French and Francophone Studies

Students may complete a major or minor in French and Francophone Studies with two possible tracks: Language and Literature or Transdisciplinary Studies. Within the major, students may complete the requirements for the secondary education certification. Students may, with departmental approval, complete an M.A. in the combined A.B./M.A. program.

Faculty

Grace Armstrong, Eunice M. Schenck 1907 Professor of French and Director of Middle Eastern Languages and and Co-Director of the International Studies Program (fall)

Rudy Le Menthéour, Associate Professor of French and Director of the Institut d’Etudes Françaises d’Avignon

Brigitte Mahuzier, Chair and Professor of French

Agnès Peysson-Zeiss, Lecturer of French

Corine Ragueneau-Wells, Instructor

Marie Sanquer, Lecturer

Julien Suaudeau, Lecturer

The Departments of French at Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges offer a variety of courses and two options for the major. The purpose of the major in French and Francophone Studies is to develop sophisticated critical and analytical skills through the analysis of, among other things, French and Francophone literature, history, art, film, material culture, and/or institutions. Courses in the Language and Literature track serve students with primary interests in French and Francophone literature, film, critical theory and criticism. Additional courses in and outside the department serve the Transdisciplinary track. A thorough knowledge of written and spoken French is a common goal for both literary and transdisciplinary options.

100-level courses introduce students to the study of the French language, French and Francophone literatures and cultures, as well as exposing them to critical materials related to textual analysis conceived broadly. Courses at the 200-level treat French and Francophone literature and cultures across the historical spectrum. In addition, two 200-level courses are devoted to advanced language training and one to the study of theory. Advanced (300-level) courses offer detailed study either of individual authors, genres and movements or of particular periods, themes and problems in French and Francophone culture. In both major options, students are admitted to advanced courses after satisfactory completion of two semesters of 200-level courses in French.

All students who wish to pursue their study of French, regardless of level, must take a departmental placement examination prior to arriving at Bryn Mawr. Those students who enter beginning French have two options: intensive study of the language in the intensive sequence (001-002 Intensive Elementary and 005 Intensive Intermediate; or non-intensive study of the language in the non-intensive sequence (001-002 Elementary; 003-004 Intermediate). Although it is possible to major in French using either of the two sequences, students who are considering doing so and have been placed at the 001 level are strongly encouraged to take the intensive sequence.

Major Requirements

Requirements in the major subject are:

  • French and Francophone Literature track: FREN 005-102 or 005-105 or 101-102 or 101-105; the 200-level advanced language course, FREN 260; FREN 213 Theory in Practice: Critical Discourses in the Humanities (BMC) or “Qu’est-ce que la théorie” (HC);” three 200-level literature courses, two 300-level literature courses, and the year-long Senior Experience, which consists of Senior Conference (FREN 398) in the fall semester and either a Senior Thesis or a third 300-level course culminating in the Senior Essay during the spring semester. In either case, the work of the spring semester is capped by an oral defense.
  • Transdisciplinary French and Francophone Studies: FREN 005-102 or 005-105 or 101-102 or 101-105; the 200-level advanced language course, FREN 260; two 200-level courses, within the department: e.g., FREN 291 or 299; two 200-level courses, to be chosen by the student outside the French departments (at BMC/HC or JYA), which contribute coherently to her independent program of study; FREN 325 or 326 Etudes avancées de civilisation, Senior Conference (FREN 398), plus two 300-level courses outside the departments; a thesis of one semester in French or English. Students interested in this track are encouraged to present the rationale and the projected content of their transdisciplinary program for departmental approval during their sophomore year and to update their plan in junior year; they should have excellent records in French and the other subjects involved in their proposed program.
  • Both concentrations: all French majors are expected to have acquired fluency in the French language, both written and oral. Unless specifically exempted by the department, they are required to take the 200-level advanced language course. Students may wish to continue from this course to hone their skills further in courses on debate, stylistics and translation offered at Bryn Mawr College or abroad. Students placed at the 200-level by departmental examinations are exempted from the 100-level requirements. Occasionally, students may be admitted to seminars in the graduate school.
  • The Major Writing Intensive requirement may be met by any one of the following courses: FREN 101, 102, 260, Senior Essay (in a 300-l. course).

Honors and the Senior Experience

For the French and Francophone Literature option: After taking Senior Conference in semester I of the senior year, students have the choice in semester II of writing a thesis in French (40-50 pp.) under the direction of a faculty member or taking a 300-level course in which they write a Senior Essay in French (15-25 pp.) The first choice offers self-selected students who already have developed a clearly defined subject in semester I the opportunity to pursue independent research and writing of the thesis with a faculty mentor. The second choice allows students, often double majors with another thesis or pre-medical students, the opportunity to produce a substantial, but shorter, piece of work within the structure of their 300-level course in semester II. Departmental honors are awarded for excellence in the Senior Experience after the oral defense of either the Senior Thesis or the Senior Essay.

For the Interdisciplinary Studies in French option: Students take French 325 or 326, if they have not already done so, and French 398 in Semester I of their senior year and, if they have not already done so, complete the two 300-level courses required outside the department. In semester II they write a thesis in French or English under the direction of a member of the French faculty and a mentor outside the department. Departmental honors are awarded for excellence in the Senior Experience after the oral defense of the Senior Thesis.

Minor Requirements

Requirements for a French minor are FREN 005-102 or 005-105, or 101-102 or 101-105; the 200-level advanced language course; and four 200-level or 300-level courses. At least one course must be 300-level.

Teacher Certification

The Department of French and Francophone Studies offers a certification program in secondary teacher education. For more information, see the description of the Education Program.

A.B./M.A. Program

Particularly well-qualified students may undertake work toward the joint A.B./M.A. degree in French. Such a program may be completed in four, four and a half or five years and is undertaken with the approval of the department, the Special Cases Committee and the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Study Abroad

Students majoring in French may, by a joint recommendation of the deans of the Colleges and the Departments of French, be allowed to spend a semester of their junior year in France and/or a Francophone country under one of the junior-year plans approved by Bryn Mawr.

Students wishing to enroll in a summer program may apply for admission to the Institut d’Etudes Françaises d’Avignon, held under the auspices of Bryn Mawr. The Institut is designed for selected undergraduates with a serious interest in French and Francophone literatures and cultures; it will be particularly attractive for those who anticipate professional or graduate-school careers requiring knowledge of the language and civilization of France and French-speaking countries. The curriculum includes general and advanced courses in French language, literature, social sciences, history, art, and economics. The program is open to students of high academic achievement who have completed a course in French at the third-year level or the equivalent.

COURSES

FREN B005 Intensive Intermediate French

The emphasis on speaking and understanding French is continued; literary and cultural texts are read and increasingly longer papers are written in French. In addition to three class meetings a week, students develop their skills in group sessions with the professors and in oral practice hours with assistants. Students use internet resources regularly. This course prepares students to take 102 or 105 in semester II. Open only to graduates of Intensive Elementary French or to students placed by the department. Students who did not complete Intensive Elementary French must take either 102 or 105 to receive language credit. Two additional hours of instruction outside class time required. Prerequisite: FREN B002IN (intensive) or Placement exam.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.5
Instructor(s): Peysson-Zeiss,A., Sanquer,M.
(Fall 2016)

FREN B101 Introduction à l’analyse littéraire et culturelle I

Presentation of essential problems in literary and cultural analysis by close reading of works selected from various periods and genres and by analysis of voice and image in French writing and film. from female to male voices in Metropolitan France, Africa, Canada, and The Antilles. Participation in discussion and practice in written and oral expression are emphasized, as are grammar review and exercises. Prerequisites: FREN B004 or B005 or placement. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Armstrong,G.
(Fall 2016)

FREN B102 Introduction à l’analyse littéraire et culturelle II

Continued development of students’ expertise in literary and cultural analysis by emphasizing close reading as well as oral and written analyses of increasingly complex works chosen from various genres and periods of French and Francophone works in their written and visual modes. Readings include theater of the 17th or 18th centuries and build to increasingly complex nouvelles, poetry and novels of the 19th and 20th centuries. Participation in guided discussion and practice in oral/written expression continue to be emphasized, as is grammar review. Prerequisite: FREN 005 or 101. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sanquer,M.
(Spring 2017)

FREN B105 Directions de la France contemporaine

An examination of contemporary society in France and Francophone cultures as portrayed in recent documents and film. Emphasizing the tension in contemporary French-speaking societies between tradition and change, the course focuses on subjects such as family structures and the changing role of women, cultural and linguistic identity, an increasingly multiracial society, the individual and institutions (religious, political, educational), and “les loisirs”. In addition to the basic text and review of grammar, readings are chosen from newspapers, contemporary literary texts and magazines, complemented by video materials. Prerequisite: FREN 005 or 101.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Peysson-Zeiss,A.
(Spring 2017)

FREN B201 Le Chevalier, la dame et le prêtre: littérature et publics du Moyen Age

Using literary texts, historical documents and letters as a mirror of the social classes that they address, this interdisciplinary course studies the principal preoccupations of secular and religious women and men in France and Norman England from the eleventh century through the fifteenth. Selected works from epic, lai, roman courtois, fabliau, theater, letters, and contemporary biography are read in modern French translation. Prerequisite: FREN 102 or 105.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Armstrong,G.
(Spring 2017)

FREN B204 Le Siècle des lumières

Representative texts of the Enlightenment with emphasis on the development of liberal thought as illustrated in the Encyclopédie and the works of Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. Prerequisites: FREN 102 or 105.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Le Menthéour,R.

Spring 2017: La Liberté ou la mort. Current topic description: TBA.

FREN B205 Le Temps des prophètes

This is a topics course, course content varies.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Mahuzier,B.

Fall 2016: Genius and Gender in Post-Revo France. A study of post-Revolutionary texts in which the prophetic voice of the “genius” is often gendered feminine and/or other. On the syllabus Staël’s romantic and brainy Corinne ou l’Italie and Sand’s explosive feminist manifesto Indiana; Stendhal’s Le Rouge et le noir; Balzac’s Père Goriot; and finally two contentious figures, Flaubert and Baudelaire, whose works were put on trial in 1857 for being dangerous to religion and public morals.

FREN B206 Topics: Le Temps des virtuoses

This a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: FREN 102 or 105.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0

Spring 2017: Beauty and the Beast in fin-de-sièc. The Belle Époque (1871-1914) appears to be a period characterized by optimism: exciting new scientific discoveries and technologies, and intense artistic creativity. However, the prevailing sentiment in fin-de-siècle literature often seems to be an impending sense of doom, decadence and the end of civilization. Through readings of novelists such as Zola, Mirbeau, Colette, Gide and Proust, we will examine the inner tensions of French society in the so-called Belle Époque period.

FREN B207 Introduction à la littérature du 20ème et 21ème siècle

A study of selected works illustrating the principal literary movements from 1900 to the present. Depending on the professor, this class will focus on various authors and literary movements of the 20th century such as Surrealism, Modernism, the Nouveau Roman, Oulipo, as well as works from the broader Francophone world. Prerequisites: FREN 102 or 105.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sanquer,M.

Spring 2017: Literature of the Absurd. Beginning with “Ubu, roi” literature of the absurd breaks (with) the mystical conception of art. After Alfred Jarry (the author of Ubu) diverse movements such as Surrealism, Existentialism, OULIPO, and numerous colonial and postcolonial Francophone writers use absurdist effects or a perspective borrowed from Jarry. In this course we will examine these diverse literary currents and try to come up with a coherent definition of the literature of the absurd while seeing where it exists today.

FREN B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities

An examination in English of leading theories of interpretation from Classical Tradition to Modern and Post-Modern Time. This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: FREN 102 or 105.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sanquer,M.

Fall 2016: Critic Approaches to the World. This course will be taught in English and focus on works of French feminist, postcolonial and post-structuralist theory. While our primary critical texts will draw from a particular linguistic tradition (namely French), and more or less distinctly circumscribed fields, we will also look at the broader transcultural and translinguistic influences that brought these “schools” into being and, most importantly, what fields of thinking they have subsequently inspired across language traditions.

FREN B248 Histoire des Femmes en France

A study of women and gender in France from the Revolution to the present. The course will pay particular attention to the role of women in the French Revolution (declarations, manifestos, women’s clubs, salons, etc.) and in the post-revolutionary era, as well as to the more contemporary feminist manifestations in France since Simone de Beauvoir’s Deuxième Sexe and the flow of feminist texts produced in the wake of May ‘68.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

FREN B254 Teaching (in) the Postcolony: Schooling in African Fiction

This seminar examines novels from Francophone and Anglophone Africa, critical essays, and two films, in order better to understand the forces that inform the African child’s experiences of education. This course is taught in English.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

FREN B260 Atelier d’écriture

Intensive practice in speaking and writing. Conversation, discussion, advanced training in grammar and stylistics. Depending on the professor, there may be a praxis component through language exchange.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Suaudeau,J.
(Spring 2017)

FREN B262 Débat, discussion, dialogue

This advanced study of oral communication develops students’ linguistic skills in narration, hypothesizing, persuasion or counseling, debate, negotiation, etc. Such skills will be nurtured through enrichment of vocabulary, reinforcement of accuracy in manipulation of complex grammatical structures, and enhancement of discursive strategies. The authentic material (both print and film) which serves as the basis of analytical discussion will reflect issues of contemporary importance; for example, France and Third World Francophone countries. Prerequisite: FREN B212 or B260.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

FREN B275 Improving Mankind: Enlightened Hygiene and Eugenics

At first sight, hygiene and eugenics have nothing in common: the former is usually conceived as a good management of our everyday conditions of life, whereas the latter is commonly reviled for having inspired discriminatory practices (in Nazi Germany, but also in the US, Sweden, and Switzerland). Our inquiry will explore how, in the context of the French Enlightenment, a subdiscipline of Medicine (namely Hygiene) was redefined, expanded its scope, and eventually became hegemonic both in the medical field and in civil society. We will also explore how and why a philanthropic ideal led to the quest for the improvement of the human species. We will compare the French situation with that of other countries (mainly UK and the USA). Students who wish to get credit in French will meet one extra hour.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

FREN B302 Le printemps de la parole féminine: femmes écrivains des débuts

This study of selected women authors from Latin CE-Carolingian period through the Middle Ages, Renaissance and 17th century—among them, Perpetua, Hrotswitha, Marie de France, the trobairitz, Christine de Pisan, Louise Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, and Madame de Lafayette—examines the way in which they appropriate and transform the male writing tradition and define themselves as self-conscious artists within or outside it. Particular attention will be paid to identifying recurring concerns and structures in their works, and to assessing their importance to women’s writing in general: among them, the poetics of silence, reproduction as a metaphor for artistic creation, and sociopolitical engagement. Prerequisite: two 200-level courses or permission instructor.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Armstrong,G.
(Spring 2017)

FREN B306 Libertinage et subversion

The libertine movement of the 18th century has long been condemned for moral reasons or considered of minor importance when compared to the Enlightenment. Yet, the right to happiness (‘droit au bonheur’) celebrated by the so-called ‘Philosophes’ implies a duty to experience pleasure (‘devoir de jouir’). This is what the libertine writers promoted. The libertine movement thus does not confine itself to literature, but also involves a dimension of social subversion. This course will allow you to understand Charles Baudelaire’s enigmatic comment: “the Revolution was made by voluptuaries.” Prerequisite: two 200-level courses or permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Le Menthéour,R.
(Fall 2016)

FREN B325 Topics: Etudes avancées

An in-depth study of a particular topic, event or historical figure in French civilization. This is a topics course. Course content varies. The seminar topic rotates among many subjects: La Révolution frantaise: histoire, littérature et culture; L’Environnement naturel dans la culture française; Mal et valeurs éthiques; Le Cinéma et la politique, 1940-1968; Le Nationalisme en France et dans les pays francophones; Etude socio-culturelle des arts du manger en France du Moyen Age à nos jours; Crimes et criminalité; Ecrire la Grande Guerre: 1914-10; Le “Rentrée Littéraire; Proust.
Units: 1.0

Spring 2017: Ecrire la Grande Guerre: 1917. 1917 in the history of the so-called “Great War” is known as “l’année terrible” for all participtants : patriotic consensus is gone, moral is low, desertion and mutinies high, “war efforts” wavering; 1917 is also the year Russia switches sides, and the United States enters the conflict. Paying special attention to that year, this course proposes to study the immediate as well as the long lasting impact of WWI on French society, literature, art, history and memory.

FREN B326 Etudes avancées

An in-depth study of a particular topic, event or historical figure in French civilisation. The seminar topic rotates among many subjects: La Révolution française: histoire, littérature et culture; L’Environnement naturel dans la culture française; Mal et valeurs éthiques; Le Cinéma et la politique, 1940-1968; Le Nationalisme en France et dans les pays francophones; Etude socio-culturelle des arts du manger en France du Moyen Age à nos jours; French film.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

FREN B350 Voix médiévales et échos modernes

A study of selected 19th- and 20th-century works inspired by medieval subjects, such as the Grail and Arthurian legends and the Tristan and Yseut stories, and by medieval genres, such as the roman, saints’ lives, or the miracle play. Included are texts and films by Bonnefoy, Cocteau, Flaubert, Genevoix, Giono, Gracq, and Yourcenar.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

FREN B355 Variations sur le recit moderne

For Francophone societies, whether traditional, pre-modern or modern, the production of narratives involves a complex interplay between practices associated with orality and writing. Among the texts studied are those by Chrétien de Troyes, Margerite de Navarre, Tahar Ben Jelloun, and theoretical works by Genette and Ong.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

FREN B356 Rousseau polémiste

This course will explore Rousseau’s work not as a closed system, but as a polemical reaction to major trends of the French Enlightenment. Although he was denying any taste for polemics, Rousseau fought intellectual battles most of his life. The author of the ultimate best-seller of the 18th century, he harshly criticized novels. He also opposed theatre, established a new form of pedagogy, and undermined the foundations of the Western political theory by stating that men are not political animals. We will thus consider Rousseau not only as a philosopher, but also as one of the most brilliant polemicists of his time.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

FREN B398 Senior Conference

A weekly seminar examining major French and Francophone literary texts and the interpretive problems they raise. Theoretical texts will encourage students to think beyond traditional literary categories and disciplinary boundaries and to interrogate issues such as cultural memory, political and moral subversion, etc. This course prepares students for the second semester of their Senior Experience, during which those not writing a thesis are expected to choose a 300-level course and write a long research paper, the Senior Essay.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Armstrong,G.
(Fall 2016)

FREN B403 Supervised Work

Units: 1.0
(Fall 2016, Spring 2017)

FREN B655 Rousseau polémiste

Jean-Jacques Rousseau n’a cessé de susciter des polémiques. Aucun | écrivain n’a suscité autant de débats dans des domaines aussi variés, de l’esthétique théâtrale à la pédagogie, en passant par la théorie politique et l’écriture romanesque. Ses sectateurs ont vu en lui un grand peintre de la sensibilité humaine, un partisan sincère de la justice républicaine, un pédagogue révolutionnaire. A l’inverse, ses ennemis l’ont dépeint comme un paranoïaque idéaliste, un brillant plagiaire, ou encore comme le promoteur d’un régime totalitaire.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

FREN B670 Hysterics, Saints, Mystics and Criminals in France’s Secular Republic

This course will approach the debate between science and religion which flared up as France became more secularized in the second part of the 19th century through such figures as hysterics, mystics, saints and criminals. The reading of medical treatises, court case reports, media and other cultural artifacts, along with literary works, will allow us to discuss the relevance of these figures in the imaginary cultural unconscious of the time, how their designation and diagnosis can also be read as symptoms of a broader culture malaise concerning gender and sexuality, power and agency, and the establisment of a special brand of secularism or laïcité in the late 19th century. We will start with Michel Foucault’s examination of a criminal case, that of Pierre Rivière, and will discuss medical treaties by Charcot, Freud, Moreau de Tours, reports on miracles at pilgrimage sites such as Lourdes, popular religious literature, as well as canonical and popular texts such as Eugène Sue’s Mystères de Paris, Flaubert’s Un cœur simple, Barbey d’Aurevilly’s Les Diaboliques, Zola’s Lourdes, Thérèse Martin’s Histoire de ma vie, and Bernanos’s Histoire de Mouchette.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

FREN B701 Supervised Work

Units: 1.0
(Fall 2016)

FREN B001 Elementary French

The speaking and understanding of French are emphasized particularly during the first semester, and written competence is stressed as well in semester II. The work includes intensive oral practice sessions. The course meets five hours a week in non-intensive sections. This is a year-long course and students must register for both semesters.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Ragueneau Wells,C., Suaudeau,J.
(Fall 2016)

FREN B001IN Intensive Elementary French

French 001 Intensive Elementary is the first half of a two-semester beginning sequence designed to help students attain a level of proficiency to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. It is both speaking-intensive (through pair work, group work and drills) and writing-intensive (through blogs and essays). In drill sessions, students develop the ability to speak and understand increasingly well through songs, skits, debates, and a variety of activities. The course meets nine hours per week.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.5
Instructor(s): Peysson-Zeiss,A.
(Fall 2016)

FREN B002 Elementary French

The speaking and understanding of French are emphasized particularly during the first semester, and written competence is stressed as well in semester II. The work includes intensive oral practice sessions. The course meets in non-intensive (five hours a week) sections. This is a year-long course.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Suaudeau,J., Sanquer,M.
(Spring 2017)

FREN B002IN Intensive Elementary French

The second half of a two-semester beginning sequence designed to help students attain a level of proficiency to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. It is both speaking-intensive (through pair work, group work and drills) and writing-intensive (through blogs and essays). In drill sessions, students develop the ability to speak and understand increasingly well through songs, skits, debates, and a variety of activities. Class meets nine hours per week.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.5
Instructor(s): Peysson-Zeiss,A.
(Spring 2017)

FREN B003 Intermediate French

The emphasis on speaking, understanding, and writing French is continued; texts from French literature and cultural media are read; and short papers are written in French. Students regularly attend supplementary oral practice sessions. The course meets in non-intensive (three hours a week) sections that are supplemented by an extra hour per week with an assistant. This is a year-long course. Prerequisite: FREN B002 or placement required.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Mahuzier,B., Suaudeau,J.
(Fall 2016)

FREN B004 Intermediate French

The emphasis on speaking, understanding, and writing French is continued; texts from French literature and cultural media are read; and short papers are written in French. Students regularly attend supplementary oral practice sessions. The course meets in non-intensive (three hours a week) sections that are supplemented by an extra hour per week with an assistant. This is a year-long course. .
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Peysson-Zeiss,A., Suaudeau,J.
(Spring 2017)

FREN B701 Supervised Work

Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities

An examination in English of leading theories of interpretation from Classical Tradition to Modern and Post-Modern Time. This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)