Latin American, Latina/o, and Iberian Peoples and Cultures

Students may complete a minor in Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies.

Coordinators

Jennifer Harford-Vargas, Assistant Professor of English and Co-Director of the Latin American, Latina/o and Iberian Studies Program

Veronica Montes, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Co-Director of the Latin American, Latina/o and Iberian Studies Program

Affiliated Faculty

Inés Arribas, Senior Lecturer in Spanish

Kaylea Berard, Lecturer in Spanish

Ignacio Gallup-Diaz, Associate Professor of History

Martín Gaspar, Assistant Professor of Spanish (on leave semesters I and II)

Gary W. McDonogh, Chair and Professor of Growth and Structure of Cities and on the Helen Herrmann Chair

María Cristina Quintero, Chair and Professor of Spanish, Co-Director of Comparative Literature, and Director of Romance Languages

Enrique Sacerio-Garí, Dorothy Nepper Marshall Professor of Hispanic and Hispanic-American Studies
H. Rosi Song, Associate Professor of Spanish

Minor Requirements

To fulfill the requirements, the student must complete:

  • An introductory course, GNST 245: Introduction to Latin American, Latina/o and Iberian Studies or its Haverford equivalent: SPAN 240 Latin American and Iberian Culture and Civilization.
  • Five courses that count toward the minor. At least one of them should be at the 300-level.
  • In the spring of the senior year, an individual presentation on an issue relevant to LAILS. Minors will present their individual projects in a conference-style panel.
  • It is strongly recommended that students seek proficiency in one of the languages spoken by peoples of Iberia or Latin America.

COURSES

ANTH B219 Visual Anthropology, Latin America and Social Movements

Focusing on indigenous communities and social movements, this course examines the cultural uses of visual art, photography, film, and new media in Latin America. Students will analyze a variety of materials to reconsider western conceptions of art. As well, students will explore how anthropologists employ visual methods in ethnographic research. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or higher.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

CITY B229 Topics in Comparative Urbanism

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): McDonogh,G.

Spring 2017: Colonial and Post-Colonial Cities. Probing the relations of power at the heart of power and society in many cities worldwide, this class uses case studies to test urban theory, forms and practice. In order to grapple with colonialism and its aftermaths, we will focus on cities in North Africa, France, Ireland, Hong Kong and Cuba, systematically exploring research, writing and insights from systematic interdisciplinary comparisons.

COML B225 Censorship: Historical Contexts, Local Practices and Global Resonance

The course is in English. It examines the ban on books and art in a global context through a study of the historical and sociopolitical conditions of censorship practices. The course raises such questions as how censorship is used to fortify political power, how it is practiced locally and globally, who censors, what are the categories of censorship, how censorship succeeds and fails, and how writers and artists write and create against and within censorship. The last question leads to an analysis of rhetorical strategies that writers and artists employ to translate the expression of repression, trauma, and torture into idioms of resistance. German majors/minors can get German Studies credit. Prerequisite: EMLY B001 or a 100-level intensive writing course.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies; Middle Eastern Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Seyhan,A.
(Fall 2016)

ENGL B217 Narratives of Latinidad

This course explores how Latina/o writers fashion bicultural and transnational identities and narrate the intertwined histories of the U.S. and Latin America. We will focus on topics of shared concern among Latino groups such as struggles for social justice, the damaging effects of machismo and racial hierarchies, the politics of Spanglish, and the affective experience of migration. By analyzing a range of cultural production, including novels, poetry, testimonial narratives, films, activist art, and essays, we will unpack the complexity of Latinidad in the Americas.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Harford Vargas,J.
(Fall 2016)

ENGL B236 Latina/o Culture and the Art of Migration

Gloria Anzaldúa has famously described the U.S.-Mexico border as an open wound and the border culture that arises from this fraught site as a third country. This course will explore how Chicana/os and Latina/os creatively represent different kinds of migrations across geo-political borders and between cultural traditions to forge transnational identities and communities. We will use cultural production as a lens for understanding how citizenship status, class, gender, race, and language shape the experiences of Latin American migrants and their Latina/o children. We will also analyze alternative metaphors and discourses of resistance that challenge anti-immigrant rhetoric and reimagine the place of undocumented migrants and Latina/os in contemporary U.S. society. Over the course of the semester, we will probe the role that literature, art, film, and music can play in the struggle for migrants’ rights and minority civil rights, querying how the imagination and aesthetics can contribute to social justice. We will examine a number of different genres, as well as read and apply key theoretical texts on the borderlands and undocumented migration.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Harford Vargas,J.
(Spring 2017)

ENGL B237 Latino Dictator Novel in Americas

This course examines representations of dictatorship in Latin American and Latina/o novels. We will explore the relationship between narrative form and absolute power by analyzing the literary techniques writers use to contest authoritarianism. We will compare dictator novels from the United States, the Caribbean, Central America, and the Southern Cone.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

ENGL B345 Topics in Narrative Theory

This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Harford Vargas,J.

Fall 2016: Theory of the Ethnic Novel. This course traces the development of the U.S. ethnic novel. We will examine novels by Native Americans, Chicana/os, and African Americans, focusing on key formal innovations in their respective traditions. We will be using – and testing -- core concepts developed by narrative theorists to understand the genre of the novel. We will be using--and testing--core concepts in critical theory to understand the genre of the novel and ethnic literary imaginaries.

ENGL B354 Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf has been interpreted as a feminist, a modernist, a crazy person, a resident of Bloomsbury, a victim of child abuse, a snob, a socialist, and a creation of literary and popular history. We will try out all these approaches and examine the features of our contemporary world that influence the way Woolf, her work, and her era are perceived. We will also attempt to theorize about why we favor certain interpretations over others.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

GERM B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile

This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Felipe Alfau, Julia Alvarez, Sigmund Freud, Eva Hoffman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, W. G. Sebald, and others.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies; International Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Seyhan,A.
(Spring 2017)

GNST B145 Introduction to Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Peoples and Cultures

A broad, interdisciplinary survey of themes uniting and dividing societies from the Iberian Peninsula through the contemporary New World. The class introduces the methods and interests of all departments in the concentration, posing problems of cultural continuity and change, globalization and struggles within dynamic histories, political economies, and creative expressions.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies; International Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

GNST B245 Introduction to Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Peoples and Cultures

A broad, interdisciplinary survey of themes uniting and dividing societies from the Iberian Peninsula through the contemporary New World. The class introduces the methods and interests of all departments in the concentration, posing problems of cultural continuity and change, globalization and struggles within dynamic histories, political economies, and creative expressions.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies; International Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HIST B127 Indigenous Leaders 1492-1750

Studies the experiences of indigenous men and women who exercised local authority in the systems established by European colonizers. In return for places in the colonial administrations, these leaders performed a range of tasks. At the same time they served as imperial officials, they exercised “traditional” forms of authority within their communities, often free of European presence. These figures provide a lens through which early modern colonialism is studied.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies; Peace, Justice and Human Rights
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HIST B129 The Religious Conquest of the Americas

The course examines the complex aspects of the European missionization of indigenous people, and explores how two traditions of religious thought/practice came into conflict. Rather than a transposition of Christianity from Europe to the Americas, something new was created in the contested colonial space.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HIST B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800

The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies; International Studies; Peace, Justice and Human Rights
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HIST B265 Colonial Encounters in the Americas

The course explores the confrontations, conquests and accommodations that formed the “ground-level” experience of day-to-day colonialism throughout the Americas. The course is comparative in scope, examining events and structures in North, South and Central America, with particular attention paid to indigenous peoples and the nature of indigenous leadership in the colonial world of the 18th century.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Gallup-Diaz,I.
(Fall 2016)

HIST B327 Topics in Early American History
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HIST B339 The Making of the African Diaspora 1450-1800

This course explores the emergence, development, and challenges to the ideologies of whiteness and blackness, that have been in place from the colonial period to the present. Through the reading of primary and secondary sources, we will explore various ways through which enslaved people imagined freedom, personal rights, community membership, and some of the paths they created in order to improve their experiences and change the social order. In an attempt to have a comparative approach, we will look at particular events and circumstances that took place in few provinces in the Americas, with an emphasis on Latin America and the Caribbean. The course will also look at the methodological challenges of studying and writing history of people who in principle, were not allowed to produce written texts. Throughout, we will identify and underscore the contribution that people of African descent have made to the ideas of rights, freedom, equality, and democracy.
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

HIST B371 Topics in Atlantic History: The Early Modern Pirate in Fact and Fiction

This course will explore piracy in the Americas in the period 1550-1750. We will investigate the historical reality of pirates and what they did, and the manner in which pirates have entered the popular imagination through fiction and films. Pirates have been depicted as lovable rogues, anti-establishment rebels, and enlightened multiculturalists who were skilled in dealing with the indigenous and African peoples of the Americas. The course will examine the facts and the fictions surrounding these important historical actors.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SOCL B225 Women in Society

A study of the contemporary experiences of women of color in the Global South. The household, workplace, community, and the nation-state, and the positions of women in the private and public spheres are compared cross-culturally. Topics include feminism, identity and self-esteem; globalization and transnational social movements and tensions and transitions encountered as nations embark upon development.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Montes,V.
(Spring 2017)

SOCL B231 Punishment and Social Order

A cross-cultural examination of punishment, from mass incarceration in the United States, to a widened “penal net” in Europe, and the securitization of society in Latin America. The course addresses theoretical approaches to crime control and the emergence of a punitive state connected with pervasive social inequality.
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SOCL B235 Mexican-American Communities

For its unique history, the number of migrants, and the two countries’ proximity, Mexican migration to the United States represents an exceptional case in world migration. There is no other example of migration with more than 100 years of history. The copious presence of migrants concentrated in a host country, such as we have in the case of the 11.7 million Mexican migrants residing in the United States, along with another 15 million Mexican descendants, is unparalleled. The 1,933-mile-long border shared by the two countries makes it one of the longest boundary lines in the world and, unfortunately, also one of the most dangerous frontiers in the world today. We will examine the different economic, political, social and cultural forces that have shaped this centenarian migration influx and undertake a macro-, meso-, and micro-levels of analysis. At the macro-level of political economy, we will investigate the economic interdependency that has developed between Mexico and the U.S. over different economic development periods of these countries, particularly, the role the Mexican labor force has played to boosting and sustaining both the Mexican and the American economies. At the meso-level, we will examine different institutions both in Mexico and the U.S. that have determined the ways in which millions of Mexican migrate to this country. Last, but certainly not least, we will explore the impacts that both the macro-and meso-processes have had on the micro-level by considering the imperatives, aspirations, and dreams that have prompted millions of people to leave their homes and communities behind in search of better opportunities. This major life decision of migration brings with it a series of social transformations in family and community networks, this will look into the cultural impacts in both the sending and receiving migrant communities. In sum, we will come to understand how these three levels of analysis work together.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Montes,V.
(Fall 2016)

SOCL B246 Immigrant Experiences: Introduction to International Migration

The twenty-first century began much as the twentieth century did for the United States with high levels of immigration. This has affected not only the nation, but the discipline of sociology. Just as early twentieth century Chicago School sociology focused on immigration and settlement issues, so too the first decade of the twenty-first century shows a flurry of sociological imagination devoted to immigration scholarship. This course will center on the key texts, issues, and approaches coming out of this renovated sociology of immigration, but we will also include approaches to the study of immigration from history, anthropology, and ethnic studies. While we will consider comparative and historical approaches, our focus will be on the late twentieth century through the present, and we will spend a good deal of time focusing on the longest running labor migration in the world, Mexican immigration to the U.S., as well as on Central American migrant communities in the U.S. Students with an interest in contemporary U.S. immigration will be exposed to a survey of key theoretical approaches and relevant issues in immigration studies in the social sciences. Current themes, such as globalization, transnationalism, gendered migration, immigrant labor markets, militarization of the U.S.-Mexican border, U.S. migration policy, the new second generation and segmented assimilation, and citizenship will be included.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Montes,V.
(Spring 2017)

SOCL B259 Comparative Social Movements in Latin America

An examination of resistance movements to the power of the state and globalization in three Latin American societies: Mexico, Columbia, and Peru. The course explores the political, legal, and socio-economic factors underlying contemporary struggles for human and social rights, and the role of race, ethnicity, and coloniality play in these struggles.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SPAN B110 Introducción al análisis cultural

An introduction to the history and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world in a global context: art, folklore, geography, literature, sociopolitical issues, and multicultural perspectives. This course is a requisite for the Spanish major. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or placement.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Song,R., Angeles,F.
(Fall 2016, Spring 2017)

SPAN B120 Introducción al análisis literario

Readings from Spanish and Spanish-American works of various periods and genres (drama, poetry, short stories). Main focus on developing analytical skills with attention to improvement of grammar. This course is a requisite for the Spanish major. Prerequisite: SPAN 102, or placement.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sacerio-Garí,E.
(Fall 2016, Spring 2017)

SPAN B208 Drama y sociedad en España

A study of the rich dramatic tradition of Spain from the Golden Age (16th and 17th centuries) to the 20th century within specific cultural and social contexts. The course considers a variety of plays as manifestations of specific sociopolitical issues and problems. Topics include theater as a site for fashioning a national identity; the dramatization of gender conflicts; and plays as vehicles of protest in repressive circumstances. Counts toward the Latin American, Latino and Iberian Peoples and Cultures Concentration. Prerequiste: SPAN B110 and/or B120 (previously SPAN B200/B202); or another SPAN 200-level course.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Quintero,M.
(Fall 2016)

SPAN B209 Lo que hemos comido: Identidades en España

This course considers the relationship between the food we eat and our sense of identity in the context of regional identity politics in Spain. We will review the historical tension as they surface in diverse linguistic and cultural communities and currently challenged by the new wave of immigration to the peninsula. Amid this intersection of different cultures and practices, we will study how each region as turned to its traditional cuisine and local culinary products to strengthen their sense of regional identity while strategizing to communicate this uniqueness beyond the brand of “Spain” to the world. We will examine, for instance, how this new trend compares to the tourism industry endorsed by the dictatorship in the 1960s. This discussion will serve as a case study to explore how communities remember and narrate their own histories to themselves and to others, using concepts such as taste, terroir, memory, and identity. Students in the course will view films and read fiction, essays, and culinary essays from around Spain. Prerequisite: SPAN 120 or SPAN 110.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SPAN B211 Borges y sus lectores

Primary emphasis on Borges and his poetics of reading; other writers are considered to illustrate the semiotics of texts, society, and traditions. Prerequisite: SPAN B110 and/or B120 (previously SPAN B200/B202); or another SPAN 200-level course.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sacerio-Garí,E.
(Spring 2017)

SPAN B219 Focus: Imaginando Barcelona

An introduction to the textual and visual representation of the city of Barcelona, a key geographical, historical, political, and cultural referent for Spain and Catalonia. In this course we will read past and present texts that narrate the origins and the symbolic significance of this city and discuss recent films that capture the evolving experience of its residents, as a global destination for many and a city of immigrants. Prerequisite: SPAN B110 or SPAN B120.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 0.5
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SPAN B223 Género y modernidad en la narrativa del siglo XIX

A reading of 19th-century Spanish narrative by both men and women writers, to assess how they come together in configuring new ideas of female identity and its social domains, as the country is facing new challenges in its quest for modernity. Prerequisites: SPAN B110 and/or B120 (previously SPAN B200/B202); or another SPAN 200-level course.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SPAN B231 El cuento y novela corta en España

Traces the development of the novella and short story in Spain, from its origins in the Middle Ages to our time. The writers will include Pardo Bazán, Cervantes, Clarín, Don Juan Manuel, Matute, Zayas, and a number of contemporary writers such as Marina Mayoral and Rosa Montero. Our approach will include formal and thematic considerations, and attention will be given to social and historical contexts. Prerequiste: SPAN B110 and/or B120; or another SPAN 200-level course.Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latino/a Studies.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SPAN B233 Focus: La Habana y sus textos

La Habana (a historical, artistic and literary crossroad) is studied in its intersemiotic complexity. Readings from the colonial period to the present. Authors included, among others: La Condesa de Merlín, Alexander von Humboldt, Alejo Carpentier, José Lezama Lima. Selective films by Fernando Pérez and other Cuban directors. Prerequisite: SPAN B110 or SPAN B120.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 0.5
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SPAN B243 Temas de la literatura hispana

This is a topic course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: SPAN B110 and/or B120 (previously SPAN B200/B202); or another 200-level.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Song,R.

Spring 2017: Migration in the Hispanic World. An introduction to the narratives of immigration in the Hispanic world starting from the 19th century to the present. Immigrants from Spain have populated Latin American countries during different periods of the continent’s history. More recently, Latin Americans have migrated to the Iberian Peninsula in large numbers challenging Spain’s notion of cultural and ethnic homogeneity. Offered in English. For Spanish credit, students will do part of the reading, discussion in some additional sessions and all written assignments in Spanish. Current topic description: An introduction to the history of immigration in the Hispanic world starting from the 19th century to the present. Immigrants from Spain have populated Latin American countries during different periods of the continent’s history. More recently, Latin Americans have migrated to the Iberian Peninsula in large numbers challenging Spain’s notion of cultural and ethnic homogeneity. Offered in English. For Spanish credit, students will do part of the reading and all written assignments in Spanish.

SPAN B252 Compassion, Indignation, and Anxiety in Latin American Film

Stereotypically, Latin Americans are viewed as “emotional people”—often a euphemism to mean irrational, impulsive, wildly heroic, fickle. This course takes this expression at face value to ask: Are there particular emotions that identify Latin Americans? And, conversely, do these “people” become such because they share certain emotions? Can we find a correlation between emotions and political trajectories? To answer these questions, we will explore three types of films that seem to have, at different times, taken hold of the Latin American imagination and feelings: melodramas (1950s-1960s), documentaries (1970s-1990s), and “low-key” comedies (since 2000s.)
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Film Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SPAN B265 Escritoras españolas: entre tradición, renovación y migración

Fiction by women writers from Spain in the 20th and 21st century. Breaking the traditional female stereotypes during and after Franco’s dictatorship, the authors explore through their creative writing changing sociopolitical and cultural issues including regional identities and immigration. Topics of discussion include gender marginality, feminist studies and the portrayal of women in contemporary society. Prerequiste: SPAN B110 and/or B120 (previously SPAN B200/B202); or another SPAN 200-level course.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SPAN B307 Cervantes

A study of themes, structure, and style of Cervantes’ masterpiece Don Quijote and its impact on world literature. In addition to a close reading of the text and a consideration of narrative theory, the course examines the impact of Don Quijote on the visual arts, music, film, and popular culture. Counts toward the Latin American, Latino and Iberian Peoples and Cultures Concentration. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SPAN B309 La mujer en la literatura española del Siglo de Oro

A study of the depiction of women in the fiction, drama, and poetry of 16th- and 17th-century Spain. Topics include the construction of gender; the idealization and codification of women’s bodies; the politics of feminine enclosure (convent, home, brothel, palace); and the performance of honor. The first half of the course will deal with representations of women by male authors (Calderón, Cervantes, Lope, Quevedo) and the second will be dedicated to women writers such as Teresa de Ávila, Ana Caro, Juana Inés de la Cruz, and María de Zayas. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Quintero,M.
(Fall 2016)

SPAN B315 El futuro ya llegó: relatos del presente en América Latina

Taught in Spanish. In the 21st Century, “Here and now” is not what it used to be. There is no single “here” but instead multiple, coexisting realities (that of the cellphone, the street, the ‘world’.) There’s no clear present when the “now” is multiple. In this course we will explore 21st century Latin American shorts-stories, films, works of art, and novellas that synchronize with our contemporary circumstances—-fictions and representations where realities alternate, identities flow, and the world appears oddly out of scale. As contemporaries, you will also be asked to write fictions about life “here and now.” Throughout, we will keep two fundamental questions in mind: What is reality (here)? What is the contemporary (now)? Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SPAN B317 Poéticas del deseo y el poder en la lírica del Siglo de Oro

A study of the evolution of the lyric in Spain during the Renaissance and Baroque periods beginning with the oral tradition and the imitation of Petrarch. Topics include: the representation of women as objects of desire and pre-texts for writing, the political and national subtexts for lyric production, the self-fashioning and subjectivity of the lyric voice, theories of parody and imitation, and the feminine appropriation of the Petrarchan tradition. Although concentrating on the poetry of Spain, reading will include texts from Italy, France, England and Mexico. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: at least one 200-level course. Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latina/o Studies
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Quintero,M.
(Spring 2017)

SPAN B321 Surrealismo al afrorrealismo

Examines artistic texts that trace the development and relationships of surrealism, lo real maravilloso americano, realismo mágico and afrorealismo. Manifestos and literary works by Latin American authors will be emphasized: Miguel Angel Asturias, Alejo Carpentier, Gabriel García Márquez, Isabel Allende, Laura Esquivel, Quince Duncan. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SPAN B323 Memoria y Guerra Civil

A look into the Spanish Civil War and its wide-ranging international significance as both the military and ideological testing ground for World War II. This course examines the endurance of myths related to this conflict and the cultural memory it has produced along with the current negotiations of the past that is taking place in democratic Spain. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SPAN B332 Novelas de las Américas

What do we gain by reading a Latin American or a US novel as “American” in the continental sense? What do we learn by comparing novels from “this” America to classics of the “other” Americas? Can we find through this Panamericanist perspective common aesthetics, interests, conflicts? In this course we will explore these questions by connecting and comparing major US novels with Latin American classics of the 20th and 21st century. We will read these works in clusters to illuminate aesthetic, political and cultural resonances and affinities. This course is taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SPAN B350 Lo fantástico y el cuento hispanoamericano

Special attention to the double, the fantastic and the sociopolitical thematics of short fiction in Spanish America. Authors include Quiroga, Borges, Carpentier, Rulfo, Cortázar and Valenzuela. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2016-2017)

SPAN B351 Tradición y revolución: Cuba y su literatura

An examination of Cuba, its history and its literature with emphasis on the analysis of cultural and economic transformations. Major topics include slavery and resistance; Cuba’s struggles for freedom; changing cultural policies and film of the Revolution. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sacerio-Garí,E.
(Fall 2016)