Health Studies

Students may complete a minor in Health Studies.

Faculty

Kalala Ngalamulume, Associate Professor of Africana Studies and History, Co-Director of International Studies and Co-Director of Health Studies

Susan White, Professor of Chemistry and Co-Director of Health Studies

The Health Studies Minor at Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges brings together courses and faculty members in the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities to guide students through the biomedical, cultural, ethical, and political questions that relate to health issues on local, regional and global scales. Our Colleges value the intersection of public health and social justice, and this new course of study will allow students to approach these vital issues with greater knowledge and understanding.

Given its multidisciplinary structure, the health studies minor will give scientific context to students in the social sciences and humanities who are interested in health policy, public health, law, medical ethics, social services, or health education. The minor also complements the curriculum for traditional science majors by providing important social and behavioral dimensions for those students planning to go into medicine, nursing, physical therapy, psychology and other clinical fields.

This is a Bi-College minor, and courses will be taught by Bryn Mawr College and Haverford College across many disciplines. When approved by the faculty steering committee, selected courses for the minor may also be taken at Swarthmore College, University of Pennsylvania and while studying abroad.

Minor Requirements

The minor consists of a total of six courses and must include the following:

  • A multidisciplinary introductory course taught by two faculty members from different academic divisions that must be taken before enrolling in the Health Studies Capstone Seminar. Introduction to Health Studies (HLTH H115B).
  • Three core courses from a list approved by the faculty steering committee. Two of these courses must be elected from a Department outside of the student’s major and at least two of the courses should be at the non-introductory level. Students must take one course in each of three areas
    1. M Track: Mechanisms of disease and the maintenance of the health body (M)
    2. R Track: Cultural and Literary Rrepresentations of Health and Illness (R)
    3. S Track: Responses of familial, social, civic and governmental Structures to issues of health and disease (S)
  • One additional course, outside the student’s major. Students may choose either a core course (C) or one selected from a list of approved affiliate courses (A), which deal with health issues, but not necessarily as their primary focus.
  • Health Studies Capstone Seminar. A capstone course organized around a theme, such as vaccines, AIDS, drug abuse, disability, etc. Students will analyze current literature addressing the theme from their own disciplinary perspectives and will develop research proposals and collaborative projects.

Sample Core Courses

Please Visit Haverford’s Health Studies Web Page for Updates

Track M

  • ANTH B208: Human Biology
  • ANTH B317: Disease and Human Evolution
  • BIOL B210: Biology and Public Policy
  • BIOL B303: Human Physiology
  • CHEM B315: Medicinal Chemistry
  • GNST B201: Nutrition, Smoking, and Cardiovascular Health
  • PSYC B209/H209: Abnormal Psychology
  • PSYC B351: Developmental Psychopathology
  • PSYC B395: Psychopharmacology
  • PSYC B346: Pediatric Psychology
  • BIOL H121: Poisons, Plagues, Pollution and Progress
  • BIOL H125: Perspectives: Genetic Roil and Royal Families 0.5 credits
  • BIOL H128: Perspectives: How Do I Know Who I Am? 0.5 credits
  • BIOL H308: Immunology 0.5 credits
  • BIOL H310: Molecular Microbiology 0.5 credits
  • ICPR H311A: Reproductive Health and Justice
  • PSYC H245: Health Psychology
  • PSYC H318B: Neurobiology of Disease

Track R

  • ANTH B210: Medical Anthropology
  • ANTH B237: Environmental Health
  • ANTH B312: Anthropology of Reproduction
  • ANTH B331: Advanced Topics in Medical Anthropology
  • PHIL B205: Medical Ethics
  • ANTH H260: Cultures of Health and Healing
  • ANTH H200: Viruses, Humans, Vital Politics: An Anthropology of HIV & AIDS
  • ICPR H281: Violence and Public Health

Track S

  • ANTH B210: Medical Anthropology
  • ANTH B237: Environmental Health
  • ANTH B312: Anthropology of Reproduction
  • BIOL B210: Biology and Public Policy
  • FREN B275/HIST B275: Improving Mankind: Enlightened Hygiene and Eugenics
  • HIST B303: Topics in American History. Topic: History of Medicine in America
  • HIST B336: Topics in African History. Topic: Social and Medical History of Medicine in Africa
  • PSYC B231: Health Psychology
  • PSYC B340: Women’s Mental Health
  • ANTH H200: Viruses, Humans, Vital Politics: An Anthropology of HIV & AIDS
  • ICPR H311: Reproductive Health and Justice
  • PSYC H242: Cultural Psychology
  • PSYC H327: Supersized Nation: Understanding and Managing America’s Obesity Epidemic

Affiliate Courses

Track M

  • BIOL B201: Genetics
  • BIOL B215: Experimental Design and Statistics
  • BIOL B216: Genomics
  • BIOL B255: Microbiology
  • BIOL B271: Developmental Biology
  • CHEM B242: Biological Chemistry
  • SOWK B556: Adult Development and Aging
  • BIOL H352: Cellular Immunology 0.5 credits
  • BIOL H360: Bacterial Pathogenesis 0.5 credits
  • CHEM H357: Topics in Bioorganic Chemistry 0.5 credits
  • PSYC H223: Psychology of Human Sexuality

Track R

  • ITAL B208: Petrarca and Boccaccio in Translation
  • ITAL B303: Petrarca and Boccaccio in Italian
  • FREN B325: Topics: Etudes avancées. Topic: Lumiéres et Medicine
  • PSYC B260: The Psychology of Mindfulness
  • PSYC B375: Movies and Madness
  • ICPR H207A: Disability, Identity, Culture
  • ICPR H223: Mental Affliction: The Disease of Thought
  • PEAC H201: Ethics and Justice: Applied Ethics of Peace, Justice and Human Rights
  • WRPR H120: Evolutionary Fictions Available only to HC first year students
  • WRPR H161: Written on the Body: Narrative and the Construction of contemporary Sexuality Available only to HC first year students

Track S

  • BIOL B215: Experimental Design and Statistics
  • ECON B214: Public Finance
  • EDUC B225: Topics: Empowering Learners. Topic: Health Literacies in Context
  • PEAC H201: Ethics and Justice: Applied Ethics of Peace, Justice and Human Rights

COURSES

HLTH B115 Introduction to Health Studies

The multidisciplinary foundation for the health studies minor. Students will be introduced to theories and methods from the life sciences, social sciences, and humanities and will learn to apply them to problems of health and illness. Topics include epidemiological, public health, and biomedical perspectives on health and disease; social, behavioral, and environmental determinants of health; globalization of health issues; cultural representations of illness; health inequalities, social justice, and the ethics of health as a human right.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): White,S.
(Spring 2017)

ANTH B208 Human Biology

This course will be a survey of modern human biological variation. We will examine the patterns of morphological and genetic variation in modern human populations and discuss the evolutionary explanations for the observed patterns. A major component of the class will be the discussion of the social implications of these patterns of biological variation, particularly in the construction and application of the concept of race. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ANTH B210 Medical Anthropology

This course examines the relationships between culture, society, disease and illness. It considers a broad range of health-related experiences, discourses, knowledge and practice among different cultures and among individuals and groups in different positions of power. Topics covered include sorcery, herbal remedies, healing rituals, folk illnesses, modern disease, scientific medical perceptions, clinical technique, epidemiology and political economy of medicine. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or permission of instructor.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Pashigian,M.
(Fall 2016)

ANTH B237 Environmental Health

This course introduces principles and methods in environmental anthropology and public health used to analyze global environmental health problems globally and develop health and disease control programs. Topics covered include risk; health and environment; food production and consumption; human health and agriculture; meat and poultry production; and culture, urbanization, and disease. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or permission of instructor.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ANTH B312 Anthropology of Reproduction

An examination of social and cultural constructions of reproduction, and how power and politics in everyday life shapes reproductive behavior and its meaning in Western and non-Western cultures. The influence of competing interests within households, communities, states, and institutions on reproduction is considered. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 (or ANTH H103) or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Pashigian,M.
(Fall 2016)

ANTH B317 Disease and Human Evolution

Pathogens and humans have been having an “evolutionary arms race” since the beginning of our species. In this course, we will look at methods for tracing diseases in our distant past through skeletal and genetic analyses as well as tracing the paths and impacts of epidemics that occurred during the historic past. We will also address how concepts of Darwinian medicine impact our understanding of how people might be treated most effectively. There will be a midterm, a final, and an essay and short presentation on a topic developed by the student relating to the class. Prerequisite: ANTH B101 or permission of the instructor. Counts towards: Health Studies, Biology
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ANTH B322 Anthropology of the Body

This course examines a diversity of meanings and interpretations of the body in anthropology. It explores anthropological theories and methods of studying the body and social difference via a series of topics including the construction of the body in medicine, identity, race, gender, sexuality and as explored through cross-cultural comparison. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Pashigian,M.
(Fall 2016)

ANTH B331 Advanced Topics in Medical Anthropology

The purpose of the course is to provide a survey of theoretical frameworks used in medical anthropology, coupled with topical subjects and ethnographic examples. The course will highlight a number of sub-specializations in the field of Medical Anthropology including genomics, science and technology studies, ethnomedicine, cross-cultural psychiatry/psychology, cross-cultural bioethics, ecological approaches to studying health and behavior, and more. Prerequisite: ANTH B102, ANTH H103, or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B201 Genetics

This course focuses on the principles of genetics, including classical genetics, population genetics and molecular genetics. Topics to be covered include the genetic and molecular nature of mutations and phenotypes, genetic mapping and gene identification, chromosome abnormalities, developmental genetics, genome editing and epigenetics. Examples of genetics analyses are drawn from a variety of organisms including Drosophila, C. elegans, mice and humans. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL B110 and CHEM B104.
Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Davis,T.
(Fall 2016)

BIOL B210 Biology and Public Policy

A lecture/discussion course on major issues and advances in biology and their implications for public policy decisions. Topics discussed include reproductive technologies, the Human Genome project, environmental health hazards, bioterrorism, and euthanasia and organ transplantation. Readings include scientific articles, public policy and ethical considerations, and lay publications. Lecture three hours a week. This class involves considerable writing. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111, or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Greif,K.
(Spring 2017)

BIOL B215 Experimental Design and Statistics

An introductory course in designing experiments and analyzing biological data. This course is structured to develop students’ understanding of when to apply different quantitative methods, and how to implement those methods using the R statistics environment. Topics include summary statistics, distributions, randomization, replication, parametric and nonparametric tests, and introductory topics in multivariate and Bayesian statistics. The course is geared around weekly problem sets and interactive learning. Suggested Preparation: BIOL B110 or B111 is highly recommended.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B216 Genomics

An introduction to the study of genomes and genomic data. This course will examine the types of biological questions that can be answered using large biological data sets and complete genome sequences as well as the techniques and technologies that make such studies possible. Topics include genome organization and evolution, comparative genomics, and analysis of transcriptomes and proteomes. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111. BIOL 201 highly recommended.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B255 Microbiology

Invisible to the naked eye, microbes occupy every niche on the planet. This course will examine how microbes have become successful colonizers; review aspects of interactions between microbes, humans and the environment; and explore practical uses of microbes in industry, medicine and environmental management. The course will combine lecture, discussion of primary literature and student presentations. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: One semester of BIOL 110 and CHEM B104.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Environmental Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Chander,M.
(Spring 2017)

BIOL B271 Developmental Biology

An introduction to embryology and the concepts of developmental biology. Concepts are illustrated by analyzing the experimental observations that support them. Topics include gametogenesis and fertilization, morphogenesis, cell fate specification and differentiation, pattern formation, regulation of gene expression, neural development, and developmental plasticity. The laboratory focuses on observations and experiments on living embryos. Lecture three hours, laboratory three scheduled hours a week; most weeks require additional hours outside of the regularly scheduled lab. Prerequisite: one semester of BIOL 110-111 or permission of instructor.
Approach: Scientific Investigation (SI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Davis,G.
(Fall 2016)

BIOL B303 Human Physiology

A comprehensive study of the physical and chemical processes in tissues, organs and organ systems that form the basis of animal and human function. Homeostasis, control systems and the structural basis of function are emphasized. Laboratories are designed to introduce basic physiological techniques and the practice of scientific inquiry. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. Prerequisites: One semester of BIOL 110-111, CHEM 103, 104 and one 200-level biology course.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

BIOL B380 Topics in Cellular and Organismal Physiology

Physiology is the study of the normal functioning of a living organism and its components, including all its physical and chemical processes. The integration of function across many levels of organization will be emphasized. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111, CHEM 103, 104 and one 200-level biology course
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CHEM B242 Biological Chemistry

The structure, chemistry and function of amino acids, proteins, lipids, polysaccharides and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics; metabolic relationships of carbohydrates, lipids and amino acids, and the control of various pathways. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: CHEM B212 or CHEM H222.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Malachowski,B., Miller,B.
(Fall 2016)

ECON B214 Public Finance

Analysis of government’s role in resource allocation, emphasizing effects of tax and expenditure programs on income distribution and economic efficiency. Topics include sources of inefficiency in markets and possible government responses; federal budget composition; social insurance and antipoverty programs; U.S. tax structure and incidence. Prerequisites: ECON B105.
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

FREN B275 Improving Mankind: Enlightened Hygiene and Eugenics

At first sight, hygiene and eugenics have nothing in common: the former is usually conceived as a good management of our everyday conditions of life, whereas the latter is commonly reviled for having inspired discriminatory practices (in Nazi Germany, but also in the US, Sweden, and Switzerland). Our inquiry will explore how, in the context of the French Enlightenment, a subdiscipline of Medicine (namely Hygiene) was redefined, expanded its scope, and eventually became hegemonic both in the medical field and in civil society. We will also explore how and why a philanthropic ideal led to the quest for the improvement of the human species. We will compare the French situation with that of other countries (mainly UK and the USA). Students who wish to get credit in French will meet one extra hour.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

GNST B201 Nutrition, Smoking, and Cardiovascular Health

The class explores the relationships between health, national associations, and the federal government is they relate to the creation and implementation of laws and policies as well as the perception of what is healthy. The class focuses on health in the U.S. The course will include a look at tobacco use through U.S. history as a case study for how the federal government acts and reacts to protect the public. Then, in turn, to evaluate how the public reacts to pressures from the government and other national associations. From there, students will be asked to examine current trends in nutrition and cardiovascular health in order to draw parallels between the previous function of government in the protection of the populace and the current efforts in these two areas.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HIST B209 Introduction to the History of Medicine

This course provides an introduction to the history of medicine, from Hippocrates to the Black Plague to contemporary struggles to combat HIV/AIDS. It examines topics including epidemic disease, the processes of medical knowledge production, the hospital and the rise of clinical medicine, and issues of hygiene and public health. We will focus on the intersecting social, political, and cultural histories of medicine, addressing themes of race, gender, and constructions of biological difference; the history of the body; professionalization; and medical ethics. Disrupting straightforward narratives of medical progress, this course will focus on the contingencies involved in medical knowledge production and situate elements of historical medical practice, for example humoral theory or polypharmacy, within their appropriate historical context.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Black,S.
(Fall 2016)

HIST B233 Health and Disability in the U.S.

This course examines how scientific, medical, and cultural discourses have shaped the construction of health and disability in U.S. history. Paying attention to the ways in which health and disability are constructed in relationship to other social categories such as race, class, gender, sexuality, and nationality, we will examine the processes through which certain bodies are defined as healthy, useful and productive while others are marked as diseased, defective, and socially undesirable. Topics will include eugenics, public health, immigration policies, birth control and sterilization, the women’s health movement, AIDS activism, disability rights, mental health, obesity, biological citizenship, and health consumerism.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Butler-Wall,K.
(Fall 2016)

HIST B249 History of Global Health

This course examines the interrelated histories of public health, international health, and global health from the late 18th to the 21st centuries as part of a broader history of epidemics, empire, and global mobility. We will pay particular attention this semester to the use of architectural and spatial strategies for managing crises of contagion, disaster, and epidemic. The architectural spaces to be examined will include urban-based hospitals, public health infrastructure, and quarantine buildings as well as mobile architectural technologies such as incubators, wartime pop-up surgical tents, and floating hospitals in both Western and non-Western environments. The course will trace the role of health and medicine in mediating the relationships between metropolis and colony, state and citizen, research practice and human subject.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HIST B277 Food and Fitness in America

This course investigates the centrality of food and fitness to national identity and culture in modern U.S. history. From the “physical culture” movement in the late nineteenth century and the rise of the diet industry in the 1920s to the aerobics craze of the 1980s and the contemporary “slow food” movement, we will explore how changing patterns of production and consumption have shaped the role that food and fitness play as key markers of identity and “lifestyle.” Paying particular attention to how concerns about nutrition and exercise have historically indexed larger social anxieties regarding race, class, gender, and sexuality, this course asks students to think critically about food and fitness as contradictory sites of pleasure and self-control in U.S. culture.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Butler-Wall,K.
(Spring 2017)

PHIL B205 Medical Ethics

The field of medicine provides a rich terrain for the study and application of philosophical ethics. This course will introduce students to fundamental ethical theories and present ways in which these theories connect to particular medical issues. We will also discuss what are often considered the four fundamental principles of medical ethics (autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice) in connection to specific topics related to medical practice (such as reproductive rights, euthanasia, and allocation of health resources).
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

POLS B310 Comparative Public Policy

A comparison of policy processes and outcomes across space and time. Focusing on particular issues such as health care, domestic security, water and land use, we identify institutional, historical, and cultural factors that shape policies. We also examine the growing importance of international-level policy making and the interplay between international and domestic pressures on policy makers. Prerequisite: One course in Political Science or public policy.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

PSYC B209 Abnormal Psychology

This course examines the experience, origins and consequences of psychological difficulties and problems. Among the questions we will explore are: What do we mean by abnormal behavior or psychopathology? What are the strengths and limitations of the ways in which psychopathology is assessed and classified? What are the major forms of psychopathology? How do psychologists study and treat psychopathology? How is psychopathology experienced by individuals? What causes psychological difficulties and what are their consequences? How do we integrate social, biological and psychological perspectives on the causes of psychopathology? Do psychological treatments (therapies) work? How do we study the effectiveness of psychology treatments? Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC B105 or H100).
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Schulz,M.
(Spring 2017)

PSYC B231 Health Psychology

This course will provide an overview of the field of health psychology using lecture, exams, videos, assignments, and an article critique. We will examine the current definition of health psychology, as well as the theories and research behind many areas in health psychology (both historical and contemporary). The course will focus on specific health and social psychological theories, empirical research, and applying the theory and research to real world situations. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC B105) or Foundations of Psychology (PSYC H100)
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Peterson,L.
(Fall 2016)

PSYC B260 The Psychology of Mindfulness

This course focuses on psychological theory and research on mindfulness and meditative practices. Readings and discussion will introduce students to modern conceptualizations and implementation of mindfulness practices that have arisen in the West. Students will be encouraged to engage in mindfulness activities as part of their involvement in this course.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Schulz,M.
(Fall 2016)

PSYC B331 Health Behavior and Context

This seminar will be devoted to a discussion of theory and research in health psychology. We will investigate both historical and contemporary perspectives on the psychology of wellness and illness. We will begin with a consideration of how psychosocial forces influence health cognitions, behaviors, and physiological processes. The second half of the course will focus on contextual factors, interventions, and emerging topics in research. We will debate the question of whether/how psychological forces influence health outcomes. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 and PSYC B231 or PSYC B208, or by permission of the instructor.
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Peterson,L.
(Fall 2016)

PSYC B346 Pediatric Psychology

This course uses a developmental-ecological perspective to understand the psychological challenges associated with physical health issues in children. The course explores how different environments support the development of children who sustain illness or injury and will cover topics including: prevention, coping, adherence to medical regimens, and pain management. The course will consider the ways in which cultural beliefs and values shape medical experiences. Suggested Preparations: PSYC B206 highly recommended.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

PSYC B351 Developmental Psychopathology

This course will examine emotional and behavioral disorders of children and adolescents, including autism, attention deficit disorder, conduct disorder, phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, anorexia, and schizophrenia. Major topics covered will include: contrasting models of psychopathology; empirical and categorical approaches to assessment and diagnosis; outcome of childhood disorders; risk, resilience, and prevention; and therapeutic approaches and their efficacy .Prerequisite: PSYC 206 or 209.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Health Studies; Neuroscience
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

PSYC B375 Movies and Madness: Abnormal Psychology Through Films

This writing-intensive seminar (maximum enrollment = 16 students) deals with critical analysis of how various forms of psychopathology are depicted in films. The primary focus of the seminar will be evaluating the degree of correspondence between the cinematic presentation and current research knowledge about the disorder, taking into account the historical period in which the film was made. For example, we will discuss how accurately the symptoms of the disorder are presented and how representative the protagonist is of people who typically manifest this disorder based on current research. We will also address the theory of etiology of the disorder depicted in the film, including discussion of the relevant intellectual history in the period when the film was made and the prevailing accounts of psychopathology in that period. Another focus will be how the film portrays the course of the disorder and how it depicts treatment for the disorder. This cinematic presentation will be evaluated with respect to current research on treatment for the disorder as well as the historical context of prevailing treatment for the disorder at the time the film was made. Prerequisite: PSYC B209.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Film Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Rescorla,L.
(Fall 2016)

PSYC B395 Psychopharmacology

A study of the role of drugs in understanding basic brain-behavior relations. Topics include the pharmacological basis of motivation and emotion; pharmacological models of psychopathology; the use of drugs in the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression, and psychosis; and the psychology and pharmacology of drug addiction. Prerequisite: PSYC B218 or BIOL B202 or PSYC H217 or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Health Studies; Neuroscience
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Thomas,E.
(Spring 2017)

SOCL B342 Bodies in Social Life

Can social life exist without bodies? How can attention to the body influence our understanding of social processes of subjectivity, interaction, and practice? While the body has long been an “absent presence” in sociology, multiple approaches to theorizing and researching the body have emerged in recent decades. A sociological approach to the body and embodiment provides an opportunity to bridge the gap between everyday experience and analyses of broad social structures which can seem disconnected from daily life. In this course, we will examine the processes by which individual bodies are shaped by and, in turn, shape social life. Key questions to be explored include: how are bodies regulated by social forces; how do individuals perform the body and how does interactional context influence this performance; what is the meaning of the body in social life; and is there a “right” body? Suggested preparation: At least one course in the social sciences.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Coutinho-Sledge,P.
(Fall 2016)

SOWK B556 Adult Development and Aging

The course broadly explores the biological, psychological, and social aspects of aging into middle and late adulthood for individual, families, communities, and society at large. This is accomplished through exploration of a.) the psychological and social developmental challenges of adulthood, b.) the core biological changes that accompany this stage of life, c.) research methodology for inquiry into aging, d.) the demands and impact on care givers and families, e.) psychopathology common in older adults, f.) social welfare policies and programs designed to ameliorate stress and promote well-being among older adults, and g.) the political, social, and academic discourse around the concept of aging successfully in the 21st century. Throughout the course, the experience of aging, and the ways in which this experience differs by race, ethnicity, gender, class, culture, and sexual orientation are considered. This course builds on theory, knowledge, and skills of social work with older adults introduced in Foundation Practice and Human Behavior in the Social Environment I and III. This course is relevant to the clinical, management, and policy concentrations, in that it focuses on the concepts, theories, and policies central to effective assessment and intervention with older adults. Enrollment limited to 5 advanced undergraduates.
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Bressi,S.
(Fall 2016)