Gender and Sexuality

Students may complete a minor or concentration in Gender and Sexuality. Students may submit an application to major in Gender and Sexuality through the independent major program.

Steering Committee

Gregory Davis, Associate Professor of Biology

Hoang Nguyen, Associate Professor of English and Film Studies

H. Rosi Song, Associate Professor of Spanish (on leave semester I)

Sharon Ullman, Chair and Professor of History and Director of Gender and Sexuality Studies

The Program in Gender and Sexuality is an interdisciplinary, Bi-College program that can be integrated with any major or pursued independently. Students graduate from the program with a high level of fluency and rigor in their understanding of the different ways issues of gender and sexuality shape our lives as individuals and as members of larger communities, both local and global.

Students choosing a concentration, minor or independent major in gender and sexuality plan their programs in consultation with the Gender and Sexuality coordinator on their home campus. Members of the Gender and Sexuality steering committee serve as their individual mentors. All students in the program take the core course, “Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Sex and Gender.” Other courses in the program allow them to explore a range of approaches to gender and sexual difference: critical feminist theory; women’s studies; transnational and third-world feminisms; the experiences of women of color; gender and science; the construction of masculinity; gay, lesbian, queer, transgender, and transsexual studies; the history and representation of gender and sexuality in a global context.

Minor and Concentration Requirements

Six courses distributed as follows are required for the concentration:

  • An introductory course (including equivalent offerings at Swarthmore College or the University of Pennsylvania).
  • The junior seminar: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Sex and Gender (alternating fall semesters between Bryn Mawr and Haverford).
  • Four additional approved courses from at least two different departments, two of which are normally at the 300 level. Units of Independent Study (480) may be used to fulfill this requirement.
  • Of the six courses, no fewer than two and no more than three will also form part of the student’s major.

Requirements for the minor are identical to those for the concentration, with the stipulation that no courses in gender and sexuality will overlap with courses taken to fulfill requirements in the student’s major.

Neither a senior seminar nor a senior thesis is required for the concentration or minor; however, with the permission of the major department, a student may choose to count toward the concentration a senior thesis with significant content in gender and sexuality. Students wishing to construct an independent major in gender and sexuality should make a proposal to the Committee on Independent Majors.

COURSES

ANTH B102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

An introduction to the methods and theories of cultural anthropology in order to understand and explain cultural similarities and differences among contemporary societies.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; International Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Fioratta,S.
(Spring 2016)

ANTH B238 Chinese Culture and Society

This course encourages students to think critically about major developments in Chinese culture and society that have occurred during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, with an emphasis on understanding both cultural change and continuity in China. Drawing on ethnographic material and case studies from rural and urban China over the traditional, revolutionary, and reform periods, this course examines a variety of topics including family and kinship; marriage, reproduction, and death; popular religion; women and gender; the Cultural Revolution; social and economic reforms and development; gift exchange and guanxi networks; changing perceptions of space and place; as well as globalization and modernity. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; International Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ANTH B239 Anthropology of Media

This course examines the impact of non-print media such as films, television, sound recordings, radio, cell phones, the internet and social media on contemporary life from an anthropological perspective. The course will focus on the constitutive power of media at two interlinked levels: first, in the construction of subjectivity, senses of self, and the production of affect; and second, in collective social and political projects, such as building national identity, resisting state power, or giving voice to indigenous claims. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 or ANTH H103, or permission of instructor
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ANTH B248 Race, Power and Culture

This course examines race and power through a variety of topics including colonialism, nation-state formation, genocide, systems of oppression/privilege, and immigration. Students will examine how class, gender, and other social variables intersect to affect individual and collective experiences of race, as well as the consequences of racism in various cultural contexts. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 or permission of instructor.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ANTH B268 Cultural Perspectives on Marriage and Family

This course explores the family and marriage as basic social institutions in cultures around the world. We will consider various topics including: kinship systems in social organization; dating and courtship; parenting and childhood; cohabitation and changing family formations; family planning and reproductive technologies; and gender and the division of household labor. In addition to thinking about individuals in families, we will consider the relationship between society, the state, and marriage and family. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 or permission of instructor.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ANTH B287 Sex, Gender and Culture

Introduces students to core concepts and topics of the cultural anthropological study of gender, sexuality difference and power in today’s world. Focusing on the body as a site of lived experience, the course explores the varied intersections of gender, race, ethnicity, economics, class, location and sexual preference that produce different experiences for people both within and across nations. Particular attention will be paid to how gender and other forms of difference are shaped and transformed by global forces, and how these processes are gendered and raced. Topics include: scientific discourses, femininity/masculinity, marriage and intimacy, media and childhood, gender and variance, systems of inequality, race and ethnicity, sexuality, queer theory, labor, globalization and social change, and others. Prerequisites: ANTH 102 or permission of instructor.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ANTH B312 Anthropology of Reproduction

An examination of social and cultural constructions of reproduction, and how power in everyday life shapes reproductive behavior and its meaning in Western and non-Western cultures. The influence of competing interests within households, communities, states, and institutions on reproduction is considered. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ANTH B316 Media, Performance, and Gender in South Asia

Examines gender as a culturally and historically constructed category in the modern South Asian context, focusing on the ways in which everyday experiences of and practices relating to gender are informed by media, performance, and political events. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Weidman,A.
(Fall 2015)

ANTH B354 Identity, Ritual and Cultural Practice in Contemporary Vietnam

This course focuses on the ways in which recent economic and political changes in Vietnam influence and shape everyday lives, meanings and practices there. It explores construction of identity in Vietnam through topics including ritual and marriage practices, gendered socialization, social reproduction and memory. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Pashigian,M.
(Spring 2016)

ARCH B224 Women in the Ancient Near East

A survey of the social position of women in the ancient Near East, from sedentary villages to empires of the first millennium B.C.E. Topics include critiques of traditional concepts of gender in archaeology and theories of matriarchy. Case studies illustrate the historicity of gender concepts: women’s work in early village societies; the meanings of Neolithic female figurines; the representation of gender in the Gilgamesh epic; the institution of the “Tawananna” (queen) in the Hittite empire; the indirect power of women such as Semiramis in the Neo-Assyrian palaces. Reliefs, statues, texts and more indirect archaeological evidence are the basis for discussion.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Middle Eastern Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ARCH B234 Picturing Women in Classical Antiquity

We investigate representations of women in different media in ancient Greece and Rome, examining the cultural stereotypes of women and the gender roles that they reinforce. We also study the daily life of women in the ancient world, the objects that they were associated with in life and death and their occupations.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): HART-B234; CSTS-B234
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ARCH B254 Cleopatra

This course examines the life and rule of Cleopatra VII, the last queen of Ptolemaic Egypt, and the reception of her legacy in the Early Roman Empire and the western world from the Renaissance to modern times. The first part of the course explores extant literary evidence regarding the upbringing, education, and rule of Cleopatra within the contexts of Egyptian and Ptolemaic cultures, her relationships with Julius Caesar and Marc Antony, her conflict with Octavian, and her death by suicide in 30 BCE. The second part examines constructions of Cleopatra in Roman literature, her iconography in surviving art, and her contributions to and influence on both Ptolemaic and Roman art. A detailed account is also provided of the afterlife of Cleopatra in the literature, visual arts, scholarship, and film of both Europe and the United States, extending from the papal courts of Renaissance Italy and Shakespearean drama, to Thomas Jefferson’s art collection at Monticello and Joseph Mankiewicz’s 1963 epic film, Cleopatra.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ARTD B240 Dance History I: Roots of Western Theater Dance

This course investigates the historic and cultural forces affecting the development and functions of pre-20th-century Western theater dance. It will consider nontheatrical forms and applications as well, but will give special emphasis to the development of theater dance forms within the context of their relationship to and impact on Western culture. The course, of necessity, will give some consideration as well to the impact of global interchange on the development of Western dance. It will also introduce students to a selection of traditional and more contemporary models of historiography with particular reference to the changing modes of documenting, researching and analyzing dance. In addition to lectures and discussion, the course will include film, video, slides, and some movement experiences.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ARTD B250 Performing the Political Body

This course explores how artists, activists, intellectuals and people in the street have used dance and performance to support political goals and ideologies or to perform social, political, or cultural interventions in the public sphere. From a wide range of possibilities across time and cultures we will focus on how dance as an embodied practice is an effective medium for analyzing ideologies and practices of power particularly with reference to gender, class, and ethnicity. Students will also investigate the body as an active agent of social change and political action. In addition to lectures and discussion, the course will include film, video, slides, guest lecturers and some easy movement exercises. A prior dance lecture/seminar course or a course in a relevant discipline e.g. gender studies, anthropology, sociology, history is recommended but not a prerequisite.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Caruso Haviland,L.
(Spring 2016)

BIOL B214 The Historical Roots of Women in Genetics and Embryology

This course provides a general history of genetics and embryology from the late 19th to the mid-20th century with a focus on the role that women scientists and technicians played in the development of these sub-disciplines. We will look at the lives of well known and lesser-known individuals, asking how factors such as their educational experiences and mentor relationships influenced the roles these women played in the scientific enterprise. We will also examine specific scientific contributions in historical context, requiring a review of core concepts in genetics and developmental biology. One facet of the course will be to look at the Bryn Mawr Biology Department from the founding of the College into the mid-20th century.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B214
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Davis,G.
(Spring 2016)

CITY B205 Social Inequality

Introduction to the major sociological theories of gender, racial-ethnic, and class inequality with emphasis on the relationships among these forms of stratification in the contemporary United States, including the role of the upper class(es), inequality between and within families, in the work place, and in the educational system.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B205
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Nolan,B.
(Fall 2015)

CITY B237 Themes in Modern African History

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Environmental Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B237
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Ngalamulume,K.

Fall 2015, Spring 2016: Urbanization in Africa. The course examines the cultural, environmental, economic, political, and social factors that contributed to the expansion and transformation of pre-industrial cities, colonial cities, and cities today. We will examine various themes, such as the relationship between cities and societies; migration and social change; urban space, health problems, city life, and women.

CITY B335 Topics in City and Media

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Crosslisting(s): ANTH-B335
Units: 1.0

Spring 2016: Digital Rome.

COML B214 Italy Today: New Voices, New Writers, New Literature

This course, taught in English, will focus primarily on the works of the so-called “migrant writers” who, having adopted the Italian language, have become a significant part of the new voice of Italy. In addition to the aesthetic appreciation of these works, this course will also take into consideration the social, cultural, and political factors surrounding them. The course will focus on works by writers who are now integral to Italian canon – among them: Cristina Ali-Farah, Igiaba Scego, Ghermandi Gabriella, Amara Lakhous. As part of the course, movies concerned with various aspects of Italian Migrant literature will be screened and analyzed.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Film Studies
Crosslisting(s): ITAL-B212
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

COML B220 Writing the Self in the Middle Ages

What leads people to write about their lives? Do men and women present themselves differently? Do they think different issues are important? How do they claim authority for their thoughts and experiences? We shall address these questions, reading a wide range of autobiography from the Medieval period in the West, with a particular emphasis on women’s writing and on feminist critiques of autobiographical practice.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): CSTS-B220
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

COML B237 The Dictator Novel in the Americas

This course examines representations of dictatorship in Latin American and Latina/o novels. We will explore the relationship between narrative form and absolute power by analyzing the literary techniques writers use to contest authoritarianism. We will compare dictator novels from the United States, the Caribbean, Central America, and the Southern Cone.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B237; SPAN-B237
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

COML B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Taught in English.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): GERM-B245; CITY-B245
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

COML B302 Le printemps de la parole féminine: femmes écrivains des débuts

This study of selected women authors from the Carolingian period through the Middle Ages, Renaissance and 17th century—among them, Marie de France, the trobairitz, Christine de Pisan, Louise Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, and Madame de Lafayette—examines the way in which they appropriate and transform the male writing tradition and define themselves as self-conscious artists within or outside it. Particular attention will be paid to identifying recurring concerns and structures in their works, and to assessing their importance to women’s writing in general: among them, the poetics of silence, reproduction as a metaphor for artistic creation, and sociopolitical engagement.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): FREN-B302
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

COML B321 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): GERM-B321; CITY-B319
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

COML B322 Queens, Nuns, and Other Deviants in the Early Modern Iberian World

The course examines literary, historical, and legal texts from the early modern Iberian world (Spain, Mexico, Peru) through the lens of gender studies. The course is divided around three topics: royal bodies (women in power), cloistered bodies (women in the convent), and delinquent bodies (figures who defy legal and gender normativity). Course is taught in English and is open to all juniors or seniors who have taken at least one 200-level course in a literature department. Students seeking Spanish credit must have taken BMC Spanish 110 and/or 120 and at least one other Spanish course at a 200-level, or received permission from instructor.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Crosslisting(s): SPAN-B322
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

COML B340 Topics in Baroque Art

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): HART-B340
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

COML B345 Topics in Narrative Theory

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B345
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

COML B365 Erotica: Love and Art in Plato and Shakespeare

The course explores the relationship between love and art, “eros” and “poesis,” through in-depth study of Plato’s “Phaedus” and “Symposium,” Shakespeare’s “As You Like It” and “Antony and Cleopatra,” and essays by modern commentators (including David Halperin, Anne Carson, Martha Nussbaum, Marjorie Garber, and Stanley Cavell). We will also read Shakespeare’s Sonnets and “Romeo and Juliet.”
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B365; POLS-B365; PHIL-B365
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CSTS B175 Feminism in Classics

This course will illustrate the ways in which feminism has had an impact on classics, as well as the ways in which feminists think with classical texts. It will have four thematic divisions: feminism and the classical canon; feminism, women, and rethinking classical history; feminist readings of classical texts; and feminists and the classics - e.g. Cixous’ Medusa and Butler’s Antigone.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CSTS B230 Food and Drink in the Ancient World

This course explores practices of eating and drinking in the ancient Mediterranean world both from a socio-cultural and environmental perspective. Since we are not only what we eat, but also where, when, why, with whom, and how we eat, we will examine the wider implications of patterns of food production, preparation, consumption, availability, and taboos, considering issues like gender, health, financial situation, geographical variability, and political status. Anthropological, archaeological, literary, and art historical approaches will be used to analyze the evidence and shed light on the role of food and drink in ancient culture and society. In addition, we will discuss how this affects our contemporary customs and practices and how our identity is still shaped by what we eat.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B229
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Baertschi,A.
(Fall 2015)

CSTS B234 Picturing Women in Classical Antiquity

We investigate representations of women in different media in ancient Greece and Rome, examining the cultural stereotypes of women and the gender roles that they reinforce. We also study the daily life of women in the ancient world, the objects that they were associated with in life and death and their occupations.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): ARCH-B234; HART-B234
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

CSTS B246 Eros in Ancient Greek Culture

This course explores the ancient Greek’s ideas of love, from the interpersonal loves between people of the same or different genders to the cosmogonic Eros that creates and holds together the entire world. The course examines how the idea of eros is expressed in poetry, philosophy, history, and the romances.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

EALC B315 Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & Film

This interdisciplinary course focuses on a critical survey of literary and visual texts by and about Chinese women. We will begin by focusing on the cultural norms that defined women’s lives beginning in early China, and consider how those tropes are reflected and rejected over time and geographical borders (in Japan, Hong Kong and the United States). No prior knowledge of Chinese culture or language necessary.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Film Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ECON B324 The Economics of Discrimination and Inequality

Explores the causes and consequences of discrimination and inequality in economic markets. Topics include economic theories of discrimination and inequality, evidence of contemporary race- and gender-based inequality, detecting discrimination, and identifying sources of racial and gender inequality. Additionally, the instructor and students will jointly select supplementary topics of specific interest to the class. Possible topics include: discrimination in historical markets, disparity in legal treatments, issues of family structure, and education gaps. Prerequisites: At least one 200-level applied microeconomics elective; ECON 253 or 304; ECON 200 or 202.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B334
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Nutting,A.
(Spring 2016)

EDUC B290 Learning in Institutional Spaces

This course considers how the institutions of schools and prisons operate as sites of learning. Beginning with an examination of educational and penitential institutions, we inquire into how these structures both constrain and propel learning, and how human beings take up, challenge and change their surroundings. We investigate the role of “voice”--speaking out, expressing, engaging in dialogue—in teaching and learning: In what ways can “voice” instigate understanding and even change, and how is this notion also complex and problematic? We consider explicit curriculae alongside implicit, even hidden curriculae; how do people inside these spaces collude with, subvert, and challenge official agendas as they create their own agendas for learning?
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Cohen,J.
(Fall 2015)

ENGL B193 Critical Feminist Studies

Combines the study of specific literary texts with larger questions about feminist forms of theorizing: three fictional texts will be supplemented by a wide range of essays. Students will review current scholarship, identify their own stake in the conversation, and define a critical question they want to pursue at length.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B203 Imagined Worlds: Utopia and Dystopia in Literature

When Thomas More coined the term “Utopia” in 1516, it meant both “good place” and “no place” – an ideal society, and an unreachable one. Since then, the term (as well as its opposite, dystopia) has been applied to representations of imagined worlds that hold a mirror up to our own. In this class, we’ll read texts from the early modern period (Utopia, The Blazing World) through the present day (The Handmaid’s Tale, The Hunger Games) that use invented societies to critique the ‘real world.’ We will pay particular attention to how descriptions of imagined places explore very real tensions around class, gender and racial identities. Do these texts offer a path to better worlds, or do such fantasies always remain out of reach?
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Weissbourd,E.
(Spring 2016)

ENGL B210 Renaissance Literature: Performances of Gender

Readings chosen to highlight the construction and performance of gender identity during the period from 1550 to 1650 and the ways in which the gender anxieties of 16th- and 17th-century men and women differ from, yet speak to, our own. Texts will include plays, poems, prose fiction, diaries, and polemical writing of the period.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Hedley,J.
(Fall 2015)

ENGL B216 Re-creating Our World: Vision, Voice, Value

To this shared project, the discipline of English literary studies will contribute an awareness of the limits and possibilities of representation, asking what is foregrounded, what backgrounded or omitted, in each verbal, visual, aural or tactile re-presentation of the world. Asking, too, what might be imagined that has not yet been experienced, “Re-creating Our World” invites students both to create their own multi-modal representations of the spaces they occupy, and to re-create, in some way, the space that is Bryn Mawr. This course offers a shared exploration of imaginative images and texts, with a global reach and in a range of genres (photography, film, poetry, as well as multiple narratives, in forms that will vary from satire to science fiction, from apocalypse to utopia). On field trips to local sites, we will also study “representations” of the world in the form of various “shaped spaces,” including The Center for Environmental Transformation in Camden, the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum, John James Audubon’s house @ Mill Grove, Wissahickon Valley Park, Chanticleer (a pleasure garden in Wayne), and the Laurel Hill Cemetery.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B217 Narratives of Latinidad

This course explores how Latina/o writers fashion bicultural and transnational identities and narrate the intertwined histories of the U.S. and Latin America. We will focus on topics of shared concern among Latino groups such as imperialism and annexation, the affective experience of migration, race and gender stereotypes, the politics of Spanglish, and struggles for social justice. By analyzing novels, poetry, performance art, testimonial narratives, films, and essays, we will unpack the complexity of Latinadad in the Americas.
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Crosslisting(s): SPAN-B217
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Harford Vargas,J.
(Fall 2015)

ENGL B218 Ecological Imaginings

Re-thinking the evolving nature of representation, with a focus on language as a link between natural and cultural ecosystems. We will observe the world; read classical and cutting edge ecolinguistic, ecoliterary, ecofeminist, and ecocritical theory, along with a wide range of exploratory, speculative, and imaginative essays and stories; and seek a variety of ways of expressing our own ecological interests.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B221 Roaring Girls & Ranting Widows: Narratives of Crime

Narratives of Crime and Adventure will explore the figure of the female outlaw (picara), in literary and visual texts from the early modern period to today. Through reading British and American texts that feature the figure of the female outlaw (or picara), students will understand the ways in which literary content and literary form function together, and how they reflect cultural changes and norms. Students will focus their readings through the role of the female outlaw to the more common picaro, male outlaw. Students will learn how the “female picaresque” (as seen in novels, other writings, and visual texts) explores gender, changes in moral and aesthetic values, class, race, politics, colonialism, the body, and sexuality.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B228 Silence: The Rhetorics of Class, Gender, Culture, Religion

This course will consider silence as a rhetorical art and political act, an imaginative space and expressive power that can serve many functions, including that of opening new possibilities among us. We will share our own experiences of silence, re-thinking them through the lenses of how it is explained in philosophy, enacted in classrooms and performed by various genders, cultures, and religions.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Dalke,A.
(Fall 2015)

ENGL B232 Pirates in the Popular Imagination

This course will explore popular representations of pirates from the seventeenth century to the present, in memoirs, first-hand and fictional accounts (including children’s literature), and films. The context will be global, with an emphasis on the transatlantic world. Topics will include slavery, gender/sexuality, captivity, class/status, race, and imperialism/colonialism.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Ricketts,R.
(Spring 2016)

ENGL B237 Latino Dictator Novel in Americas

This course examines representations of dictatorship in Latin American and Latina/o novels. We will explore the relationship between narrative form and absolute power by analyzing the literary techniques writers use to contest authoritarianism. We will compare dictator novels from the United States, the Caribbean, Central America, and the Southern Cone.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Crosslisting(s): SPAN-B237; COML-B237
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B254 Female Subjects: American Literature 1750-1900

This course explores the subject, subjection, and subjectivity of women and female sexualities in U.S. literatures between the signing of the Constitution and the ratification of the 19th Amendment. While the representation of women in fiction grew and the number of female authors soared, the culture found itself at pains to define the appropriate moments for female speech and silence, action and passivity. We will engage a variety of pre-suffrage literatures that place women at the nexus of national narratives of slavery and freedom, foreignness and domesticity, wealth and power, masculinity and citizenship, and sex and race “purity.”
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B261 Topics: Film and the German Literary Imagination

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Film Studies
Crosslisting(s): GERM-B262
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B262 Survey in African American Literature

Pairing canonical African American fiction with theoretical, popular, and filmic texts from the late-19th Century through to the present day, we will address the ways in which the Black body, as cultural text, has come to be both constructed and consumed within the nation’s imagination and our modern visual regime.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B263 Toni Morrison and the Art of Narrative Conjure

All of Morrison’s primary imaginative texts, in publication order, as well as essays by Morrison, with a series of critical lenses that explore several vantages for reading a conjured narration.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B270 American Girl: Childhood in U.S. Literatures, 1690-1935

This course will focus on the “American Girl” as a particularly contested model for the nascent American. Through examination of religious tracts, slave and captivity narratives, literatures for children and adult literatures about childhood, we will analyze U. S. investments in girlhood as a site for national self-fashioning.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B272 Queer of Color Critique

Queer of color critique (QoCC) is a mode of criticism with roots in women of color feminism, post-structuralism, critical race theory, and queer studies. QoCC focuses on “intersectional” analyses. That is, QoCC seeks to integrate studies of race, sexuality, gender, class, and nationalism, and to show how these categories are co-constitutive. In so doing, QoCC contends that a focus on gay rights or reliance on academic discourse is too narrow. QoCC therefore addresses a wide set of issues from beauty standards to terrorism and questions the very idea of “normal.” This course introduces students to the ideas of QoCC through key literary and film texts.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B284 Women Poets: Giving Eurydice a Voice

This course covers English and American woman poets of the 19th and 20th centuries whose gender was important for their self-understanding as poets, their choice of subject matter, and the audience they sought to gain for their work. Featured poets include Elizabeth Bishop, Gwendolyn Brooks, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Lucille Clifton, H.D., Emily Dickinson, Marianne Moore, Sylvia Plath, Adrienne Rich, Christina Rossetti, Anne Sexton, and Gertrude Stein.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B293 Critical Feminist Studies: An Introduction

Combines the study of specific literary texts with larger questions about feminist forms of theorizing. Three book length texts will be supplemented by on-line readings. Students will review current scholarship, identify their own stake in the conversation and define a critical question they want to pursue at length.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B297 Terror, Pleasure, and the Gothic Imagination

Introduces students to the 18th-century origins of Gothic literature and its development across genres, media and time. Exploring the formal contours and cultural contexts of the enduring imaginative mode in literature, film, art, and architecture, the course will also investigate the Gothic’s connection to the radical and conservative cultural agendas.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B301 Women on Top: Gender and Power in Renaissance Drama

From virtuous queens to scheming adulteresses and cross-dressed “Roaring Girls,” powerful female characters are at the center of a number of Renaissance plays. This class will explore how playwrights such as Shakespeare, Webster and Dekker represent both fantasies and anxieties about tough women who take charge of their destinies. We will read these plays first in the context of the historical position of women in early modern England, and then turn to gender theory (e.g. Butler, Sedgwick, Rubin) to examine constructions of gender identity and female agency.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Weissbourd,E.
(Spring 2016)

ENGL B310 Confessional Poetry

Poetry written since 1950 that deploys an autobiographical subject to engage with the psychological and political dynamics of family life and with states of psychic extremity and mental illness. Poets will include Lowell, Ginsberg, Sexton, and Plath. The impact of this`movement’ on late twentieth century American poetry will also receive attention. A prior course in poetry is desirable but not required.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Hedley,J.
(Fall 2015)

ENGL B313 Ecological Imaginings

Re-thinking the evolving nature of representation, with a focus on language as a link between natural and cultural ecosystems. We will observe the world; read classical and cutting edge ecolinguistic, ecoliterary, ecofeminist, and ecocritical theory, along with a wide range of exploratory, speculative, and imaginative essays and stories; and seek a variety of ways of expressing our own ecological interests. Prerequisites: Environmental Studies minors, Gender Studies concentrators, or English majors.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B333 Lesbian Immortal

Lesbian literature has repeatedly figured itself in alliance with tropes of immortality and eternity. Using recent queer theory on temporality, and 19th and 20th century primary texts, we will explore topics such as: fame and noteriety; feminism and mythology; epistemes, erotics and sexual seasonality; the death drive and the uncanny; fin de siecle manias for mummies and seances.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B334 Topics in Film Studies

This is a topics course. Content varies.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Film Studies
Crosslisting(s): HART-B334
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B345 Topics in Narrative Theory

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Crosslisting(s): COML-B345
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B354 Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf has been interpreted as a feminist, a modernist, a crazy person, a resident of Bloomsbury, a victim of child abuse, a snob, a socialist, and a creation of literary and popular history. We will try out all these approaches and examine the features of our contemporary world that influence the way Woolf, her work, and her era are perceived. We will also attempt to theorize about why we favor certain interpretations over others.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Tratner,M.
(Fall 2015)

ENGL B355 Performance Studies

Introduces students to the field of performance studies, a multidisciplinary species of cultural studies which theorizes human actions as performances that both construct and resist cultural norms of race, gender, and sexuality. The course will explore “performativity” in everyday life as well as in the performing arts, and will include multiple viewings of dance and theater both on- and off-campus. In addition, we will consider the performative aspects of film and video productions.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Ricketts,R.
(Spring 2016)

ENGL B365 Erotica: Love and Art in Plato and Shakespeare

The course explores the relationship between love and art, “eros” and “poesis,” through in-depth study of Plato’s “Phaedus” and “Symposium,” Shakespeare’s “As You Like It” and “Antony and Cleopatra,” and essays by modern commentators (including David Halperin, Anne Carson, Martha Nussbaum, Marjorie Garber, and Stanley Cavell). We will also read Shakespeare’s Sonnets and “Romeo and Juliet.”
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B365; PHIL-B365; COML-B365
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B367 Asian American Film Video and New Media

The course explores the role of pleasure in the production, reception, and performance of Asian American identities in film, video, and the internet, taking as its focus the sexual representation of Asian Americans in works produced by Asian American artists from 1915 to present. In several units of the course, we will study graphic sexual representations, including pornographic images and sex acts some may find objectionable. Students should be prepared to engage analytically with all class material. To maintain an atmosphere of mutual respect and solidarity among the participants in the class, no auditors will be allowed.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Film Studies
Crosslisting(s): HART-B367
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Nguyen,H.
(Fall 2015)

ENGL B368 Pleasure, Luxury, and Consumption

Course will consider pleasure and consumerism in English texts and culture of the 17th and 18th centuries. Readings will include classical and neoclassical philosophies of hedonism and Epicureanism, Defoe’s “Roxana”, Mandeville’s “Fable of the Bees”, Pope’s “Rape of the Lock”, John Cleland’s “Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure” and early periodical essays, among others. Secondary readings will include critical studies on cultural history and material culture. Prerequisites: at least two 200-level English courses.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B373 Masculinity in English Literature: From Chivalry to Civility

This course will examine images and concepts of masculinity as represented in a wide variety of texts in English. Beginning in the early modern period and ending with our own time, the course will focus on texts of the “long” 18th century to contextualize the relationships between masculinity and chivalry, civility, manliness, and femininity.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ENGL B379 The African Griot(te)

A focused exploration of the multi-genre productions of Southern African writer Bessie Head and the critical responses to such works. Students are asked to help construct a critical-theoretical framework for talking about a writer who defies categorization or reduction.
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

FREN B201 Le Chevalier, la dame et le prêtre: littérature et publics du Moyen Age

Using literary texts, historical documents and letters as a mirror of the social classes that they address, this interdisciplinary course studies the principal preoccupations of secular and religious women and men in France and Norman England from the eleventh century through the fifteenth. Selected works from epic, lai, roman courtois, fabliau, theater, letters, and contemporary biography are read in modern French translation. Prerequisite: FREN 102 or 105.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Armstrong,G.
(Fall 2015)

FREN B248 Histoire des Femmes en France

A study of women and gender in France from the Revolution to the present. The course will pay particular attention to the role of women in the French Revolution (declarations, manifestos, women’s clubs, salons, etc.) and in the post-revolutionary era, as well as to the more contemporary feminist manifestations in France since Simone de Beauvoir’s Deuxième Sexe and the flow of feminist texts produced in the wake of May ‘68.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

FREN B302 Le printemps de la parole féminine: femmes écrivains des débuts

This study of selected women authors from the Carolingian period through the Middle Ages, Renaissance and 17th century—among them, Marie de France, the trobairitz, Christine de Pisan, Louise Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, and Madame de Lafayette—examines the way in which they appropriate and transform the male writing tradition and define themselves as self-conscious artists within or outside it. Particular attention will be paid to identifying recurring concerns and structures in their works, and to assessing their importance to women’s writing in general: among them, the poetics of silence, reproduction as a metaphor for artistic creation, and sociopolitical engagement.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): COML-B302
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

FREN B670 Hysterics, Saints, Mystics and Criminals in France’s Secular Republic

This course will approach the debate between science and religion which flared up as France became more secularized in the second part of the 19th century through such figures as hysterics, mystics, saints and criminals. The reading of medical treatises, court case reports, media and other cultural artifacts, along with literary works, will allow us to discuss the relevance of these figures in the imaginary cultural unconscious of the time, how their designation and diagnosis can also be read as symptoms of a broader culture malaise concerning gender and sexuality, power and agency, and the establisment of a special brand of secularism or « laïcité » in the late 19th century. We will start with Michel Foucault’s examination of a criminal case, that of Pierre Rivière, and will discuss medical treaties by Charcot, Freud, Moreau de Tours, reports on « miracles » at pilgrimage sites such as Lourdes, popular religious literature, as well as canonical and popular texts such as Eugène Sue’s Mystères de Paris, Flaubert’s Un cœur simple, Barbey d’Aurevilly’s Les Diaboliques, Zola’s Lourdes, Thérèse Martin’s Histoire de ma vie, and Bernanos’s Histoire de Mouchette.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

GERM B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Taught in English.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): COML-B245; CITY-B245
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

GERM B321 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): HART-B348; COML-B321; CITY-B319
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

GNST B223 Acting in Prison: Vision as Resource for Change

This course uses the theme of “vision” to explore the context and consequences of mass incarceration, daily experiences inside correctional institutions and social movements formed and inspired by incarcerated individuals. Students will explore and apply course materials in campus-based classes and in classes with incarcerated women inside a correctional facility.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

GNST B290 Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

This course offers a rigorous grounding for students interested in questions of gender and sexuality. Bringing together intellectual resources from multiple disciplines, it also explores what it means to think across and between disciplinary boundaries. Team-taught by Bryn Mawr and Haverford professors from different disciplines, this course is offered yearly on alternate campuses.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Nguyen,H., Pryor,J.
(Fall 2015)

GREK B201 Plato and Thucydides

This course is designed to introduce the student to two of the greatest prose authors of ancient Greece, the philosopher, Plato, and the historian, Thucydides. These two writers set the terms in the disciplines of philosophy and history for millennia, and philosophers and historians today continue to grapple with their ideas and influence. The brilliant and controversial statesman Alcibiades provides a link between the two texts in this course (Plato’s Symposium and Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War), and we examine the ways in which both authors handle the figure of Alcibiades as a point of entry into the comparison of the varying styles and modes of thought of these two great writers.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Edmonds,R.
(Fall 2015)

HART B107 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Self and Other in the Arts of France

A study of artists’ self-representations in the context of the philosophy and psychology of their time, with particular attention to issues of political patronage, gender and class, power and desire.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Levine,S.
(Fall 2015)

HART B108 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Women, Feminism, and History of Art

An investigation of the history of art since the Renaissance organized around the practice of women artists, the representation of women in art, and the visual economy of the gaze.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Saltzman,L.
(Spring 2016)

HART B234 Picturing Women in Classical Antiquity

We investigate representations of women in different media in ancient Greece and Rome, examining the cultural stereotypes of women and the gender roles that they reinforce. We also study the daily life of women in the ancient world, the objects that they were associated with in life and death and their occupations.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): ARCH-B234; CSTS-B234
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

HART B334 Topics in Film Studies

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Film Studies
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B334
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

HART B340 Topics in Baroque Art

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): COML-B340
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

HART B367 Asian American Film, Video and New Media

The course explores the role of pleasure in the production, reception, and performance of Asian American identities in film, video, and the internet, taking as its focus the sexual representation of Asian Americans in works produced by Asian American artists from 1915 to present. In several units of the course, we will study graphic sexual representations, including pornographic images and sex acts some may find objectionable. Students should be prepared to engage analytically with all class material. To maintain an atmosphere of mutual respect and solidarity among the participants in the class, no auditors will be allowed.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Film Studies
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B367
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Nguyen,H.
(Fall 2015)

HEBR B115 Women in Judaism: History, Texts, Practices

This course will investigate the varied experiences of women in Jewish history. Cultural, religious, and theoretical perspectives will be engaged as we seek to illuminate the roles, practices, and texts of Jewish women, from the biblical matriarchs to Hasidic teenagers today. No previous knowledge of Judaism is required.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): HIST-B115
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

HIST B102 Introduction to African Civilizations

The course is designed to introduce students to the history of African and African Diaspora societies, cultures, and political economies. We will discuss the origins, state formation, external contacts, and the structural transformations and continuities of African societies and cultures in the context of the slave trade, colonial rule, capitalist exploitation, urbanization, and westernization, as well as contemporary struggles over authority, autonomy, identity and access to resources. Case studies will be drawn from across the continent.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Ngalamulume,K.
(Fall 2015)

HIST B115 Women in Judaism: History, Texts, Practices

This course will investigate the varied experiences of women in Jewish history. Cultural, religious, and theoretical perspectives will be engaged as we seek to illuminate the roles, practices, and texts of Jewish women, from the biblical matriarchs to Hasidic teenagers today. No previous knowledge of Judaism is required.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): HEBR-B115
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

HIST B156 The Long 1960’s

The 1960s has had a powerful effect on recent US History. But what was it exactly? How long did it last? And what do we really mean when we say “The Sixties?” This term has become so potent and loaded for so many people from all sides of the political spectrum that it’s almost impossible to separate fact from fiction; myth from memory. We are all the inheritors of this intense period in American history but our inheritance is neither simple nor entirely clear. Our task this semester is to try to pull apart the meaning as well as the legend and attempt to figure out what “The Sixties” is (and what it isn’t) and try to assess its long term impact on American society. This course satifies the History Major’s 100 level requirement.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Ullman,S.
(Fall 2015)

HIST B214 The Historical Roots of Women in Genetics and Embryology

This course provides a general history of genetics and embryology from the late 19th to the mid-20th century with a focus on the role that women scientists and technicians played in the development of these sub-disciplines. We will look at the lives of well known and lesser-known individuals, asking how factors such as their educational experiences and mentor relationships influenced the roles these women played in the scientific enterprise. We will also examine specific scientific contributions in historical context, requiring a review of core concepts in genetics and developmental biology. One facet of the course will be to look at the Bryn Mawr Biology Department from the founding of the College into the mid-20th century.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): BIOL-B214
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Davis,G.
(Spring 2016)

HIST B229 Food and Drink in the Ancient World

This course explores practices of eating and drinking in the ancient Mediterranean world both from a socio-cultural and environmental perspective. Since we are not only what we eat, but also where, when, why, with whom, and how we eat, we will examine the wider implications of patterns of food production, preparation, consumption, availability, and taboos, considering issues like gender, health, financial situation, geographical variability, and political status. Anthropological, archaeological, literary, and art historical approaches will be used to analyze the evidence and shed light on the role of food and drink in ancient culture and society. In addition, we will discuss how this affects our contemporary customs and practices and how our identity is still shaped by what we eat.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): CSTS-B230
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Baertschi,A.
(Fall 2015)

HIST B237 Themes in Modern African History

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Environmental Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B237
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Ngalamulume,K.

Fall 2015, Spring 2016: Urbanization in Africa. The course examines the cultural, environmental, economic, political, and social factors that contributed to the expansion and transformation of pre-industrial cities, colonial cities, and cities today. We will examine various themes, such as the relationship between cities and societies; migration and social change; urban space, health problems, city life, and women.

HIST B238 From Bordellos to Cybersex History of Sexuality in Modern Europe

This course is a detailed examination of the changing nature and definition of sexuality in Europe from the late nineteenth century to the present. Throughout the semester we critically examine how understandings of sexuality changed—from how it was discussed and how authorities tried to control it to how the practice of sexuality evolved. Focusing on both discourses and lived experiences, the class will explore sexuality in the context of the following themes; prostitution and sex trafficking, the rise of medicine with a particular attention to sexology, psychiatry and psychoanalysis; the birth of the homo/hetero/bisexual divide; the rise of the “New Woman”; abortion and contraception; the “sexual revolution” of the 60s; pornography and consumerism; LGBTQ activism; concluding with considering sexuality in the age of cyber as well as genetic technology. In examining these issues we will question the role and influence of different political systems and war on sexuality. By paying special attention to the rise of modern nation-states, forces of nationalism, and the impacts of imperialism we will interrogate the nature of regulation and experiences of sexuality in different locations in Europe from the late nineteenth century to the present.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

HIST B249 History of Global Health

In this course, we will trace the emergence of public health practices, systems, and ideas from the 19th to the 21st centuries as a critical part of a broader history of epidemics, empire, and global mobility. We will explore these developments as they emerge at the intersection of Western and non-Western understandings of health, medicine, and the body; imperial health goals; decolonization and development initiatives after World War II; the rise of modern biomedicine and pharmaceutical industries; and the shift from “international health” to “global health.” Over the semester, we will examine themes of commodification, expertise, autonomy, sociality, agency, and disability as they emerge in such topics as tropical hygiene, eugenics, biosecurity, sexual and reproductive health, and in the management of diseases ranging from malaria, smallpox, and polio to HIV and Ebola.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

HIST B284 Movies and America

Movies are one of the most important means by which Americans come to know – or think they know—their own history. This class examines the complex cultural relationship between film and American historical self fashioning.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Film Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

HIST B303 Topics in American History

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Recent topics have included medicine, advertising, and history of sexuality.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Mercado,M., Gurtler,B.

Fall 2015: History of the Body. Through topics ranging from dieting, weight loss, and drugs to disease, sex, and dancing this course explores the modern history of the body. Using an interdisciplinary lens and global perspective, we will investigate themes of disability, vulnerability, bodily modification, reproduction, erotiism, and personhood. Our aim is to understand how raced, sexed, gendered, and aging bodies function in historical, contemporary, and emerging biopolitics.

Spring 2016: Race, Gender and Campus Memory. This course explores the theoretical and methodological challenges that surround the public preservation and presentation of history in spaces like museums and archives. Students will learn the skills professionals use to communicate historical scholarship to wider audiences and will grapple with the issues around expanding history’s stakeholders. Drawing on the rich history of Bryn Mawr College as our primary case study, we will focus on histories of race and gender in the U.S. context as they intersect with elite higher education; the challenges of building institutional memory; and the processes of collecting and exhibiting the experiences of diverse alumnae/i, faculty, and staff. Over the course of the semester, we will gain experience in archives and special collections research, oral history, and digital methods, and contribute to the building of contemporary collections d ocumenting Bryn Mawr campus life.

HIST B325 Topics in Social History

This a topics course that explores various themes in American social history. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Gurtler,B., Ullman,S.

Fall 2015: Queering History. This course examines both key events and developments in the emerging visibility of queer subjects in the American context as well the processes by which such visibility occurs. How is queer history made? Who makes it? Who gets to appear in history and what voice are they allowed to offer to the narration of the past? While we will study a sampling of specific historical moments, the focus of the course will be this search to understand what it would mean to ‘queer’ American history.

Spring 2016: History of Reproduction. This course investigates the evolution of reproduction in American medicine, science, politics and culture. We will explore changing ideas about reproductive bodies and health, parenthood, sexuality, and the family as well as changing practices of contraception, conception and childbirth. From midwifery in colonial America to contemporary practices of In Vitro Fertilization (IVF), this course focuses on persistent efforts of individuals, organizations, and the state to control reproduction.

HIST B332 Higher Education for Women: Bryn Mawr and Beyond

This course will explore the history of women’s higher learning in the United States from its origins in the antebellum female seminary movement through debates about coeducation and the meaning of single-sex education in the second half of the twentieth century. Drawing on the rich history of Bryn Mawr College as our primary case study, we will focus on the expansion of social and professional opportunities for women, the workings of gender difference within American educational institutions, and the experiences of diverse alumnae/i, faculty, and staff. Over the course of the semester, we will gain experience in archives and special collections research, oral history, and digital methods, and contribute to the building of contemporary collections documenting Bryn Mawr campus life. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Status.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ITAL B212 Italy Today: New Voices, New Writers, New Literature

This course, taught in English, will focus primarily on the works of the so-called “migrant writers” who, having adopted the Italian language, have become a significant part of the new voice of Italy. In addition to the aesthetic appreciation of these works, this course will also take into consideration the social, cultural, and political factors surrounding them. The course will focus on works by writers who are now integral to Italian canon – among them: Cristina Ali-Farah, Igiaba Scego, Ghermandi Gabriella, Amara Lakhous. As part of the course, movies concerned with various aspects of Italian Migrant literature will be screened and analyzed.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Film Studies
Crosslisting(s): COML-B214
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

ITAL B304 Il Rinascimento in Italia e oltre

Students will become familiar with the growing importance of women during the Renaissance, as women expanded their sphere of activity in literature (as authors of epics, lyrics, treatises, and letters), in court (especially in Ferrara), and in society, where for the first time women formed groups and their own discourse. What happens when women become the subject of study? What is learned about women and the nation? What is learned about gender and how disciplinary knowledge itself is changed through the centuries? Prerequisite: At least two 200-level literature courses. Taught in Italian.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

PHIL B205 Medical Ethics

The field of medicine provides a rich terrain for the study and application of philosophical ethics. This course will introduce students to fundamental ethical theories and present ways in which these theories connect to particular medical issues. We will also discuss what are often considered the four fundamental principles of medical ethics (autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice) in connection to specific topics related to medical practice (such as reproductive rights, euthanasia, and allocation of health resources).
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

PHIL B221 Ethics

An introduction to ethics by way of an examination of moral theories and a discussion of important ancient, modern, and contemporary texts which established theories such as virtue ethics, deontology, utilitarianism, relativism, emotivism, care ethics. This course considers questions concerning freedom, responsibility, and obligation. How should we live our lives and interact with others? How should we think about ethics in a global context? Is ethics independent of culture? A variety of practical issues such as reproductive rights, euthanasia, animal rights and the environment will be considered.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Bell,M.
(Fall 2015)

PHIL B225 Global Ethical Issues

The need for a critical analysis of what justice is and requires has become urgent in a context of increasing globalization, the emergence of new forms of conflict and war, high rates of poverty within and across borders and the prospect of environmental devastation. This course examines prevailing theories and issues of justice as well as approaches and challenges by non-western, post-colonial, feminist, race, class, and disability theorists.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; International Studies
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B225
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Bell,M.
(Spring 2016)

PHIL B252 Feminist Theory

Beliefs that gender discrimination has been eliminated and women have achieved equality have become commonplace. We challenge these assumptions examining the concepts of patriarchy, sexism, and oppression. Exploring concepts central to feminist theory, we attend to the history of feminist theory and contemporary accounts of women’s place and status in different societies, varied experiences, and the impact of the phenomenon of globalization. We then explore the relevance of gender to philosophical questions about identity and agency with respect to moral, social and political theory. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or permission of instructor.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B253
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Bell,M.
(Fall 2015)

PHIL B344 Development Ethics

This course explores the meaning of and moral issues raised by development. In what direction and by what means should a society “develop”? What role, if any, does the globalization of markets and capitalism play in processes of development and in systems of discrimination on the basis of factors such as race and gender? Answers to these sorts of questions will be explored through an examination of some of the most prominent theorists and recent literature. Prerequisites: a philosophy, political theory or economics course or permission of the instructor.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; International Studies
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B344
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

PHIL B352 Feminism and Philosophy

It has been said that one of the most important feminist contributions to theory is its uncovering of the ways in which theory in the Western tradition, whether of science, knowledge, morality, or politics has a hidden male bias. This course will explore feminist criticisms of and alternatives to traditional Western theory by examining feminist challenges to traditional liberal moral and political theory. Specific questions may include how to understand the power relations at the root of women’s oppression, how to theorize across differences, or how ordinary individuals are to take responsibility for pervasive and complex systems of oppression.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B352
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

PHIL B365 Erotica: Love and Art in Plato and Shakespeare

The course explores the relationship between love and art, “eros” and “poesis,” through in-depth study of Plato’s “Phaedus” and “Symposium,” Shakespeare’s “As You Like It” and “Antony and Cleopatra,” and essays by modern commentators (including David Halperin, Anne Carson, Martha Nussbaum, Marjorie Garber, and Stanley Cavell). We will also read Shakespeare’s Sonnets and “Romeo and Juliet.”
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B365; POLS-B365; COML-B365
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

POLS B225 Global Ethical Issues

The need for a critical analysis of what justice is and requires has become urgent in a context of increasing globalization, the emergence of new forms of conflict and war, high rates of poverty within and across borders and the prospect of environmental devastation. This course examines prevailing theories and issues of justice as well as approaches and challenges by non-western, post-colonial, feminist, race, class, and disability theorists.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; International Studies
Crosslisting(s): PHIL-B225
Units: 1.0
(Spring 2016)

POLS B253 Feminist Theory

Beliefs that gender discrimination has been eliminated and women have achieved equality have become commonplace. We challenge these assumptions examining the concepts of patriarchy, sexism, and oppression. Exploring concepts central to feminist theory, we attend to the history of feminist theory and contemporary accounts of women’s place and status in different societies, varied experiences, and the impact of the phenomenon of globalization. We then explore the relevance of gender to philosophical questions about identity and agency with respect to moral, social and political theory. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or permission of instructor.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): PHIL-B252
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Bell,M.
(Fall 2015)

POLS B262 Who Believes What and Why: the Sociology of Public Opinion

This course explores public opinion: what it is, how it is measured, how it is shaped, and how it changes over time. Specific attention is given to the role of elites, the mass media, and religion in shaping public opinion. Examples include racial/ethnic civil rights, abortion, gay/lesbian/transgendered sexuality, and inequalities.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B262
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

POLS B290 Power and Resistance

What more is there to politics than power? What is the force of the “political” for specifying power as a practice or institutional form? What distinguishes power from authority, violence, coercion, and domination? How is power embedded in and generated by cultural practices, institutional arrangements, and processes of normalization? This course seeks to address questions of power and politics in the context of domination, oppression, and the arts of resistance. Our general topics will include authority, the moralization of politics, the dimensions of power, the politics of violence (and the violence of politics), language, sovereignty, emancipation, revolution, domination, normalization, governmentality, genealogy, and democratic power. Writing projects will seek to integrate analytical and reflective analyses as we pursue these questions in common.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

POLS B344 Development Ethics

This course explores the meaning of and moral issues raised by development. In what direction and by what means should a society “develop”? What role, if any, does the globalization of markets and capitalism play in processes of development and in systems of discrimination on the basis of factors such as race and gender? Answers to these sorts of questions will be explored through an examination of some of the most prominent theorists and recent literature. Prerequisites: a philosophy, political theory or economics course or permission of the instructor.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; International Studies
Crosslisting(s): PHIL-B344
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

POLS B352 Feminism and Philosophy

It has been said that one of the most important feminist contributions to theory is its uncovering of the ways in which theory in the Western tradition, whether of science, knowledge, morality, or politics has a hidden male bias. This course will explore feminist criticisms of and alternatives to traditional Western theory by examining feminist challenges to traditional liberal moral and political theory. Specific questions may include how to understand the power relations at the root of women’s oppression, how to theorize across differences, or how ordinary individuals are to take responsibility for pervasive and complex systems of oppression.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): PHIL-B352
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

POLS B365 Erotica: Love and Art in Plato and Shakespeare

The course explores the relationship between love and art, “eros” and “poesis,” through in-depth study of Plato’s “Phaedus” and “Symposium,” Shakespeare’s “As You Like It” and “Antony and Cleopatra,” and essays by modern commentators (including David Halperin, Anne Carson, Martha Nussbaum, Marjorie Garber, and Stanley Cavell). We will also read Shakespeare’s Sonnets and “Romeo and Juliet.”
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B365; PHIL-B365; COML-B365
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

POLS B375 Gender, Work and Family

As the number of women participating in the paid workforce who are also mothers exceeds 50 percent, it becomes increasingly important to study the issues raised by these dual roles. This seminar will examine the experiences of working and nonworking mothers in the United States, the roles of fathers, the impact of working mothers on children, and the policy implications of women, work, and family.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B375
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

POLS B393 U.S. Welfare Politics: Theory and Practice

Major theoretical perspectives concerning the welfare state with a focus on social policy politics, including recent welfare reforms and how in an era of globalization there has been a turn to a more restrictive system of social provision. Special attention is paid to the ways class, race, and gender are involved in making of social welfare policy and the role of social welfare policy in reinforcing class, race, and gender inequities. Prerequisite: POLS B121 or SOCL B102.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): SOCL-B393
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

PSYC B340 Women’s Mental Health

This course will provide an overview of current research and theory related to women’s mental health. We will discuss psychological phenomena and disorders that are particularly salient to and prevalent among women, why these phenomena/disorders affect women disproportionately over men, and how they may impact women’s psychological and physical well-being. Psychological disorders covered will include: depression, eating disorders, dissociative identity disorder, borderline personality disorder, and chronic pain disorders. Other topics discussed will include work-family conflict for working mothers, the role of sociocultural influences on women’s mental health, and mental health issues particular to women of color and to lesbian women. Prerequisite: PSYC B209 or PSYC B351 (or equivalent 200-level course).
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

SOCL B102 Society, Culture, and the Individual

Analysis of the basic sociological methods, perspectives, and concepts used in the study of society, with emphasis on social structure, education, culture, the self, and power. Theoretical perspectives that focus on sources of stability, conflict, and change are emphasized throughout.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; International Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Nolan,B.
(Fall 2015, Spring 2016)

SOCL B201 The Study of Gender in Society

The definition of male and female social roles and sociological approaches to the study of gender in the United States, with attention to gender in the economy and work place, the division of labor in families and households, and analysis of class and ethnic differences in gender roles. Of particular interest in this course is the comparative exploration of the experiences of women of color in the United States.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Nolan,B.
(Fall 2015)

SOCL B205 Social Inequality

Introduction to the major sociological theories of gender, racial-ethnic, and class inequality with emphasis on the relationships among these forms of stratification in the contemporary United States, including the role of the upper class(es), inequality between and within families, in the work place, and in the educational system.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): CITY-B205
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Nolan,B.
(Fall 2015)

SOCL B217 The Family in Social Context

A consideration of the family as a social institution in the United States, looking at how societal and cultural characteristics and dynamics influence families; how the family reinforces or changes the society in which it is located; and how the family operates as a social organization. Included is an analysis of family roles and social interaction within the family. Major problems related to contemporary families are addressed, such as domestic violence and divorce. Cross-cultural and subcultural variations in the family are considered.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

SOCL B225 Women in Society

A study of the contemporary experiences of women of color in the Global South. The household, workplace, community, and the nation-state, and the positions of women in the private and public spheres are compared cross-culturally. Topics include feminism, identity and self-esteem; globalization and transnational social movements and tensions and transitions encountered as nations embark upon development.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Montes,V.
(Spring 2016)

SOCL B257 Marginals and Outsiders: The Sociology of Deviance

An examination of unconventional and criminal behavior from the standpoint of different theoretical perspectives on deviance (e.g., social disorganization, symbolic interaction, structural functionalism, Marxism) with particular emphasis on the labeling and social construction perspectives; and the role of conflicts and social movements in changing the normative boundaries of society. Topics will include alcoholism, drug addiction, homicide, homosexuality, mental illness, prostitution, robbery, and white-collar crime.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Washington,R.
(Spring 2016)

SOCL B262 Who Believes What and Why: The Sociology of Public Opinion

This course explores public opinion: what it is, how it is measured, how it is shaped, and how it changes over time. Specific attention is given to the role of elites, the mass media, and religion in shaping public opinion. Examples include racial/ethnic civil rights, abortion, gay/lesbian/transgendered sexuality, and inequalities.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B262
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

SOCL B350 Movements for Social Justice in the US

Throughout human history, powerless groups of people have organized social movements to improve their lives and their societies. Powerful groups and institutions have resisted these efforts in order to maintain their own privilege. Some periods of history have been more likely than others to spawn protest movements. What factors seem most likely to lead to social movements? What determines their success/failure? We will examine 20th-century social movements in the United States to answer these questions. Includes a film series. Prerequisite: At least one prior social science course or permission of the instructor.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Peace, Justice and Human Rights
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

SOCL B375 Gender, Work and Family

As the number of women participating in the paid workforce who are also mothers exceeds 50 percent, it becomes increasingly important to study the issues raised by these dual roles. This seminar will examine the experiences of working and nonworking mothers in the United States, the roles of fathers, the impact of working mothers on children, and the policy implications of women, work, and family.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Crosslisting(s): POLS-B375
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

SPAN B217 Narratives of Latinidad

This course explores how Latina/o writers fashion bicultural and transnational identities and narrate the intertwined histories of the U.S. and Latin America. We will focus on topics of shared concern among Latino groups such as imperialism and annexation, the affective experience of migration, race and gender stereotypes, the politics of Spanglish, and struggles for social justice. By analyzing novels, poetry, performance art, testimonial narratives, films, and essays, we will unpack the complexity of Latinadad in the Americas.
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B217
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s):Harford Vargas,J.
(Fall 2015)

SPAN B223 Género y modernidad en la narrativa del siglo XIX

A reading of 19th-century Spanish narrative by both men and women writers, to assess how they come together in configuring new ideas of female identity and its social domains, as the country is facing new challenges in its quest for modernity. Prerequisites: SPAN B110 and/or B120 (previously SPAN B200/B202); or another SPAN 200-level course.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

SPAN B237 Latino Dictator Novel in Americas

This course examines representations of dictatorship in Latin American and Latina/o novels. We will explore the relationship between narrative form and absolute power by analyzing the literary techniques writers use to contest authoritarianism. We will compare dictator novels from the United States, the Caribbean, Central America, and the Southern Cone.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Crosslisting(s): ENGL-B237; COML-B237
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

SPAN B265 Escritoras españolas: entre tradición, renovación y migración

Fiction by women writers from Spain in the 20th and 21st century. Breaking the traditional female stereotypes during and after Franco’s dictatorship, the authors explore through their creative writing changing sociopolitical and cultural issues including regional identities and immigration. Topics of discussion include gender marginality, feminist studies and the portrayal of women in contemporary society. Prerequiste: SPAN B110 and/or B120 (previously SPAN B200/B202); or another SPAN 200-level course.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

SPAN B309 La mujer en la literatura española del Siglo de Oro

A study of the depiction of women in the fiction, drama, and poetry of 16th- and 17th-century Spain. Topics include the construction of gender; the idealization and codification of women’s bodies; the politics of feminine enclosure (convent, home, brothel, palace); and the performance of honor. The first half of the course will deal with representations of women by male authors (Calderón, Cervantes, Lope, Quevedo) and the second will be dedicated to women writers such as Teresa de Ávila, Ana Caro, Juana Inés de la Cruz, and María de Zayas. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)

SPAN B322 Queens, Nuns, and Other Deviants in the Early Modern Iberian World

The course examines literary, historical, and legal texts from the early modern Iberian world (Spain, Mexico, Peru) through the lens of gender studies. The course is divided around three topics: royal bodies (women in power), cloistered bodies (women in the convent), and delinquent bodies (figures who defy legal and gender normativity). Course is taught in English and is open to all juniors or seniors who have taken at least one 200-level course in a literature department. Students seeking Spanish credit must have taken BMC Spanish 110 and/or 120 and at least one other Spanish course at a 200-level, or received permission from instructor.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures
Crosslisting(s): COML-B322
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2015-2016)