Biology

Students may complete a major or minor in Biology. Within the major, students may complete minors in computational methods, environmental studies or neural and behavioral sciences.

Faculty

Peter Brodfuehrer, Eleanor A. Bliss Professor of Biology

Monica Chander, Chair and Associate Professor of Biology

Gregory Davis, Associate Professor of Biology

Tamara Davis, Professor of Biology

Karen Greif, Professor of Biology

Michelle Kanther, Lecturer

Courtney Harmon Morris, Instructor

Thomas Mozdzer, Assistant Professor of Biology

Sydne Record, Assistant Professor of Biology

Joshua Shapiro, Assistant Professor of Biology (on leave semesters I & II)

Jennifer Skirkanich, Lecturer in Biology

Michelle Wien, Lecturer in Biology (on leave semester I)

TThe programs of the department are designed to introduce students to unifying concepts and broad issues in biology, and to provide the opportunity for in-depth inquiry into topics of particular interest through coursework and independent research. Introductory- and intermediate-level courses examine the structures and functions of living systems at all levels of organization, from molecules, cells and organisms to populations. Advanced courses encourage the student to gain proficiency in the critical reading of research literature, leading to the development, defense and presentation of a senior paper. Opportunities for supervised research with faculty are available and highly encouraged. Students considering coursework in Biology are encouraged to meet with the department’s major advisor to determine the best sequence of courses based on their interests and goals.

Major Requirements

Course requirements for a major in Biology include two semesters of introductory biology (BIOL110-111,115), six courses at the 200 and 300 level (excluding BIOL 390-399), of which at least two must be at the 300-level and three must be laboratory courses, and one senior seminar course (BIOL 390-399). No more than two 200- or 300-level courses may be taken outside the Bryn Mawr Biology Department. Two semesters of supervised laboratory research, BIOL 403, may be substituted for one of the required laboratory courses. In addition, two semester courses in general chemistry and three additional semester courses in allied sciences, to be selected from Anthropology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geology, Mathematics, Physics or Psychology are required for all majors. Selection of the three additional allied science courses must be done in consultation with the student’s major adviser and be approved by the department.

BIOL110/111/115 and CHEM103/104 must be completed within the first two years if you want to declare a Biology major.
Students interested in pursuing graduate studies or medical school are encouraged to take two semesters each of physics and organic chemistry. In addition, all biology students are encouraged to take courses that employ quantitative reasoning or computational approaches; such courses can be taken within the Biology Department or in other departments.

A score of 5 on the Advanced Placement examination, or equivalent International Baccalaureate scores, can be used to satisfy one semester of the introductory biology requirement for the major. One additional semester of BIOL 110/111/115 is required to fulfill the introductory biology requirement. The department, however, highly recommends both semesters of introductory biology for majors. Placement out of one semester of introductory biology does not satisfy the introductory biology pre-requisite for 200/300-level courses.
The writing within the Major Requirement is fulfilled by the completion of two 200/300-level laboratory courses in Biology, all of which are writing attentive.

Honors

Departmental honors are awarded to students who have distinguished themselves academically or via their participation in departmental activities. As part of the process for awarding honors in Biology, interested seniors are asked to write a short (one-page maximum) essay identifying ways in which they have distinguished themselves within the Biology Department, including activities and scholarship beyond the classroom that exemplify their engagement and growth as a Biology major. Final selection for honors is made by the Biology faculty.

Minor Requirements

A minor in Biology consists of six semester courses in Biology, of which no more than two may be taken outside the Bryn Mawr Biology Department.

Minors in Environmental Studies, Computational Methods, and Neural and Behavioral Sciences

Minors in Environmental Studies, Computational Methods, and Neural and Behavioral Sciences are available for students interested in interdisciplinary exploration in these areas. Check relevant sections of the course catalog for complete descriptions of the minors.

Teacher Certification

The College offers a certification program in secondary teacher education.

Animal Experimentation Policy

Students who object to participating directly in laboratory activities involving the use of animals in a course required for the major are required to notify the faculty member of her or his objections at the beginning of the course. If alternative activities are available and deemed consistent with the pedagogical objectives of the course by the faculty member, then a student will be allowed to pursue alternative laboratory activities without penalty.

COURSES

BIOL B101 Introduction to Biology I: Genetics & the Central Dogma

For post-baccalaureate premedical students only. A comprehensive examination of topics in genetics, molecular biology and cancer biology. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Wien,M., Kanther,M.
(Fall 2016)

BIOL B102 Introduction to Biology II: Biochemistry & Human Physiology

For post-baccalaureate premedical students only. A comprehensive examination of topics in biochemistry, cell biology and human physiology. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. BIOL B101 is strongly recommended.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Wien,M., Kanther,M.
(Spring 2017)

BIOL B110 Biological Exploration I

BIOL B110 is an introductory-level course designed to encourage students to explore the field of biology at multiple levels of organization: molecular, cellular, organismal and ecological. Each course will explore these areas of biology through a unifying theme. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. Quantitative readiness is required for this course. This is a topics course, course topic varies.
Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Greif,K., Davis,T., Skirkanich,J.

Fall 2016: Biology of Cancer. Biology B110-001 will explore the biology underlying cancer through examination of areas of biochemistry, cell biology, genetics and genomics, building a picture of cell function that helps explain the physiology of cancer.
Fall 2016: From Genotype to Phenotype. Biology B110-002 will explore the relationship between phenotype and genotype through analyses of inheritance patterns in families and populations, the underlying molecular basis of phenotypes, and an examination of the regulation and decoding of genetic information that ultimately produces the proteins whose structure /function dictate cellular activity.

BIOL B111 Biological Exploration II

BIOL 111 is an introductory-level course designed to encourage students to explore the field of biology at multiple levels of organization: molecular, cellular, organismal and ecological. Each course will explore these areas of biology through a unifying theme. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. Prerequisite: Quantitative readiness is required for this course. This is a topics course, course topic varies.
Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Skirkanich,J., Davis,G., Record,S.

Spring 2017: Development and Evolution. B111-001.
Spring 2017: Global Change and Ecosystems. B111-002.

BIOL B115 Computing Through Biology: An Introduction

This course is an introduction to biology through computer science, or an introduction to computer science through biology. The course will examine biological systems through the use of computer science, exploring concepts and solving problems from bioinformatics, evolution, ecology, and molecular biology through the practice of writing and modifying code in the Python programming language. The course will introduce students to the subject matter and branches of computer science as an academic discipline, and the nature, development, coding, testing, documenting and analysis of the efficiency and limitations of algorithms. Additional Meeting Time: (Lab) 2 hours.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B201 Genetics

This course focuses on the principles of genetics, including classical genetics, population genetics and molecular genetics. Topics to be covered include the genetic and molecular nature of mutations and phenotypes, genetic mapping and gene identification, chromosome abnormalities, developmental genetics, genome editing and epigenetics. Examples of genetics analyses are drawn from a variety of organisms including Drosophila, C. elegans, mice and humans. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL B110 and CHEM B104.
Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology;
Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Davis,T.
(Fall 2016)

BIOL B202 Introduction to Neuroscience

An introduction to the nervous system and its broad contributions to function. The class will explore fundamentals of neural anatomy and signaling, sensory and motor processing and control, nervous system development and examples of complex brain functions. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111 or permission of instructor.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Neuroscience
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Greif,K.
(Fall 2016)

BIOL B210 Biology and Public Policy

A lecture/discussion course on major issues and advances in biology and their implications for public policy decisions. Topics discussed include reproductive technologies, the Human Genome project, environmental health hazards, bioterrorism, and euthanasia and organ transplantation. Readings include scientific articles, public policy and ethical considerations, and lay publications. Lecture three hours a week. This class involves considerable writing. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111, or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Greif,K.
(Spring 2017)

BIOL B214 The Historical Roots of Women in Genetics and Embryology

This course provides a general history of genetics and embryology from the late 19th to the mid-20th century with a focus on the role that women scientists and technicians played in the development of these sub-disciplines. We will look at the lives of well known and lesser-known individuals, asking how factors such as their educational experiences and mentor relationships influenced the roles these women played in the scientific enterprise. We will also examine specific scientific contributions in historical context, requiring a review of core concepts in genetics and developmental biology. One facet of the course will be to look at the Bryn Mawr Biology Department from the founding of the College into the mid-20th century.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B215 Experimental Design and Statistics

An introductory course in designing experiments and analyzing biological data. This course is structured to develop students’ understanding of when to apply different quantitative methods, and how to implement those methods using the R statistics environment. Topics include summary statistics, distributions, randomization, replication, parametric and nonparametric tests, and introductory topics in multivariate and Bayesian statistics. The course is geared around weekly problem sets and interactive learning. Suggested Preparation: BIOL B110 or B111 is highly recommended.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B216 Genomics

An introduction to the study of genomes and genomic data. This course will examine the types of biological questions that can be answered using large biological data sets and complete genome sequences as well as the techniques and technologies that make such studies possible. Topics include genome organization and evolution, comparative genomics, and analysis of transcriptomes and proteomes. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111. BIOL 201 highly recommended.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B220 Ecology

A study of the interactions between organisms and their environments. The scientific underpinnings of current environmental issues, with regard to human impacts, are also discussed. Students will also become familiar with ecological principles and with the methods ecologists use. Students will apply these principles through the design and implementation of experiments both in the laboratory and the field. Lecture three hours a week, laboratory/field investigation three hours a week. There will be optional field trips throughout the semester. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL B110 or B111 or permission of instructor.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Mozdzer,T.
(Fall 2016)

BIOL B225 Biology and Ecology of Plants

Plants are critical to numerous contemporary issues, such as ecological sustainability, economic stability, and human health. Students will examine the fundamentals of how plants are structured, how they function, how they interact with other organisms, and how they respond to environmental stimuli. In addition, students will be taught to identify important local species, and will explore the role of plants in human society and ecological systems. One semester of BIOL 110/111.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B236 Evolution

A lecture/discussion course on the development of evolutionary biology. This course will cover the history of evolutionary theory, population genetics, molecular and developmental evolution, paleontology, and phylogenetic analysis. Lecture three hours a week.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Davis,G., Marenco,P.
(Spring 2017)

BIOL B244 Behavioral Endocrinology

An interdisciplinary-based analysis of the nature of hormones, how hormones affect cells and systems, and how these effects alter the behavior of animals. Topics will be covered from a research perspective using a combination of lectures, discussions and student presentations. Prerequisites: One semester of BIOL 110-111 or one of the following courses: BIOL B202, PSYC B218 or PSYC H217.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Neuroscience
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B250 Computational Methods in the Sciences

A study of how and why modern computation methods are used in scientific inquiry. Students will learn basic principles of visualizing and analyzing scientific data through hands-on programming exercises. The majority of the course will use the R programming language and corresponding open source statistical software. Content will focus on data sets from across the sciences. Six hours of combined lecture/lab per week.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Environmental Studies; Neuroscience
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B255 Microbiology

Invisible to the naked eye, microbes occupy every niche on the planet. This course will examine how microbes have become successful colonizers; review aspects of interactions between microbes, humans and the environment; and explore practical uses of microbes in industry, medicine and environmental management. The course will combine lecture, discussion of primary literature and student presentations. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: One semester of BIOL 110 and CHEM B104.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Environmental Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Chander,M.
(Spring 2017)

BIOL B262 Urban Ecosystems

Cities can be considered ecosystems whose functions are highly influenced by human activity. This course will address many of the living and non-living components of urban ecosystems, as well as their unique processes. Using an approach focused on case studies, the course will explore the ecological and environmental problems that arise from urbanization, and also examine solutions that have been attempted. Prerequisite: BIOL B110 or B111 or ENVS B101.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B271 Developmental Biology

An introduction to embryology and the concepts of developmental biology. Concepts are illustrated by analyzing the experimental observations that support them. Topics include gametogenesis and fertilization, morphogenesis, cell fate specification and differentiation, pattern formation, regulation of gene expression, neural development, and developmental plasticity. The laboratory focuses on observations and experiments on living embryos. Lecture three hours, laboratory three scheduled hours a week; most weeks require additional hours outside of the regularly scheduled lab. Prerequisite: one semester of BIOL 110-111 or permission of instructor.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Davis,G.
(Fall 2016)

BIOL B303 Human Physiology

A comprehensive study of the physical and chemical processes in tissues, organs and organ systems that form the basis of animal and human function. Homeostasis, control systems and the structural basis of function are emphasized. Laboratories are designed to introduce basic physiological techniques and the practice of scientific inquiry. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. Prerequisites: One semester of BIOL 110-111, CHEM 103, 104 and one 200-level biology course.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B313 Integrative Organismal Biology I

The first semester of a two-semester course focusing on the anatomical and physiological properties of cells, tissues, organs and organ systems that form the basis of human function. Homeostasis, control systems and the structural basis of function are emphasized. Lecture: three hours, laboratory: three hours a week. Prerequisites: One semester of BIOL 110-111, CHEM 103, 104 and one 200-level biology course.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Brodfuehrer,P.
(Fall 2016)

BIOL B314 Integrative Organismal Biology II

The second semester of Integrative Organismal Biology. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. Prerequisite: BIOL 313 or permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Brodfuehrer,P.
(Spring 2017)

BIOL B321 Neuroethology

This course provides an opportunity for students to understand the neuronal basis of behavior through the examination of how particular animals have evolved neural solutions to specific problems posed to them by their environments. The topics will be covered from a research perspective using a combination of lectures, discussions and student presentations. Prerequisite: BIOL 202, PSYC 218 or PSYC 217 at Haverford.
Counts towards: Neuroscience
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B323 Coastal and Marine Ecology

An interdisciplinary course exploring the ecological, biogeochemical, and physical aspects of coastal and marine ecosystems. We will compare intertidal habitats in both temperate and tropical environments, with a specific emphasis on global change impacts on coastal systems (e.g. sea level rise, warming, and species shifts). In 2015 the course will have a mandatory field trip to a tropical marine field station and an overnight field trip to a temperate field station in the mid-Atlantic. Prerequisite: BIOL B220 (Ecology)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B326 From Channels to Behavior

Introduces the principles, research approaches, and methodologies of cellular and behavioral neuroscience. The first half of the course will cover the cellular properties of neurons using current and voltage clamp techniques along with neuron simulations. The second half of the course will introduce students to state-of-the-art techniques for acquiring and analyzing data in a variety of rodent models linking brain and behavior. Prerequisites: one semester of BIOL 110-111 and one of the following: PSYC B218/PSYC H217, or BIOL 202.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Neuroscience
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B332 Global Change Biology

Global changes to our environment present omnipresent environmental challenges. We are only beginning to understand the complex interactions between organisms and the rapidly changing environment. Students will explore the effects of global change on ecosystems by analyzing the primary literature and the latest IPCC report. In 2017, there will be a mandatory one-day field trip to the Smithsonian Global Change Research Wetland. Prerequisites: BIOL B220, BIOL 225 or BIOL B262, or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Mozdzer,T.
(Spring 2017)

BIOL B340 Cell Biology

A lecture course with laboratory emphasizing current knowledge in cell biology. Among topics discussed are cell membranes, cell surface specializations, cell motility and the cytoskeleton, regulation of cell activity and cell signaling. Laboratory experiments are focused on studies of the cytoskeleton making use of techniques in cell culture and immunocytochemistry. A student-designed project is a major component. Lecture three hours, laboratory four hours a week. Prerequisites: One semester of Organic Chemistry (CHEM B211/B212), and BIOL B201 or B271, or permission of instructor.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B352 Immunology

This course is intended to familiarize students with the cellular, molecular, and biochemical aspects of the innate and adaptive components of the immune system. The course will consist of interactive lectures and discussions to gain a comprehensive introduction to the underlying principles of immunology. Lectures will be supplemented with analysis of primary literature, group presentations, and discussion. The first half of the course will focus on the immune system and the functions of its major components. The second half will focus on how the various components of the immune system function during their response to infections agents and how the system is deregulated during non-infections immune diseases. Prerequisite: BIOL B110 or B111, and one 200 level Biology course.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Kanther,M.
(Fall 2016)

BIOL B364 Developmental Neurobiology

A lecture/discussion course on major topics in the development of the nervous system. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 or 271, BIOL 202 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Neuroscience
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Greif,K.
(Spring 2017)

BIOL B375 Integrated Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I

The first semester of a two-semester course that focuses on the structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids, enzyme kinetics, metabolic pathways, gene regulation and recombinant DNA techniques. Students will explore these topics via lecture, critical reading and discussion of primary literature and laboratory experimentation. Three hours of lecture, three hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL B110 and two semesters of Organic Chemistry (CHEM B211/B212)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Chander,M.
(Fall 2016)

BIOL B376 Integrated Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II

This second semester of a two-semester sequence will continue with analysis of nucleic acids and gene regulation through lecture, critical reading and discussion of primary literature and laboratory experimentation. Three hours of lecture, three hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 or BIOL B375 or permission of instructor.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Davis,T.
(Spring 2017)

BIOL B380 Topics in Cellular and Organismal Physiology

Physiology is the study of the normal functioning of a living organism and its components, including all its physical and chemical processes. The integration of function across many levels of organization will be emphasized. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111, CHEM 103, 104 and one 200-level biology course
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B390 Senior Seminar in Ecology

A focus on the interactions among organisms and their environments. Students read and discuss current and classic papers from the primary literature. Topics may include biogeographic patterns, population and community dynamics, and ecosystem functioning. We may explore current issues such as global warming, habitat degradation and fragmentation, loss of biodiversity and the introduction of alien species. The effects of these human induced changes on the biota are examined. Students write, defend and publicly present one long research paper. Three hours of class lecture and discussion a week, supplemented by frequent meetings with individual students. Prerequisite: BIOL 220 or permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B392 Senior Seminar

An advanced course in the study of the organization and function of physiological systems from the molecular level to the organismal level. Specific topics related to the organization and function of physiological systems are examined in detail using the primary literature. In addition, students write, defend and publicly present one long research paper. Three hours of class lecture and discussion a week, supplemented by frequent meetings with individual students.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B393 Senior Seminar in Molecular Genetics

This seminar course focuses on topics of current interest and significance in genetics, molecular genetics and genomics. Topics vary, and may include the characterization of functional DNA elements, the effects of allelic variation, mechanisms of gene regulation, and/or genetics as a tool for understanding development. Students investigate topics of interest through critical reading of primary literature and hone written and oral communication skills via the presentation and discussion of scientific information and ideas. In addition, students write, defend, and publicly present one long research paper. Three hours of discussion per week, supplemented by regular meetings with individual students. Prerequisites: BIOL 201 or Biology 271 or Biology 376, or permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Davis,T.
(Spring 2017)

BIOL B394 Senior Seminar in Evolutionary Developmental Biology

Topics of current interest and significance in evolutionary developmental biology are examined with critical readings and oral presentations of work from the research literature. In addition, students write, defend and publicly present a research paper based on their readings. Three hours of class lecture and discussion a week, supplemented by frequent meetings with individual students. Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 216, 236, 271 or permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B398 Senior Seminar in Science and Society

A seminar that addresses a variety of topics at the interface of biology and society. Students write, defend and publicly present a research project. Students examine issues through readings from the research literature and oral presentations in class. Students also prepare, defend and publicly present a research project. Three hours of discussion per week, supplemented by frequent meetings with individual students. Prerequisite: Biology or Biochemistry major.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Greif,K.
(Fall 2016)

BIOL B399 Senior Seminar in Laboratory Investigations

This seminar provides students with a collaborative forum to facilitate the exchange of ideas and broaden their perspective and understanding of research approaches used in various sub-disciplines of biology. There will be a focus on the presentation, interpretation and discussion of data, and communication of scientific findings to diverse audiences. In addition, students write, defend and publicly present a paper on their supervised research project. Three hours of class discussion each week. Corequisite: enrollment in BIOL B403.
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Record,S.
(Spring 2017)

BIOL B401 Supervised Research in Neuroscience

Laboratory or library research under the supervision of a member of the Neuroscience committee. Required for those with the concentration. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Neuroscience
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2016)

BIOL B425 Praxis III: Independent Study

Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community.
Counts towards: Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ANTH B208 Human Biology

This course will be a survey of modern human biological variation. We will examine the patterns of morphological and genetic variation in modern human populations and discuss the evolutionary explanations for the observed patterns. A major component of the class will be the discussion of the social implications of these patterns of biological variation, particularly in the construction and application of the concept of race. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B354 Basic Concepts and Special Topics in Biochemistry

For post-baccalaureate premedical students and non-majors who meet the prerequisites. Course does not count toward the biology major, majors should take BIOL B375. Prerequisites: one semester of BIOL 110/B111, and CHEM 211 or permission of the instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Miller,B.
(Spring 2017)

CHEM B103 General Chemistry I

For students with some back ground in chemistry who are motivated, self-directed learners. Topics include aqueous solutions and solubility; the electronic structure of atoms and molecules; chemical reactions and energy; intermolecular forces. Examples discussed in lecture and laboratory workshop include environmental sciences, material sciences and biological chemistry. Lecture three hours and Chemistry workshop three hours a week. The laboratory workshop period will be used for traditional chemical experimentation or related problem solving. The course may include individual conferences, evening peer-led instruction sessions. Prerequisite: Quantitative Readiness Required.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): White,S., Goldsmith,J., Watkins,L.
(Fall 2016)

CHEM B104 General Chemistry II

A continuation of CHEM B103. Topics include chemical reactions; introduction to thermodynamics and chemical equilibria; acid-base chemistry; electrochemistry; chemical kinetics. Lecture three hours, recitation one hour and laboratory three hours a week. May include individual conferences, evening problems or peer-led instruction sessions. Prerequisite: CHEM B103 with a grade of at least 2.0 or chemistry department placement or permission of the instructor. Students interested in the intensive section of CHEM B104 must have earned at least a 3.0 in CHEM B103.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Francl,M., Watkins,L.
(Spring 2017)

CHEM B377 Biochemistry II: Biochemical Pathways and Metabolism

This course is a continuation of CHEM B242 or BIOL B375. Biochemical pathways involved in cellular metabolism will be explored in molecular detail. Energy producing, degradation, and biosynthetic pathways involving sugars, fats, amino acids, and nucleotides will be discussed with an emphasis on structures and mechanisms, experimental methods, regulation, and integration. Additional topics, drawn from the primary research literature, may be covered. Readings will be drawn from textbooks and from the primary literature and assessments may include oral presentations, problem sets, written examinations, and writing assignments. This is a second course in Biochemistry and assumes a strong foundation in the fundamentals of Biochemistry. Prerequisite: BIO 375 or CHEM 375, or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): White,S.
(Spring 2017)

CMSC B115 Computing Through Biology: An Introduction

This course is an introduction to biology through computer science, or an introduction to computer science through biology. The course will examine biological systems through the use of computer science, exploring concepts and solving problems from bioinformatics, evolution, ecology, and molecular biology through the practice of writing and modifying code in the Python programming language. The course will introduce students to the subject matter and branches of computer science as an academic discipline, and the nature, development, coding, testing, documenting and analysis of the efficiency and limitations of algorithms. Additional Meeting Time: (Lab) 2 hours.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CMSC B361 Emergence

A multidisciplinary exploration of the interactions underlying both real and simulated systems, such as ant colonies, economies, brains, earthquakes, biological evolution, artificial evolution, computers, and life. These emergent systems are often characterized by simple, local interactions that collectively produce global phenomena not apparent in the local interactions. Prerequisite: CMSC 206 or H106 and CMSC 231 or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Neuroscience
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

PSYC B401 Supervised Research in Neuroscience

Laboratory or field research on a wide variety of topics. Students should consult with faculty members to determine their topic and faculty supervisor, early in the semester prior to when they will begin.
Counts towards: Neuroscience
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2016, Spring 2017)