefits, Maternal and Child Health, Medicaid, Medicare, and laws related to the protection of the frail elderly. The subject of HIV/AIDS will be used to review all of the concepts and issues of the course.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2014-2015)