Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies

Students may complete a major in Greek, Latin, Classical Languages, or Classical Culture and Society. Students may complete a minor in Greek, Latin, or Classical Culture and Society. Students may complete an M.A. in Greek or Latin in the combined A.B./M.A. program.

Faculty

Annette Baertschi, Associate Professor of Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies and Director of the Graduate Group

Catherine Conybeare, Chair and Professor of Greek, Latin and Classical Studies

Radcliffe Edmonds, Paul Shorey Professor of Greek and Professor of Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies (on leave semester II)

Collin Hilton, Instructor

Russell Scott, Doreen C. Spitzer Professor of Latin and Classical Studies

Asya Sigelman, Assistant Professor of Greek, Latin and Classical Studies

Daniel Tober, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities and Humanistic Studies

Cooperating Faculty at Haverford College

Bret Mulligan, Chair and Associate Professor

Deborah H. Roberts, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Classics and Comparative Literature

Robert Germany, Associate Professor

Hannah Silverblank, Visiting Assistant Professor

In collaboration with the Department of Classics at Haverford College, the department offers four major programs of study: Greek, Latin, Classical Languages, and Classical Culture and Society. In addition to the sequence of courses specified for each major, all majors are expected to have read through the Classics Reading List before they participate in the Senior Seminar, a required full-year course. In the first term, students refine their ability to read, discuss, and critique classical texts through engagement with scholarship from various fields of Classics while in the second term, they conduct independent research, culminating in a substantial thesis paper and a presentation to the department. Senior essays of exceptionally high quality may be awarded departmental honors at commencement.

In addition to completing the course requirements for each type of major (Greek, Latin, Classical Languages, or Classical Culture & Society), every student must fulfill the requisite training in writing within the discipline by taking as part of her major plan two courses that are designated as Writing Attentive or a single course designated as Writing Intensive. The student may count a Writing Attentive or Intensive course that is taught outside the department if it is included in the major plan.

Students, according to their concentrations, are encouraged to consider a term of study during junior year in programs such as the College Year in Athens or the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome.

Courses in Greek (GREK) and Latin (LATN) involve the study of the ancient language and reading texts in that language. Courses for which a knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required are listed under Classical Studies (CSTS).

College Foreign Language Requirement

The College’s foreign language requirement may be satisfied by completing two semesters of Greek with an average grade of at least 2.0 or with a grade of 2.0 or better in the second semester.

GREEK

The sequence of courses in the ancient Greek language is designed to acquaint the students with the various aspects of Greek culture through a mastery of the language and a comprehension of Greek history, mythology, religion and the other basic forms of expression through which the culture developed. The works of poets, philosophers, and historians are studied both in their historical context and in relation to subsequent Western thought.

Major Requirements

Requirements in the major are two courses in Greek at the introductory level, two courses at the 100 level, two courses at the 200 level, one course at the 300 level (or above) and the Senior Seminar and the thesis.

Also required are three courses to be distributed as follows: one in Greek history, one in Greek archaeology, and one in Greek philosophy.

In addition to completing the course requirements for the Greek major, every student must fulfill the requisite training in writing within the discipline by taking as part of her major plan two courses that are designated as Writing Attentive or a single course designated as Writing Intensive. The student may count a Writing Attentive or Intensive course that is taught outside the department if it is included in the major plan.

By the end of the senior year, majors will be required to have completed a sight translation examination from Greek to English.

Prospective majors in Greek are advised to take Greek in their first year. For students entering with Greek there is the possibility of completing the requirements for both A.B. and M.A. degrees in four years. Those interested in pursuing advanced degrees are advised also to have a firm grounding in Latin.

Minor Requirements

Requirements for a minor in Greek are two courses at the introductory level, two courses at the 100 level, two courses at the 200 level.

COURSES

GREK B010 Traditional and New Testament Greek

This is the first half of a year-long introductory course to ancient Greek. It is designed to familiarize students with the basic elements of classical Greek grammar and syntax as well as to provide them with experience in reading short sentences and passages in both Greek prose and poetry.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sigelman,A.
(Fall 2016)

GREK B011 Traditional and New Testament Greek

This is the second half of a year-long introductory course to ancient Greek. It is designed to familiarize students with the basic elements of classical Greek grammar and syntax. Once the grammar has been fully introduced, students will develop facility by reading parts of the New Testament and a dialogue of Plato.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sigelman,A.
(Spring 2017)

GREK B101 Herodotus

Greek 101 introduces the student to one of the greatest prose authors of ancient Greece, the historian, Herodotus. The “Father of History,” as Herodotus is sometimes called, wrote one of the earliest lengthy prose texts extant in Greek literature, in the Ionian dialect of Greek. The “Father of Lies,” as he is also sometimes known, wove into his history a number of fabulous and entertaining anecdotes and tales. His ‘historie’ or inquiry into the events surrounding the invasions by the Persian empire against the Greek city-states set the precedent for all subsequent historical writings. This course meets three times a week with a required fourth hour to be arranged. Prerequisite: GREK B010 and B011 or equivalent.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Hilton,C.
(Fall 2016)

GREK B104 Homer

Greek 104 is designed to introduce the student to the epic poetry attributed to Homer, the greatest poet of ancient Greece, through selections from the Odyssey. Since Homer’s poetic form is so important to the shape and texture of the Odyssey, we will examine the mechanics of Homeric poetry, both the intricacies of dactylic hexameter and the patterns of oral formulaic composition. We will also spend time discussing the characters and ideas that animate this text, since the value of Homer lies not merely in his incomparable mastery of his poetic form, but in the values and patterns of behavior in his story, patterns which remained remarkably influential in the Greek world for centuries.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

GREK B201 Plato and Thucydides

This course is designed to introduce the student to two of the greatest prose authors of ancient Greece, the philosopher, Plato, and the historian, Thucydides. These two writers set the terms in the disciplines of philosophy and history for millennia, and philosophers and historians today continue to grapple with their ideas and influence. The brilliant and controversial statesman Alcibiades provides a link between the two texts in this course (Plato’s Symposium and Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War), and we examine the ways in which both authors handle the figure of Alcibiades as a point of entry into the comparison of the varying styles and modes of thought of these two great writers. Suggested Preparation: At least 2 years of college Greek or the equivalent.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Edmonds,R.
(Fall 2016)

GREK B202 The Form of Tragedy

This course will introduce the student to two of the three great Athenian tragedians—Sophocles and Euripides. Their dramas, composed two-and-a-half millenia ago, continue to be performed regularly on modern stages around the world and exert a profound influence on current day theatre. We will read Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannos and Euripides’ Bacchae in full, focusing on language, poetics, meter, and performance studies.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sigelman,A.
(Spring 2017)

GREK B403 Supervised Work

Units: 1.0
(Fall 2016, Spring 2017)

GREK B630 Euripides

In this seminar we will look closely at several plays of Euripides, paying special attention to the tragedian’s language and meter. We will also read widely in 20th and 21st century scholarship on Euripides.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sigelman,A.
(Fall 2016)

GREK B653 Athens in the Hellenistic Period

Surveys of Athenian history tend to conclude if not at the Battle of Chaeronea at any rate at the death of Alexander. Yet Athens did not disappear with the imposition of the Macedonian garrison in 322. Democracy resurfaced periodically over the course of the next century (in 318, 307, 288, and 229), and, more to the point, even under periods of oligarchic rule and Macedonian control, Athenian institutions remained intact, and Athenians continued to make significant contributions to the greater Greek world. Indeed, the century that followed Alexander’s death saw the flowering of Athenian historiography (e.g. Demochares, Diyllus, Philochorus, Timaeus, and Phylarchus) and new comedy (e.g. Menander and Poseidippus), as well as the advent of important philosophical schools (Epicureanism and Stoicism). This course will focus on Athens between the Battle of Chaeronea (338 BCE) and its liberation from Macedonian rule ca. 229 BCE. By way of a variety of contemporary sources, we shall have the opportunity to familiarize ourselves both with the historical narrative and with the intellectual climate of the polis in the early Hellenistic period.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ARCH B260 Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome

The often-praised achievements of the classical cultures arose from the realities of day-to-day life. This course surveys the rich body of material and textual evidence pertaining to how ancient Greeks and Romans -- famous and obscure alike -- lived and died. Topics include housing, food, clothing, work, leisure, and family and social life.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donohue,A.
(Spring 2017)

ARCH B504 Archaeology of Greek Religion

This course approaches the topic of ancient Greek religion by focusing on surviving archaeological, architectural, epigraphical, artistic and literary evidence that dates from the Archaic and Classical periods. By examining a wealth of diverse evidence that ranges, for example, from temple architecture, and feasting and banqueting equipment to inscriptions, statues, vase paintings, and descriptive texts, the course enables the participants to analyze the value and complexity of the archaeology of Greek religion and to recognize its significance for the reconstruction of daily life in ancient Greece. Special emphasis is placed on subjects such as the duties of priests and priestesses, the violence of animal sacrifice, the function of cult statues and votive offerings and also the important position of festivals and hero and mystery cults in ancient Greek religious thought and experience.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B208 The Roman Empire

Imperial history from the principate of Augustus to the House of Constantine with focus on the evolution of Roman culture and society as presented in the surviving ancient evidence, both literary and archaeological.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B225 In Vino Veritas: Wine in the Literature and Cult of Ancient Greece & Rome

This course will explore ancient Greeks’ and Romans’ perception of wine-drinking as a sacral experience, often of critical cultural, social, and even cosmic importance. We will study the cult of Dionysus and the role of wine in Greek and Latin poetry, drama, and philosophy. We will then trace the development of these religious and cultural trends in subsequent Western history, to the medieval tradition of the carnival and to twentieth-century literature.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B228 Utopia: Good Place or No Place?

What is the ideal human society? What is the role and status of man and woman therein? Is such a society purely hypothetical or should we strive to make it viable in our modern world? This course will address these questions by exploring the historic development of the concept of utopia.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B230 Food and Drink in the Ancient World

This course explores practices of eating and drinking in the ancient Mediterranean world both from a socio-cultural and environmental perspective. Since we are not only what we eat, but also where, when, why, with whom, and how we eat, we will examine the wider implications of patterns of food production, preparation, consumption, availability, and taboos, considering issues like gender, health, financial situation, geographical variability, and political status. Anthropological, archaeological, literary, and art historical approaches will be used to analyze the evidence and shed light on the role of food and drink in ancient culture and society. In addition, we will discuss how this affects our contemporary customs and practices and how our identity is still shaped by what we eat.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B274 Greek Tragedy in Global Cinema

This is a topics course. Topics vary. This course explores how contemporary film, a creative medium appealing to the entire demographic spectrum like Greek drama, looks back to the ancient origins. Examining both films that are directly based on Greek plays and films that make use of classical material without being explicitly classical in plot or setting, we will discuss how Greek mythology is reconstructed and appropriated for modern audiences and how the classical past continues to be culturally significant. A variety of methodological approaches such as film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist theory will be applied in addition to more straightforward literary-historical interpretation.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Baertschi,A.

Fall 2016: Greek Tragedy in Contemporary Film.

CSTS B398 Senior Seminar

This is a bi-college seminar devoted to readings in and discussion of selected topics in the various sub-fields of Classics (e.g. literature, religion, philosophy, law, social history) and of how to apply contemporary critical approaches to the primary sources. Students will also begin developing a topic for their senior thesis, composing a prospectus and giving a preliminary presentation of their findings.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B399 Senior Seminar

This is the continuation of CSTS B398. Working with individual advisors from the bi-college classics departments, students will continue to develop the topic sketched out in the fall semester. By the end of the course, they will have completed at least one draft and a full, polished version of the senior thesis, of which they will give a final oral presentation.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

GREK B101 Herodotus

Greek 101 introduces the student to one of the greatest prose authors of ancient Greece, the historian, Herodotus. The “Father of History,” as Herodotus is sometimes called, wrote one of the earliest lengthy prose texts extant in Greek literature, in the Ionian dialect of Greek. The “Father of Lies,” as he is also sometimes known, wove into his history a number of fabulous and entertaining anecdotes and tales. His ‘historie’ or inquiry into the events surrounding the invasions by the Persian empire against the Greek city-states set the precedent for all subsequent historical writings. This course meets three times a week with a required fourth hour to be arranged. Prerequisite: GREK B010 and B011 or equivalent.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Hilton,C.
(Fall 2016)

GREK B104 Homer

Greek 104 is designed to introduce the student to the epic poetry attributed to Homer, the greatest poet of ancient Greece, through selections from the Odyssey. Since Homer’s poetic form is so important to the shape and texture of the Odyssey, we will examine the mechanics of Homeric poetry, both the intricacies of dactylic hexameter and the patterns of oral formulaic composition. We will also spend time discussing the characters and ideas that animate this text, since the value of Homer lies not merely in his incomparable mastery of his poetic form, but in the values and patterns of behavior in his story, patterns which remained remarkably influential in the Greek world for centuries.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

GREK B201 Plato and Thucydides

This course is designed to introduce the student to two of the greatest prose authors of ancient Greece, the philosopher, Plato, and the historian, Thucydides. These two writers set the terms in the disciplines of philosophy and history for millennia, and philosophers and historians today continue to grapple with their ideas and influence. The brilliant and controversial statesman Alcibiades provides a link between the two texts in this course (Plato’s Symposium and Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War), and we examine the ways in which both authors handle the figure of Alcibiades as a point of entry into the comparison of the varying styles and modes of thought of these two great writers. Suggested Preparation: At least 2 years of college Greek or the equivalent.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Edmonds,R.
(Fall 2016)

GREK B202 The Form of Tragedy

This course will introduce the student to two of the three great Athenian tragedians—Sophocles and Euripides. Their dramas, composed two-and-a-half millenia ago, continue to be performed regularly on modern stages around the world and exert a profound influence on current day theatre. We will read Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannos and Euripides’ Bacchae in full, focusing on language, poetics, meter, and performance studies.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sigelman,A.
(Spring 2017)

GREK B403 Supervised Work

Units: 1.0
(Fall 2016, Spring 2017)

GREK B601 Homer

We will focus on a careful reading of significant portions of the Homeric epics and on the history of Homeric scholarship. Students will develop an appreciation both for the beauty of Homer’s poetics and for the scholarly arguments surrounding interpretation of these texts.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

GREK B603 Greek Patrology

This course is an introduction to Greek patrology, with an emphasis on biblical interpretation. We shall start from Philo and go on to read a selection of important texts from the early Greek fathers, notably Origen, Gregory of Nazianzus, and John Chrysostom.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

GREK B609 Pindar & Greek Lyric

We will begin with a careful reading of Pindar’s shorter odes, then proceed to his most famous long odes (Olympian 1, Pythian 3, Pythian 1) and then consider interpretative strategies (past, present, and future) as we survey the rest of the odes. One additional hour of reading TBA.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

GREK B620 5th century Greek Historians

This course will present a detailed reading of three or more books of Herodotus, with close study of his language, structure, and understanding of historical causation. We shall also work to situate Herodotus as an early prose writer in the tradition of the earlier geographical and ethnographical writings and will to that end read the fragments of Hecataeus as well as other early historians.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Tober,D.
(Spring 2017)

GREK B623 Sophocles

In this seminar we will conduct an in-depth reading of several of Sophocles’ plays with special emphasis on the language and metrics of Greek tragedy. We will also focus on the history of Sophoclean scholarship. Secondary readings and in-class discussions will cover topics such as the role of the chorus; lyric vs. narrative in drama; the Sophoclean hero; the role of time and oracles; the role of the divine; comparison of Sophocles’ favorite themes and techniques with those of Aeschylus and Euripides. All students will complete a term paper on a research topic of their choice by the end of the semester.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

GREK B639 Greek Orators:Classical Athens

The Attic orators provide a rich array of evidence for the social structures of men and women in ancient Athens, giving insights into aspects of personal life that literary texts rarely touch upon. In this seminar, we will explore the ideas of gender and citizenship as they are expressed in a number of the orations from 4th century Athens. We will examine the ways in which rhetoric is used in the speeches, with close attention to the kind of social and personal dynamics that were central to the forensic arena of this time period. A close reading of the texts themselves in the original Greek will help provide insight into the language of the courts, while the readings from modern scholarship will allow us to probe more deeply into some of the issues raised by the texts.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

GREK B644 Plato

In this seminar, we will explore the central ideas of a Platonic dialogue as they are unfolded by the varying voices of the interlocutors. In the “Phaedo”, Plato presents a poignant picture of the last hours of Socrates. Plato’s dialogues all prompt questions about how to read and understand the complex interchanges between the interlocutors, but no dialogue presents the stakes of the discussion as vividly as the “Phaedo”, where the debates on the nature of death and the soul are set against the background of Socrates’ imminent execution. How ought one to live? What does it mean to die? How is the life of philosophy a practice for death? In this seminar, we will explore the ideas of life and death, soul and body, philosophy and purification in the “Phaedo”. In addition to a close reading of the text itself, we will sample from the scholarly debates over the understanding and interpretation of the Phaedo that have gone on over the past two and a half millennia of reading Plato’s “Phaedo”.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

GREK B653 Athens in the Hellenistic Period

Surveys of Athenian history tend to conclude if not at the Battle of Chaeronea at any rate at the death of Alexander. Yet Athens did not disappear with the imposition of the Macedonian garrison in 322. Democracy resurfaced periodically over the course of the next century (in 318, 307, 288, and 229), and, more to the point, even under periods of oligarchic rule and Macedonian control, Athenian institutions remained intact, and Athenians continued to make significant contributions to the greater Greek world. Indeed, the century that followed Alexander’s death saw the flowering of Athenian historiography (e.g. Demochares, Diyllus, Philochorus, Timaeus, and Phylarchus) and new comedy (e.g. Menander and Poseidippus), as well as the advent of important philosophical schools (Epicureanism and Stoicism). This course will focus on Athens between the Battle of Chaeronea (338 BCE) and its liberation from Macedonian rule ca. 229 BCE. By way of a variety of contemporary sources, we shall have the opportunity to familiarize ourselves both with the historical narrative and with the intellectual climate of the polis in the early Hellenistic period.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B350 Topics in Latin Literature

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: at least two 200-level Latin courses or permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Baertschi,A., Conybeare,C.

Fall 2016: Late Latin Poetry. This course will survey the florescence of Latin poetry in the fourth and fifth centuries CE. At the heart of the course will be a study of some of Prudentius’ works, for example the Hamartigenia and the Cathemerinon; works by Claudian, Ausonius, Avitus, Dracontius, and Paulinus of Nola may also be included. We shall analyze both the literary and (where applicable) the theological properties of these great works.

Spring 2017: Horace. Horace, Rome’s most versatile author, produced some of antiquity’s most important and intriguing poems on themes ranging from erotics to poetics, from political instability to philosophy, from morality to myth. This course will focus on the poems published in his Epodes and the four books of Odes, paying special attention to Horace’s engagement with his poetic predecessors and the Greek and Latin literary tradition in general, his relationship with Maecenas and Augustus, and his brilliant use of meter and Latin poetic diction. We will also consider some of his other works such as the Ars Poetica and the Epistles in order to appreciate more fully his poetic practices and his appropriation of the Greek heritage into Roman cultural contexts.

LATIN

The major in Latin is designed to acquaint the student with Roman literature, history and culture in all its aspects. Works in Latin language, ranging from its beginnings to the Renaissance, are examined both in their historical context and as influences on post-classical cultures and societies up to the present day. A number of courses in Latin at the 200-level are offered in rotation at Bryn Mawr and Haverford. They are based on authors and topics in Roman imperial literature ranging from the Augustan Age to Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages and are designed to illustrate the richness of this literary patrimony.

College Foreign Language Requirement

The College’s foreign language requirement may be satisfied by completing two semesters of Latin with an average grade of at least 2.0 or with a grade of 2.0 or better in the second semester.

Major Requirements

Requirements for the major are two courses in Latin at the 100 level, two literature courses at the 200 level, two literature courses at the 300 level, HIST 207 or 208, Senior Seminar and thesis, and two courses to be selected from the following: Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology at the 100 level or above; Greek at the 100 level or above; French, Italian or Spanish at the 200 level or above. Courses taken at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome are accepted as part of the major.

In addition to completing the course requirements for the Latin major, every student must fulfill the requisite training in writing within the discipline by taking as part of her major plan two courses that are designated as Writing Attentive or a single course designated as Writing Intensive. The student may count a Writing Attentive or Intensive course that is taught outside the department if it is included in the major plan.

By the end of the senior year, majors will be required to have completed successfully a sight translation examination from Latin to English.

Students who place into 200-level courses in their first year may be eligible to participate in the A.B./M.A. program. Those interested should consult the department as soon as possible.

Minor Requirements

Requirements for the minor are normally six courses in Latin, including one at the 300-level. For non-majors, two literature courses at the 200-level must be taken as a prerequisite for admission to a 300-level course.

COURSES

LATN B001 Elementary Latin

Latin 001 is the first part of a year-long course that introduces the student to the language and literature of ancient Rome. The first semester focuses upon the grammar of Latin, developing the student’s knowledge of the forms of the language and the basic constructions used. Exercises in translation and composition aid in the student’s learning of the language, while readings in prose and poetry from the ancient authors provide the student with a deeper appreciation of the culture which used this language.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Conybeare,C.
(Fall 2016)

LATN B002 Elementary Latin

Latin 002 is the second part of a year-long course that introduces the student to the language and literature of ancient Rome. The second semester completes the course of study of the grammar of Latin, improving the student’s knowledge of the forms of the language and forms of expression. Exercises in translation and composition aid in the student’s learning of the language, while readings in prose and poetry from the ancient authors provide the student with a deeper appreciation of the culture which used this language.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Baertschi,A.
(Spring 2017)

LATN B110 Intermediate Latin

Intensive review of grammar, reading in classical prose and poetry. For students who have had the equivalent of several years of high school Latin or are not adequately prepared to take LATN 101. This course meets three times a week with a required fourth hour to be arranged.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Fall 2016)

LATN B112 Latin Literature

In the second semester of the intermediate Latin sequence, readings in prose and poetry are frequently drawn from a period, such as the age of Augustus, that illustrate in different ways the leading political and cultural concerns of the time. The Latin readings and discussion are supplemented by readings in the secondary literature. This course meets three times a week with a required fourth hour to be arranged. Prerequisite: LATN 101 or 110 or placement by the department.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Conybeare,C.

Spring 2017: Livy and Horace.

LATN B201 Topics: Advanced Latin Literature

This is a topics course, course content varies. In this course typically a variety of Latin prose and poetry of the high and later Roman empire (first to fourth centuries CE) is read. Single or multiple authors may be featured in a given semester. Suggested Preparation: two years of college Latin or equivalent.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Baertschi,A.

Fall 2016: Vergil’s Aeneid. Few poems have been read steadily for over 2000 years. Fewer still have become a school text soon after publication and a ‘classic’ of the Western canon, exerting a major influence on European literature, art, and politics. This course will attempt to reveal the enduring appeal of Vergil’s Aeneid through study of all aspects of the work, from its engagement with the literary tradition to its relation to the Augustan ideology to the author’s unique language, imagery, and poetic style.

LATN B202 Topics: Advanced Latin Literature

In this course typically a variety of Latin prose and poetry of the high and later Roman empire (first to fourth centuries CE) is read. Single or multiple authors may be featured in a given semester. This is a topics course, course content varies.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B203 Medieval Latin Literature

Selected works of Latin prose and poetry from the late Roman Empire through the 12th century. Prerequisite: At least one 200-level Latin course or equivalent.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B305 Livy & the Conquest of the Mediterranean

Close analysis of Livy’s account of the Second Macedonian War, the Syrian War, and the origins of the third Macedonian War. Emphasis will be placed on Livy’s method of composition and reliability, of his general historical outlook, and that of other authors who covered the period. The relevant sections of Polybius’ history, Plutarch’s biographies of Flamininus, the Elder Cato, and Aemilius Paullus as well as all relevant inscriptions will be dealt with in English.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B312 Roman Satire

Satire is the most slippery and subversive of genres. It is richly entertaining to read, but if we engage with it seriously it is often abrasive, shocking, shattering. Reading Roman satire requires an energetic exercise in cultural translation: we are confronted with the alienness of the Roman world, as well as its perverse literary vigour. This course will span four turbulent centuries of Roman imperialism in its reading of Roman satire. We will range from the sharp minutiae of social observation in Horace’s Sermones to the calculated public abuse of a eunuch consul in Claudian’s In Eutropium; from the swirling filthy riches of Persius and Juvenal to the nastily eloquent Christian condemnation of riches (and much else) in St Jerome. Students are warned: the language is difficult, the content often excoriating, even if exquisitely expressed. Reading this material challenges any comfortable separation between “literature” and “life”.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B350 Topics in Latin Literature

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: at least two 200-level Latin courses or permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Baertschi,A., Conybeare,C.

Fall 2016: Late Latin Poetry. This course will survey the florescence of Latin poetry in the fourth and fifth centuries CE. At the heart of the course will be a study of some of Prudentius’ works, for example the Hamartigenia and the Cathemerinon; works by Claudian, Ausonius, Avitus, Dracontius, and Paulinus of Nola may also be included. We shall analyze both the literary and (where applicable) the theological properties of these great works.

Spring 2017: Horace. Horace, Rome’s most versatile author, produced some of antiquity’s most important and intriguing poems on themes ranging from erotics to poetics, from political instability to philosophy, from morality to myth. This course will focus on the poems published in his Epodes and the four books of Odes, paying special attention to Horace’s engagement with his poetic predecessors and the Greek and Latin literary tradition in general, his relationship with Maecenas and Augustus, and his brilliant use of meter and Latin poetic diction. We will also consider some of his other works such as the Ars Poetica and the Epistles in order to appreciate more fully his poetic practices and his appropriation of the Greek heritage into Roman cultural contexts.

LATN B403 Supervised Work

Units: 1.0
(Fall 2016, Spring 2017)

LATN B613 Cicero

The public and private legal speeches and relevant letters of Cicero as advocate and politician.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ARCH B260 Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome

The often-praised achievements of the classical cultures arose from the realities of day-to-day life. This course surveys the rich body of material and textual evidence pertaining to how ancient Greeks and Romans -- famous and obscure alike -- lived and died. Topics include housing, food, clothing, work, leisure, and family and social life.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donohue,A.
(Spring 2017)

CSTS B156 Roman Law in Action

An introduction to Roman public and private law from the early republic to the high empire. The development of legal institutions, including the public courts, the role of the jurists and the importance of case law, is stressed.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Fall 2016)

CSTS B207 Early Rome and the Roman Republic

This course surveys the history of Rome from its origins to the end of the Republic, with special emphasis on the rise of Rome in Italy and the evolution of the Roman state. The course also examines the Hellenistic world in which the rise of Rome takes place. The methods of historical investigation using the ancient sources, both literary and archaeological, are emphasized.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Spring 2017)

CSTS B225 In Vino Veritas: Wine in the Literature and Cult of Ancient Greece & Rome

This course will explore ancient Greeks’ and Romans’ perception of wine-drinking as a sacral experience, often of critical cultural, social, and even cosmic importance. We will study the cult of Dionysus and the role of wine in Greek and Latin poetry, drama, and philosophy. We will then trace the development of these religious and cultural trends in subsequent Western history, to the medieval tradition of the carnival and to twentieth-century literature.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B228 Utopia: Good Place or No Place?

What is the ideal human society? What is the role and status of man and woman therein? Is such a society purely hypothetical or should we strive to make it viable in our modern world? This course will address these questions by exploring the historic development of the concept of utopia.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B230 Food and Drink in the Ancient World

This course explores practices of eating and drinking in the ancient Mediterranean world both from a socio-cultural and environmental perspective. Since we are not only what we eat, but also where, when, why, with whom, and how we eat, we will examine the wider implications of patterns of food production, preparation, consumption, availability, and taboos, considering issues like gender, health, financial situation, geographical variability, and political status. Anthropological, archaeological, literary, and art historical approaches will be used to analyze the evidence and shed light on the role of food and drink in ancient culture and society. In addition, we will discuss how this affects our contemporary customs and practices and how our identity is still shaped by what we eat.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B274 Greek Tragedy in Global Cinema

This is a topics course. Topics vary. This course explores how contemporary film, a creative medium appealing to the entire demographic spectrum like Greek drama, looks back to the ancient origins. Examining both films that are directly based on Greek plays and films that make use of classical material without being explicitly classical in plot or setting, we will discuss how Greek mythology is reconstructed and appropriated for modern audiences and how the classical past continues to be culturally significant. A variety of methodological approaches such as film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist theory will be applied in addition to more straightforward literary-historical interpretation.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Baertschi,A.

Fall 2016: Greek Tragedy in Contemporary Film.

CSTS B398 Senior Seminar

This is a bi-college seminar devoted to readings in and discussion of selected topics in the various sub-fields of Classics (e.g. literature, religion, philosophy, law, social history) and of how to apply contemporary critical approaches to the primary sources. Students will also begin developing a topic for their senior thesis, composing a prospectus and giving a preliminary presentation of their findings.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B399 Senior Seminar

This is the continuation of CSTS B398. Working with individual advisors from the bi-college classics departments, students will continue to develop the topic sketched out in the fall semester. By the end of the course, they will have completed at least one draft and a full, polished version of the senior thesis, of which they will give a final oral presentation.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B110 Intermediate Latin

Intensive review of grammar, reading in classical prose and poetry. For students who have had the equivalent of several years of high school Latin or are not adequately prepared to take LATN 101. This course meets three times a week with a required fourth hour to be arranged.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Fall 2016)

LATN B112 Latin Literature

In the second semester of the intermediate Latin sequence, readings in prose and poetry are frequently drawn from a period, such as the age of Augustus, that illustrate in different ways the leading political and cultural concerns of the time. The Latin readings and discussion are supplemented by readings in the secondary literature. This course meets three times a week with a required fourth hour to be arranged. Prerequisite: LATN 101 or 110 or placement by the department.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Conybeare,C.

Spring 2017: Livy and Horace.

LATN B201 Topics: Advanced Latin Literature

This is a topics course, course content varies. In this course typically a variety of Latin prose and poetry of the high and later Roman empire (first to fourth centuries CE) is read. Single or multiple authors may be featured in a given semester. Suggested Preparation: two years of college Latin or equivalent.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Baertschi,A.

Fall 2016: Vergil’s Aeneid. Few poems have been read steadily for over 2000 years. Fewer still have become a school text soon after publication and a ‘classic’ of the Western canon, exerting a major influence on European literature, art, and politics. This course will attempt to reveal the enduring appeal of Vergil’s Aeneid through study of all aspects of the work, from its engagement with the literary tradition to its relation to the Augustan ideology to the author’s unique language, imagery, and poetic style.

LATN B202 Topics: Advanced Latin Literature

In this course typically a variety of Latin prose and poetry of the high and later Roman empire (first to fourth centuries CE) is read. Single or multiple authors may be featured in a given semester. This is a topics course, course content varies.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B203 Medieval Latin Literature

Selected works of Latin prose and poetry from the late Roman Empire through the 12th century. Prerequisite: At least one 200-level Latin course or equivalent.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B305 Livy & the Conquest of the Mediterranean

Close analysis of Livy’s account of the Second Macedonian War, the Syrian War, and the origins of the third Macedonian War. Emphasis will be placed on Livy’s method of composition and reliability, of his general historical outlook, and that of other authors who covered the period. The relevant sections of Polybius’ history, Plutarch’s biographies of Flamininus, the Elder Cato, and Aemilius Paullus as well as all relevant inscriptions will be dealt with in English.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B312 Roman Satire

Satire is the most slippery and subversive of genres. It is richly entertaining to read, but if we engage with it seriously it is often abrasive, shocking, shattering. Reading Roman satire requires an energetic exercise in cultural translation: we are confronted with the alienness of the Roman world, as well as its perverse literary vigour. This course will span four turbulent centuries of Roman imperialism in its reading of Roman satire. We will range from the sharp minutiae of social observation in Horace’s Sermones to the calculated public abuse of a eunuch consul in Claudian’s In Eutropium; from the swirling filthy riches of Persius and Juvenal to the nastily eloquent Christian condemnation of riches (and much else) in St Jerome. Students are warned: the language is difficult, the content often excoriating, even if exquisitely expressed. Reading this material challenges any comfortable separation between “literature” and “life”.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B350 Topics in Latin Literature

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: at least two 200-level Latin courses or permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Baertschi,A., Conybeare,C.

Fall 2016: Late Latin Poetry. This course will survey the florescence of Latin poetry in the fourth and fifth centuries CE. At the heart of the course will be a study of some of Prudentius’ works, for example the Hamartigenia and the Cathemerinon; works by Claudian, Ausonius, Avitus, Dracontius, and Paulinus of Nola may also be included. We shall analyze both the literary and (where applicable) the theological properties of these great works.

Spring 2017: Horace. Horace, Rome’s most versatile author, produced some of antiquity’s most important and intriguing poems on themes ranging from erotics to poetics, from political instability to philosophy, from morality to myth. This course will focus on the poems published in his Epodes and the four books of Odes, paying special attention to Horace’s engagement with his poetic predecessors and the Greek and Latin literary tradition in general, his relationship with Maecenas and Augustus, and his brilliant use of meter and Latin poetic diction. We will also consider some of his other works such as the Ars Poetica and the Epistles in order to appreciate more fully his poetic practices and his appropriation of the Greek heritage into Roman cultural contexts.

LATN B403 Supervised Work

Units: 1.0
(Fall 2016, Spring 2017)

LATN B612 Tacitus

Studies in the Annals of Tacitus.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Fall 2016)

LATN B613 Livy & the Conquest of the Mediterranean 2nd & 1st c.

Close analysis of Livy’s account of the Second Macedonian War, the Syrian War, and the origins of the third Macedonian War. Emphasis will be placed on Livy’s method of composition and reliability, of his general historical outlook, and that of other authors who covered the period. The relevant sections of Polybius’ history, Plutarch’s biographies of Flamininus, the Elder Cato, and Aemilius Paullus as well as all relevant inscriptions will be dealt with in English.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B615 Roman Biography

The course surveys the development of Roman Biography from the late Republic to the High Empire. Authors read include Cornelius Nepos, Cornelius Tacitus, Plutarch, Suetonius Tranquillus and anonymous authors representative of both pagan and Christian resistance literature.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B619 Roman Satire

This course will span four turbulent centuries of Roman imperilism in its reading or Roman satire. We will range from the sharp minutiae of social observation in Horace’s Sermones to the calculated public abuse of a eunuch consul in Claudian’s In Eutropium; from the swirling filthy riches of Persius and Juvenal to the nastily eloquent Christian condemnation of riches (and much else) in St Jerome.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B637 Vergil Aeneid

A complete reading and close study of Virgil, whose “afterlife,” it has been said with little exaggeration, “is Western literature.” We read all of the certain poems--Eclogues (c. 39 BCE), Georgics (c. 29 BCE), and Aeneid (c. 19 BCE)--completely in English, substantial portions of each in the Latin, and scholarship and criticism. Aiming at increased fluency in reading Latin poetry, we also seek to deepen our capacity to respond to this astonishing ancient poet rigorously and meaningfully. Attention is paid to some of Virgil’s models in Latin and Greek and to some imitators especially in the European epic tradition.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B640 Topics: Imperial Latin Literature

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B650 Topics in Latin Literature

Topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B658 Late Latin Poetry

This course will survey the florescence of Latin poetry in the fourth and fifth centuries CE. At the heart of the course will be a study of some of Prudentius’ works, for example the Hamartigenia and the Cathemerinon; works by Claudian, Ausonius, Avitus, Dracontius, and Paulinus of Nola may also be included. We shall analyze both the literary and (where applicable) the theological properties of these great works.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Conybeare,C.
(Fall 2016)

LATN B660 Horace, Odes and Epodes

Horace, Rome’s most versatile author, produced some of antiquity’s most important and intriguing poems on themes ranging from erotics to poetics, from political instability to philosophy, from morality to myth. This course will focus on the poems published in his Epodes and the four books of Odes, paying special attention to Horace’s engagement with his poetic predecessors and the Greek and Latin literary tradition in general, his relationship with Maecenas and Augustus, and his brilliant use of meter and Latin poetic diction. We will also consider some of his other works such as the Ars Poetica and the Epistles in order to appreciate more fully his poetic practices and his appropriation of the Greek heritage into Roman cultural contexts.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Baertschi,A.
(Spring 2017)

LATN B671 Fasti

Ovid’s Fasti is a work that the poet was not able to complete before being sent into exile by Augustus. Nevertheless, as it survives, it is an extraordinarily rich work that blends the antiquarian religious research characteristic of the Augustan age with the subtle poetic craft for which the author is famous.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Spring 2017)

LATN B673 Roman Civil War

Civil war seemed to be Rome’s inescapable destiny from the foundation of the city through the early empire. This course will assess its historical significance as well as its representation and commemoration in Roman literature. We will focus particularly on Lucan’s Bellum civile recounting the strife between Caesar and Pompey, but also read other texts in both poetry and prose to trace the development of civil conflict at Rome and its lasting influence on Roman identity and cultural memory.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES

The major in Classical Languages is designed for the student who wishes to divide her time between the two languages and literatures.

Major Requirements

The requirements for the major, in addition to the Senior Seminar and the thesis, are eight courses in Greek and Latin including at least two at the 200-level in one language and two at the 300-level or above in the other, as well as two courses in ancient history and/or classical archaeology. In addition to completing the course requirements for the major in Classical Languages, every student must fulfill the requisite training in writing within the discipline by taking as part of her major plan two courses that are designated as Writing Attentive or a single course designated as Writing Intensive. The student may count a Writing Attentive or Intensive course that is taught outside the department if it is included in the major plan. There are two final examinations, a sight translation from Greek to English and another from Latin to English.

COURSES

CSTS B274 Greek Tragedy in Global Cinema

This is a topics course. Topics vary. This course explores how contemporary film, a creative medium appealing to the entire demographic spectrum like Greek drama, looks back to the ancient origins. Examining both films that are directly based on Greek plays and films that make use of classical material without being explicitly classical in plot or setting, we will discuss how Greek mythology is reconstructed and appropriated for modern audiences and how the classical past continues to be culturally significant. A variety of methodological approaches such as film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist theory will be applied in addition to more straightforward literary-historical interpretation.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Baertschi,A.

Fall 2016: Greek Tragedy in Contemporary Film.

CSTS B398 Senior Seminar

This is a bi-college seminar devoted to readings in and discussion of selected topics in the various sub-fields of Classics (e.g. literature, religion, philosophy, law, social history) and of how to apply contemporary critical approaches to the primary sources. Students will also begin developing a topic for their senior thesis, composing a prospectus and giving a preliminary presentation of their findings.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B399 Senior Seminar

This is the continuation of CSTS B398. Working with individual advisors from the bi-college classics departments, students will continue to develop the topic sketched out in the fall semester. By the end of the course, they will have completed at least one draft and a full, polished version of the senior thesis, of which they will give a final oral presentation.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

GREK B101 Herodotus

Greek 101 introduces the student to one of the greatest prose authors of ancient Greece, the historian, Herodotus. The “Father of History,” as Herodotus is sometimes called, wrote one of the earliest lengthy prose texts extant in Greek literature, in the Ionian dialect of Greek. The “Father of Lies,” as he is also sometimes known, wove into his history a number of fabulous and entertaining anecdotes and tales. His ‘historie’ or inquiry into the events surrounding the invasions by the Persian empire against the Greek city-states set the precedent for all subsequent historical writings. This course meets three times a week with a required fourth hour to be arranged. Prerequisite: GREK B010 and B011 or equivalent.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Hilton,C.
(Fall 2016)

GREK B653 Athens in the Hellenistic Period

Surveys of Athenian history tend to conclude if not at the Battle of Chaeronea at any rate at the death of Alexander. Yet Athens did not disappear with the imposition of the Macedonian garrison in 322. Democracy resurfaced periodically over the course of the next century (in 318, 307, 288, and 229), and, more to the point, even under periods of oligarchic rule and Macedonian control, Athenian institutions remained intact, and Athenians continued to make significant contributions to the greater Greek world. Indeed, the century that followed Alexander’s death saw the flowering of Athenian historiography (e.g. Demochares, Diyllus, Philochorus, Timaeus, and Phylarchus) and new comedy (e.g. Menander and Poseidippus), as well as the advent of important philosophical schools (Epicureanism and Stoicism). This course will focus on Athens between the Battle of Chaeronea (338 BCE) and its liberation from Macedonian rule ca. 229 BCE. By way of a variety of contemporary sources, we shall have the opportunity to familiarize ourselves both with the historical narrative and with the intellectual climate of the polis in the early Hellenistic period.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B112 Latin Literature

In the second semester of the intermediate Latin sequence, readings in prose and poetry are frequently drawn from a period, such as the age of Augustus, that illustrate in different ways the leading political and cultural concerns of the time. The Latin readings and discussion are supplemented by readings in the secondary literature. This course meets three times a week with a required fourth hour to be arranged. Prerequisite: LATN 101 or 110 or placement by the department.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Conybeare,C.

Spring 2017: Livy and Horace.

LATN B202 Topics: Advanced Latin Literature

In this course typically a variety of Latin prose and poetry of the high and later Roman empire (first to fourth centuries CE) is read. Single or multiple authors may be featured in a given semester. This is a topics course, course content varies.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B350 Topics in Latin Literature

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: at least two 200-level Latin courses or permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Baertschi,A., Conybeare,C.

Fall 2016: Late Latin Poetry. This course will survey the florescence of Latin poetry in the fourth and fifth centuries CE. At the heart of the course will be a study of some of Prudentius’ works, for example the Hamartigenia and the Cathemerinon; works by Claudian, Ausonius, Avitus, Dracontius, and Paulinus of Nola may also be included. We shall analyze both the literary and (where applicable) the theological properties of these great works.

Spring 2017: Horace. Horace, Rome’s most versatile author, produced some of antiquity’s most important and intriguing poems on themes ranging from erotics to poetics, from political instability to philosophy, from morality to myth. This course will focus on the poems published in his Epodes and the four books of Odes, paying special attention to Horace’s engagement with his poetic predecessors and the Greek and Latin literary tradition in general, his relationship with Maecenas and Augustus, and his brilliant use of meter and Latin poetic diction. We will also consider some of his other works such as the Ars Poetica and the Epistles in order to appreciate more fully his poetic practices and his appropriation of the Greek heritage into Roman cultural contexts.

CLASSICAL CULTURE AND SOCIETY

The major provides a broad yet individually structured background for students whose interest in the ancient classical world is general and who wish to pursue more specialized work in one or more particular areas.

Major Requirements

The requirements for the major, in addition to the Senior Seminar and thesis, are nine courses distributed as follows:

  • Two courses in either Latin or Greek beyond the elementary level
  • One course in Greek and/or Roman history
  • Three courses, at least two of which are at the 200 level or higher, in one of the following concentrations: archaeology and art history, philosophy and religion, literature and the classical tradition, history and society
  • Three electives, at least one of which is at the 200-level or higher, and one of which is must be among the courses counted toward the history/society concentration (except in the case of students in that concentration)

In addition to completing the course requirements for the major in Classical Culture & Society, every student must fulfill the requisite training in writing within the discipline by taking as part of her major plan two courses that are designated as Writing Attentive or a single course designated as Writing Intensive. The student may count a Writing Attentive or Intensive course that is taught outside the department if it is included in the major plan.

Minor Requirements

The requirements for the minor are six courses drawn from the range of courses counted toward the major. Of these, two must be in Greek or Latin beyond the elementary level and at least one must be in classical culture and society at the 200-level.

COURSES

CSTS B156 Roman Law in Action

An introduction to Roman public and private law from the early republic to the high empire. The development of legal institutions, including the public courts, the role of the jurists and the importance of case law, is stressed.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Fall 2016)

CSTS B175 Feminism in Classics

This course will illustrate the ways in which feminism has had an impact on classics, as well as the ways in which feminists think with classical texts. It will have four thematic divisions: feminism and the classical canon; feminism, women, and rethinking classical history; feminist readings of classical texts; and feminists and the classics - e.g. Cixous’ Medusa and Butler’s Antigone.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B205 Greek History

This course traces the rise of the city-state (polis) in the Greek-speaking world beginning in the seventh-century BC down to its full blossoming in classical Athens and Sparta. Students should gain an understanding of the formation and development of Greek identity, from the Panhellenic trends in archaic epic and religion through its crystallization during the heroic defense against two Persian invasions and its subsequent disintegration during the Peloponnesian war. The class will also explore the ways in which the evolution of political, philosophical, religious, and artistic institutions reflect the changing socio-political circumstances of Greece. The latter part of the course will focus on Athens in particular: its rise to imperial power under Pericles, its tragic decline from the Peloponnesian War and its important role as a center for the teaching of rhetoric and philosophy. Since the study of history involves the analysis, evaluation, and synthesis of the sources available for the culture studied, students will concentrate upon the primary sources available for Greek history, exploring the strengths and weakness of these sources and the ways in which their evidence can be used to create an understanding of ancient Greece. Students should learn how to analyze and evaluate the evidence from primary texts and to synthesize the information from multiple sources in a critical way.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Tober,D.
(Fall 2016)

CSTS B207 Early Rome and the Roman Republic

This course surveys the history of Rome from its origins to the end of the Republic, with special emphasis on the rise of Rome in Italy and the evolution of the Roman state. The course also examines the Hellenistic world in which the rise of Rome takes place. The methods of historical investigation using the ancient sources, both literary and archaeological, are emphasized.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Spring 2017)

CSTS B208 The Roman Empire

Imperial history from the principate of Augustus to the House of Constantine with focus on the evolution of Roman culture and society as presented in the surviving ancient evidence, both literary and archaeological.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B213 Persia and The Greeks

This course explores interactions between Greeks and Persians in the Mediterranean and Near East from the Archaic Period to the Hellenistic Age. Through a variety of sources (from Greek histories, tragedies, and ethnography, to Persian royal inscriptions and administrative documents and the Hebrew Bible), we shall work to illuminate the interface between these two distinct yet complementary cultures. Our aim will be to gain familiarity not only with a general narrative of Greco-Persian history, from the foundation of the Achaemenid Empire in the middle of the sixth century BCE to the Macedonian conquest of Persia some 250 years later, but also with the materials (archaeological, numismatic, epigraphical, artistic, and literary) from which we build such a narrative. At the same time, we shall work to understand how contact between Persia and the Greeks in antiquity has influenced discourse about the opposition between East and West in the modern world.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B214 Remembering the Saints: Reading Pilgrimage & Tourism

This course is divided into two parts. In the first half of the semester, it will trace the rise and function of the holy women and men of late antiquity (300–600 CE), with an emphasis on the literary portrayal of their lives, a genre called hagiography (sacred biography). Methods for reading and interpreting this large body of literature will play a key role in this part of the course. In the second half of the semester, the focus will shift from saint to devotee. Saints were like magnets that set the people of late antiquity into motion. By reading pilgrim travelogues and catalogues of miraculous healings, studying the archeological and artistic evidence for pilgrimage, we will explore the profound social and cultural impact the cult of the saints had on the peoples of this period. In addition to gaining a familiarity with the history of early Christian saints and the cults that arose around them, students will also investigate the many issues at stake in the study of late antique Christianity. This includes but is not limited to: the conflict between history and literature in hagiography, gender and sanctity in late antiquity, self-harm as religious practice in early Christianity, and the intersection of medicine, magic, and miracle.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Spring 2017)

CSTS B225 In Vino Veritas: Wine in the Literature and Cult of Ancient Greece & Rome

This course will explore ancient Greeks’ and Romans’ perception of wine-drinking as a sacral experience, often of critical cultural, social, and even cosmic importance. We will study the cult of Dionysus and the role of wine in Greek and Latin poetry, drama, and philosophy. We will then trace the development of these religious and cultural trends in subsequent Western history, to the medieval tradition of the carnival and to twentieth-century literature.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B228 Utopia: Good Place or No Place?

What is the ideal human society? What is the role and status of man and woman therein? Is such a society purely hypothetical or should we strive to make it viable in our modern world? This course will address these questions by exploring the historic development of the concept of utopia.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B230 Food and Drink in the Ancient World

This course explores practices of eating and drinking in the ancient Mediterranean world both from a socio-cultural and environmental perspective. Since we are not only what we eat, but also where, when, why, with whom, and how we eat, we will examine the wider implications of patterns of food production, preparation, consumption, availability, and taboos, considering issues like gender, health, financial situation, geographical variability, and political status. Anthropological, archaeological, literary, and art historical approaches will be used to analyze the evidence and shed light on the role of food and drink in ancient culture and society. In addition, we will discuss how this affects our contemporary customs and practices and how our identity is still shaped by what we eat.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B237 Underworlds in Virgil & After

What is a ‘literary tradition’, and what sense may we make of one? In this course we focus on an influential episode in the Western literary tradition: the hero’s journey into the underworld in Virgil’s epic poem, the Aeneid. Keeping in mind a master metaphor by which ‘underworld’ stands for ‘afterlife’, we consider that perilous ‘journey below’ on its own, in context of the complete poem, and in contexts provided by other authors’ visions of ‘what lies beneath’, including Homer (Odyssey), Ovid (Metamorphoses), Dante (Inferno), Milton (Paradise Lost), Shakespeare (The Tempest), Jules Verne (Journey to the Center of the Earth), Joseph Conrad (Heart of Darkness), J. R. R. Tolkien (The Hobbit), and the nameless author of the Epic of Gilgamesh.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B242 Magic in the Greco-Roman World

Bindings and curses, love charms and healing potions, amulets and talismans - from the simple spells designed to meet the needs of the poor and desperate to the complex theurgies of the philosophers, the people of the Greco-Roman World made use of magic to try to influence the world around them. In this course students will gain an understanding of the magicians of the ancient world and the techniques and devices they used to serve their clientele, as well as the cultural contexts in which these ideas of magic arose. We shall consider ancient tablets and spell books as well as literary descriptions of magic in the light of theories relating to the religious, political, and social contexts in which magic was used.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Edmonds,R.
(Fall 2016)

CSTS B246 Eros in Ancient Greek Culture

This course explores the ancient Greek’s ideas of love, from the interpersonal loves between people of the same or different genders to the cosmogonic Eros that creates and holds together the entire world. The course examines how the idea of eros is expressed in poetry, philosophy, history, and the romances.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B255 Show and Spectacle in Ancient Greece and Rome

A survey of public entertainment in the ancient world, including theater and dramatic festivals, athletic competitions, games and gladiatorial combats, and processions and sacrifices. Drawing on literary sources and paying attention to art, archaeology and topography, this course explores the social, political and religious contexts of ancient spectacle. Special consideration will be given to modern equivalents of staged entertainment and the representation of ancient spectacle in contemporary film.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B274 Greek Tragedy in Global Cinema

This is a topics course. Topics vary. This course explores how contemporary film, a creative medium appealing to the entire demographic spectrum like Greek drama, looks back to the ancient origins. Examining both films that are directly based on Greek plays and films that make use of classical material without being explicitly classical in plot or setting, we will discuss how Greek mythology is reconstructed and appropriated for modern audiences and how the classical past continues to be culturally significant. A variety of methodological approaches such as film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist theory will be applied in addition to more straightforward literary-historical interpretation.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Baertschi,A.

Fall 2016: Greek Tragedy in Contemporary Film.

CSTS B306 Choral Voice as Text and as Performance

This course engages students in close reading and analysis of several ancient Greek dramas in English translation. While these ancient scripts raise such familiar and relevant issues as gender, identity, family-structure, sexuality, loyalty, heroism, and euthanasia, these issues are presented in a way distinct from the literary formats of Modernity: action is compressed within the scope of one day; there are only three actors despite there being many more roles; all the really intense action (e.g., murder, suicide) takes place offstage; and, perhaps most obviously and most importantly, the thematic and aesthetic centerpiece of the play are not the protagonists but the singing and dancing chorus, whose lyrics weave a dense web of mixed metaphors, accumulated appositions, and compound adjectives taking the place of verbs and actions. Analysis of these lyrics will be key to addressing one of the central questions of the course: how can a genre that is so focused on the incredibly complex choral lyrics be a performance genre? We will discuss theories of how the plays were performed in fifth-century Greece comparing and contrasting them with modern adaptations of ancient choruses, as in the present-day productions of Theodoros Terzopoulos. Ultimately, the aim of the course is to give students a first-hand experience with the manifold social, emotional, political, and cultural implications of chorality, in both word (poetic script) and deed (performance).
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sigelman,A.
(Spring 2017)

CSTS B310 Forming the Classics: From Papyrus to Print

This course will trace the constitution of Classics as a discipline in both its intellectual and its material aspects, and will examine how the works of classical antiquity were read, interpreted, and preserved from the late Roman empire to the early modern period. Topics will include the material production and dissemination of texts, the conceptual organization of codices (e.g. punctuation, rubrication, indexing), and audiences and readers (including annotation, marginalia, and commentary). Students will also learn practical techniques for approaching these texts, such as palaeography and the expansion of abbreviations. The course will culminate in student research projects using manuscripts and early printed books from Bryn Mawr’s exceptional collections. Prerequisite: a 200 level course in Greek, Latin, or Classical Studies.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B375 Interpreting Mythology

The myths of the Greeks have provoked outrage and fascination, interpretation and retelling, censorship and elaboration, beginning with the Greeks themselves. We will see how some of these stories have been read and understood, recounted and revised, in various cultures and eras, from ancient tellings to modern movies. We will also explore some of the interpretive theories by which these tales have been understood, from ancient allegory to modern structural and semiotic theories. The student should gain a more profound understanding of the meaning of these myths to the Greeks themselves, of the cultural context in which they were formulated. At the same time, this course should provide the student with some familiarity with the range of interpretations and strategies of understanding that people of various cultures and times have applied to the Greek myths during the more than two millennia in which they have been preserved. Preference to upperclassmen, previous coursework in myth required.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B398 Senior Seminar

This is a bi-college seminar devoted to readings in and discussion of selected topics in the various sub-fields of Classics (e.g. literature, religion, philosophy, law, social history) and of how to apply contemporary critical approaches to the primary sources. Students will also begin developing a topic for their senior thesis, composing a prospectus and giving a preliminary presentation of their findings.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B399 Senior Seminar

This is the continuation of CSTS B398. Working with individual advisors from the bi-college classics departments, students will continue to develop the topic sketched out in the fall semester. By the end of the course, they will have completed at least one draft and a full, polished version of the senior thesis, of which they will give a final oral presentation.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B403 Supervised Work

Units: 1.0
(Fall 2016, Spring 2017)

ARCH B101 Introduction to Egyptian and Near Eastern Archaeology

A historical survey of the archaeology and art of the ancient Near East and Egypt.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ARCH B102 Introduction to Classical Archaeology

A historical survey of the archaeology and art of Greece, Etruria, and Rome.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Lindenlauf,A.
(Fall 2016)

ARCH B204 Animals in the Ancient Greek World

This course focuses on perceptions of animals in ancient Greece from the Geometric to the Classical periods. It examines representations of animals in painting, sculpture, and the minor arts, the treatment of animals as attested in the archaeological record, and how these types of evidence relate to the featuring of animals in contemporary poetry, tragedy, comedy, and medical and philosophical writings. By analyzing this rich body of evidence, the course develops a context in which participants gain insight into the ways ancient Greeks perceived, represented, and treated animals. Juxtaposing the importance of animals in modern society, as attested, for example, by their roles as pets, agents of healing, diplomatic gifts, and even as subjects of specialized studies such as animal law and animal geographies, the course also serves to expand awareness of attitudes towards animals in our own society as well as that of ancient Greece.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ARCH B215 Classical Art

A survey of the visual arts of ancient Greece and Rome from the Bronze Age through Late Imperial times (circa 3000 B.C.E. to 300 C.E.). Major categories of artistic production are examined in historical and social context, including interactions with neighboring areas and cultures; methodological and interpretive issues are highlighted.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donohue,A.
(Fall 2016)

ARCH B234 Picturing Women in Classical Antiquity

We investigate representations of women in different media in ancient Greece and Rome, examining the cultural stereotypes of women and the gender roles that they reinforce. We also study the daily life of women in the ancient world, the objects that they were associated with in life and death and their occupations.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Lindenlauf,A.
(Spring 2017)

ARCH B254 Cleopatra

This course examines the life and rule of Cleopatra VII, the last queen of Ptolemaic Egypt, and the reception of her legacy in the Early Roman Empire and the western world from the Renaissance to modern times. The first part of the course explores extant literary evidence regarding the upbringing, education, and rule of Cleopatra within the contexts of Egyptian and Ptolemaic cultures, her relationships with Julius Caesar and Marc Antony, her conflict with Octavian, and her death by suicide in 30 BCE. The second part examines constructions of Cleopatra in Roman literature, her iconography in surviving art, and her contributions to and influence on both Ptolemaic and Roman art. A detailed account is also provided of the afterlife of Cleopatra in the literature, visual arts, scholarship, and film of both Europe and the United States, extending from the papal courts of Renaissance Italy and Shakespearean drama, to Thomas Jefferson’s art collection at Monticello and Joseph Mankiewicz’s 1963 epic film, Cleopatra.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Tasopoulou,E.
(Spring 2017)

ARCH B260 Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome

The often-praised achievements of the classical cultures arose from the realities of day-to-day life. This course surveys the rich body of material and textual evidence pertaining to how ancient Greeks and Romans -- famous and obscure alike -- lived and died. Topics include housing, food, clothing, work, leisure, and family and social life.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donohue,A.
(Spring 2017)

ARCH B304 Archaeology of Greek Religion

This course approaches the topic of ancient Greek religion by focusing on surviving archaeological, architectural, epigraphical, artistic and literary evidence that dates from the Archaic and Classical periods. By examining a wealth of diverse evidence that ranges, for example, from temple architecture, and feasting and banqueting equipment to inscriptions, statues, vase paintings, and descriptive texts, the course enables the participants to analyze the value and complexity of the archaeology of Greek religion and to recognize its significance for the reconstruction of daily life in ancient Greece. Special emphasis is placed on subjects such as the duties of priests and priestesses, the violence of animal sacrifice, the function of cult statues and votive offerings and also the important position of festivals and hero and mystery cults in ancient Greek religious thought and experience.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ARCH B308 Ceramic Analysis

Pottery is a fundamental means of establishing the relative chronology of archaeological sites and of understanding past human behavior. Included are theories, methods and techniques of pottery description, analysis and interpretation. Topics include typology, seriation, ceramic characterization, production, function, exchange and the use of computers in pottery analysis. Laboratory work on pottery in the department collections. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Geoarchaeology
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Magee,P.
(Spring 2017)

ARCH B359 Topics in Classical Art and Archaeology

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: 200-level coursework in some aspect of classical or related cultures, archeology or art history.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ARCH B516 Trade and Transport in the Ancient World

Issues of trade, commerce and production of export goods are addressed with regard to the Bronze Age and Iron Age cultures of Mesopotamia, Arabia, Iran and south Asia. Crucial to these systems is the development of means of transport via maritime routes and on land. Archaeological evidence for traded goods and shipwrecks is used to map the emergence of sea-faring across the Indian Ocean and Gulf while bio-archaeological data is employed to examine the transformative role that Bactrian and Dromedary camels played in ancient trade and transport.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B156 Roman Law in Action

An introduction to Roman public and private law from the early republic to the high empire. The development of legal institutions, including the public courts, the role of the jurists and the importance of case law, is stressed.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Fall 2016)

CSTS B205 Greek History

This course traces the rise of the city-state (polis) in the Greek-speaking world beginning in the seventh-century BC down to its full blossoming in classical Athens and Sparta. Students should gain an understanding of the formation and development of Greek identity, from the Panhellenic trends in archaic epic and religion through its crystallization during the heroic defense against two Persian invasions and its subsequent disintegration during the Peloponnesian war. The class will also explore the ways in which the evolution of political, philosophical, religious, and artistic institutions reflect the changing socio-political circumstances of Greece. The latter part of the course will focus on Athens in particular: its rise to imperial power under Pericles, its tragic decline from the Peloponnesian War and its important role as a center for the teaching of rhetoric and philosophy. Since the study of history involves the analysis, evaluation, and synthesis of the sources available for the culture studied, students will concentrate upon the primary sources available for Greek history, exploring the strengths and weakness of these sources and the ways in which their evidence can be used to create an understanding of ancient Greece. Students should learn how to analyze and evaluate the evidence from primary texts and to synthesize the information from multiple sources in a critical way.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Tober,D.
(Fall 2016)

CSTS B207 Early Rome and the Roman Republic

This course surveys the history of Rome from its origins to the end of the Republic, with special emphasis on the rise of Rome in Italy and the evolution of the Roman state. The course also examines the Hellenistic world in which the rise of Rome takes place. The methods of historical investigation using the ancient sources, both literary and archaeological, are emphasized.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Spring 2017)

CSTS B208 The Roman Empire

Imperial history from the principate of Augustus to the House of Constantine with focus on the evolution of Roman culture and society as presented in the surviving ancient evidence, both literary and archaeological.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B214 Remembering the Saints: Reading Pilgrimage & Tourism

This course is divided into two parts. In the first half of the semester, it will trace the rise and function of the holy women and men of late antiquity (300–600 CE), with an emphasis on the literary portrayal of their lives, a genre called hagiography (sacred biography). Methods for reading and interpreting this large body of literature will play a key role in this part of the course. In the second half of the semester, the focus will shift from saint to devotee. Saints were like magnets that set the people of late antiquity into motion. By reading pilgrim travelogues and catalogues of miraculous healings, studying the archeological and artistic evidence for pilgrimage, we will explore the profound social and cultural impact the cult of the saints had on the peoples of this period. In addition to gaining a familiarity with the history of early Christian saints and the cults that arose around them, students will also investigate the many issues at stake in the study of late antique Christianity. This includes but is not limited to: the conflict between history and literature in hagiography, gender and sanctity in late antiquity, self-harm as religious practice in early Christianity, and the intersection of medicine, magic, and miracle.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Spring 2017)

CSTS B228 Utopia: Good Place or No Place?

What is the ideal human society? What is the role and status of man and woman therein? Is such a society purely hypothetical or should we strive to make it viable in our modern world? This course will address these questions by exploring the historic development of the concept of utopia.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B237 Underworlds in Virgil & After

What is a ‘literary tradition’, and what sense may we make of one? In this course we focus on an influential episode in the Western literary tradition: the hero’s journey into the underworld in Virgil’s epic poem, the Aeneid. Keeping in mind a master metaphor by which ‘underworld’ stands for ‘afterlife’, we consider that perilous ‘journey below’ on its own, in context of the complete poem, and in contexts provided by other authors’ visions of ‘what lies beneath’, including Homer (Odyssey), Ovid (Metamorphoses), Dante (Inferno), Milton (Paradise Lost), Shakespeare (The Tempest), Jules Verne (Journey to the Center of the Earth), Joseph Conrad (Heart of Darkness), J. R. R. Tolkien (The Hobbit), and the nameless author of the Epic of Gilgamesh.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B242 Magic in the Greco-Roman World

Bindings and curses, love charms and healing potions, amulets and talismans - from the simple spells designed to meet the needs of the poor and desperate to the complex theurgies of the philosophers, the people of the Greco-Roman World made use of magic to try to influence the world around them. In this course students will gain an understanding of the magicians of the ancient world and the techniques and devices they used to serve their clientele, as well as the cultural contexts in which these ideas of magic arose. We shall consider ancient tablets and spell books as well as literary descriptions of magic in the light of theories relating to the religious, political, and social contexts in which magic was used.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Edmonds,R.
(Fall 2016)

CSTS B246 Eros in Ancient Greek Culture

This course explores the ancient Greek’s ideas of love, from the interpersonal loves between people of the same or different genders to the cosmogonic Eros that creates and holds together the entire world. The course examines how the idea of eros is expressed in poetry, philosophy, history, and the romances.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B255 Show and Spectacle in Ancient Greece and Rome

A survey of public entertainment in the ancient world, including theater and dramatic festivals, athletic competitions, games and gladiatorial combats, and processions and sacrifices. Drawing on literary sources and paying attention to art, archaeology and topography, this course explores the social, political and religious contexts of ancient spectacle. Special consideration will be given to modern equivalents of staged entertainment and the representation of ancient spectacle in contemporary film.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B274 Greek Tragedy in Global Cinema

This is a topics course. Topics vary. This course explores how contemporary film, a creative medium appealing to the entire demographic spectrum like Greek drama, looks back to the ancient origins. Examining both films that are directly based on Greek plays and films that make use of classical material without being explicitly classical in plot or setting, we will discuss how Greek mythology is reconstructed and appropriated for modern audiences and how the classical past continues to be culturally significant. A variety of methodological approaches such as film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist theory will be applied in addition to more straightforward literary-historical interpretation.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Baertschi,A.

Fall 2016: Greek Tragedy in Contemporary Film.

CSTS B375 Interpreting Mythology

The myths of the Greeks have provoked outrage and fascination, interpretation and retelling, censorship and elaboration, beginning with the Greeks themselves. We will see how some of these stories have been read and understood, recounted and revised, in various cultures and eras, from ancient tellings to modern movies. We will also explore some of the interpretive theories by which these tales have been understood, from ancient allegory to modern structural and semiotic theories. The student should gain a more profound understanding of the meaning of these myths to the Greeks themselves, of the cultural context in which they were formulated. At the same time, this course should provide the student with some familiarity with the range of interpretations and strategies of understanding that people of various cultures and times have applied to the Greek myths during the more than two millennia in which they have been preserved. Preference to upperclassmen, previous coursework in myth required.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B398 Senior Seminar

This is a bi-college seminar devoted to readings in and discussion of selected topics in the various sub-fields of Classics (e.g. literature, religion, philosophy, law, social history) and of how to apply contemporary critical approaches to the primary sources. Students will also begin developing a topic for their senior thesis, composing a prospectus and giving a preliminary presentation of their findings.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B399 Senior Seminar

This is the continuation of CSTS B398. Working with individual advisors from the bi-college classics departments, students will continue to develop the topic sketched out in the fall semester. By the end of the course, they will have completed at least one draft and a full, polished version of the senior thesis, of which they will give a final oral presentation.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B610 Forming the Classics: From Papyrus to Print

This course will trace the constitution of Classics as a discipline in both its intellectual and its material aspects, and will examine how the works of classical antiquity were read, interpreted, and preserved from the late Roman empire to the early modern period. Topics will include the material production and dissemination of texts, the conceptual organization of codices (e.g. punctuation, rubrication, indexing), and audiences and readers (including annotation, marginalia, and commentary). Students will also learn practical techniques for approaching these texts, such as palaeography and the expansion of abbreviations. The course will culminate in student research projects using manuscripts and early printed books from Bryn Mawr’s exceptional collections. Prerequisite: a 200 level course in Greek, Latin, or Classical Studies.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B645 Ancient Magic

Magic – the word evokes the mysterious and the marvelous, the forbidden and the hidden, the ancient and the arcane. But what did magic mean to the people who coined the term, the people of ancient Greece and Rome? Drawing on the expanding body of evidence for ancient magical practices, as well as recent theoretical approaches to the history of religions, this seminar explores the varieties of phenomena labeled magic in the ancient Greco-Roman world. Bindings and curses, love charms and healing potions, amulets and talismans - from the simple spells designed to meet the needs of the poor and desperate to the complex theurgies of the philosophers, the people of the Greco-Roman world did not only imagine what magic could do, they also made use of magic to try to influence the world around them. The seminar examines the primary texts in Greek, the tablets and spell books, as well as literary descriptions of magic, in the light of theories relating to the religious, political, and social contexts in which magic was used.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Edmonds,R.
(Fall 2016)

CSTS B675 Interpreting Mythology

The myths of the Greeks have provoked outrage and fascination, interpretation and retelling, censorship and elaboration, beginning with the Greeks themselves. We will see how some of these stories have been read and understood, recounted and revised, in various cultures and eras, from ancient tellings to modern movies. We will also explore some of the interpretive theories by which these tales have been understood, from ancient allegory to modern structural and semiotic theories. The student should gain a more profound understanding of the meaning of these myths to the Greeks themselves, of the cultural context in which they were formulated. At the same time, this course should provide the student with some familiarity with the range of interpretations and strategies of understanding that people of various cultures and times have applied to the Greek myths during the more than two millennia in which they have been preserved.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CSTS B701 Supervised Work

Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R., Edmonds,R., Conybeare,C., Baertschi,A., Sigelman,A.
(Fall 2016, Spring 2017)

GREK B653 Athens in the Hellenistic Period

Surveys of Athenian history tend to conclude if not at the Battle of Chaeronea at any rate at the death of Alexander. Yet Athens did not disappear with the imposition of the Macedonian garrison in 322. Democracy resurfaced periodically over the course of the next century (in 318, 307, 288, and 229), and, more to the point, even under periods of oligarchic rule and Macedonian control, Athenian institutions remained intact, and Athenians continued to make significant contributions to the greater Greek world. Indeed, the century that followed Alexander’s death saw the flowering of Athenian historiography (e.g. Demochares, Diyllus, Philochorus, Timaeus, and Phylarchus) and new comedy (e.g. Menander and Poseidippus), as well as the advent of important philosophical schools (Epicureanism and Stoicism). This course will focus on Athens between the Battle of Chaeronea (338 BCE) and its liberation from Macedonian rule ca. 229 BCE. By way of a variety of contemporary sources, we shall have the opportunity to familiarize ourselves both with the historical narrative and with the intellectual climate of the polis in the early Hellenistic period.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HIST B224 High Middle Ages

This course will cover the second half of the European Middle Ages, often called the High and Late Middle Ages, from roughly 1000-1400. The course has a general chronological framework, and is based on important themes of medieval history. These include feudalism and the feudal economy; the social transformation of the millennium; monastic reform; the rise of the papacy; trade, exchange, and exploration; urbanism and the growth of towns.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HIST B368 Topics in Medieval History

This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B110 Intermediate Latin

Intensive review of grammar, reading in classical prose and poetry. For students who have had the equivalent of several years of high school Latin or are not adequately prepared to take LATN 101. This course meets three times a week with a required fourth hour to be arranged.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Fall 2016)

LATN B112 Latin Literature

In the second semester of the intermediate Latin sequence, readings in prose and poetry are frequently drawn from a period, such as the age of Augustus, that illustrate in different ways the leading political and cultural concerns of the time. The Latin readings and discussion are supplemented by readings in the secondary literature. This course meets three times a week with a required fourth hour to be arranged. Prerequisite: LATN 101 or 110 or placement by the department.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Conybeare,C.

Spring 2017: Livy and Horace.

LATN B202 Topics: Advanced Latin Literature

In this course typically a variety of Latin prose and poetry of the high and later Roman empire (first to fourth centuries CE) is read. Single or multiple authors may be featured in a given semester. This is a topics course, course content varies.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B312 Roman Satire

Satire is the most slippery and subversive of genres. It is richly entertaining to read, but if we engage with it seriously it is often abrasive, shocking, shattering. Reading Roman satire requires an energetic exercise in cultural translation: we are confronted with the alienness of the Roman world, as well as its perverse literary vigour. This course will span four turbulent centuries of Roman imperialism in its reading of Roman satire. We will range from the sharp minutiae of social observation in Horace’s Sermones to the calculated public abuse of a eunuch consul in Claudian’s In Eutropium; from the swirling filthy riches of Persius and Juvenal to the nastily eloquent Christian condemnation of riches (and much else) in St Jerome. Students are warned: the language is difficult, the content often excoriating, even if exquisitely expressed. Reading this material challenges any comfortable separation between “literature” and “life”.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

LATN B350 Topics in Latin Literature

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: at least two 200-level Latin courses or permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Baertschi,A., Conybeare,C.

Fall 2016: Late Latin Poetry. This course will survey the florescence of Latin poetry in the fourth and fifth centuries CE. At the heart of the course will be a study of some of Prudentius’ works, for example the Hamartigenia and the Cathemerinon; works by Claudian, Ausonius, Avitus, Dracontius, and Paulinus of Nola may also be included. We shall analyze both the literary and (where applicable) the theological properties of these great works.

Spring 2017: Horace. Horace, Rome’s most versatile author, produced some of antiquity’s most important and intriguing poems on themes ranging from erotics to poetics, from political instability to philosophy, from morality to myth. This course will focus on the poems published in his Epodes and the four books of Odes, paying special attention to Horace’s engagement with his poetic predecessors and the Greek and Latin literary tradition in general, his relationship with Maecenas and Augustus, and his brilliant use of meter and Latin poetic diction. We will also consider some of his other works such as the Ars Poetica and the Epistles in order to appreciate more fully his poetic practices and his appropriation of the Greek heritage into Roman cultural contexts.

LATN B613 Cicero

The public and private legal speeches and relevant letters of Cicero as advocate and politician.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)