History of Art

Students may complete a major or minor in History of Art.

Faculty

David Cast, Professor of History of Art

Maeve Doyle, Lecturer

Matthew Charles Feliz, Lecturer

Christiane Hertel, Katharine E. McBride Professor

Sylvia Houghteling, Assistant Professor of History of Art

Homay King, Professor of History of Art and the Eugenia Chase Guild Chair in the Humanities (on leave semester I)

Steven Levine, Professor of History of Art and the Leslie Clark Professor in the Humanities

Lisa Saltzman, Chair and Professor of History of Art and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Chair in the Humanities

Alicia Walker, Associate Professor of History of Art on the Marie Neuberger Fund for the Study of Arts and Director of the Center for Visual Culture (on leave semesters I & II)

The curriculum in History of Art immerses students in the study of visual culture. Structured by a set of evolving disciplinary concerns, students learn to interpret the visual through methodologies dedicated to the historical, the material, the critical, and the theoretical. Majors are encouraged to supplement courses taken in the department with history of art courses offered at Haverford, Swarthmore, and the University of Pennsylvania. Majors are also encouraged to study abroad for a semester of their junior year.

Major Requirements

The major requires ten units, approved by the major adviser. A usual sequence of courses would include at least one 100-level “critical approaches” seminar, which also fulfills the departmental writing intensive requirement, four 200-level lecture courses, three 300-level seminars, and senior conference I and II in the fall and spring semesters of the senior year. In the course of their departmental studies, students are strongly encouraged to take courses across media and areas, and in at least three of the following fields of study: Ancient and Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque, Modern and Contemporary, Film, and Global/Non-Western.

With the approval of the major adviser, courses in fine arts or with significant curricular investment in visual studies may be counted toward the fulfillment of the distribution requirements, such as courses in ancient art offered by the Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology department or in architecture by the Growth and Structure of Cities department. Similarly, courses in art history taken abroad or at another institution in the United States may be counted. Generally, no more than two such courses may be counted toward the major requirements.

A senior thesis, based on independent research and using scholarly methods of historical and/or critical interpretation must be submitted at the end of the spring semester. Generally 25-40 pages in length, the senior thesis represents the culmination of the departmental experience.

Honors

Seniors whose work is outstanding (with a 3.7 GPA in the major) will be invited to submit an honors thesis. Two or three faculty members discuss the completed thesis with the honors candidate in a one-half hour oral examination.

Minor Requirements

A minor in history of art requires six units: one or two 100-level courses and four or five others selected in consultation with the major adviser.

COURSES

HART B102 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Naturalism and the Supernatural in South Asian Art

This course examines the coexistence of aniconic, figural and supernatural representations of gods, plants, humans and animals in the Hindu, Buddhist, Jain and Islamic artistic traditions of India. It will trace both the development of naturalistic representations, as well as departures and embellishments on naturalism in the painting, sculpture, architecture, metalwork and textiles of South Asia. In this course, we will study the central tenets of South Asian religious traditions and will read and listen to the epic narratives, Sufi poetry and classical Indian music that influenced so much of South Asia’s visual culture. With this foundation, the course will consider the spiritual, social, political and creative motivations that led artists to choose naturalistic or supernatural forms of representation, reaffirming that the anti- and super-naturalistic elements of South Asian art rarely resulted from a lack of skill but from the conscious choice of the artist. In writing assignments, students will be challenged to find words to describe the myriad representational strategies that South Asian artists have used over time to depict their own world, but also to render other realms. This writing intensive (WI) course will therefore emphasize the importance of using of precise and creative language in art historical visual analysis.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Houghteling,S.
(Spring 2017)

HART B104 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: The Classical Tradition

An investigation of the historical and philosophical ideas of the classical, with particular attention to the Italian Renaissance and the continuance of its formulations throughout the Westernized world.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cast,D.
(Fall 2016)

HART B107 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Self and Other in the Arts of France

A study of artists’ self-representations in the context of the philosophy and psychology of their time, with particular attention to issues of political patronage, gender and class, power and desire.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Levine,S.
(Fall 2016)

HART B108 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Women, Feminism, and History of Art

An investigation of the history of art since the Renaissance organized around the practice of women artists, the representation of women in art, and the visual economy of the gaze.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Saltzman,L.
(Spring 2017)

HART B110 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the Cinema

An introduction to the analysis of film through particular attention to the role of the spectator. Why do moving images compel our fascination? How exactly do film spectators relate to the people, objects, and places that appear on the screen? Wherein lies the power of images to move, attract, repel, persuade, or transform its viewers? In this course, students will be introduced to film theory through the rich and complex topic of identification. We will explore how points of view are framed in cinema, and how those viewing positions differ from those of still photography, advertising, video games, and other forms of media. Students will be encouraged to consider the role the cinematic medium plays in influencing our experience of a film: how it is not simply a film’s content, but the very form of representation that creates interactions between the spectator and the images on the screen. Film screenings include Psycho, Being John Malkovich, and others. Course is geared to freshman and those with no prior film instruction. Fulfills History of Art major 100-level course requirement, Film Studies minor Introductory course or Theory course requirement.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): King,H.
(Spring 2017)

HART B211 Topics in Medieval Art History

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B212 Medieval Art & Architecture

This course takes a broad geographic and chronological scope, allowing for full exposure to the rich variety of objects and monuments that fall under the rubric of “medieval” art and architecture. We focus on the Latin and Byzantine Christian traditions, but also consider works of art and architecture from the Islamic and Jewish spheres. Topics to be discussed include: the role of religion in artistic development and expression; secular traditions of medieval art and culture; facture and materiality in the art of the middle ages; the use of objects and monuments to convey political power and social prestige; gender dynamics in medieval visual culture; and the contribution of medieval art and architecture to later artistic traditions.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Spring 2017)

HART B230 Renaissance Art

A survey of painting in Florence and Rome in the 15th and 16th centuries (Giotto, Masaccio, Botticelli, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael), with particular attention to contemporary intellectual, social, and religious developments.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B240 The Global Baroque

“The Global Baroque” examines artistic production in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries as the Baroque style spread far beyond its original European context to Eastern Europe, the New World, the Ottoman Empire, the Kingdom of Kongo, India, Japan and China. We will study the emergence in this period of new intellectual, artistic and social formations: the migration of artisans and changes in the structure of guilds; the creation of princely collections of wonders; the invention, importation and use of exotic art materials; early modern ethnography and representations of the “other”; and the participation of art in early modern politics, religious missions and global trade. As a class, we will study the Baroque as an invitation for emotional engagement, a response to the new material culture of global trade, as a style of power that was complicit in the violence and inhumanity of European colonialism, and, paradoxically, as a tool of cultural reclamation used by artists across the world. We will ultimately interrogate how to construct an art history of “The Global Baroque” that also attends to the complex specificities of time and place.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Houghteling,S.
(Fall 2016)

HART B250 Nineteenth-Century Art in France

Close attention is selectively given to the work of Cézanne, Courbet, David, Degas, Delacroix, Géricault, Ingres, Manet, and Monet. Extensive readings in art criticism are required.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Levine,S.
(Spring 2017)

HART B253 Survey of Western Architecture

The major traditions in Western architecture are illustrated through detailed analysis of selected examples from classical antiquity to the present. The evolution of architectural design and building technology, and the larger intellectual, aesthetic, and social context in which this evolution occurred, are considered.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cast,D.
(Spring 2017)

HART B260 Modern Art

This course will trace the history of modern art, from its origins to its ends.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Feliz,M.
(Fall 2016)

HART B272 Since 1960: Contemporary Art and Theory

Lectures and readings will examine major movements in contemporary art, including Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptualism, Performance, Postmodernism, and Installation Art. We will examine the dialogue between visual works and critical texts by Roland Barthes, Claire Bishop, Frederic Jameson, Adrian Piper, and Kobena Mercer, among others.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B273 Topics in Early China

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B274 Topics in Chinese Art
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B277 Topics: History of Photography
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B279 Exhibiting Africa: Art, Artifact and New Articulations

At the turn of the 20th century, the Victorian natural history museum played an important role in constructing and disseminating images of Africa to the Western public. The history of museum representations of Africa and Africans reveals that exhibitions—both museum exhibitions and “living” World’s Fair exhibitions— has long been deeply embedded in politics, including the persistent “othering” of African people as savages or primitives. While paying attention to stereotypical exhibition tropes about Africa, we will also consider how art museums are creating new constructions of Africa and how contemporary curators and conceptual artists are creating complex, challenging new ways of understanding African identities.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Museum Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,M.
(Fall 2016)

HART B281 Museum Studies: History, Theory, Practice

Using the museums of Philadelphia as field sites, this course provides an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of museum studies and the foundations of the “new museology.” Students will learn: the history of museums as institutions of both education and leisure; how the museum itself became a symbol of prestige, power and sometimes alienation; debates around the ethics and politics of collecting objects of art, culture and nature; and the qualities that make an exhibition effective (or not). By visiting exhibitions and meeting with a range of museum professionals in art, anthropology and science museums, this course offers a critical perspective on the inner workings of the museum.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Museum Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,M.
(Fall 2016)

HART B299 History of Narrative Cinema, 1945 to the present

This course surveys the history of narrative film from 1945 through contemporary cinema. We will analyze a chronological series of styles and national cinemas, including Classical Hollywood, Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, and other post-war movements and genres. Viewings of canonical films will be supplemented by more recent examples of global cinema. While historical in approach, this course emphasizes the theory and criticism of the sound film, and we will consider various methodological approaches to the aesthetic, socio-political, and psychological dimensions of cinema. Readings will provide historical context, and will introduce students to key concepts in film studies such as realism, formalism, spectatorship, the auteur theory, and genre studies. Fulfills the history requirement or the introductory course requirement for the Film Studies minor.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B300 The Curator in the Museum

This course provides an introduction to theoretical and practical aspects of museums and to the links between practice and theory that are the defining characteristic of the museum curator’s work today. The challenges and opportunities confronting curators and their colleagues, peers, audiences, and constituents will be addressed through readings, discussions, guest presentations, writings, and individual and group projects.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B301 Topics in Exhibition Strategies

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Museum Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Robbins,C.

Spring 2017: Exhibiting the Self. Mirroring the Self, Exhibiting the Self is a two-semester cluster, building toward a student-curated exhibition of art and artifacts from the College’s collections. In the fall, participants will study the history and theories of self-portraiture, self-representation, and self-fashioning in cultures around the globe from antiquity to the present. They will research and write catalogue entries on the objects they have selected for exhibition. In the spring, students will explore museums and discuss theories of exhibition-making, learning to identify different curatorial approaches. They will determine a curatorial agenda, produce didactic materials, develop public programming, and install an exhibition.

HART B306 Film Theory

An introduction to major developments in film theory and criticism. Topics covered include: the specificity of film form; cinematic realism; the cinematic “author”; the politics and ideology of cinema; the relation between cinema and language; spectatorship, identification, and subjectivity; archival and historical problems in film studies; the relation between film studies and other disciplines of aesthetic and social criticism. Each week of the syllabus pairs critical writing(s) on a central principle of film analysis with a cinematic example. Class will be divided between discussion of critical texts and attempts to apply them to a primary cinematic text. Prerequisite: A course in Film Studies (HART B110, HART B299, ENGL B205, or the equivalent from another college by permission of instructor).
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): King,H.
(Spring 2017)

HART B311 Topics in Medieval Art
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Current topic description: Topic TBA
Counts towards: Middle Eastern Studies
Units: 1.0
(Spring 2017)

HART B323 Topics in Renaissance and Baroque Art
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B334 Topics in Film Studies

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Feliz,M.

Fall 2016: Visual Culture and Technology. This course examines the intersections of art and technology across a wide range of visual culture and popular media. Beginning with an exploration of a set of aesthetic and cultural production that includes 16th century woodcuts, 17th century cabinets of curiosity, 18th century magic lantern shows, and 19th century stereoscopes and panoramas, the course will provide historical context for a consideration of the role that various forms of technology have played in shaping art, film and new media in the 20th and 21st century.

HART B340 Topics in Baroque Art

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Hertel,C.

Fall 2016: Dutch Painting. This seminar examines the conceptual polarity of realism and illusionism in paintings by Hals, Peeters, Steen, Rembrandt, Ruisdael, Terborch, Vermeer, and others by way of attending to genres (e.g., scenes of social life, portrait, still life, landscape) and modes of representation (e.g., comedy, parody, vanitas), as well as cultural, social, and political practices (e.g., religion, colonialism, luxury consumption, gender roles, scientific exploration, and collection).

HART B345 Topics in Material Culture

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Houghteling,S.

Fall 2016: Textiles of Asia. This course will delve into more local questions including techniques of production, paths of circulation and contexts of reception. Through close study of woven objects and visits to the Penn Museum and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, this course will trace the history of textiles from the 9th century to the 18th century, encompassing Eastern and Western Asia, from Chinese and Indonesian textile traditions to the weavings of Iran and Turkey.

HART B350 Topics in Modern Art

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Levine,S.

Fall 2016: Mirroring the Self. Mirroring the Self, Exhibiting the Self is a 2-semester 360° cluster, building toward a student-authored catalog & student-curated exhibition of College collections. In the fall, history of self-representation & cosmetic self-fashioning in cultures around the globe from antiquity to the present. In the spring, theory & practice of exhibitions, curatorial approaches, installation, and public programming.

HART B355 Topics in the History of London

Selected topics of social, literary, and architectural concern in the history of London, emphasizing London since the 18th century.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cast,D.
(Fall 2016)

HART B370 Topics in Chinese Art
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B373 Contemporary Art in Exhibition: Museums and Beyond

How does the collection and display of artwork create meanings beyond the individual art object? In recent decades, enormous shifts have occurred in exhibition design as artwork projected from the walls of the museum, moved outdoors to the space of the street, and eventually went online. We will study an array of contemporary exhibition practices and sites in their social and historical contexts, including the temporary exhibition, “the white cube,” the “black box,” museum installations, international biennials, and websites. During the seminar, we will examine how issues such as patronage, avant-gardism, globalization, and identity politics have progressively brought museums and other exhibition spaces into question.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B374 Topics: Exhibition Seminar

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Students will gain practical experience in the production of an exhibition: conceiving a curatorial approach, articulating themes, writing didactics, researching a checklist, designing gallery layout, producing print and web materials, developing programs, and marketing the exhibit. Prerequisite: At least one previous HART course at Bryn Mawr College.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B380 Topics in Contemporary Art

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Feliz,M.

Fall 2016: Visual Culture & the Holocaust. Poems, novels, films, photographs, paintings, performances, monuments, memorials, even comics have engaged us with the traumatic history of the Holocaust. Our task will be to examine such cultural objects, aided by the extensive body of critical, historical, theoretical, and philosophical writings through which such work has been variously critiqued and commended.

Spring 2017: Latin American Conceptualisms.

HART B398 Senior Conference I

A critical review of the discipline of art history in preparation for the senior thesis. Required of all senior majors.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cast,D., Saltzman,L.
(Fall 2016)

HART B399 Senior Conference II

A seminar for the discussion of senior thesis research and such theoretical and historical concerns as may be appropriate. Interim oral reports. Required of all majors; culminates in the senior thesis.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cast,D., Levine,S.
(Spring 2017)

HART B403 Supervised Work

Advanced students may do independent research under the supervision of a faculty member whose special competence coincides with the area of the proposed research. Consent of the supervising faculty member and of the major adviser is required.
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2016, Spring 2017)

HART B425 Praxis III

Students are encouraged to develop internship projects in the college’s collections and other art institutions in the region.
Counts towards: Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B624 Topics in Dutch Painting

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Hertel,C.

Fall 2016: Realism and Illusionism This seminar examines the conceptual polarity of realism and illusionism in paintings by Hals, Peeters, Steen, Rembrandt, Ruisdael, Terborch, Vermeer, and others by way of attending to genres (e.g., scenes of social life, portrait, still life, landscape) and modes of representation (e.g., comedy, parody, vanitas), as well as cultural, social, and political practices (e.g., religion, colonialism, luxury consumption, gender roles, scientific exploration, and collection).

HART B630 Topics in Renaissance and Baroque Art
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B636 Vasari

This seminar focuses on Giorgio Vasari as painter and architect and above all as a founder of the Florentine Academy and the writer of the first modern history of the arts. Topics covered range across the arts of that time and then the questions any such critical accounting of the arts calls up, imitation, invention, the notion of the artist and however it is possible to capture in words what seems often to be beyond them.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B673 Contemporary Art in Exhibition: Museums and Beyond

How does the collection and display of artwork create meanings beyond the individual art object? In recent decades, enormous shifts have occurred in exhibition design as artwork projected from the walls of the museum, moved outdoors to the space of the street, and eventually went online. We will study an array of contemporary exhibition practices and sites in their social and historical contexts, including the temporary exhibition, “the white cube,” the “black box,” museum installations, international biennials, and websites. During the seminar, we will examine how issues such as patronage, avant-gardism, globalization, and identity politics have progressively brought museums and other exhibition spaces into question.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ANTH B271 Museum Anthropology: History, Politics, Practices

This course provides an in-depth exploration of museum anthropology: the critical study of museum practices from an anthropological perspective. The course will fundamentally consider the role of museums in exhibiting culture—the politics of placing cultures on display, from living humans and human remains to cultural objects and artifacts. The course will also consider changing practices in museum anthropology, including repatriation efforts, shifting notions of heritage and identity and the emergence of community-curated exhibitions. This course complements the theoretical explorations of the museum with visits to area museums and hands-on work in Special Collections.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ARCH B125 Classical Myths in Art and in the Sky

This course explores Greek and Roman mythology using an archaeological and art historical approach, focusing on the ways in which the traditional tales of the gods and heroes were depicted, developed and transmitted in the visual arts such as vase painting and architectural sculpture, as well as projected into the natural environment.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Lindenlauf,A.
(Fall 2016)

ARCH B204 Animals in the Ancient Greek World

This course focuses on perceptions of animals in ancient Greece from the Geometric to the Classical periods. It examines representations of animals in painting, sculpture, and the minor arts, the treatment of animals as attested in the archaeological record, and how these types of evidence relate to the featuring of animals in contemporary poetry, tragedy, comedy, and medical and philosophical writings. By analyzing this rich body of evidence, the course develops a context in which participants gain insight into the ways ancient Greeks perceived, represented, and treated animals. Juxtaposing the importance of animals in modern society, as attested, for example, by their roles as pets, agents of healing, diplomatic gifts, and even as subjects of specialized studies such as animal law and animal geographies, the course also serves to expand awareness of attitudes towards animals in our own society as well as that of ancient Greece.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ARCH B205 Greek Sculpture

One of the best preserved categories of evidence for ancient Greek culture is sculpture. The Greeks devoted immense resources to producing sculpture that encompassed many materials and forms and served a variety of important social functions. This course examines sculptural production in Greece and neighboring lands from the Bronze Age through the fourth century B.C.E. with special attention to style, iconography and historical and social context.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ARCH B206 Hellenistic and Roman Sculpture

This course surveys the sculpture produced from the fourth century B.C.E. to the fourth century C.E., the period, beginning with the death of Alexander the Great, that saw the transformation of the classical world through the rise of Rome and the establishment and expansion of the Roman Empire. Style, iconography, and production will be studied in the contexts of the culture of the Hellenistic kingdoms, the Roman appropriation of Greek culture, the role of art in Roman society, and the significance of Hellenistic and Roman sculpture in the post-antique classical tradition.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ARCH B215 Classical Art

A survey of the visual arts of ancient Greece and Rome from the Bronze Age through Late Imperial times (circa 3000 B.C.E. to 300 C.E.). Major categories of artistic production are examined in historical and social context, including interactions with neighboring areas and cultures; methodological and interpretive issues are highlighted.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donohue,A.
(Fall 2016)

ARCH B234 Picturing Women in Classical Antiquity

We investigate representations of women in different media in ancient Greece and Rome, examining the cultural stereotypes of women and the gender roles that they reinforce. We also study the daily life of women in the ancient world, the objects that they were associated with in life and death and their occupations.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Lindenlauf,A.
(Spring 2017)

ARCH B254 Cleopatra

This course examines the life and rule of Cleopatra VII, the last queen of Ptolemaic Egypt, and the reception of her legacy in the Early Roman Empire and the western world from the Renaissance to modern times. The first part of the course explores extant literary evidence regarding the upbringing, education, and rule of Cleopatra within the contexts of Egyptian and Ptolemaic cultures, her relationships with Julius Caesar and Marc Antony, her conflict with Octavian, and her death by suicide in 30 BCE. The second part examines constructions of Cleopatra in Roman literature, her iconography in surviving art, and her contributions to and influence on both Ptolemaic and Roman art. A detailed account is also provided of the afterlife of Cleopatra in the literature, visual arts, scholarship, and film of both Europe and the United States, extending from the papal courts of Renaissance Italy and Shakespearean drama, to Thomas Jefferson’s art collection at Monticello and Joseph Mankiewicz’s 1963 epic film, Cleopatra.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Tasopoulou,E.
(Spring 2017)

ARCH B303 Classical Bodies

An examination of the conceptions of the human body evidenced in Greek and Roman art and literature, with emphasis on issues that have persisted in the Western tradition. Topics include the fashioning of concepts of male and female standards of beauty and their implications; conventions of visual representation; the nude; clothing and its symbolism; the athletic ideal; physiognomy; medical theory and practice; the visible expression of character and emotions; and the formulation of the “classical ideal” in antiquity and later times.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donohue,A.
(Spring 2017)

ARCH B359 Topics in Classical Art and Archaeology
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: 200-level coursework in some aspect of classical or related cultures, archeology or art history.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CITY B190 The Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the Present

This course studies the city as a three-dimensional artifact. A variety of factors—geography, economic and population structure, politics, planning, and aesthetics—are considered as determinants of urban form.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Morton,T.
(Spring 2017)

CITY B227 Topics in Modern Planning
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CITY B254 History of Modern Architecture

A survey of the development of modern architecture since the 18th century. The course focuses on international networks in the transmission of architectural ideas since 1890.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Morton,T.
(Fall 2016)

CITY B255 Survey of American Architecture

This survey course examines architecture within the global framework of “the modern.” Through an introduction to an architectural canon of works and figures, it seeks to foster a critical consideration of modernity, modernization, and modernism. The course explores each as a category of meaning that framed the theory and practice of architecture as a cultural, political, social, and technological enterprise. It also uses these conjugates to study the modes by which architecture may be said to have framed history. We will study practical and discursive activity that formed a dynamic field within which many of the contradictions of “the modern” were made visible (and visual) through architecture. In this course, we will engage architectural concepts and designs by studying drawings and buildings closely within their historical context. We will examine spheres of reception for architecture and its theoretical, discursive, and cultural life through a variety of media: buildings of course, but also journals, books, and film. We will also investigate architecture as a site and subject for critical inquiry. In particular, we will see what it may tell us about the globalization and politics of the twentieth century, and about history, theory, and criticism as epistemological tracks.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cohen,J.
(Spring 2017)

CITY B304 Disaster, War and Rebuilding in the Japanese City

Natural and man-made disasters have destroyed Japanese cities regularly. Rebuilding generally ensued at a very rapid pace, often as a continuation of the past. Following a brief examination of literature on disaster and rebuilding and a historical overview of architectural and urban history in Japan, this course explores the reasons for historical transformations large and small. It specifically argues that rebuilding was mostly the result of traditions, whereas transformation of urban space occurred primarily as a result of political and socio-economic change. Focusing on the period since the Meiji restoration of 1868, we ask: How did reconstruction after natural and man-made disasters shape the contemporary Japanese landscape? We will explore specifically the destruction and rebuilding after the 1891 Nobi earthquake, the 1923 Great Kanto earthquake that leveled Tokyo and Yokohama, the bombing of more than 200 cities in World War II and their rebuilding, as well as the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake that destroyed Kobe and its reconstruction. In the context of the long history of destruction and rebuilding we will finally explore the recent disaster in Fukushima 2011. Through the story of disaster and rebuilding emerge different approaches to permanence and change, to urban livability, the environment and sustainability.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CITY B306 Advanced Fieldwork Techniques: Places in Time

A workshop for research into the histories of places, intended to bring students into contact with some of the raw materials of architectural and urban history. A focus will be placed on historical images and texts, and on creating engaging informational experiences that are transparent to their evidentiary basis.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cohen,J.
(Spring 2017)

CITY B360 Topics: Urban Culture and Society

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Morton,T.

Fall 2016: City of Rome. In this seminar we will study the city of Rome through time and space and will start with the city’s mythical founding and work our way through contemporary Rome. Focal points will include: the Roman Empire, the urban planning of the Baroque popes, Mussolini’s ‘Third Rome,’ and the contemporary city of Renzo Piano, Richard Meier, and Zaha Hadid. Throughout this discussion-based course we will examine innumerable issues, such as the use and abuse of the past throughout the city’s long history.

CITY B377 Topics in Modern Architecture
This is a topics course on modern architecture. Topics vary.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CITY B378 Formative Landscapes: The Architecture and Planning of American Collegiate Campuses

The campus and buildings familiar to us here at the College reflect a long and rich design conversation regarding communicative form, architectural innovation, and orchestrated planning. This course will explore that conversation through varied examples, key models, and shaping conceptions over time.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

EALC B212 Topics: Introduction to Chinese Literature
This is a topics course. Topics may vary.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ENGL B205 Introduction to Film

This course is intended to provide students with the tools of critical film analysis. Through readings of images and sounds, sections of films and entire narratives, students will cultivate the habits of critical viewing and establish a foundation for focused work in film studies. The course introduces formal and technical units of cinematic meaning and categories of genre and history that add up to the experiences and meanings we call cinema. Although much of the course material will focus on the Hollywood style of film, examples will be drawn from the history of cinema. Attendance at weekly screenings is mandatory.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Nguyen,H.
(Spring 2017)

ENGL B336 Topics in Film

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Nguyen,H.

Fall 2016: Global Queer Cinema. This course asks, “What can the theories of globalization, transnationalism, and diaspora contribute to the study of same-sex eroticisms in the cinema?” To help us answer this question, we will base our investigation on a corpus of films drawn from across the globe (mostly from non-US contexts) that deal with non-normative sexualities.

ENGL B367 Asian American Film Video and New Media

The course explores the role of pleasure in the production, reception, and performance of Asian American identities in film, video, and the internet, taking as its focus the sexual representation of Asian Americans in works produced by Asian American artists from 1915 to present. In several units of the course, we will study graphic sexual representations, including pornographic images and sex acts some may find objectionable. Students should be prepared to engage analytically with all class material. To maintain an atmosphere of mutual respect and solidarity among the participants in the class, no auditors will be allowed.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Film Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

FREN B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities

An examination in English of leading theories of interpretation from Classical Tradition to Modern and Post-Modern Time. This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: FREN 102 or 105.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sanquer,M.

Fall 2016: Critic Approaches to the World. This course will be taught in English and focus on works of French feminist, postcolonial and post-structuralist theory. While our primary critical texts will draw from a particular linguistic tradition (namely French), and more or less distinctly circumscribed fields, we will also look at the broader transcultural and translinguistic influences that brought these “schools” into being and, most importantly, what fields of thinking they have subsequently inspired across language traditions.

GERM B321 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Shen,Q.

Fall 2016: Representing Diversity in German Cinema. This course examines a wide-ranging repertoire of transnational films produced in contemporary Germany. It presents an introduction to modern German cinema through a close analysis of visual material and identity construction in the worlds of the real and the reel.

HART B603 Advanced Research Methods

Grounded in the foundational and emergent methods of the discipline, this seminar will immerse students in the process of advanced art historical research and writing. Designed to strengthen skills and facilitate the timely completion of MA theses, if not also, should more advanced students be interested, dissertations, this seminar will be at once an incubator and a workshop.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): King,H.
(Spring 2017)

HART B610 Topics in Medieval Art
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B640 Topics in Baroque Art

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Houghteling,S.

Spring 2017: Tapestry. This course will examine the technical origins, spatial functions and art historical contributions of the tapestry medium in the early modern world.

HART B645 Problems in Representation

This seminar examines, as philosophy and history, the idea of realism, as seen in the visual arts since the Renaissance and beyond to the 19th and 20th centuries.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B650 Topics in Modern Art

This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Levine,S.

Spring 2017: Monet and Modernisim. This seminar considers a variety of approaches to the work of Claude Monet and his contemporaries in the context of Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, and Modernism.

HART B651 Topics: Interpretation and Theory

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Saltzman,L.

Fall 2016: Approaches to Abstraction This course will examine a range of theoretical approaches to abstraction.

HART B671 Topics in German Art
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B678 Portraiture

This seminar on self-portraiture examines the representation of the individual from the Renaissance to the present in painting, photography, and film. Artists range from Artemisia Gentileschi and Poussin to Cézanne and Cindy Sherman.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HART B680 Topics in Contemporary Art

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Units: 1.0

Fall 2016: Visual Culture & the Holocaust. Poems, novels, films, photographs, paintings, performances, monuments, memorials, even comics have engaged us with the traumatic history of the Holocaust. Our task will be to examine such cultural objects, aided by the extensive body of critical, historical, theoretical, and philosophical writings through which such work has been variously critiqued and commended.

HART B701 Supervised Work
Supervised Work
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cast,D., Levine,S., Saltzman,L., King,H., Houghteling,S.
(Fall 2016, Spring 2017)

ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities

An examination in English of leading theories of interpretation from Classical Tradition to Modern and Post-Modern Time. This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ITAL B219 Multiculturalism in Medieval Italy

This course examines cross-cultural interactions in medieval Italy played out through the patronage, production, and reception of works of art and architecture. Sites of patronage and production include the cities of Venice, Palermo, and Pisa. Media examined include buildings, mosaics, ivories, and textiles.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

RUSS B215 Russian Avant-Garde Art, Literature and Film

This course focuses on Russian avant-garde painting, literature and cinema at the start of the 20th century. Moving from Imperial Russian art to Stalinist aesthetics, we explore the rise of non-objective painting (Malevich, Kandinsky, etc.), ground-breaking literature (Bely, Mayakovsky), and revolutionary cinema (Vertov, Eisenstein). No knowledge of Russian required.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

RUSS B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Harte,T.

Spring 2017: Silent Film: From U.S. to Soviet Russia & Beyond. This course will explore cinema from its earliest, most primitive beginnings up to the end of the silent era. While the course will focus on a variety of historical and theoretical aspects of cinema, the primary aim is to look at films analytically. Emphasis will be on the various artistic methods that went into the direction and production of a variety of celebrated silent films from Russia, Germany, the U.S. and elsewhere. These films will be considered in many contexts: artistic, historical, social, and even philosophical, so that students can develop a deeper understanding of silent cinema’s rapid evolution.