2017-18 Catalog

Africana Studies

Students may complete a minor in Africana Studies.

Core and Affiliated Faculty

Michael Allen, Professor of Political Science on the Harvey Wexler Chair in Political Science

Linda-Susan Beard, Associate Professor of English and Director of Africana Studies

Jody Cohen, Term Professor in the Bryn Mawr/Haverford Education Program

Susanna Fioratta, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (on leave semesters I & II)

Ignacio Gallup-Díaz, Associate Professor of History

Jennifer Harford-Vargas, Associate Professor of English on the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Change Master Fund and Co-Director of the Latin American, Latina/o and Iberian Studies Program (on leave semesters I & II)

Lela Aisha Jones, Pre-Doctoral Fellow in Dance

Kwame Labi, Visiting Scholar in History of Art and Museum Studies from the University of Ghana

Alice Lesnick, Director and Term Professor in the Bryn Mawr/Haverford Education Program and Faculty Convener of International Programs

Airea D. Matthews, Assistant Professor of Creative Writing

Veronica Montes, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Co-Director of the Latin American, Iberian, and Latina/o Studies Program

Elaine Mshomba, Instructor in Swahili Language and Culture

Kalala Ngalamulume, Associate Professor of Africana Studies and History, Co-Director of International Studies, and Co-Director of Health Studies (spring)

Mary Osirim, Provost and Professor of Sociology

Monique Scott, Director of Museum Studies

Mecca Jamilah Sullivan, Assistant Professor of English

Michael Tratner, Mary E. Garrett Alumnae Professor in English

Sharon Ullman, Professor of History

Robert Washington, Professor of Sociology

Susan A. White, Professor of Chemistry and Co-Director of Health Studies (fall) (on leave semester II)

The Africana Studies Program brings an international vantage to the study of Africa and its diasporas. Drawing on analytical and affective perspectives from anthropology, economics, history, literary studies, political science, the health sciences, education, the fine arts, museum studies, creative writing, and sociology, the Program focuses on peoples of African descent within the context of increasing globalization and dramatic cultural, economic, and political change.

In consortial relationship with Haverford College, Swarthmore College, and the University of Pennsylvania, Bryn Mawr offers its students the opportunity to take a broad range of courses by enrolling in courses offered by all participating institutions. The African Studies Center at Penn is one of four global resource centers offering courses and specialized language training, which our students utilize. Moreover, Bryn Mawr participates in study abroad programs offered in Kenya, Zimbabwe, Ghana, and Senegal. Bryn Mawr and Haverford students may also participate in the Dalun Bi-Co Lagim Tehi Tuma Summer Fellowship Program in Northern Ghana.

Students are encouraged to begin their work in the Africana Studies Program by taking Introduction to African Civilizations (HIST B102). This required introductory level course, which provides students with a common intellectual experience as well as the foundation for subsequent courses in Africana Studies, should be completed by the end of the student’s junior year.

Minor Requirements

The requirements for a minor in Africana Studies are the following:

  • One-semester interdisciplinary course: Introduction to African Civilizations (HIST B102 at Bryn Mawr or ICPR 101 at Haverford)
  • Five additional semester courses from an approved list of courses in Africana Studies or by permission of the Africana faculty.

At least three of these have to be taken at Bryn Mawr or Haverford.

  • A senior thesis or seminar-length essay in an area of Africana Studies. A copy of the thesis or essay has to be deposited with the Director of Africana Studies who serves as advisor to Africana Studies minors.

Students are encouraged to organize their course work along one of several prototypical routes. Such model programs might feature:

  • Regional or area studies, for example, focusing on blacks in Latin America, the English-speaking Caribbean or North America.
  • Thematic emphases, for example, exploring class politics, ethnic conflicts and/or economic development in West and East Africa.
  • Comparative emphases, for example, problems of development, governance, public health or family and gender.

The student should indicate the focus of the minor at the time of registration.

The final requirement for the Africana Studies minor is a senior thesis or its equivalent. If the department in which the student is majoring requires a thesis, the Africana Studies requirement can be satisfied by writing on a topic that is approved in writing by her department and the Africana Studies Director. If the major department does not require a thesis, a seminar-length essay is required. The essay may be written within the framework of a particular course or as an independent study project. The topic must be approved in writing by both the instructor in question and the Africana Studies Program Director. A copy of the thesis or the essay will become the property of the Africana Studies archives.

COURSES

ANTH B202 Africa in the World

In this course, we will approach Africa with an emphasis on the many interconnections that link the continent with the rest of the world, through both time and space. Much popular talk about Africa in the U.S. is overwhelmingly negative—focusing on poverty, violence, and failed states—and often portrays Africa as something “other,” both different from and unrelated to the United States and much of the rest of the world. But such preconceptions blatantly overlook what we know about historical and contemporary movements of people, ideas, materials, and money around the globe. Rather than regarding Africa as separate or apart, in this course we will examine the centrality of African engagements with these global movements. Rather than attempting a survey of particular, bounded African “peoples” or “cultures,” we will explore complex issues and processes through interconnected topics including colonial and postcolonial politics, urban life, gender and sexuality, religion, economic networks, development, and transnational migration. We will use these themes as guides for exploring larger, interlinked questions of social life in Africa and around the world. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B101 Introduction to Egyptian and Near Eastern Archaeology

A historical survey of the archaeology and art of the ancient Near East and Egypt.

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B230 Archaeology and History of Ancient Egypt

A survey of the art and archaeology of ancient Egypt from the Pre-Dynastic through the Graeco-Roman periods, with special emphasis on Egypt’s Empire and its outside connections, especially the Aegean and Near Eastern worlds.

Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARTD B267 Diasporic Bodies, Grounding Freedom: The Black Dancing Body

Diasporic Bodies, Grounding Freedom: The Black/African Dancing Body, Restoration, and Activism take Marronage—the act of escaping from slavery in the Americas to create communities of freedom and autonomy—as its model. This course views Black/African diasporic movement and artistic practices as a form of contemporary marronage, providing spaces of activism and embodied restoration. These thriving, fertilizing spaces, communities, and artists center and reboot, with integrity, the connections among black/African diasporic bodies, traditions, and cultures across oceans and lands. While focusing on the black experience, this course will examine these temporal, Imaginative spaces, claiming them as essential to all people in societies that do not acknowledge multiplicity or diversity as societal norms, and capable of conjuring semi·lost histories waiting to be revived. It will examine marronage in diasporic communities as an effort to ground, re-ground, and free bodies. Together, we will explore other diasporic-based research and approaches to understanding and experiencing embodied restoration and we will also learn a meditative embodiment process with 3 elements: mining, archiving, and witnessing. We will examine literature, animation, and film resources to broaden our dialogue on how interdisciplinary, artistic spaces make fertile foundations for embodied and restorative activism. This course will merge lecture, readings, viewings, and praxis as its main components. No dance experience is necessary but students should dress comfortably to move. In lieu of books, readings will be posted on Moodle and students will be assigned to see a performance (typical costs: $12-30) but may take advantage of free Tri-co performances. A previous dance lecture/seminar course or a course in a relevant discipline such as anthropology, sociology, or history is strongly recommended but not required.

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Jones,L.
(Fall 2017)

EDUC B200 Critical Issues in Education

Designed to be the first course for students interested in pursuing one of the options offered through the Education Program, this course is also open to students exploring an interest in educational practice, theory, research, and policy. The course examines major issues and questions in education in the United States by investigating the purposes of education. Fieldwork in an area school required (eight visits, 1.5-2 hours per visit).

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Cohen,J.
(Spring 2018)

EDUC B208 Race-ing Education

This course investigates education as part of processes of racialization and marginalization and also as a space for challenging these processes. How do race and schooling intersect and interact? How can educators – along with students, parents, and communities – learn and teach critical awareness of race as an idea and a system? With a focus on the U.S., we look at ways in which race as a way of creating power is embedded in earlier iterations of schooling, as in cases regarding access to education for Black, Latinx, and Asian students and in American Indian boarding schools, and how race is differently taken up in the work of such thinkers/educators as W.E.B. Dubois, James Baldwin, and Paulo Freire. We consider how such issues play out in the recent past and contemporary moment through ongoing cases on affirmative action; work in Critical Race Theory and LatCrit by such educators as Patricia Williams and Tara Yosso, and in decolonizing education by Eve Tuck and Gloria Anzaldua; and curriculum and pedagogy in the theory and practice of such educators as Kevin Kumashiro and movements such as Black Lives Matter. We also consider Bryn Mawr’s own history, in light of how to move forward through critically engaged education.

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

EDUC B260 Multicultural Education

In our era of globalization, increased standardization of education, and perpetual discrimination, this course investigates the following key question: What does multicultural education mean today? We will investigate globalization, reflect on notions of power and privilege, critique understandings of difference, and examine the multi-faceted ways in which multicultural education is enacted in pedagogy, curriculum and educational organization. We will also examine the intersections between race, class, gender, sexuality, language, and citizenship status and try to assess their impact on teaching and learning. Fieldwork of two to three hours per week.

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Spring 2018)

EDUC B266 Schools in American Cities

This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal “case” that students investigate through documents and school placements. This is a Praxis II course (weekly fieldwork in a school required)

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Spring 2018)

ENGL B217 Narratives of Latinidad

This course explores how Latina/o writers fashion bicultural and transnational identities and narrate the intertwined histories of the U.S. and Latin America. We will focus on topics of shared concern among Latino groups such as struggles for social justice, the damaging effects of machismo and racial hierarchies, the politics of Spanglish, and the affective experience of migration. By analyzing a range of cultural production, including novels, poetry, testimonial narratives, films, activist art, and essays, we will unpack the complexity of Latinidad in the Americas.

Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ENGL B234 Postcolonial Literature in English

This course will survey a broad range of novels and poems written while countries were breaking free of British colonial rule. Readings will also include cultural theorists interested in defining literary issues that arise from the postcolonial situation.

Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ENGL B239 African American Poetry

This course explores the work of black poets in the Americas. Focusing on a range of poetic forms from the 18th century through the present, we will consider key questions that have animated the works of black poets in North America and the Caribbean, and how they have used poetic strategy to engage these questions. How do black poets explore black political and social life in various historical and geographical contexts? How do they use particular formal strategies (for example, form poetry, free verse, narrative poetry, and experimental modes) to interrogate notions of blackness? How do political movements around gender, class, and sexuality factor in? As we approach these questions, we will consider important critical conversations on African American poetry and poetics, examining how both well-known and underexplored poets use form to complicate blackness and imagine various forms of freedom. Our work will take us through several poetic genres and forms, including print works, performance poetry, hip hop music, and digital media. Throughout our analysis, we will consider how discourses on gender, sexuality, class, national and transnational identity, and other engagements with difference shape black poetic expression, both historically and in our current moment.

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sullivan,M.
(Spring 2018)

ENGL B262 Survey in African American Literature

English 262 is a topics course that allows for multiple themes to be taught. Each topic will have its own description and students may enroll for credit in the course as long as the topics vary. Current topic description: Nineteenth-Century African American Narrative. A study of the interplay of history, politics, art, and fiction, this course traces a chronological, new historicist path between the forging of a literary identity in a new nation and Pauline Hopkins’ Contending Forces (1900).

Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Beard,L-S.
(Spring 2018)

ENGL B263 Toni Morrison and the Art of Narrative Conjure

A comprehensive study of Morrison’s narrative experiments in fiction, this course traces her entire oeuvre from “Recitatif” to God Help the Child. We read the works in publication order with three main foci: Morrison-as-epistemologist questioning what it is that constitutes knowing and being known, Morrison-as-revisionary-teacher-of-reading-strategies, and Morrison in intertextual dialogue with several oral and literary traditions. In addition to critical essays, students complete a “Pilate Project” – a creative response to the works under study.

Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Beard,L-S.
(Fall 2017)

ENGL B264 Black Bards: Poetry in the Diaspora

An interrogation of poetic utterance in works of the African diaspora, primarily in English, this course addresses a multiplicity of genres, including epic, lyric, sonnet, rap, and mimetic jazz. The development of poetic theories at key moments such as the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement will be explored.

Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ENGL B279 Introduction to African Literature

Taking into account the oral, written, aural, and visual forms of African “texts” over several thousand years, this course will explore literary production, intertextuality, translation, and audience/critical reception. Representative works to be studied include oral traditions, the Sundiata and Mwindo epics, the plays of Wole Soyinka and his Burden of History, the Muse of Forgiveness; and the work of Sembène Ousmane, Bessie Head, Ayi Kwei Armah, Mariama Bâ, Naguib Mahfouz, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Yvonne Vera, and others.

Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ENGL B320 Black Feminist Literature

This course explores contemporary black feminist literature and culture on a transnational stage. We will consider the works of prominent, emerging, and underexplored black feminist writers from various African diaspora locations, including South Africa, West Africa, Europe, North America, and the Caribbean. How do these writers engage with key currents in global black feminist politics, including understandings of gender, sexuality, class, nationality and colonialism? How do they complicate these discussions in their work? We will ground our exploration in close study of black feminist poetics—the specific formal and creative choices that black feminist poets, fiction writers, visual artists, hip hop artists, webseries producers and others use to examine gender end sexuality in their art. Paying particular attention to the work of queer and LGBTI+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans* and Intersex) artists, we will consider the various meanings of t erms such as “black,” “feminist,” and “queer” in various parts of the African Diaspora. Our work will emphasize close analysis of black feminist writers’ works, as well as collaborative exercises and invited in-class discussions with several contemporary black diasporic feminist artists themselves. Requirements include two short papers, regular response papers, and a final project.

Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sullivan,M.
(Fall 2017)

ENGL B362 African American Literature: Hypercanonical Codes

Intensive study of six 18th-21st century hypercanonical African American written and visual texts (and critical responses) with specific attention to the tradition’s long use of speaking in code and in multiple registers simultaneously. Focus on language as a tool of opacity as well as transparency, translation, transliteration, invention and resistance. Previous reading required.

Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ENGL B379 The African Griot(te)

English 379 is a capstone topics course in the study of two or more distinguished African writers who have made significant contributions to African literary production. The focus changes from one semester to the next so that students may re-enroll in the course for credit. The specific focus of each semester’s offering of the course is outlined separately.

Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Beard,L-S.

Fall 2017: Women Writing Southern Africa. This is a study of two centuries of Southern African literatures written by and about Xhosa, Zulu, Khoikhoi, Shona, Matabele, Setswana, English, Afrikaner, Indian, and Coloured women from Jewish, Christian, Muslim, and traditional com-munities. Our goal is the exploration of literature’s role in constructing space, place, and politics in South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Lesotho, Swaziland, and the old Rhodesia. We begin with the ventriloquized story of Sarah Baartman, the so-called Hottentot Venus, who was displayed semi-nude in Great Britain between 1810 and 1815. We will journey to and beyond Zoe Wicomb’s multidirectional You Can’t Get Lost in Cape Town.

Spring 2018: Nobel Laureates Speak. This is an intensive study of two African Nobel laureates: Wole Soyinka, J. M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, Naguib Mahfouz, Nelson Mandela, or Doris Lessing.

ENGL B381 Post-Apartheid Literature

South African texts from several language communities which anticipate a post-apartheid polity and texts by contemporary South African writers which explore the complexities of life in “the new South Africa.” Several films emphasize the minefield of post-apartheid reconciliation and accountability.

Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ENGL B388 Contemporary African Fiction

Noting that the official colonial independence of most African countries dates back only half a century, this course focuses on the fictive experiments of the most recent decade. A few highly controversial works from the 90’s serve as an introduction to very recent work. Most works are in English. To experience depth as well as breadth, there is a small cluster of works from South Africa. With novels and tales from elsewhere on the huge African continent, we will get a glimpse of “living in the present” in history and letters.

Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Beard,L-S.
(Spring 2018)

FREN B254 Teaching (in) the Postcolony: Schooling in African Fiction

This seminar examines novels from Francophone and Anglophone Africa, critical essays, and two films, in order better to understand the forces that inform the African child’s experiences of education. This course is taught in English.

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

GNST B103 Introduction to Swahili Language and Culture I

The primary goal of this course is to develop an elementary level ability to speak, read, and write Swahili. The emphasis is on communicative competence in Swahili based on the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning. In the process of acquiring the language, students will also be introduced to East Africa and its cultures. No prior knowledge of Swahili or East Africa is required. Note: GNST B103/B105 do not fulfill the Bryn Mawr College language requirement.

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Mshomba,E.
(Fall 2017)

GNST B105 Introduction to Swahili Language and Culture II

The primary goal of this course is to continue working on an elementary level ability to speak, read, and write Swahili. The emphasis is on communicative competence in Swahili based on the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning. Students will also continue learning about East Africa and its cultures. Prerequisite: GNST B103 (Introduction to Swahili Language and Culture I) or permission of the instructor is required. Note: GNST B103/B105 does not fulfill the Bryn Mawr College language requirement.

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Mshomba,E.
(Spring 2018)

HART B226 Perspectives on African Art

This course is an exploration of a selected range of art that represent the role and place of art in Africa and demonstrate the changes in artwork over time. The course begins with an examination of what defines the art of Africa, and proceeds to seek an understanding of its philosophical underpinnings and aesthetics. It then conducts a cultural as well as an historical exploration of selected art traditions on the continent. The course will emphasize the diversity of African aesthetics as well as highlight the similarities and differences between African people within and across various artistic practices in secular and non-secular settings.

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Museum Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Labi,K.
(Fall 2017)

HART B279 Exhibiting Africa: Art, Artifact and New Articulations

At the turn of the 20th century, the Victorian natural history museum played an important role in constructing and disseminating images of Africa to the Western public. The history of museum representations of Africa and Africans reveals that exhibitions—both museum exhibitions and “living” World’s Fair exhibitions— has long been deeply embedded in politics, including the persistent “othering” of African people as savages or primitives. While paying attention to stereotypical exhibition tropes about Africa, we will also consider how art museums are creating new constructions of Africa and how contemporary curators and conceptual artists are creating complex, challenging new ways of understanding African identities.

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Museum Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

HIST B102 Introduction to African Civilizations

The course is designed to introduce students to the history of African and African Diaspora societies, cultures, and political economies. We will discuss the origins, state formation, external contacts, and the structural transformations and continuities of African societies and cultures in the context of the slave trade, colonial rule, capitalist exploitation, urbanization, and westernization, as well as contemporary struggles over authority, autonomy, identity and access to resources. Case studies will be drawn from across the continent.

Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; International Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Ngalamulume,K.
(Fall 2017)

HIST B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800

The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.

Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies; International Studies; Peace, Justice and Human Rights
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

HIST B212 Pirates, Travelers, and Natural Historians: 1492-1750

In the early modern period, conquistadors, missionaries, travelers, pirates, and natural historians wrote interesting texts in which they tried to integrate the New World into their existing frameworks of knowledge. This intellectual endeavor was an adjunct to the physical conquest of American space, and provides a framework though which we will explore the processes of imperial competition, state formation, and indigenous and African resistance to colonialism.

Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Environmental Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Gallup-Díaz,I.
(Fall 2017)

HIST B215 Europe and the Other 1492-1800

This course will introduce students to process through which Europeans created systems and categories of difference into which they placed Indigenous, African, and Asian peoples between the years 1492 and 1815. Topics of study include Indigenous leaders, slave and free communities, and cultural mediators on colonial frontiers.

Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Gallup-Díaz,I.
(Fall 2017)

HIST B236 African History since 1800

The course analyzes the history of Africa in the last two hundred years in the context of global political economy. We will examine the major themes in modern African history, including the 19th-century state formation, expansion, or restructuration; partition and resistance; colonial rule; economic, social, political, religious, and cultural developments; nationalism; post-independence politics, economics, and society, as well as conflicts and the burden of disease. The course will also introduce students to the sources and methods of African history.

Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; International Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Ngalamulume,K.
(Spring 2018)

HIST B237 Topic: Modern African History

This is a topics course. Course content varies

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Ngalamulume,K.

Fall 2017: Urban History.

Spring 2018: African Economic Development. This course examines the political economy of African development in historical perspectives. We will address the following questions: Why is the African continent, which is rich in natural resources, so poor? What are the causes of poverty in Africa? The course will analyze the environmental, economic, political, and historical factors that have affected the development of Africa. We will discuss the impact of slavery, colonial exploitation, foreign interventions, foreign aid, trade, and democratic transitions on African development. We will also explore the theories of development and underdevelopment.

HIST B243 Topics: Atlantic Cultures

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Gallup-Díaz,I.

Spring 2018: Maroon Communities

HIST B265 Colonial Encounters in the Americas

The course explores the confrontations, conquests and accommodations that formed the “ground-level” experience of day-to-day colonialism throughout the Americas. The course is comparative in scope, examining events and structures in North, South and Central America, with particular attention paid to indigenous peoples and the nature of indigenous leadership in the colonial world of the 18th century.

Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

HIST B325 Topics in Social History

This a topics course that explores various themes in American social history. Course content varies.

Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Ullman,S.

Spring 2018: Civil War, Race, and American Memory. This course explores how the American Civil War, fought over the issue of maintaining race based slavery, has become enshrined with a host of contested meanings about race and citizenship to generations of Americans ever since the Confederacy surrendered at Appomattox. During this semester we will explore some of those contests and address the Civil War’s intense power in the American psyche.

HIST B336 Topics in African History

This is a topic course. Course content varies.

Counts towards: Africana Studies; International Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

HIST B337 Topics in African History

This is a topics course. Topics vary.

Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; International Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Ngalamulume,K.

Fall 2017: Global Health Histories in Africa

HIST B339 The Making of the African Diaspora 1450-1800

This course explores the emergence, development, and challenges to the ideologies of whiteness and blackness, that have been in place from the colonial period to the present. Through the reading of primary and secondary sources, we will explore various ways through which enslaved people imagined freedom, personal rights, community membership, and some of the paths they created in order to improve their experiences and change the social order. In an attempt to have a comparative approach, we will look at particular events and circumstances that took place in few provinces in the Americas, with an emphasis on Latin America and the Caribbean. The course will also look at the methodological challenges of studying and writing history of people who in principle, were not allowed to produce written texts. Throughout, we will identify and underscore the contribution that people of African descent have made to the ideas of rights, freedom, equality, and democracy.

Counts towards: Africana Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

HIST B349 Topics in Comparative History

This is a topics course. Topics vary.

Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Museum Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Vider,S.

Spring 2018: Public History and Praxis

HLTH B115 Introduction to Health Studies

The multidisciplinary foundation for the health studies minor. Students will be introduced to theories and methods from the life sciences, social sciences, and humanities and will learn to apply them to problems of health and illness. Topics include epidemiological, public health, and biomedical perspectives on health and disease; social, behavioral, and environmental determinants of health; globalization of health issues; cultural representations of illness; health inequalities, social justice, and the ethics of health as a human right.

Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): White,S., Montgomery,A.
(Fall 2017)

POLS B243 African and Caribbean Perspectives in World Politics

This course makes African and Caribbean voices audible as they create or adopt visions of the world that explain their positions and challenges in world politics. Students learn analytical tools useful in understanding other parts of the world. Prerequisite: POLS 141 or 1 course in African or Latin American history.

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Allen,M.
(Spring 2018)

SOCL B225 Women in Society

A study of the contemporary experiences of women of color in the Global South. The household, workplace, community, and the nation-state, and the positions of women in the private and public spheres are compared cross-culturally. Topics include feminism, identity and self-esteem; globalization and transnational social movements and tensions and transitions encountered as nations embark upon development.

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Montes,V.
(Spring 2018)

SOCL B229 Black America in Sociological Perspective

This course presents sociological perspectives on various issues affecting black America as a historically unique minority group in the United States: the legacy of slavery and the Jim Crow era; the formation of urban black ghettos; the civil rights reforms; the problems of poverty and unemployment; the problems of crime and other social problems; the problems of criminal justice; the continuing significance of race; the varied covert modern forms of racial discrimination; and the role of race in American politics.

Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SOCL B321 The Black American Intellectual Community

Viewing black American intellectuals from the perspective of the sociology of knowledge, this course examines the patterns of development and conflict in the black American intellectual community, from early 20th century to the 21st century. It highlights the social and historical influences that shaped black intellectuals’ world views on racism, black social problems,racial integration, black culture and black identity. Prerequisites: At least one previous sociology course or a course focused on black Americans or race relations. Open only to sophomores, juniors, or seniors.

Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Washington,R.
(Fall 2017)