Education

Students may complete a minor in education, in which there are two tracks: the minor in educational studies and the minor in education leading to secondary teacher certification. Alumnae may also complete the requirements for secondary teacher certification after they graduate through the Post-baccalaureate Teacher Education Program.

Faculty

Jody Cohen, Term Professor in the Bryn Mawr/Haverford Education Program

Alison Cook-Sather, Mary Katherine Woodworth Chair and Professor in the Bryn Mawr/Haverford Education Program and Director of Peace, Conflict and Social Justice Program

Heather Curl, Lecturer

Debbie Flaks, Instructor

Alice Lesnick, Director and Term Professor in the Bryn Mawr/Haverford Education Program and Faculty Convener of International Programs

The field of education is about teaching people how to teach and more. The Bryn Mawr/Haverford Education Program is built around four mutually-informing pursuits: teacher preparation; the interdisciplinary study of learning as a central human and cultural activity; the investigation of the politics of schooling; and students’ growth as reflective facilitators, learners, researchers and change agents.

Courses in the Education Program address students interested in:

  • The theory, process and transformation of education
  • Social justice, activism and working within and against systems
  • Future work as educators in schools, public or mental health, community, or other settings
  • Examining and reclaiming their own learning and educational goals
  • Integrating experiential and academic learning

Each education course includes a field component through which instructors seek continuously to integrate theory and practice, asking students to bridge academic and experiential knowledge in the classroom and beyond it. Field placements in schools and other educational settings range from two hours per week in the introductory course to full-time student teaching in the certification program.

The Bi-College Education Program offers several options. Students may:

  • Explore one or more aspects of education in areas of particular interest – such as urban schooling – by enrolling in single courses
  • Pursue a minor in educational studies
  • Pursue a minor in education leading to secondary teacher certification
  • Complete the secondary teacher certification program after they graduate through the Post-baccalaureate Teacher Education Program

or

  • In a five-year program, complete both the A.B./M.A. program in French, mathematics, physics, or possibly other departments that offer the AB/MA option and the secondary teaching certification program.

Students in the tri-college community may also apply to sub-matriculate as juniors or seniors into the University of Pennsylvania, Graduate School of Education’s elementary or secondary education Master’s program.

The requirements for the minor in education and teacher certification are described below. Students interested in these options, or the other options named above, should meet with the Education Program Adviser as early as possible for advice on scheduling, preferably by the sophomore year.

Requirements for the Minor in Educational Studies

The bi-college minor in educational studies is an interdisciplinary exploration of the cultural, political, developmental, and interactional dimensions of teaching and learning and is designed for students with a broad range of education-related interests, such as graduate study in education, pursuit of elementary or secondary certification after graduation, or a host of activities that require educational expertise. Many professions and pursuits – management and training positions, research, administration and policy work, and careers in social work, health and law -- involve using an educator’s skills and knowledge. Civic engagement, community development, and work towards social justice also require knowledge of how people learn and change. Because students interested in these or other education-related pursuits major in different subject areas and have different aspirations, they are encouraged to design a minor appropriate to their major area of study and their anticipated futures.

Requirements for the minor in educational studies include:

  • EDUC 200 Critical Issues in Education
  • Four education courses. At least two must be offered by Education Program or affiliated faculty (J. Cohen,/A. Cook-Sather/H. Curl/V. Donnay/D. Flaks/A. Lesnick). Up to two may be education courses offered by faculty in other departments (of these, one may be taken at Swarthmore, Penn, or while studying away).
  • One of the following as a culminating course: EDUC 311( Theories of Change in Educational Institutions), EDUC 301 (Curriculum and Pedagogy Seminar), SOWKB676 (Making Space for Learning: Pedagogical Planning and Facilitation), or an intensified version of EDUCB295 (Advocating Diversity in Higher Education).

Requirements for Secondary Certification

The Bryn Mawr/Haverford Education Program is accredited by the state of Pennsylvania to prepare undergraduates and alumnae for certification in the following subject areas: English; languages, including French, Latin, and Spanish; mathematics; the sciences, including biology, chemistry, and physics; and social studies. Pursuit of certification in Chinese, German, and Russian is also possible but subject to availability of student teaching placements. Students certified in a language have K-12 certification.

To qualify for a teaching certificate, students must complete an academic major in the subject area in which they seek certification (or, in the case of social studies, students must major in history, political science, economics, anthropology, sociology, or Growth and Structure of Cities and take courses outside their major in the other areas). Within their major, students must select courses that help them meet the state standards for teachers in that subject area. Students must also complete the secondary teacher certification track of the minor in education, taking these courses:

  • EDUC 200 Critical Issues in Education
  • PSYC 203 Educational Psychology
  • EDUC 210 Perspectives on Special Education
  • EDUC 275 English Learners in U.S. Schools
  • EDUC 301 Curriculum and Pedagogy Seminar (fall semester, prior to student teaching)
  • EDUC 302 Practice Teaching Seminar and EDUC 303 Practice Teaching. These courses are taken concurrently for three credits.

Students preparing for certification must also take two courses in English and two courses in math, maintain a grade point average of 3.0 or higher, and pass a series of exams for beginning teachers (state requirements). To be admitted to the culminating student teaching phase of the program, students must earn a grade of a 2.7 or higher in both EDUC 200 (Critical Issues in Education) and EDUC 301 (Curriculum and Pedagogy) and be recommended by their major department and the director of the Education Program. To be recommended for certification, students must earn a grade of 2.7 or higher in EDUC 302 (Practice Teaching Seminar) and a grade of Satisfactory in EDUC 303 (Practice Teaching).

Note: Students practice-teach full time for 12 weeks in a local school during the spring semester of their senior year. Given this demanding schedule, students are not able to take courses other than the Practice Teaching Seminar and senior seminar for their major.

Graduates may complete the requirements for secondary teacher certification at Bryn Mawr in a post-baccalaureate program.

Title II Reporting

Title II of the Higher Education Act (HEA) requires that a full teacher preparation report, including the institution’s pass rate as well as the state’s pass rate, be available to the public on request. Copies of the report may be requested from Ann Brown, Program Coordinator and Advisor, by email at abrown@brynmawr.edu or phone at (610) 526-5376.

COURSES

EDUC B200 Critical Issues in Education

Designed to be the first course for students interested in pursuing one of the options offered through the Education Program, this course is also open to students exploring an interest in educational practice, theory, research, and policy. The course examines major issues and questions in education in the United States by investigating the purposes of education. Fieldwork in an area school required (eight visits, 1.5-2 hours per visit).
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Curl,H.
(Fall 2016)

EDUC B208 Race-ing Education

This course investigates education as part of processes of racialization and marginalization and also as a space for challenging these processes. How do race and schooling intersect and interact? How can educators – along with students, parents, and communities – learn and teach critical awareness of race as an idea and a system? With a focus on the U.S., we look at ways in which race as a way of creating power is embedded in earlier iterations of schooling, as in cases regarding access to education for Black, Latinx, and Asian students and in American Indian boarding schools, and how race is differently taken up in the work of such thinkers/educators as W.E.B. Dubois, James Baldwin, and Paulo Freire. We consider how such issues play out in the recent past and contemporary moment through ongoing cases on affirmative action; work in Critical Race Theory and LatCrit by such educators as Patricia Williams and Tara Yosso, and in decolonizing education by Eve Tuck and Gloria Anzaldua; and curriculum and pedagogy in the theory and practice of such educators as Kevin Kumashiro and movements such as Black Lives Matter. We also consider Bryn Mawr’s own history, in light of how to move forward through critically engaged education.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cohen,J.
(Fall 2016)

EDUC B210 Perspectives on Special Education

The goal of this course is to introduce students to a range of topics, challenges, dilemmas, and strategies to understand and educate all learners—those considered typical learners as well as those considered “special” learners. Students will learn about: how students’ learning profiles affect their ability to learn in school from a functional perspective; how and why students’ educational experience is affected by education law (especially special education law); major issues in special education; and how to meet diverse students’ needs in an inclusive classroom. Two hours of fieldwork per week required.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Flaks,D.
(Fall 2016)

EDUC B220 Changing Pedagogies in Mathematics and Science

This Praxis course will examine research-based approaches to teaching mathematics and science. What does research tell us about how people learn? How can one translate this learning theory into teaching approaches that will help all students learn mathematics and science? How are these new approaches, that often involve active, hands-on, inquiry based learning, being implemented in the classroom? What challenges arise when one tries to bring about these types of changes in education? How do issues of equity, discrimination, and social justice impact math and science education? The Praxis component of the course usually involves two (2) two hour visits per week for 8 weeks to a local math or science classroom.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donnay,V.
(Fall 2016)

EDUC B225 Topics: Empowering Learners

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Praxis course. Prerequisite: EDUC B200 or permission of instructor.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Lesnick,A.

Spring 2017: Holistic Approaches to Education and Health.This course supports students in developing their philosophy of educational empowerment with a focus on integrating mind, body, spirit, and emotions in the design of teaching and learning. Drawing on critical disability studies, health studies, mindfulness approaches, and culture-centered understandings, students will gain practical and conceptual tools for strength-based work with individuals and communities.

EDUC B244 Unsettling Literacy: Praxis

Taught, by teachers in the Education Program and English Department, each instructor is serving a “term professorship” at Bryn Mawr College, while doing long(er) term instruction at Riverside Correctional Facility in North Philadelphia. We will offer these two “walled communities” as comparative contexts for experiences and reflections on what it means to “learn our letters”: What gives us access, to texts and selves? What are the outcomes of such educational processes? Do we imagine “letters,” in Frederick Douglas’s words, as providing “the pathway from slavery to freedom,” and/or (as claimed by a contemporary criminologist) as “training good workers for a problematic system”? Does becoming “lettered” enable learners to fill roles in stratified, normalizing institutions, and/or give us increased leeway in living our lives, perhaps even opening up what educator Jean Anyon calls “radical possibilities”? Co-requisite: Students must register for both EDUC B244 and ENGL B244.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cohen,J.
(Spring 2017)

EDUC B255 Technology, Education and Society Altering Environments

This course examines the dynamic role and impact of technology in classroom, informal, community, and global contexts. In order to develop agency and judgment in using, creating and evaluating technologies, students will learn via experience and critical exploration of associated questions of power, knowledge, culture, access, and identity. Prerequisite: EDUC 200
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

EDUC B260 Multicultural Education

An investigation of education as a cultural event that engages issues of identity, difference, and power. The course explores a set of key tensions in the contested areas of multiculturalism and multicultural education: identity and difference; peace and conflict; dialogue and silence; and culture and the individual psyche. Students will apply theory and practice to global as well as specific, localized situations — communities and schools that contend with significant challenges in terms of equity and places where educators, students, and parents are trying out ways of educating for diversity and social justice. Fieldwork of two to three hours per week.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

EDUC B266 Schools in American Cities

This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal “case” that students investigate through documents and school placements. This is a Praxis II course (weekly fieldwork in a school required)
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cohen,J.
(Spring 2017)

EDUC B270 Identity, Access, and Innovation in Education

This course explores formal policies that address dimensions of identity such as race, class, gender, language and dis/ability in education, and the informal ways that such policies play out in access to education and in knowledge construction and production. Praxis placements will provide students with opportunities to work in participatory ways in relation to these issues.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

EDUC B285 Ecologies of Minds and Communities

This course will attend to students’ distinctive ways of seeing and being in the world, in the context of communitarian questions of identity, access, and power. How can we re-imagine ecological literacy more deeply and fruitfully with and for diverse students and communities?
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

EDUC B290 Learning in Institutional Spaces

This course considers how the institutions of schools and prisons operate as sites of learning. Beginning with an examination of educational and penitential institutions, we inquire into how these structures both constrain and propel learning, and how human beings take up, challenge and change their surroundings. We investigate the role of “voice”--speaking out, expressing, engaging in dialogue—in teaching and learning: In what ways can “voice” instigate understanding and even change, and how is this notion also complex and problematic? We consider explicit curriculae alongside implicit, even hidden curriculae; how do people inside these spaces collude with, subvert, and challenge official agendas as they create their own agendas for learning?
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

EDUC B295 Advocating Diversity in Higher Education

As institutions of higher education embrace and even seek greater diversity, we also see an increase in tensions born of differences across which we have little preparation to communicate, learn, and live. This course will be co-created by students enrolled and the instructor, and it will provide a forum for exploration of diversity and difference and a platform for action and campus-wide education. Extensive, informal writing and more formal research and presentations will afford you the opportunity to craft empowering narratives for yourselves and your lives and to take research and teaching beyond the classroom. Two to three hours of campus-based field work required each week.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cook-Sather,A.
(Spring 2017)

EDUC B302 Practice Teaching Seminar

Drawing on participants’ diverse student teaching placements, this seminar invites exploration and analysis of ideas, perspectives and approaches to teaching at the middle and secondary levels. Taken concurrently with Practice Teaching. Open only to students engaged in practice teaching.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies
Units: 1.0
(Spring 2017)

EDUC B303 Practice Teaching in Secondary Schools
Supervised teaching in secondary schools (12 weeks). Two units of credit are given for this course. Open only to students preparing for state certification.
Units: 2.0
(Spring 2017)

ANTH B271 Museum Anthropology: History, Politics, Practices

This course provides an in-depth exploration of museum anthropology: the critical study of museum practices from an anthropological perspective. The course will fundamentally consider the role of museums in exhibiting culture—the politics of placing cultures on display, from living humans and human remains to cultural objects and artifacts. The course will also consider changing practices in museum anthropology, including repatriation efforts, shifting notions of heritage and identity and the emergence of community-curated exhibitions. This course complements the theoretical explorations of the museum with visits to area museums and hands-on work in Special Collections.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ARTA B251 Arts Teaching in Educational and Community Settings

This is a Praxis II course intended for students who have substantial experience in an art form and are interested in extending that experience into teaching and learning at educational and community sites. Following an overview of the history of the arts in education, the course will investigate underlying theories. The praxis component will allow students to create a fluid relationship between theory and practice through observing, teaching and reflecting on arts practices in educational contexts. School or community placement 4 hours a week. Prerequisite: At least an intermediate level of experience in an art form. This course counts toward the minor in Dance or Theater.
Counts towards: Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

EDUC B403 Supervised Work

Units: 1.0
(Fall 2016, Spring 2017)

EDUC B425 Praxis III: Independent Study

Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community.
Counts towards: Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ENGL B244 Unsettling Literacy

Taught, by teachers in the Education Program and English Department, each instructor is serving a “term professorship” at Bryn Mawr College, while doing long(er) term instruction at Riverside Correctional Facility in North Philadelphia. We will offer these two “walled communities” as comparative contexts for experiences and reflections on what it means to “learn our letters”: What gives us access, to texts and selves? What are the outcomes of such educational processes? Do we imagine “letters,” in Frederick Douglas’s words, as providing “the pathway from slavery to freedom,” and/or (as claimed by a contemporary criminologist) as “training good workers for a problematic system”? Does becoming “lettered” enable learners to fill roles in stratified, normalizing institutions, and/or give us increased leeway in living our lives, perhaps even opening up what educator Jean Anyon calls “radical possibilities”? Co-requisite: Students must register for both EDUC B244 and ENGL B244.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Dalke,A., Cohen,J.
(Spring 2017)

POLS B374 Education Politics & Policy

This course will examine education policy through the lens of federalism and federalism through a case study of education policy. The dual aims are to enhance our understanding of this specific policy area and our understanding of the impact that our federal system of government has on policy effectiveness.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SOWK B676 Making Space for Learning: Pedagogical Planning and Facilitation

Supported by the Teaching and Learning Institute (TLI) and a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, this series of pedagogy workshops for graduate students may be taken in its entirety for course credit, or individual workshops may be attended as stand-alone sessions. Seven two-hour workshops focused on a variety of pedagogical issues (e.g., course design, teaching styles, creating culturally responsive classrooms, grading) are scheduled for both the fall and the spring semesters.* These are interactive workshops, some of which require the completion of reading in advance and some of which include discussion of texts during the workshops themselves, but all of which focus on active, collaborative explorations of pedagogical issues. A full list of the workshop topics is available through the Dean’s Office. These workshops count toward the completion of the Dean’s Certificate in Pedagogy (www.brynmawr.edu/gsas/Resources/certificate.html). Enrollment limited to 5 advanced undergraduates.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cook-Sather,A.
(Fall 2016)