Growth and Structure of Cities

Students may complete a major or minor in Growth and Structure of Cities. Complementing the major, students may complete a minor in Environmental Studies, or a concentration in Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Peoples and Cultures. Students also may enter the 3-2 Program in City and Regional Planning, offered in cooperation with the University of Pennsylvania.

Faculty

Jeffrey Cohen, Term Professor in Growth and Structure of Cities

Carola Hein, Professor of Growth and Structure of Cities (on leave semesters I and II)

Gary McDonogh, Chair and Professor of Growth and Structure of Cities and on the Helen Herrmann Chair

Thomas Morton, Visiting Assistant Professor

Victoria Reyes, Assistant Professor in Growth and Structure of Cities

Ellen Stroud, Associate Professor of Growth and Structure of Cities on the Johanna Alderfer Harris and William H. Harris, M.D. Professorship in Environmental Studies

Daniela Voith, Senior Lecturer in the Growth and Structure of Cities Program

The interdisciplinary Growth and Structure of Cities major challenges students to understand the dynamic relationships connecting urban spatial organization and the built environment with politics, economics, cultures and societies worldwide. Core introductory classes present analytic approaches that explore changing forms of the city over time and analyze the variety of ways through which women and men have re-created global urban life across history and across cultures. With these foundations, students pursue their interests through classes in architecture, urban social and economic relations, urban history, studies of planning and the environmental conditions of urban life. Opportunities for internships, volunteering, and study abroad also enrich the major. Advanced seminars further ground the course of study by focusing on specific cities and topics.

Major Requirements

A minimum of 15 courses (11 courses in Cities and four allied courses in other related fields) is required to complete the major. Two introductory courses (185, 190) balance sociocultural and formal approaches to urban form and the built environment, and introduce cross-cultural and historical comparison of urban development. The introductory sequence should be completed with a broader architectural survey course (253, 254, 255) and a second social science course that entails extended analysis and writing (229). These courses should be completed as early as possible in the first and second years; at least two of them must be taken by the end of the first semester of the sophomore year.

Writing across multiple disciplines is central to the major, drawing on sources as varied as architectural and visual studies, ethnographic fieldwork, archival and textual study, theoretical reflection and policy engagement. Students will begin to write and receive commentary on their arguments and expression from their introductory classes through their required capstone thesis. While most courses in the major have important writing components, at the moment City 229 acts as our primary writing-intensive course, asking students to draw upon the breadth of their interests to focus on researching, writing and rewriting within a comparative framework. We will be expanding our pedagogy in this area over time in conjunction with college initiatives and student feedback. At the same time, students are encouraged to use other classes within the major to develop a range of skills in methods, theory, and presentations, oral and written.

In addition to these introductory courses, each student selects six elective courses within the Cities Department, including cross-listed courses. One of these should be a methods class. The student should also take the 0.5 credit junior seminar (298) during one semester of their junior year. At least two must be at the 300 level. In the senior year, a capstone course is required of all majors. Most students join together in a research seminar, CITY 398, in the Fall of that year. Occasionally, however, after consultation with the major advisers, the student may elect another 300-level course or a program for independent research. This is often the case with double majors who write a thesis in another field.

Finally, each student must also identify four courses outside Cities that represent additional expertise to complement her work in the major. These may include courses such as physics and calculus for architects, additional courses in economics, political science, sociology, or anthropology for students more focused on the social sciences and planning, or courses that build on language, design, or regional interests. Any minor, concentration, or second major also fulfills this requirement. Cities courses that are cross-listed with other departments or originate in them can be counted only once in the course selection, although they may be either allied or elective courses.

Both the Cities Department electives and the four or more allied courses must be chosen in close consultation with the major advisers in order to create a strongly coherent sequence and focus. This is especially true for students interested in architectural design, who will need to arrange studio courses (226, 228) as well as accompanying courses in math, science and architectural history; they should contact the department chair or Daniela Voith in their first year. Likewise, students interested in pursuing a minor in Environmental Studies should consult with Ellen Stroud early in their career, and those interested in pursuing a concentration in Iberian, Latin American, and Latino/a themes or in Global Asian Studies should consult with Gary McDonogh.

Students should also note that many courses in the department as well as cross-listed courses are not given every year. They should also note that courses may carry prerequisites in cities, art history, economics, history, sociology, or the natural sciences.

Programs for study abroad or off campus are encouraged, within the limits of the Bryn Mawr and Haverford rules and practices. In general, a one-semester program is strongly preferred. The Cities Department regularly works with off-campus and study-abroad programs that are strong in architectural history, planning, and design, as well as those that allow students to pursue social and cultural interests. Students who would like to spend part or all of their junior year away must consult with the major advisers and appropriate deans early in their sophomore year.

Cities majors have created major plans that have allowed them to coordinate their interests in cities with architecture, planning, ethnography, history, law, environmental studies, mass media, social justice, medicine, public health, the fine arts, and other fields. No matter the focus, though, each Cities major must develop a solid foundation in both the history of architecture and urban form and the analysis of urban culture, experience, and policy. Careful methodological choices, clear analytical writing, and critical visual analysis constitute primary emphases of the major. Strong interaction with faculty and other students are an important and productive part of the Cities Department, which helps us all take advantage of the major’s flexibility in an organized and rigorous way.

Minor Requirements

Students who wish to minor in the Cities Department must take at least two out of the four required courses and four cities electives, including two at the 300 level. Senior Seminar is not mandatory for fulfilling the cities minor.

3-2 Program in City and Regional Planning

Over the past three decades, many Cities majors have entered the 3-2 Program in City and Regional Planning, offered in conjunction with the University of Pennsylvania. Students interested in this program should meet with faculty early in their sophomore year.

COURSES

CITY B104 Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban Revolutions

This course examines the archaeology of the two most fundamental changes that have occurred in human society in the last 12,000 years, agriculture and urbanism, and we explore these in Egypt and the Near East as far as India. We also explore those societies that did not experience these changes.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): ARCH-B104
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Magee,P.
(Fall 2015)

CITY B136 Working with Economic Data

Applies selected principles of economics to the quantitative analysis of economic data; uses spreadsheets and other tools to collect and judge the reliability of economic data. Topics may include measures of income inequality and poverty; unemployment, national income and other measures of economic well-being; cost-benefit of public and private investments; construction of price indices and other government statistics; evaluating economic forecasts; and the economics of personal finance. Prerequisites: Quantitative Readiness Required.
Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Crosslisting(s): ECON-B136
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B185 Urban Culture and Society

Examines techniques and questions of the social sciences as tools for studying historical and contemporary cities. Topics include political-economic organization, conflict and social differentiation (class, ethnicity and gender), and cultural production and representation. Philadelphia features prominently in discussion, reading and exploration as do global metropolitan comparisons through papers involving fieldwork, critical reading and planning/problem solving using qualitative and quantitative methods.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): ANTH-B185
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): McDonogh,G., Reyes,V.
(Fall 2015)

CITY B190 The Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the Present

This course studies the city as a three-dimensional artifact. A variety of factors—geography, economic and population structure, politics, planning, and aesthetics—are considered as determinants of urban form.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): HART-B190
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Morton,T.
(Spring 2016)

CITY B201 Introduction to GIS for Social and Environmental Analysis

This course is designed to introduce the foundations of GIS with emphasis on applications for social and environmental analysis. It deals with basic principles of GIS and its use in spatial analysis and information management. Ultimately, students will design and carry out research projects on topics of their own choosing.
Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Narayanaraj,G.
(Fall 2015)

CITY B203 Ancient Greek Cities and Sanctuaries

A study of the development of the Greek city-states and sanctuaries. Archaeological evidence is surveyed in its historic context. The political formation of the city-state and the role of religion is presented, and the political, economic, and religious institutions of the city-states are explored in their urban settings. The city-state is considered as a particular political economy of the Mediterranean and in comparison to the utility of the concept of city-state in other cultures.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): ARCH-B203
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B204 Economics of Local Environmental Programs

Considers the determinants of human impact on the environment at the neighborhood or community level and policy responses available to local government. How can economics help solve and learn from the problems facing rural and suburban communities? The instructor was a local township supervisor who will share the day-to-day challenges of coping with land use planning, waste disposal, dispute resolution, and the provision of basis services. Prerequisite: ECON B105.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): ECON-B242
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B205 Social Inequality

Introduction to the major sociological theories of gender, racial-ethnic, and class inequality with emphasis on the relationships among these forms of stratification in the contemporary United States, including the role of the upper class(es), inequality between and within families, in the work place, and in the educational system.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B205
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Nolan,B.
(Fall 2015)

CITY B206 Introduction to Econometrics

An introduction to econometric terminology and reasoning. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. Particular emphasis is placed on regression analysis and on the use of data to address economic issues. The required computational techniques are developed as part of the course. Prerequisite: ECON B105 or H101, and H102, and a 200-level elective.
Crosslisting(s): ECON-B253
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2015, Spring 2016)

CITY B207 Topics in Urban Studies

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cohen,J.

Fall 2015: Philadelphia Architecture. A mid-level course that explores how we understand and write about architecture and architectural history, based on the analysis of visual materials, close reading of texts, and visits to actual sites. This semester, we will pay special attention to the rowhouse as a characteristic type.

CITY B210 Natural Hazards

A quantitative approach to understanding the earth processes that impact human societies. We consider the past, current, and future hazards presented by geologic processes, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, and hurricanes. The course includes discussion of the social, economic, and policy contexts within which natural geologic processes become hazards. Case studies are drawn from contemporary and ancient societies. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: one semester of college science or permission of instructor.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): GEOL-B209
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B212 Medieval Architecture

This course takes a broad geographic and chronological scope, allowing for full exposure to the rich variety of objects and monuments that fall under the rubric of “medieval” art and architecture. We focus on the Latin and Byzantine Christian traditions, but also consider works of art and architecture from the Islamic and Jewish spheres. Topics to be discussed include: the role of religion in artistic development and expression; secular traditions of medieval art and culture; facture and materiality in the art of the middle ages; the use of objects and monuments to convey political power and social prestige; gender dynamics in medieval visual culture; and the contribution of medieval art and architecture to later artistic traditions.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): HART-B212
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Walker,A.
(Spring 2016)

CITY B213 Taming the Modern Corporation

Introduction to the economics of industrial organization and regulation, focusing on policy options for ensuring that corporations enhance economic welfare and the quality of life. Topics include firm behavior in imperfectly competitive markets; theoretical bases of antitrust laws; regulation of product and occupational safety; environmental pollution; and truth in advertising. Prerequisite: ECON B105.
Crosslisting(s): ECON-B213
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B214 Public Finance

Analysis of government’s role in resource allocation, emphasizing effects of tax and expenditure programs on income distribution and economic efficiency. Topics include sources of inefficiency in markets and possible government responses; federal budget composition; social insurance and antipoverty programs; U.S. tax structure and incidence. Prerequisites: ECON B105.
Counts towards: Health Studies
Crosslisting(s): ECON-B214
Units: 1.0
(Spring 2016)

CITY B215 Urban Economics

Micro- and macroeconomic theory applied to urban economic behavior. Topics include housing and land use; transportation; urban labor markets; urbanization; and demand for and financing of urban services. Prerequisite: ECON B105.
Crosslisting(s): ECON-B215
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B216 The City of Naples

The city of Naples emerged during the Later Middle Ages as the capital of a Kingdom and one of the most influential cities in the Mediterranean region. What led to the city’s rise, and what effect did the city as a cultural, political, and economic force have on the rest of the region and beyond? This course will familiarize students with the art, architecture, culture, and institutions that made the city one of the most influential in Europe and the Mediterranean region during the Late Middle Ages. Topics include court painters in service to the crown, female monastic spaces and patronage, and the revival of dynastic tomb sculpture.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): ITAL-B215
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B217 Research Methods in the Social Sciences

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Reyes,V.

Spring 2016: Investigating Inequalities. In this course, we will focus on the processes of research and on “learning by doing.” The course encompasses quantitative and qualitative techniques, and we will compare the strengths and weaknesses of each. We will calculate descriptive statistics and basic statistical analyses manually and with statistical software, followed by engagement with various methods.

CITY B218 Topics in World Cities

This is a topics course. Course content varies. An introduction to contemporary issues related to the urban environment.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B220 Comparative Social Movements in Latin America

An examination of resistance movements to the power of the state and globalization in three Latin American societies: Mexico, Columbia, and Peru. The course explores the political, legal, and socio-economic factors underlying contemporary struggles for human and social rights, and the role of race, ethnicity, and coloniality play in these struggles.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B259; POLS-B259
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B222 Environmental Issues: Movements and Policy Making in Comparative Perspective

An exploration of the ways in which different cultural, economic, and political settings have shaped issue emergence and policy making. We examine the politics of particular environmental issues in selected countries and regions, paying special attention to the impact of environmental movements. We also assess the prospects for international cooperation in addressing global environmental problems such as climate change.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B222
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B225 Economic Development

Examination of the issues related to and the policies designed to promote economic development in the developing economies of Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Focus is on why some developing economies grow faster than others and why some growth paths are more equitable, poverty reducing, and environmentally sustainable than others. Includes consideration of the impact of international trade and investment policy, macroeconomic policies (exchange rate, monetary and fiscal policy) and sector policies (industry, agriculture, education, population, and environment) on development outcomes in a wide range of political and institutional contexts. Prerequisite: ECON B105.
Counts towards: International Studies
Crosslisting(s): ECON-B225
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Rock,M.
(Fall 2015)

CITY B226 Introduction to Architectural Design

This studio design course introduces the principles of architectural design. Suggested Preparation: drawing, some history of architecture, and permission of instructor.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Voith,D., Olshin,S.
(Fall 2015)

CITY B227 Topics in Modern Planning

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): HART-B227
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Morton,T.

Fall 2015: Visual and Historical Methods. In this course we will explore visual and historical methods for the study of objects and sites. Through observation, analysis, and description of architecture and other visual/material artifacts, we will consider how this work contributes to historical understanding and focusing on buildings in the Quaker consortium as specific objects of architectural and historical study, and documents of campus architecture from the archives of Bryn Mawr, Haverford, Swarthmore, and University of Pennsylvania.

CITY B228 Problems in Architectural Design

A continuation of CITY 226 at a more advanced level. Prerequisites: CITY B226 or permission of instructor.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Voith,D., Olshin,S.
(Spring 2016)

CITY B229 Topics in Comparative Urbanism

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Crosslisting(s): ANTH-B229; SOCL-B230; HART-B229
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): McDonogh,G.

Spring 2016: Global Suburbia. This intensive writing course uses comparison and case studies to explore a concrete topic, its literature, methods and theories, and to develop the art and craft of research and writing. In Spring 2016, the topic will be global suburbia, with case materials from Greater Philadelphia, Buenos Aires, Paris and Beijing.

CITY B231 Punishment and Social Order

A cross-cultural examination of punishment, from mass incarceration in the United States, to a widened “penal net” in Europe, and the securitization of society in Latin America. The course addresses theoretical approaches to crime control and the emergence of a punitive state connected with pervasive social inequality.
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B231
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B234 Environmental Economics

Introduction to the use of economic analysis explain the underlying behavioral causes of environmental and natural resource problems and to evaluate policy responses to them. Topics may include air and water pollution; the economic theory of externalities, public goods and the depletion of resources; cost-benefit analysis; valuing non-market benefits and costs; economic justice; and sustainable development. Prerequisites: ECON B105.
Crosslisting(s): ECON-B234
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B237 Themes in Modern African History

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Environmental Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B237
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Ngalamulume,K.

Fall 2015, Spring 2016: Urbanization in Africa. The course examines the cultural, environmental, economic, political, and social factors that contributed to the expansion and transformation of pre-industrial cities, colonial cities, and cities today. We will examine various themes, such as the relationship between cities and societies; migration and social change; urban space, health problems, city life, and women.

CITY B238 The Economics of Globalization

An introduction to international economics through theory, policy issues, and problems. The course surveys international trade and finance, as well as topics in international economics. It investigates why and what a nation trades, the consequences of such trade, the role of trade policy, the behavior and effects of exchange rates, and the macroeconomic implications of trade and capital flows. Topics may include the economics of free trade areas, world financial crises, outsourcing, immigration, and foreign investment. Prerequisites: ECON B105. The course is not open to students who have taken ECON B316 or B348.
Counts towards: International Studies
Crosslisting(s): ECON-B236
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Dominguez,C.
(Fall 2015)

CITY B241 Building Green: Sustainable Design Past and Present

At a time when more than half of the human population lives in cities, the design of the built environment is of key importance. This course is designed for students to investigate issues of sustainability in architecture. A close reading of texts and careful analysis of buildings and cities will help us understand the terms and practices of architectural design and the importance of ecological, economic, political, cultural, social sustainability over time and through space.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B242 Urban Field Research Methods

This Praxis course intends to provide students with hands-on research practice in field methods. In collaboration with the instructor and the Praxis Office, students will choose an organization or other group activity in which they will conduct participant observation for several weeks. Through this practice, students will learn how to conduct field-based primary research and analyze sociological issues.
Counts towards: Praxis Program
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B242; ANTH-B242
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B243 Economic Inequality and Government Policy Choices

This course will examine the U.S. economy and the effects of government policy choices. The class will focus on the potential trade-offs between economic efficiency and greater economic equality. Some of the issues that will be explored include tax, education, and health care policies. Different perspectives on issues will be examined. Prerequisite: ECON B105.
Crosslisting(s): ECON-B243
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Vartanian,T.
(Spring 2016)

CITY B244 Great Empires of the Ancient Near East

A survey of the history, material culture, political and religious ideologies of, and interactions among, the five great empires of the ancient Near East of the second and first millennia B.C.E.: New Kingdom Egypt, the Hittite Empire in Anatolia, the Assyrian and Babylonian Empires in Mesopotamia, and the Persian Empire in Iran.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): ARCH-B244; POLS-B244; HIST-B244
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B249 Asian American Communities

This course is an introduction to the study of Asian American communities that provides comparative analysis of major social issues confronting Asian Americans. Encompassing the varied experiences of Asian Americans and Asians in the Americas, the course examines a broad range of topics—community, migration, race and ethnicity, and identities—as well as what it means to be Asian American and what that teaches us about American society.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B249; ANTH-B249
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B250 Topics: Growth & Spatial Organization of the City

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B251
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Stroud,E.

Fall 2015: 20th C Urban Enviro History. This course explores the recent history of U.S. Cities as both physical spaces and social entities, with particular attention to the role of both nature and built environments in shaping their pasts. How have the definitions, political roles, and social perceptions of U.S. cities changed since the nineteenth century? How have those shifts, along with changes in transportation, communication, construction, and other technologies affected both the people and places that comprise U.S. Cities?

CITY B253 Survey of Western Architecture

The major traditions in Western architecture are illustrated through detailed analysis of selected examples from classical antiquity to the present. The evolution of architectural design and building technology, and the larger intellectual, aesthetic, and social context in which this evolution occurred, are considered.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): HART-B253
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B254 History of Modern Architecture

A survey of the development of modern architecture since the 18th century. The course focuses on international networks in the transmission of architectural ideas since 1890.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): HART-B254
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Morton,T.
(Fall 2015)

CITY B255 Survey of American Architecture

This survey course examines architecture within the global framework of “the modern.” Through an introduction to an architectural canon of works and figures, it seeks to foster a critical consideration of modernity, modernization, and modernism. The course explores each as a category of meaning that framed the theory and practice of architecture as a cultural, political, social, and technological enterprise. It also uses these conjugates to study the modes by which architecture may be said to have framed history. We will study practical and discursive activity that formed a dynamic field within which many of the contradictions of “the modern” were made visible (and visual) through architecture. In this course, we will engage architectural concepts and designs by studying drawings and buildings closely within their historical context. We will examine spheres of reception for architecture and its theoretical, discursive, and cultural life through a variety of media: buildings of course, but also journals, books, and film. We will also investigate architecture as a site and subject for critical inquiry. In particular, we will see what it may tell us about the globalization and politics of the twentieth century, and about history, theory, and criticism as epistemological tracks.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): HART-B255
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B259 Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome

The often-praised achievements of the classical cultures arose from the realities of day-to-day life. This course surveys the rich body of material and textual evidence pertaining to how ancient Greeks and Romans -- famous and obscure alike -- lived and died. Topics include housing, food, clothing, work, leisure, and family and social life.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): ARCH-B260; CSTS-B260; ANTH-B260
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B260 Show and Spectacle in Ancient Greece and Rome

A survey of public entertainment in the ancient world, including theater and dramatic festivals, athletic competitions, games and gladiatorial combats, and processions and sacrifices. Drawing on literary sources and paying attention to art, archaeology and topography, this course explores the social, political and religious contexts of ancient spectacle. Special consideration will be given to modern equivalents of staged entertainment and the representation of ancient spectacle in contemporary film.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Crosslisting(s): CSTS-B255; HIST-B285; ARCH-B255
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B262 Urban Ecosystems

Cities can be considered ecosystems whose functions are highly influenced by human activity. This course will address many of the living and non-living components of urban ecosystems, as well as their unique processes. Using an approach focused on case studies, the course will explore the ecological and environmental problems that arise from urbanization, and also examine solutions that have been attempted. Prerequisite: BIOL B110 or B111 or ENVS B101.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): BIOL-B262
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B266 Schools in American Cities

This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal “case” that students investigate through documents and school placements. This is a Praxis II course (weekly fieldwork in a school required)
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Praxis Program
Crosslisting(s): EDUC-B266; SOCL-B266
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B269 Black America in Sociological Perspective

This course provides sociological perspectives on various issues affecting black America: the legacy of slavery; the formation of urban ghettos; the struggle for civil rights; the continuing significance of discrimination; the problems of crime and criminal justice; educational under-performance; entrepreneurial and business activities; the social roles of black intellectuals, athletes, entertainers, and creative artists.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B229
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Washington,R.
(Spring 2016)

CITY B278 American Environmental History

This course explores major themes of American environmental history, examining changes in the American landscape, the history of ideas about nature and the interaction between the two. Students will study definitions of nature, environment, and environmental history while investigating interactions between Americans and their physical worlds.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B278
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Stroud,E.
(Spring 2016)

CITY B286 Topics in the British Empire

This is a topics course covering various “topics” in the study of the British Empire. Course content varies.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B286; POLS-B286
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B298 Topics: Advanced Research Methods

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 0.5
Instructor(s): Reyes,V.

Fall 2015, Spring 2016: Junior Seminar. For Cities juniors. We will focus on bringing together methods, theories, data and research ethics in preliminary preparation for your senior thesis and/or summer research projects (HHG/CPGC). Class will meet every other week. Weekly mini-assignments and in-class exercises are designed to help you prepare for your final project - a research proposal.

CITY B304 Disaster, War and Rebuilding in the Japanese City

Natural and man-made disasters have destroyed Japanese cities regularly. Rebuilding generally ensued at a very rapid pace, often as a continuation of the past. Following a brief examination of literature on disaster and rebuilding and a historical overview of architectural and urban history in Japan, this course explores the reasons for historical transformations large and small. It specifically argues that rebuilding was mostly the result of traditions, whereas transformation of urban space occurred primarily as a result of political and socio-economic change. Focusing on the period since the Meiji restoration of 1868, we ask: How did reconstruction after natural and man-made disasters shape the contemporary Japanese landscape? We will explore specifically the destruction and rebuilding after the 1891 Nobi earthquake, the 1923 Great Kanto earthquake that leveled Tokyo and Yokohama, the bombing of more than 200 cities in World War II and their rebuilding, as well as the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake that destroyed Kobe and its reconstruction. In the context of the long history of destruction and rebuilding we will finally explore the recent disaster in Fukushima 2011. Through the story of disaster and rebuilding emerge different approaches to permanence and change, to urban livability, the environment and sustainability.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B305 Topics in Ancient Athens

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Crosslisting(s): ARCH-B305
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B306 Advanced Fieldwork Techniques: Places in Time

A workshop for research into the histories of places, intended to bring students into contact with some of the raw materials of architectural and urban history. A focus will be placed on historical images and texts, and on creating engaging informational experiences that are transparent to their evidentiary basis.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B312 Topics in Medieval Art

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Middle Eastern Studies
Crosslisting(s): HART-B311; HIST-B311
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Walker,A.

Fall 2015: Kings, Caliphs, and Emperors. Images of Authority: This course investigates how notions of political & social authority were conveyed through the visual and material cultures of Byzantium, the Islamic world, and western Christendom during the late 11th to 13th centuries when these groups experienced an unprecedented degree of cross-cultural exposure as a result of Crusader incursions in the eastern Mediterranean.

CITY B314 The Economics of Social Policy

Introduces students to the economic rationale behind government programs and the evaluation of government programs. Topics include health insurance, social security, unemployment and disability insurance, and education. Additionally, the instructor and students will jointly select topics of special interest to the class. Emphasis will be placed on the use of statistics to evaluate social policy. Prerequisites: ECON 200; ECON 253 or 304.
Crosslisting(s): ECON-B314
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B315 Spaces of Identity: Architecture and Planning in Hamburg

Many European cities feature a shared range of architectural and urban forms that reflect histories as long as a millenium and that are the product of related sets of political, economic, social, cultural, and religious forces. This course will examine such operative factors and patterns through the particular case of the Northern German city-state of Hamburg from its medieval origins to the contemporary waterfront renewal of the HafenCity.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B316 Trade and Transport in the Ancient World

Issues of trade, commerce and production of export goods are addressed with regard to the Bronze Age and Iron Age cultures of Mesopotamia, Arabia, Iran and south Asia. Crucial to these systems is the development of means of transport via maritime routes and on land. Archaeological evidence for traded goods and shipwrecks is used to map the emergence of sea-faring across the Indian Ocean and Gulf while bio-archaeological data is employed to examine the transformative role that Bactrian and Dromedary camels played in ancient trade and transport.
Crosslisting(s): ARCH-B316
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B318 Topics in Urban Social and Cultural Theory

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): McDonogh,G.

Spring 2016: Brazil: City, Media, Nature. The FIFA World Cup and Rio Olympiad have posed Brazil on a new world stage as both a modern urbane society and a complex one, divided by issues of race, class, gender, ecological consciousness and vision. But how well do we know this state as both model and challenge? Looking with both an historical and soci-cultural lens, incorporating literature and film as well as academic readings, we look at the key topics facing Brazil as a natural haven in transformation and an urban harbinger of the 21st century.

CITY B321 Technology and Politics

An multi-media analysis of the complex role of technology in political and social life. We focus on the relationship between technological change and democratic governance. We begin with historical and contemporary Luddism as well as pro-technology movements around the world. Substantive issue areas include security and surveillance, electoral politics, warfare, social media, internet freedom, GMO foods and industrial agriculture, climate change and energy politics.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B321
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B329 Advanced Topics in Urban Environments

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B329
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Stroud,E.

Spring 2016: Water. This course is an exploration of the field of environmental history through a focus on the role of water in the history of the United States. We will examine issues of water power, water rights, water emergencies and water imagery, investigating the history and meanings of water in the United States.

CITY B330 Arch & Identity in Italy

How is architecture used to shape our understanding of past and current identities? This course looks at the ways in which architecture has been understood to represent, and used to shape regional, national, ethnic, and gender identities in Italy from the Renaissance to the present. The class focuses on Italy’s classical traditions, and looks at the ways in which architects and theorists have accepted or rejected the peninsula’s classical roots. Subjects studied include Baroque Architecture, the Risorgimento, Futurism, Fascism, and colonialism. Course readings include Vitruvius, Leon Battista Alberti, Giorgio Vasari, Jacob Burckhardt, and Alois Riegl, among others.
Crosslisting(s): ITAL-B330
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B334 The Economics of Discrimination and Inequality

Explores the causes and consequences of discrimination and inequality in economic markets. Topics include economic theories of discrimination and inequality, evidence of contemporary race- and gender-based inequality, detecting discrimination, and identifying sources of racial and gender inequality. Additionally, the instructor and students will jointly select supplementary topics of specific interest to the class. Possible topics include: discrimination in historical markets, disparity in legal treatments, issues of family structure, and education gaps. Prerequisites: At least one 200-level applied microeconomics elective; ECON 253 or 304; ECON 200 or 202.
Crosslisting(s): ECON-B324
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Nutting,A.
(Spring 2016)

CITY B335 Topics in City and Media

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B335
Units: 1.0

Spring 2016: Digital Rome.

CITY B336 East Asian Development

Identifies the core economic and political elements of an East Asian newly industrializing economies (NIEs) development model. Assesses the performance of this development model in Northeast (Korea and Taiwan) and Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand) in a comparative perspective. Considers the debate over the impact of interventionist and selective development policies associated with this model on the development successes and failures of the East Asian NIEs. Prerequisites: ECON 200 or 202; and ECON 253 or 304; or permission of instructor.
Crosslisting(s): ECON-B335
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B345 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society

This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B346; HIST-B345
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Stroud,E.

Fall 2015: Environmental Justice. In this course, we will be delving into the complex issues of environmental justice and environmental racism. We will investigate the ways in which environmentalism can and has led to environmental inequalities, and we will study how resource allocation, legal frameworks and access to social and economic power affect experiences of environmental amenities and risks.

CITY B348 Culture and Ethnic Conflict

An examination of the role of culture in the origin, escalation, and settlement of ethnic conflicts. This course examines the politics of culture and how it constrains and offers opportunities for ethnic conflict and cooperation. The role of narratives, rituals, and symbols is emphasized in examining political contestation over cultural representations and expressions such as parades, holy sites, public dress, museums, monuments, and language in culturally framed ethnic conflicts from all regions of the world. Prerequisites: two courses in the social sciences.
Counts towards: Peace, Justice and Human Rights
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B348
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B355 Topics in the History of London

Selected topics of social, literary, and architectural concern in the history of London, emphasizing London since the 18th century.
Crosslisting(s): HART-B355
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B360 Topics in Urban Culture and Society

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Crosslisting(s): ANTH-B359; SOCL-B360; HART-B359
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Morton,T.

Fall 2015: Architecture of the Eternal City. How is architecture used to shape our understanding of past and current identities? This course looks at the ways in which architecture has been understood to represent, and used to shape regional, national, ethnic, and gender identities in Italy from the Renaissance to the present. The class focuses on Rome’s classical traditions, and looks at the ways in which architects and theorists have accepted or rejected the peninsula’s classical roots. Subjects studied include Baroque Architecture, the Risorgimento, Futurism, Fascism, and colonialism.

Spring 2016: Mobility and Territory. In the early twenty-first century, the problematics of mobility and territory are the water in which we swim. This course uses these concepts as categories for theoretical and historical study of the spatial, material, and aesthetic, examining issues in architecture, urbanism, geography, visual arts, design, and technology.

CITY B365 Topics: Techniques of the City

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisite: Student must have taken at least one social science course.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Reyes,V.

Spring 2016: City and Military. This course is the social scientific examination of how the military and the city interact. We will explore the social, cultural, political, and geographic processes, interactions, and consequences of the military.

CITY B377 Topics in Modern Architecture

This is a topics course on modern architecture. Topics vary.
Crosslisting(s): HART-B377
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Morton,T.

Spring 2016: Islamic Cities. This course will focus on a history of architecture and planning that is at once a history of Islamic Cites and examining how these have been constructed from within and without the subcontinent and its diasporas, through architecture’s many forms.

CITY B378 Formative Landscapes: The Architecture and Planning of American Collegiate Campuses

The campus and buildings familiar to us here at the College reflect a long and rich design conversation regarding communicative form, architectural innovation, and orchestrated planning. This course will explore that conversation through varied examples, key models, and shaping conceptions over time.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cohen,J.
(Fall 2015)

CITY B398 Senior Seminar

An intensive research seminar designed to guide students in writing a senior thesis.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): McDonogh,G., Cohen,J., Reyes,V.
(Fall 2015)

CITY B403 Independent Study

Units: 1.0
(Fall 2015, Spring 2016)

CITY B415 Teaching Assistant

An exploration of course planning, pedagogy and creative thinking as students work to help others understand pathways they have already explored in introductory and writing classes. This opportunity is available only to advanced students of highest standing by professorial invitation.
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2015, Spring 2016)

CITY B425 Praxis III: Independent Study

Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community.
Counts towards: Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CITY B450 Urban Internships/Praxis

Individual opportunities to engage in praxis in the greater Philadelphia area; internships must be arranged prior to registration for the semester in which the internship is taken. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2015, Spring 2016)