Chemistry

Students may complete a major or minor in Chemistry. Within the major, students may complete a minor in computational methods or education. Concentrations in biological chemistry, environmental studies, or geochemistry may be completed within the major. Students may complete an M.A. in the combined A.B./M.A. program.

Faculty

Sharon Burgmayer, Dean of Graduate Studies and the W. Alton Jones Professor of Chemistry

Michelle Francl, Chair and Professor of Chemistry on the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Change Master Fund

Jonas Goldsmith, Associate Professor of Chemistry

Kimberly J. Jacoby Morris, Laboratory Lecturer

Olga Karagiaridi, Lecturer in Chemistry

Yan Kung, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (on leave semesters I & II)

Bill Malachowski, Associate Provost and Professor of Chemistry

Bradley Miller, Bucher-Jacoson Pre-Doctoral Fellow in the Sciences

Maryellen Nerz-Stormes, Senior Lecturer in Chemistry (on leave semester I)

Jason Schmink, Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Lisa Hernandez-Cuebas Watkins, Lecturer in Chemistry

Susan White, Professor of Chemistry and Co-Director of Health Studies

Chemistry Program Requirements and Opportunities

The Chemistry major is offered with several different options:

  • American Chemical Society Certified A.B., recommended for graduate school
  • Chemistry major, A.B. Only
  • Chemistry minor
  • Chemistry major with concentration in biochemistry
  • Chemistry major with concentration in geochemistry

For all degree options, merit level work is expected in every chemistry, math, biology, geology, and physics course.

See also:

More Information About Majors/ Concentrations: www.brynmawr.edu/chemistry/documents/MajorRequirements.pdf

FAQ About The Chemistry Major
www.brynmawr.edu/chemistry/undergraduate/FAQ.html

ACS Certified A.B. Major Requirements

A student may qualify for a major in chemistry by completing a total of 13 units in chemistry with the distribution:

  • Chem 103, 104
  • Chem 211, 212
  • Chem 221, 222
  • Chem 231
  • Chem 242
  • Chem 251, 252
  • Chem 398, 399
  • two other Chem 3xx

Chem 213/214 can replace Chem 212 for all major, minor and concentration requirements.

  • Other required courses: Math 101, 102, 201. Students who plan to do graduate work in chemistry should also consider taking Physics 121/122 (preferred) or 101/102 and Physics 201.

Students majoring in Chemistry fulfill the disciplinary writing requirement by satisfactorily completing Chem 251 and 252, which are writing attentive courses.

Major, A.B. only

A non-ACS certified major requires all of the above coursework except Chem 398, 399.

Timetables for Meeting Major Requirements

Students may follow various schedules to meet their major requirements. However, a fairly typical one is:

  • freshman year: Chem 103 and 104, Math 101 and 102
  • sophomore year: Chem 211 and 212, Math 201
  • junior year: Chem 221, 222, 231, 242, 251, 252
  • senior year: two or more Chem 3xx

In particular note that

  • Math 201 must be completed before taking Chem 221. Math 201 is offered at Bryn Mawr only in the fall, but an equivalent course is offered at Haverford in the spring term.
  • Chem 221/222 can be taken concurrently with Chem 211/212 and this arrangement allows for the completion of all major requirements in three years.
  • The required 300x courses all have prerequisites that generally include Chem 212 and/or Chem 222.
    Students who wish to deviate from the usual schedule should consult with the major adviser as early as possible to devise an alternative.

Honors

The requirements for departmental honors are:

  • Complete one of the major plans.
  • Maintain a chemistry GPA of 3.7 or better.
  • Complete Chem 398 and 399 with a grade of 3.3 or better each semester.
  • Participate in research oral/poster presentations.
  • Write an acceptable thesis, and meet all department deadlines for submission of the thesis.
  • Complete an additional unit of Chem 3xx (for a total of three 300-level chemistry units). With department approval, one unit of 300-level work in certain fields may be substituted.

Minor

A student may qualify for a minor in chemistry by completing a total of 7 units in chemistry with the distribution:

  • Chem 103, 104
  • Chem 211, 212
  • Chem 221* or 222*
  • Chem 231 or 242**
  • Chem 251 or 252

*Pre-requisite: Math 201
**Biol 375 may be substituted for Chem 242

  • Other required courses: Math 101, 102

Major with Concentration in Biochemistry

  • Chem 103, 104
  • Chem 211, 212
  • Chem 221*, 222*, 231 or 242** (choose 3 of 4)
  • Chem 251, 252
  • Chem 345 or 377
  • Chem 3xx
  • Biol 201
  • Biol 376***

*Pre-requisite: Math 201
**Biol 375 may be substituted for Chem 242
***Chem 242 satisfies the pre-requisite for this course

  • Other required courses: Math 101, 102

Equivalent biology courses at Haverford may be substituted.

Major with Concentration in Geochemistry

  • Chem 103, 104
  • Chem 211, 212
  • Chem 221*, 222*, 231 or 242** (choose 3 of 4)
  • Chem 251, 252
  • Chem 322 or 332
  • Chem 3xx
  • Geol 101
  • Geol 202
  • Geol 302, 305, 350 (choose 2 of 3; Geol 350 requires Geology major adviser approval)

*Pre-requisite: Math 201
**Bio 375 may be substituted for Chem 242

  • Other required courses: Math 101, 102

The Chemistry major can also be combined with any of the minors offered in the College. In particular, the minors in Environmental Studies, Education and Computational Science offer attractive combinations with a Chemistry major for future career paths that require competency in those allied fields. Detailed information about these minors can be found in the appropriate section of the catalog. Students may double major in Chemistry and Biology, but are not permitted to double major in Biology and Biochemistry or Chemistry and Biochemistry.

A.B./M.A. Program

  • Chemistry major A.B. requirements
  • four units of 5xx*
  • two units of 7xx
  • M.A. thesis
  • written final exam

*two units may be 3xx

3-2 Program in Engineering and Applied Science

The 3-2 Program in Engineering and Applied Science is offered in cooperation with the California Institute of Technology and awards both an A.B. at Bryn Mawr and a B.S. at Cal Tech. For more information, see www.brynmawr.edu/deans/exp_acad_options/3-2_prog_eng_app_sci.shtml. Chemistry students considering this program should contact Professor Michelle Francl for class of 2017, Chemistry Laboratory Lecturer Lisa Watkins for class of 2018 and Professor Jason Schmink for class of 2019.

4+1 Program in Engineering at UPenn

The University of Pennsylvania 4+1 engineering program allows students to earn an A.B. at Bryn Mawr and an M.S. in Engineering (M.S.E) at UPenn. Students apply between the beginning of the sophomore year and end of the junior year. For more information, see www.brynmawr.edu/deans/exp_acad_options/FourPlusOnePartnership.shtml. Chemistry students considering this program should contact Professor Michelle Francl. See also the description of the 4+1 Program in Engineering at UPenn.

COURSES

CHEM B103 General Chemistry I

For students with some back ground in chemistry who are motivated, self-directed learners. Topics include aqueous solutions and solubility; the electronic structure of atoms and molecules; chemical reactions and energy; intermolecular forces. Examples discussed in lecture and laboratory workshop include environmental sciences, material sciences and biological chemistry. Lecture three hours and Chemistry workshop three hours a week. The laboratory workshop period will be used for traditional chemical experimentation or related problem solving. The course may include individual conferences, evening peer-led instruction sessions. Prerequisite: Quantitative Readiness Required.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): White,S., Goldsmith,J., Watkins,L.
(Fall 2016)

CHEM B104 General Chemistry II

A continuation of CHEM B103. Topics include chemical reactions; introduction to thermodynamics and chemical equilibria; acid-base chemistry; electrochemistry; chemical kinetics. Lecture three hours, recitation one hour and laboratory three hours a week. May include individual conferences, evening problems or peer-led instruction sessions. Prerequisite: CHEM B103 with a grade of at least 2.0 or chemistry department placement or permission of the instructor. Students interested in the intensive section of CHEM B104 must have earned at least a 3.0 in CHEM B103.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Francl,M., Watkins,L.
(Spring 2017)

CHEM B211 Organic Chemistry I

An introduction to the basic concepts of organic chemistry, including acid-base principles; functional groups; alkane and cycloalkane structures; alkene reactions; alkynes; dienes and aromatic structures; substitution and elimination reactions; alcohol reactivity; and radical reactions. The laboratory course introduces basic operations in the organic chemistry lab, spectroscopy, and reactions discussed in lecture. Lecture three hours, recitation one hour and laboratory five hours a week. Prerequisite: CHEM 104 with a grade of at least 2.0.
Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Malachowski,B., Schmink,J., Karagiaridi,O., Jacoby Morris,K.
(Fall 2016)

CHEM B212 Organic Chemistry II: Biological Organic Chemistry

The second semester (biological organic chemistry) is broken into two modules. In the first module, the reactivity of carbonyl carbon is discussed, including ketones, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and derivatives, saccharides and enolate chemistry. Traditional biochemistry coverage begins with the second module. Amino acids (pI, electrophoresis, side chain pKa), protein structure (1°, 2°, 3°, 4°), and enzymatic catalysis, kinetics and inhibition are introduced. The reactivity of the co-enzymes (vitamins) is also covered as individual case studies in bio-organic reactivity. Lecture three hours, recitation one hour and laboratory five hours a week. Prerequisite: CHEM 211 with a grade of at least 2.0.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Nerz-Stormes,M., Malachowski,B., Karagiaridi,O.
(Spring 2017)

CHEM B213 Organic Chemistry II for Chem/Biochemistry Majors

A student should register for CHEM 213 if they are planning on taking the complementary quarter course, CHEM 214, in the second half of the semester. CHEM 213 mirrors the content of the first module of CHEM 212, Organic Chemistry II: Biological Organic Chemistry. In the first module, the reactivity of carbonyl carbon is discussed, including ketones, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and derivatives, saccharides and enolate chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM B211
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 0.5
(Spring 2017)

CHEM B214 Intermediate Organic Chemistry for Chem/Biochemistry Majors

A student should register for CHEM 214 if she will be completing CHEM 213 in the first quarter. CHEM 214 deals with intermediate concepts in organic chemistry, including transition-metal catalyzed reactions, molecular orbital theory, and advanced treatment of enolate chemistry with a special emphasis on predicting stereochemical outcomes of reactions.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 0.5
(Spring 2017)

CHEM B221 Physical Chemistry I

Introduction to quantum theory and spectroscopy. Atomic and molecular structure; molecular modeling; rotational, vibrational, electronic and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: CHEM B104 and MATH B201.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Francl,M.
(Fall 2016)

CHEM B222 Physical Chemistry II

Modern thermodynamics, with application to phase equilibria, interfacial phenomena and chemical equilibria; statistical mechanics; chemical dynamics. Kinetic theory of gases; chemical kinetics. Lecture three hours. Prerequisite: CHEM B104 and MATH 201.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Goldsmith,J.
(Spring 2017)

CHEM B231 Inorganic Chemistry

Bonding theory; structures and properties of ionic solids; symmetry; crystal field theory; structures, spectroscopy, stereochemistry, reactions and reaction mechanisms of coordination compounds; acid-base concepts; descriptive chemistry of main group elements. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: CHEM 212.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Burgmayer,S.
(Spring 2017)

CHEM B242 Biological Chemistry

The structure, chemistry and function of amino acids, proteins, lipids, polysaccharides and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics; metabolic relationships of carbohydrates, lipids and amino acids, and the control of various pathways. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: CHEM B212 or CHEM H222.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Malachowski,B., Miller,B.
(Fall 2016)

CHEM B251 Research Methodology in Chemistry

This is a laboratory topics course integrating advanced concepts in chemistry from biological, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry. Students gain experience in the use of departmental research instruments and in scientific literature searches, quantitative data analysis, record keeping and writing. Prerequisite CHEM B212. Co-requisite: CHEM B221 or B231 or B242. Attendance at departmental colloquia is expected of all students.
Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Goldsmith,J., White,S., Malachowski,B.

Fall 2016: Physical Chemistry.
Spring 2017: Organic and Biochemistry.

CHEM B252 Research Methodology II

This laboratory course integrates advanced concepts in chemistry from biological, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry. Students will gain experience in the use of departmental research instruments and in scientific literature searches, quantitative data analysis, record-keeping, and writing. Attendance at departmental colloquia is expected of all students. Course Prerequisites: CHEM B212. Course Co-requisites: CHEM B222 or CHEM B231 or CHEM B242.
Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CHEM B311 Advanced Organic Chemistry

A survey of the methods and concepts used in the synthesis of complex organic molecules. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisites: CHEM 212 and 222.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CHEM B312 Advanced Organic Chemistry

Principles of physical organic chemistry with emphasis on reaction mechanisms, reactive intermediates, stereochemistry, and qualitative molecular orbital theory reasoning. Prerequisites: a standard two-semester course in organic chemistry (such as CHEM B211/B212), and some coursework in physical chemistry.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Schmink,J.
(Fall 2016)

CHEM B321 Topics: Advanced Physical Chemistry

This is a topics course, course content varies. Lecture/seminar /laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 221 and 222 or permission of the instructor.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CHEM B332 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

This is a topics course covering topics in advanced inorganic chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 231 and 242 or permission of the instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Burgmayer,S.

Fall 2016: Bioinorganic Chemistry. A survey of metals in biology illustrating structural, enzymatic and pharmaceutical applications of transition metals in biological chemistry and including discussion of structural themes and bonding, reaction types, and catalysis.

CHEM B334 Organometallic Chemistry

Fundamental concepts in organometallic chemistry, including structure and bonding, reaction types, and catalysis, and applications to current problems in organic synthesis. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: CHEM 212 and 231.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CHEM B345 Advanced Biological Chemistry

This is a topics course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: CHEM B242 or BIOL B375.
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CHEM B377 Biochemistry II: Biochemical Pathways and Metabolism

This course is a continuation of CHEM B242 or BIOL B375. Biochemical pathways involved in cellular metabolism will be explored in molecular detail. Energy producing, degradation, and biosynthetic pathways involving sugars, fats, amino acids, and nucleotides will be discussed with an emphasis on structures and mechanisms, experimental methods, regulation, and integration. Additional topics, drawn from the primary research literature, may be covered. Readings will be drawn from textbooks and from the primary literature and assessments may include oral presentations, problem sets, written examinations, and writing assignments. This is a second course in Biochemistry and assumes a strong foundation in the fundamentals of Biochemistry. Prerequisite: BIO 375 or CHEM 375, or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): White,S.
(Spring 2017)

CHEM B398 Senior Seminar

Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Francl,M., Burgmayer,S., White,S., Malachowski,B., Goldsmith,J., Schmink,J., Kung,Y.
(Fall 2016)

CHEM B399 Senior Seminar

Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Francl,M., Burgmayer,S., White,S., Malachowski,B., Goldsmith,J., Schmink,J., Kung,Y.
(Spring 2017)

CHEM B425 Praxis III: Independent Study

Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community.
Counts towards: Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CHEM B511 Advanced Organic Chemistry I

A survey of the methods and concepts used in the synthesis of complex organic molecules. Lecture three hours a week.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CHEM B512 Advanced Organic Chemistry

Principles of physical organic chemistry with emphasis on reaction mechanisms, reactive intermediates, stereochemistry, and qualitative molecular orbital theory reasoning. Prerequisites: a standard two-semester course in organic chemistry (such as BMC Chemistry 211/212), and some coursework in physical chemistry.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Schmink,J.
(Fall 2016)

CHEM B515 Topics in Organic Chemistry

This is a topics course. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: CHEM B242 or equivalent.
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CHEM B521 Advanced Physical Chemistry

Quantum mechanics and its application to problems in chemistry. Topics will include molecular orbital theory, density functional theory. Readings and problem sets will be supplemented with material from the current research literature. Students will gain experience with programming in Mathematica. Prerequisites: CHEM 221 and 222 or permission of the instructor. Lecture/seminar three hours per week.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CHEM B532 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

This is a topics course covering topics in advanced inorganic chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 231 and 242 or permission of the instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Burgmayer,S.

Fall 2016: Bioinorganic Chemistry. A survey of metals in biology illustrating structural, enzymatic and pharmaceutical applications of transition metals in biological chemistry and including discussion of structural themes and bonding, reaction types, and catalysis.

CHEM B534 Organometallic Chemistry

Fundamental concepts in organometallic chemistry, including structure and bonding, reaction types, and catalysis, and applications to current problems in organic synthesis. Lecture three hours a week. Course is open to graduate students and those undergraduates with

CHEM B231 or permission from the instructor.

Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CHEM B545 Advanced Biological Chemistry

This is a topics course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: Any course in Biochemistry.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CHEM B577 Biochemistry II: Biochemical Pathways and Metabolism

This course is a continuation of CHEM B242 or BIOL B375. Biochemical pathways involved in cellular metabolism will be explored in molecular detail. Energy producing, degradation, and biosynthetic pathways involving sugars, fats, amino acids, and nucleotides will be discussed with an emphasis on structures and mechanisms, experimental methods, regulation, and integration. Additional topics, drawn from the primary research literature, may be covered. Readings will be drawn from textbooks and from the primary literature and assessments may include oral presentations, problem sets, written examinations, and writing assignments. This is a second course in Biochemistry and assumes a strong foundation in the fundamentals of Biochemistry. Prerequisite: BIO 375 or CHEM 375, or permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): White,S.
(Spring 2017)

CHEM B701 Supervised Work

Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Burgmayer,S., White,S., Malachowski,B., Goldsmith,J., Schmink,J., Kung,Y.
(Fall 2016, Spring 2017)

MATH B101 Calculus I

A first course in one-variable calculus: functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, differentiation formulas, applications of the derivative, the integral, integration by substitution, fundamental theorem of calculus. May include a computer component. Prerequisite: adequate score on calculus placement exam, or permission of the instructor. Students should have a reasonable command of high school algebra, geometry and trigonometry.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2016)

MATH B102 Calculus II

A continuation of Calculus I: transcendental functions, techniques of integration, applications of integration, infinite sequences and series, convergence tests, power series. May include a computer component. Math 102 assumes familiarity of the content covered in Math 101 or its equivalent.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM)
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2016, Spring 2017)

MATH B201 Multivariable Calculus

Vectors and geometry in two and three dimensions, partial derivatives, extremal problems, double and triple integrals, vector analysis (gradients, curl and divergence), line and surface integrals, the theorems of Gauss, Green and Stokes. May include a computer component. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or permission of instructor.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM)
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2016)

PHYS B350 Computational Methods in the Physical Sciences

This course provides an introduction to a variety of computational tools and programming techniques that physical science graduates might encounter in graduate work or employment in STEM-related fields. Tools explored will include both command-line and GUI programming environments, both scripting and scientific programming languages, basic programming concepts such as loops and function calls, and key scientific programming applications such as integration, finding of roots and minima/maxima, least-square fitting, solution of differential equations, boundary-value problems, finite-element analysis, Fourier analysis, matrix operations, Monte Carlo techniques, and possibly neural networks. Where possible, examples will be taken from multiple scientific disciplines, in addition to physics. This course is intended for second semester sophomores, juniors and seniors. Co-requisite: MATH B203 and three units of science (Biology, Physics, Chemistry or Geology).
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)