2017-18 Catalog

Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology

Students may complete a major or minor in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology.

Faculty

Alice Donohue, Rhys Carpenter Professor of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology
Astrid Lindenlauf, Associate Professor of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology
Peter Magee, Chair and Professor of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology (on leave semester II)
Susanna McFadden, Visiting Assistant Professor

The curriculum of the department focuses on the cultures of the Mediterranean regions and the Near East in antiquity. Courses treat aspects of society and material culture of these civilizations as well as issues of theory, method, and interpretation.

Major Requirements

The major requires a minimum of 10 courses. Core requirements are two 100-level courses distributed between the ancient Near East and Egypt (either ARCH 101 or 104) and ancient Greece and Rome (ARCH 102), and two semesters of the senior conference. At least two upper-level courses should be distributed between Classical and Near Eastern subjects. Additional requirements are determined in consultation with the major advisor. Additional coursework in allied subjects may be presented for major credit but must be approved in writing by the major advisor; such courses are offered in the Departments of Anthropology, Geology, Greek, Latin and Classical Studies, Growth and Structure of Cities, and History of Art. In consultation with the major advisor, one course taken in study abroad may be accepted for credit in the major.

The writing requirement for the major consists of two one-semester Writing Attentive courses offered within the department.

Each student’s course of study to meet major requirements will be determined in consultation with the undergraduate major advisor in the spring semester of the sophomore year, at which time a written plan will be designed. Students considering majoring in the department are encouraged to take the introductory courses (ARCH 101 or 104 and 102) early in their undergraduate career and should also seek advice from departmental faculty. Students who are interested in interdisciplinary concentrations or in study abroad during the junior year are strongly advised to seek assistance in planning their major early in their sophomore year.

Minor Requirements

The minor requires six courses. Core requirements are two 100-level courses distributed between the ancient Near East and Egypt and ancient Greece and Rome, in addition to four other courses selected in consultation with the major advisor.

Annual Field Trip

As of 2015/6, the Department has been organizing an annual field trip for registered majors in their Junior Year. The trip involves a city (e.g., Athens or Rome) which features in our teaching program, or a city which contains relevant museums (e.g., London, Paris, Berlin). Details for the upcoming trip will be made available at the beginning of the Fall Semester.  The airfare and accommodations costs are covered by the Department.

Concentration in Geoarcheology

The Departments of Anthropology, Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology, and Geology offer a concentration in geoarchaeology for existing majors in these departments. Please consult with Professor Magee regarding this program. Please note that these requirements are separate from those for the major and cannot be double counted.

Requirements for the concentration:

  • Two 100-level units from Anthropology, Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology (including ARCH 135, a half-credit course) or Geology, of which one must be from the department outside the student’s major.
  • ANTH/ARCH/GEOL 270: Geoarchaeology (Magee, Barber).
  • BIOL/ARCH/GEOL 328: Geospatial Data Analysis and GIS (staff).
  • Two elective courses, to be chosen in consultation with the major advisor, from among current offerings in Anthropology, Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology and Geology. One of these two courses must be from outside the student’s major. Suggested courses include but are not limited to ARCH 135 (HALF-CREDIT: Archaeological Fieldwork and Methods), ANTH 203 (Human Ecology), ANTH 220 (Methods and Theory), ARCH 330 (History of Archaeology and Theory), ANTH 225 (Paleolithic Archaeology), ANTH 240 (Traditional Technologies), ARCH 308 (Ceramic Analysis), ARCH 332 (Field Techniques), GEOL 202 (Mineralogy), GEOL 205 (Sedimentology), GEOL 310 (Geophysics), and GEOL 312 (Quaternary Climates)

Honors

Honors are granted on the basis of academic performance as demonstrated by a cumulative average of 3.5 or better in the major.

Independent Research

Majors who wish to undertake independent research, especially for researching and writing a lengthy paper, must arrange with a professor who is willing to advise them, and consult with the major advisor. Such research normally would be conducted by seniors as a unit of supervised work (403), which must be approved by the advising professor before registration. Students planning to do such research should consult with professors in the department in the spring semester of their junior year or no later than the beginning of the fall semester of the senior year.

Languages

Majors who contemplate graduate study in Classical fields should incorporate Greek and Latin into their programs. Those who plan graduate work in Near Eastern or Egyptian may take appropriate ancient languages at the University of Pennsylvania, such as Middle Egyptian, Akkadian and Sumerian. Any student considering graduate study in Classical and Near Eastern archaeology should study French and German.

Study Abroad

A semester of study abroad is encouraged if the program is approved by the department. Students are encouraged to consult with faculty, since some programs the department may approve may not yet be listed at the Office of International Programs. Students who seek major credit for courses taken abroad must consult with the major advisor before enrolling in a program. Major credit is given on a case-by-case basis after review of the syllabus, work submitted for a grade, and a transcript. Credit will not be given for more than one course and not for courses that are ordinarily offered by the department.

Fieldwork

The department strongly encourages students to gain fieldwork experience and assists them in getting positions on field projects in North America and overseas. The department is undertaking several field projects in which undergraduates may be invited to participate.

Professor Peter Magee conducts a for-credit field school at Muweilah, al-Hamriya and Tell Abraq in the United Arab Emirates. Undergraduate and graduate students participate in this project, which usually takes place during the winter break. He sends an announcement about how to apply for a position in the fall of each year. Students who participate for credit sign up for a 403 independent study with Professor Magee.

Professor Astrid Lindenlauf also conducts an excavation project at the ancient Greek trading post of Naukratis in Egypt, and there are opportunities for work there.

Museum Internships

The department is awarded annually two internships by the Nicholas P. Goulandris Foundation for students to work for a month in the Museum of Cycladic Art in Athens, Greece, with an additional two weeks at an archaeological field project. This is an all-expense paid internship for which students may submit an application. An announcement inviting applications is sent in the late fall or beginning of the second semester.

Opportunities to work with the College’s archaeology collections are available throughout the academic year and during the summer. Students wishing to work with the collections should consult Marianne Weldon, Collections Manager for Special Collections.

Funding for Internships and Special Projects

The department has two funds that support students for internships and special projects of their own design. One, the Elisabeth Packard Fund for internships in Art History and Archaeology is shared with the Department of the History of Art, while the other is the Anna Lerah Keys Memorial Prize. Any declared major may apply for these funds. An announcement calling for applications is sent to majors in the spring, and the awards are made at the annual college awards ceremony in April.

COURSES

ARCH B101 Introduction to Egyptian and Near Eastern Archaeology
A historical survey of the archaeology and art of the ancient Near East and Egypt.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B102 Introduction to Classical Archaeology
A historical survey of the archaeology and art of Greece, Etruria, and Rome.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Museum Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Lindenlauf,A.
(Spring 2018)

ARCH B104 Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban Revolutions
This course examines the archaeology of the two most fundamental changes that have occurred in human society in the last 12,000 years, agriculture and urbanism, and we explore these in Egypt and the Near East as far as India. We also explore those societies that did not experience these changes.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Geoarchaeology; Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B110 The World Through Classical Eyes
A survey of the ways in which the ancient Greeks and Romans perceived and constructed their physical and social world. The evidence of ancient texts and monuments will form the basis for exploring such subjects as cosmology, geography, travel and commerce, ancient ethnography and anthropology, the idea of natural and artificial wonders, and the self-definition of the classical cultures in the context of the oikoumene, the “inhabited world.”
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donohue,A.
(Fall 2017)

ARCH B125 Classical Myths in Art and in the Sky
This course explores Greek and Roman mythology using an archaeological and art historical approach, focusing on the ways in which the traditional tales of the gods and heroes were depicted, developed and transmitted in the visual arts such as vase painting and architectural sculpture, as well as projected into the natural environment.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Museum Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B135 Focus: Archaeological Fieldwork and Methods
The fundamentals of the practice of archaeology through readings and case studies and participatory demonstrations. Case studies will be drawn from the archives of the Nemea Valley Archaeological Project and material in the College’s collections. Each week there will be a 1-hour laboratory that will introduce students to a variety of fieldwork methods and forms of analysis. This is a half semester Focus course.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Geoarchaeology
Units: 0.5
Instructor(s): Lindenlauf,A.
(Fall 2017)

ARCH B137 Focus: Introduction into Principles of Preservation & Conservation
This half-unit introductory course provides insights into the fundamentals of the practices of archaeological preservation and conservation and enhances the understanding of their significance in the archaeological process. This half-course deals exclusively with excavated materials that are still on-site or have been moved to a storage facility or a museum. Materials considered in this course include architecture, textiles, and portable objects made of clay, stone, and metal. While most of the finds are from land sites, occasional references to marine material are made. Most of the material used in the hands-on sessions comes from the Special Collections. Suggested preparation: basic understanding of chemistry is helpful.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 0.5
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B203 Ancient Greek Cities and Sanctuaries
A study of the development of the Greek city-states and sanctuaries. Archaeological evidence is surveyed in its historic context. The political formation of the city-state and the role of religion is presented, and the political, economic, and religious institutions of the city-states are explored in their urban settings. The city-state is considered as a particular political economy of the Mediterranean and in comparison to the utility of the concept of city-state in other cultures.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B204 Animals in the Ancient Greek World
This course focuses on perceptions of animals in ancient Greece from the Geometric to the Classical periods. It examines representations of animals in painting, sculpture, and the minor arts, the treatment of animals as attested in the archaeological record, and how these types of evidence relate to the featuring of animals in contemporary poetry, tragedy, comedy, and medical and philosophical writings. By analyzing this rich body of evidence, the course develops a context in which participants gain insight into the ways ancient Greeks perceived, represented, and treated animals. Juxtaposing the importance of animals in modern society, as attested, for example, by their roles as pets, agents of healing, diplomatic gifts, and even as subjects of specialized studies such as animal law and animal geographies, the course also serves to expand awareness of attitudes towards animals in our own society as well as that of ancient Greece.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B205 Greek Sculpture
One of the best preserved categories of evidence for ancient Greek culture is sculpture. The Greeks devoted immense resources to producing sculpture that encompassed many materials and forms and served a variety of important social functions. This course examines sculptural production in Greece and neighboring lands from the Bronze Age through the fourth century B.C.E. with special attention to style, iconography and historical and social context.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donohue,A.
(Fall 2017)

ARCH B206 Hellenistic and Roman Sculpture
This course surveys the sculpture produced from the fourth century B.C.E. to the fourth century C.E., the period, beginning with the death of Alexander the Great, that saw the transformation of the classical world through the rise of Rome and the establishment and expansion of the Roman Empire. Style, iconography, and production will be studied in the contexts of the culture of the Hellenistic kingdoms, the Roman appropriation of Greek culture, the role of art in Roman society, and the significance of Hellenistic and Roman sculpture in the post-antique classical tradition.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B211 The Archaeology and Anthropology of Rubbish and Recycling
This course serves as an introduction to a range of approaches to the study of waste and dirt as well as practices and processes of disposal and recycling in past and present societies. Particular attention will be paid to the interpretation of spatial disposal patterns, the power of dirt(y waste) to create boundaries and difference, and types of recycling.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Lindenlauf,A.
(Fall 2017)

ARCH B215 Classical Art
A survey of the visual arts of ancient Greece and Rome from the Bronze Age through Late Imperial times (circa 3000 B.C.E. to 300 C.E.). Major categories of artistic production are examined in historical and social context, including interactions with neighboring areas and cultures; methodological and interpretive issues are highlighted.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B217 Captive Greece, Captor Rome?
The Western classical tradition is not monolithic, but contains elements from both ancient Greek and Roman culture. This course examines the relationship between the two, from the Hellenistic era through the Roman Empire, and its later consequences, emphasizing the primary evidence of the visual arts and contemporary texts. Suggested preparation: 100-level coursework in history of art, classics, archaeology, or comparative literature.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donohue,A.
(Spring 2018)

ARCH B226 Archaeology of Anatolia
One of the cradles of civilization, Anatolia witnessed the rise and fall of many cultures and states throughout its ancient history. This course approaches the ancient material remains of pre-classical Anatolia from the perspective of Near Eastern archaeology, examining the art, artifacts, architecture, cities, and settlements of this land from the Neolithic through the Lydian periods. Some emphasis will be on the Late Bronze Age and the Iron Age, especially phases of Hittite and Assyrian imperialism, Late Hittite states, Phrygia, and the Urartu.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B230 Archaeology and History of Ancient Egypt
A survey of the art and archaeology of ancient Egypt from the Pre-Dynastic through the Graeco-Roman periods, with special emphasis on Egypt’s Empire and its outside connections, especially the Aegean and Near Eastern worlds.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B238 Land of Buddha: The Archaeology of South Asia, First Millenium B.C.E.
This course uses archaeological evidence to reconstruct social and economic life in South Asia from ca. 1200 to 0 B.C.E. We examine the roles of religion, economy and foreign trade in the establishment of powerful kingdoms and empires that characterized this region during this period.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B240 Archaeology and History of Ancient Mesopotamia
A survey of the material culture of ancient Mesopotamia, modern Iraq, from the earliest phases of state formation (circa 3500 B.C.E.) through the Achaemenid Persian occupation of the Near East (circa 331 B.C.E.). Emphasis will be on art, artifacts, monuments, religion, kingship, and the cuneiform tradition. The survival of the cultural legacy of Mesopotamia into later ancient and Islamic traditions will also be addressed.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B244 Great Empires of the Ancient Near East
A survey of the history, material culture, political and religious ideologies of, and interactions among, the five great empires of the ancient Near East of the second and first millennia B.C.E.: New Kingdom Egypt, the Hittite Empire in Anatolia, the Assyrian and Babylonian Empires in Mesopotamia, and the Persian Empire in Iran.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B252 Pompeii
Introduces students to a nearly intact archaeological site whose destruction by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E. was recorded by contemporaries. The discovery of Pompeii in the mid-1700s had an enormous impact on 18th- and 19th-century views of the Roman past as well as styles and preferences of the modern era. Informs students in classical antiquity, urban life, city structure, residential architecture, home decoration and furnishing, wall painting, minor arts and craft and mercantile activities within a Roman city.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B254 Cleopatra
This course examines the life and rule of Cleopatra VII, the last queen of Ptolemaic Egypt, and the reception of her legacy in the Early Roman Empire and the western world from the Renaissance to modern times. The first part of the course explores extant literary evidence regarding the upbringing, education, and rule of Cleopatra within the contexts of Egyptian and Ptolemaic cultures, her relationships with Julius Caesar and Marc Antony, her conflict with Octavian, and her death by suicide in 30 BCE. The second part examines constructions of Cleopatra in Roman literature, her iconography in surviving art, and her contributions to and influence on both Ptolemaic and Roman art. A detailed account is also provided of the afterlife of Cleopatra in the literature, visual arts, scholarship, and film of both Europe and the United States, extending from the papal courts of Renaissance Italy and Shakespearean drama, to Thomas Jefferson’s art collection at Monticello and Joseph Mankiewicz’s 1963 epic film, Cleopatra.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B260 Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome
The often-praised achievements of the classical cultures arose from the realities of day-to-day life. This course surveys the rich body of material and textual evidence pertaining to how ancient Greeks and Romans -- famous and obscure alike -- lived and died. Topics include housing, food, clothing, work, leisure, and family and social life.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B301 Greek Vase-Painting
This course is an introduction to the world of painted pottery of the Greek world, from the 10th to the 4th centuries B.C.E. We will interpret these images from an art-historical and socio-economic viewpoint. We will also explore how these images relate to other forms of representation. Prerequisite: one course in classical archaeology or permission of instructor.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Lindenlauf,A.
(Spring 2018)

ARCH B303 Classical Bodies
An examination of the conceptions of the human body evidenced in Greek and Roman art and literature, with emphasis on issues that have persisted in the Western tradition. Topics include the fashioning of concepts of male and female standards of beauty and their implications; conventions of visual representation; the nude; clothing and its symbolism; the athletic ideal; physiognomy; medical theory and practice; the visible expression of character and emotions; and the formulation of the “classical ideal” in antiquity and later times.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B304 Archaeology of Greek Religion
This course approaches the topic of ancient Greek religion by focusing on surviving archaeological, architectural, epigraphical, artistic and literary evidence that dates from the Archaic and Classical periods. By examining a wealth of diverse evidence that ranges, for example, from temple architecture, and feasting and banqueting equipment to inscriptions, statues, vase paintings, and descriptive texts, the course enables the participants to analyze the value and complexity of the archaeology of Greek religion and to recognize its significance for the reconstruction of daily life in ancient Greece. Special emphasis is placed on subjects such as the duties of priests and priestesses, the violence of animal sacrifice, the function of cult statues and votive offerings and also the important position of festivals and hero and mystery cults in ancient Greek religious thought and experience.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B305 Topics in Ancient Athens
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B306 Monumental Painting
The Mediterranean tradition of large-scale painting begins in prehistoric times and continues through Late Antiquity and beyond. Important examples survive on the walls of houses, tombs and other structures at sites in the Bronze Age Aegean, in Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic Anatolia, Macedonia, Magna Graecia, and Etruria, Rome and the famous sites of Pompeii and Hercul- aneum preserved by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Technical, artistic, cultural and interpretive issues will be considered.
Counts towards: Museum Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): McFadden,S.
(Fall 2017)

ARCH B308 Ceramic Analysis
Pottery is a fundamental means of establishing the relative chronology of archaeological sites and of understanding past human behavior. Included are theories, methods and techniques of pottery description, analysis and interpretation. Topics include typology, seriation, ceramic characterization, production, function, exchange and the use of computers in pottery analysis. Laboratory work on pottery in the department collections. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Geoarchaeology
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B312 Bronze Age Internationalism
This course explores the rise and fall of the first international age in the eastern mediterranean. We will focus on the cultural and diplomatic connections between Egypt, Syria, Anatolia and the Aegean during the Bronze Age, c. 2000-1200BCE.. Prerequisites: ARCH B101 or B216 or B226 or B230 or B240 or B244.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B314 Ancient Greek Seafaring and Shipwrecks
This course examines the diverse evidence for ancient Greek seafaring and shipwrecks in the Mediterranean Sea from prehistory to the beginning of the Roman Empire. By focusing on archaeological, literary, iconographic, and epigraphic evidence, the course explores ancient Greek, Phoenician, Etruscan, and Roman interconnections in the Mediterranean Sea, through special attention to trade routes, commerce, colonization, economy, naval and maritime technology, cultural interactions, sea exploration, and piracy.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B316 Trade and Transport in the Ancient World
Issues of trade, commerce and production of export goods are addressed with regard to the Bronze Age and Iron Age cultures of Mesopotamia, Arabia, Iran and south Asia. Crucial to these systems is the development of means of transport via maritime routes and on land. Archaeological evidence for traded goods and shipwrecks is used to map the emergence of sea-faring across the Indian Ocean and Gulf while bio-archaeological data is employed to examine the transformative role that Bactrian and Dromedary camels played in ancient trade and transport.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Magee,P.
(Fall 2017)

ARCH B329 Archaeology and National Imagination in Modern Greece
This course explores the link between archaeology, antiquity and the national imagination in modern Greece from the establishment of the Greek state in the early nineteenth century to present times. Drawing from a variety of disciplines, including history, archaeology, art history, sociology, anthropology, ethnography, and political science, the course examines the pivotal role of archaeology and the classical past in the construction of national Greek identity. Special emphasis is placed on the concepts of Hellenism and nationalism, the European rediscovery of Greece in the Romantic era, and the connection between classical archaeology and Philhellenism from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Additional topics of study include the presence of foreign archaeological schools in Greece, the Greek perception of archaeology, the politics of display in Greek museums, and the importance and power of specific ancient sites, monuments, and events, such as the Athenian Acropolis, the Parthenon, and the Olympic Games, in the construction and preservation of Greek national identity.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B359 Topics in Classical Art and Archaeology
This is a topics course. Topics vary. A research-oriented course taught in seminar format, treating issues of current interest in Greek and Roman art and archaeology. Prerequisites: 200-level coursework in some aspect of classical or related cultures, archeology, art history, or Cities. Current topic description: TA research-oriented course taught in seminar format, treating issues of current interest in Greek and Roman art and archaeology. Prerequisites: 200-level coursework in some aspect of classical or related cultures, archeology, art history, or Cities.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donohue,A.
(Spring 2018)

ARCH B398 Senior Seminar
A weekly seminar on topics to be determined with assigned readings and oral and written reports.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Lindenlauf,A.
(Fall 2017)

ARCH B399 Senior Seminar
A weekly seminar on common topics with assigned readings and oral and written reports.
Units: 1.0
(Spring 2018)

ARCH B403 Supervised Work
Supervised Work
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2017, Spring 2018)

ARCH B501 Greek Vase Painting
This course is an introduction to the world of painted pottery of the Greek world, from the 10th to the 4th centuries B.C.E. We will interpret these images from an art-historical and socio-economic viewpoint. We will also explore how these images relate to other forms of representation. Prerequisite: one course in classical archaeology or permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Lindenlauf,A.
(Spring 2018)

ARCH B504 Archaeology of Greek Religion
This course approaches the topic of ancient Greek religion by focusing on surviving archaeological, architectural, epigraphical, artistic and literary evidence that dates from the Archaic and Classical periods. By examining a wealth of diverse evidence that ranges, for example, from temple architecture, and feasting and banqueting equipment to inscriptions, statues, vase paintings, and descriptive texts, the course enables the participants to analyze the value and complexity of the archaeology of Greek religion and to recognize its significance for the reconstruction of daily life in ancient Greece. Special emphasis is placed on subjects such as the duties of priests and priestesses, the violence of animal sacrifice, the function of cult statues and votive offerings and also the important position of festivals and hero and mystery cults in ancient Greek religious thought and experience.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B505 Topics in Ancient Athens
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B506 The Archaeology of Greece and Asia Minor during the Archaic and Classical Periods
This course discusses the material culture discovered in Archaic and Classical sanctuaries, cemeteries, and settlements in Greece and Asia Minor, taking into consideration past and present archaeological theory and interpretive trends. Key topics include human interaction with material culture, social change, and the use of space, landscape, and religion.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Lindenlauf,A.
(Fall 2017)

ARCH B508 Ceramic Analysis
Pottery is fundamental for establishing the relative chronology of archaeological sites and past human behavior. Included are theories, methods and techniques of pottery description, analysis, and interpretation. Topics are typology, seriation, ceramic characterization, production, function, exchange and the use of computers in pottery analysis. Laboratory in the collections.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B516 Trade and Transport in the Ancient World
Issues of trade, commerce and production of export goods are addressed with regard to the Bronze Age and Iron Age cultures of Mesopotamia, Arabia, Iran and south Asia. Crucial to these systems is the development of means of transport via maritime routes and on land. Archaeological evidence for traded goods and shipwrecks is used to map the emergence of sea-faring across the Indian Ocean and Gulf while bio-archaeological data is employed to examine the transformative role that Bactrian and Dromedary camels played in ancient trade and transport.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B529 Archaeology and National Imagination in Modern Greece
This course explores the link between archaeology, antiquity and the national imagination in modern Greece from the establishment of the Greek state in the early nineteenth century to present times. Drawing from a variety of disciplines, including history, archaeology, art history, sociology, anthropology, ethnography, and political science, the course examines the pivotal role of archaeology and the classical past in the construction of national Greek identity. Special emphasis is placed on the concepts of Hellenism and nationalism, the European rediscovery of Greece in the Romantic era, and the connection between classical archaeology and Philhellenism from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Additional topics of study include the presence of foreign archaeological schools in Greece, the Greek perception of archaeology, the politics of display in Greek museums, and the importance and power of specific ancient sites, monuments, and events, such as the Athenian Acropolis, the Parthenon, and the Olympic Games, in the construction and preservation of Greek national identity.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B552 Egyptian Architecture: New Kingdom
A proseminar that concentrates on the principles of ancient Egyptian monumental architecture with an emphasis on the New Kingdom. The primary focus of the course is temple design, but palaces, representative settlements, and examples of Graeco-Roman temples of the Nile Valley will also be dealt with.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B605 The Concept of Style
Style is a fundamental concern for historians of art. This seminar examines concepts of style in ancient and post-antique art historiography, focusing on the historical and intellectual contexts in which they arose. Special attention is paid to the recognition and description of style, explanations of stylistic change, and the meanings attached to style, particularly in classical and related art.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B634 Problems in Classical Art
This is a topics course. Topics vary. A seminar dealing with current issues in the art of ancient Greece and related traditions. Current topic description: The visual art of the classical cultures may be characterized as “representational” in both prevailing forms and content. Much of its representational content is classified as “narrative,” a category that has long occupied historians of Western art and culture. This seminar examines narrative art in ancient Greek and Roman art and related traditions, with emphasis on primary materials and on the historiographic context of the associated scholarship.
Prerequisite: Graduate Students Only
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donohue,A.
(Spring 2018)

ARCH B669 Ancient Greece and the Near East
Approaches to the study of interconnections between Ancient Greece and the Near East, mainly in the Iron Age, with emphasis on art, architecture, and intellectual perspective.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B692 Archaeology of Achaemenid Era
The course explores the archaeology of the Achaemenid Empire. It will be offered in conjunction with Professor Lauren Ristvet (UPENN) and will cover the archaeology of the regions from Libya to India fro 538 to 332 BC. Students will be expected to provide presentations as well as written work.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B101 Introduction to Egyptian and Near Eastern Archaeology
A historical survey of the archaeology and art of the ancient Near East and Egypt.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B102 Introduction to Classical Archaeology
A historical survey of the archaeology and art of Greece, Etruria, and Rome.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Museum Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Lindenlauf,A.
(Spring 2018)

ARCH B110 The World Through Classical Eyes
A survey of the ways in which the ancient Greeks and Romans perceived and constructed their physical and social world. The evidence of ancient texts and monuments will form the basis for exploring such subjects as cosmology, geography, travel and commerce, ancient ethnography and anthropology, the idea of natural and artificial wonders, and the self-definition of the classical cultures in the context of the oikoumene, the “inhabited world.”
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donohue,A.
(Fall 2017)

ARCH B125 Classical Myths in Art and in the Sky
This course explores Greek and Roman mythology using an archaeological and art historical approach, focusing on the ways in which the traditional tales of the gods and heroes were depicted, developed and transmitted in the visual arts such as vase painting and architectural sculpture, as well as projected into the natural environment.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Museum Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B215 Classical Art
A survey of the visual arts of ancient Greece and Rome from the Bronze Age through Late Imperial times (circa 3000 B.C.E. to 300 C.E.). Major categories of artistic production are examined in historical and social context, including interactions with neighboring areas and cultures; methodological and interpretive issues are highlighted.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B260 Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome
The often-praised achievements of the classical cultures arose from the realities of day-to-day life. This course surveys the rich body of material and textual evidence pertaining to how ancient Greeks and Romans -- famous and obscure alike -- lived and died. Topics include housing, food, clothing, work, leisure, and family and social life.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B308 Ceramic Analysis
Pottery is a fundamental means of establishing the relative chronology of archaeological sites and of understanding past human behavior. Included are theories, methods and techniques of pottery description, analysis and interpretation. Topics include typology, seriation, ceramic characterization, production, function, exchange and the use of computers in pottery analysis. Laboratory work on pottery in the department collections. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Geoarchaeology
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B359 Topics in Classical Art and Archaeology
This is a topics course. Topics vary. A research-oriented course taught in seminar format, treating issues of current interest in Greek and Roman art and archaeology. Prerequisites: 200-level coursework in some aspect of classical or related cultures, archeology, art history, or Cities. Current topic description: TA research-oriented course taught in seminar format, treating issues of current interest in Greek and Roman art and archaeology. Prerequisites: 200-level coursework in some aspect of classical or related cultures, archeology, art history, or Cities.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donohue,A.
(Spring 2018)

ARCH B512 Bronze Age Internationalism
This course explores the rise and fall of the first international age in the eastern Mediterranean. We will focus on the cultural and diplomatic connections between Egypt, Syria, Anatolia and the Aegean during the Bronze Age, c. 2000-1200BCE.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B514 Ancient Greek Seafaring and Shipwrecks
This course examines the diverse evidence for ancient Greek seafaring and shipwrecks in the Mediterranean Sea from prehistory to the beginning of the Roman Empire. By focusing on archaeological, literary, iconographic, and epigraphic evidence, the course explores ancient Greek, Phoenician, Etruscan, and Roman interconnections in the Mediterranean Sea, through special attention to trade routes, commerce, colonization, economy, naval and maritime technology, cultural interactions, sea exploration, and piracy.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B516 Trade and Transport in the Ancient World
Issues of trade, commerce and production of export goods are addressed with regard to the Bronze Age and Iron Age cultures of Mesopotamia, Arabia, Iran and south Asia. Crucial to these systems is the development of means of transport via maritime routes and on land. Archaeological evidence for traded goods and shipwrecks is used to map the emergence of sea-faring across the Indian Ocean and Gulf while bio-archaeological data is employed to examine the transformative role that Bactrian and Dromedary camels played in ancient trade and transport.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B608 Mediterranean Landscape Archaeology
This course explores a range of approaches to the study of landscapes that relates to core principles of the field of archaeology. It also discusses the construction of specific landscapes in the Mediterranean (e.g., gardens, sacred landscapes, and memoryscapes).
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B615 Mystery Cults
An investigation of the phenomenon of mystery cults, their foundation and dispersal from the Classical through Hellensistic and early Roman periods. A study of the topography and monuments of specific cults and of representation of mysteries in sculpture and painting.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): McFadden,S.
(Fall 2017)

ARCH B617 Herculaneum: Villa dei Papiri
The Villa of the Papyri is a ‘villa suburbana’ that housed a large collection of sculptures. Its reconstruction became famous as the Getty Villa. This Villa will serve as an ‘exemplum’ of a Roman villa to explore topics including early excavation techniques, libraries and the Epicurean philosophy, the concepts and meanings of villae, as well as the placement of statues and copy criticism
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B628 Assyria and the West: Neo-Hittite States
This seminar revolves around the art and architecture of the Neo-Hittite states of the Iron Age in Syro-Anatolia from the lens of their relations with the Neo-Assyrian Empire.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B643 Mortuary Practices
This seminar focuses on the mortuary practices of the ancient Greek and Macedonian worlds from the Iron Age to the end of the Hellenistic period. Special emphasis is placed on the examination of skeletal remains, funerary offerings, the art, and architecture of specific archaeological sites and on the study of various issues in the archaeology of death.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARCH B654 The Archaeology of Prehistoric Arabia
In this course we examine the archaeology of prehistoric Arabia from c. 8000 to 500 BC. Particular emphasis is placed upon how the archaeological evidence illuminates social and economic structures.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Magee,P.
(Fall 2017)

ARCH B701 Supervised Work
Unit of supervised work
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donohue,A., Lindenlauf,A., Magee,P.
(Fall 2017, Spring 2018)

CSTS B156 Roman Law in Action
An introduction to Roman public and private law from the early republic to the high empire. The development of legal institutions, including the public courts, the role of the jurists and the importance of case law, is stressed.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

CSTS B205 Greek History
This course traces the rise of the city-state (polis) in the Greek-speaking world beginning in the seventh-century BC down to its full blossoming in classical Athens and Sparta. Students should gain an understanding of the formation and development of Greek identity, from the Panhellenic trends in archaic epic and religion through its crystallization during the heroic defense against two Persian invasions and its subsequent disintegration during the Peloponnesian war. The class will also explore the ways in which the evolution of political, philosophical, religious, and artistic institutions reflect the changing socio-political circumstances of Greece. The latter part of the course will focus on Athens in particular: its rise to imperial power under Pericles, its tragic decline from the Peloponnesian War and its important role as a center for the teaching of rhetoric and philosophy. Since the study of history involves the analysis, evaluation, and synthesis of the sources available for the culture studied, students will concentrate upon the primary sources available for Greek history, exploring the strengths and weakness of these sources and the ways in which their evidence can be used to create an understanding of ancient Greece. Students should learn how to analyze and evaluate the evidence from primary texts and to synthesize the information from multiple sources in a critical way.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

CSTS B207 Early Rome and the Roman Republic
This course surveys the history of Rome from its origins to the end of the Republic, with special emphasis on the rise of Rome in Italy and the evolution of the Roman state. The course also examines the Hellenistic world in which the rise of Rome takes place. The methods of historical investigation using the ancient sources, both literary and archaeological, are emphasized.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

CSTS B208 The Roman Empire
Imperial history from the principate of Augustus to the House of Constantine with focus on the evolution of Roman culture and society as presented in the surviving ancient evidence, both literary and archaeological.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Spring 2018)

CSTS B213 Persia and The Greeks
This Course explores interactions between Greeks and Persians in the Mediterranean and Near East from the Archaic Period to the Hellenistic Age. Through a variety of sources (from Greek histories, tragedies, and ethnography, to Persian royal inscriptions and administrative documents and the Hebrew Bible), we shall work to illuminate the interface between these two distinct yet complementary cultures. Our aim will be to gain familiarity not only with a general narrative of Greco-Persian history, from the foundation of the Achaemenid Empire in the middle of the sixth century BCE to the Macedonian conquest of Persia some 250 years later, but also with the materials (archaeological, numismatic, epigraphical, artistic, and literary) from which we build such a narrative. At the same time, we shall work to understand how contact between Persia and the Greeks in antiquity has influenced discourse about the opposition between East and West in the modern world.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

CSTS B214 Remembering the Saints: Reading Pilgrimage & Tourism
This course is divided into two parts. In the first half of the semester, it will trace the rise and function of the holy women and men of late antiquity (300–600 CE), with an emphasis on the literary portrayal of their lives, a genre called hagiography (sacred biography). Methods for reading and interpreting this large body of literature will play a key role in this part of the course. In the second half of the semester, the focus will shift from saint to devotee. Saints were like magnets that set the people of late antiquity into motion. By reading pilgrim travelogues and catalogues of miraculous healings, studying the archeological and artistic evidence for pilgrimage, we will explore the profound social and cultural impact the cult of the saints had on the peoples of this period. In addition to gaining a familiarity with the history of early Christian saints and the cults that arose around them, students will also investigate the many issues at stake in the study of late antique Christianity. This includes but is not limited to: the conflict between history and literature in hagiography, gender and sanctity in late antiquity, self-harm as religious practice in early Christianity, and the intersection of medicine, magic, and miracle.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

CSTS B228 Utopia: Good Place or No Place?
What is the ideal human society? What is the role and status of man and woman therein? Is such a society purely hypothetical or should we strive to make it viable in our modern world? This course will address these questions by exploring the historic development of the concept of utopia.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

CSTS B230 Food and Drink in the Ancient World
This course explores practices of eating and drinking in the ancient Mediterranean world both from a socio-cultural and environmental perspective. Since we are not only what we eat, but also where, when, why, with whom, and how we eat, we will examine the wider implications of patterns of food production, preparation, consumption, availability, and taboos, considering issues like gender, health, financial situation, geographical variability, and political status. Anthropological, archaeological, literary, and art historical approaches will be used to analyze the evidence and shed light on the role of food and drink in ancient culture and society. In addition, we will discuss how this affects our contemporary customs and practices and how our identity is still shaped by what we eat.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

CSTS B237 Underworlds in Virgil & After
What is a ‘literary tradition’, and what sense may we make of one? In this course we focus on an influential episode in the Western literary tradition: the hero’s journey into the underworld in Virgil’s epic poem, the Aeneid. Keeping in mind a master metaphor by which ‘underworld’ stands for ‘afterlife’, we consider that perilous ‘journey below’ on its own, in context of the complete poem, and in contexts provided by other authors’ visions of ‘what lies beneath’, including Homer (Odyssey), Ovid (Metamorphoses), Dante (Inferno), Milton (Paradise Lost), Shakespeare (The Tempest), Jules Verne (Journey to the Center of the Earth), Joseph Conrad (Heart of Darkness), J. R. R. Tolkien (The Hobbit), and the nameless author of the Epic of Gilgamesh.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

CSTS B242 Magic in the Greco-Roman World
Bindings and curses, love charms and healing potions, amulets and talismans - from the simple spells designed to meet the needs of the poor and desperate to the complex theurgies of the philosophers, the people of the Greco-Roman World made use of magic to try to influence the world around them. In this course students will gain an understanding of the magicians of the ancient world and the techniques and devices they used to serve their clientele, as well as the cultural contexts in which these ideas of magic arose. We shall consider ancient tablets and spell books as well as literary descriptions of magic in the light of theories relating to the religious, political, and social contexts in which magic was used.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

CSTS B274 Greek Tragedy in Global Cinema
This course explores how contemporary film, a creative medium appealing to the entire demographic spectrum like Greek drama, looks back to the ancient origins. Examining both films that are directly based on Greek plays and films that make use of classical material without being explicitly classical in plot or setting, we will discuss how Greek mythology is reconstructed and appropriated for modern audiences and how the classical past continues to be culturally significant. A variety of methodological approaches such as film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist theory will be applied in addition to more straightforward literary-historical interpretation.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

CSTS B324 Roman Architecture
The course gives special attention to the architecture and topography of ancient Rome from the origins of the city to the later Roman Empire. At the same time, general issues in architecture and planning with particular reference to Italy and the provinces from republic to empire are also addressed. These include public and domestic spaces,structures, settings and uses, urban infrastructure, the relationship of towns and territories, “suburban” and working villas, and frontier settlements. Prerequisite: ARCH 102.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Fall 2017)

CSTS B324 Roman Architecture
The course gives special attention to the architecture and topography of ancient Rome from the origins of the city to the later Roman Empire. At the same time, general issues in architecture and planning with particular reference to Italy and the provinces from republic to empire are also addressed. These include public and domestic spaces,structures, settings and uses, urban infrastructure, the relationship of towns and territories, “suburban” and working villas, and frontier settlements. Prerequisite: ARCH 102.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Fall 2017)

CSTS B375 Interpreting Mythology
The myths of the Greeks have provoked outrage and fascination, interpretation and retelling, censorship and elaboration, beginning with the Greeks themselves. We will see how some of these stories have been read and understood, recounted and revised, in various cultures and eras, from ancient tellings to modern movies. We will also explore some of the interpretive theories by which these tales have been understood, from ancient allegory to modern structural and semiotic theories. The student should gain a more profound understanding of the meaning of these myths to the Greeks themselves, of the cultural context in which they were formulated. At the same time, this course should provide the student with some familiarity with the range of interpretations and strategies of understanding that people of various cultures and times have applied to the Greek myths during the more than two millennia in which they have been preserved. Preference to upperclassmen, previous coursework in myth required.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Edmonds,R.
(Fall 2017)

CSTS B398 Senior Seminar
This is a bi-college seminar devoted to readings in and discussion of selected topics in the various sub-fields of Classics (e.g. literature, religion, philosophy, law, social history) and of how to apply contemporary critical approaches to the primary sources. Students will also begin developing a topic for their senior thesis, composing a prospectus and giving a preliminary presentation of their findings.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Conybeare,C.
(Fall 2017)

CSTS B399 Senior Seminar
This is the continuation of CSTS B398. Working with individual advisors from the bi-college classics departments, students will continue to develop the topic sketched out in the fall semester. By the end of the course, they will have completed at least one draft and a full, polished version of the senior thesis, of which they will give a final oral presentation.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

GREK B101 Herodotus
Greek 101 introduces the student to one of the greatest prose authors of ancient Greece, the historian, Herodotus. The “Father of History,” as Herodotus is sometimes called, wrote one of the earliest lengthy prose texts extant in Greek literature, in the Ionian dialect of Greek. The “Father of Lies,” as he is also sometimes known, wove into his history a number of fabulous and entertaining anecdotes and tales. His ‘historie’ or inquiry into the events surrounding the invasions by the Persian empire against the Greek city-states set the precedent for all subsequent historical writings. This course meets three times a week with a required fourth hour to be arranged. Prerequisite: GREK B010 and B011 or equivalent.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

GREK B104 Homer
Greek 104 is designed to introduce the student to the epic poetry attributed to Homer, the greatest poet of ancient Greece, through selections from the Odyssey. Since Homer’s poetic form is so important to the shape and texture of the Odyssey, we will examine the mechanics of Homeric poetry, both the intricacies of dactylic hexameter and the patterns of oral formulaic composition. We will also spend time discussing the characters and ideas that animate this text, since the value of Homer lies not merely in his incomparable mastery of his poetic form, but in the values and patterns of behavior in his story, patterns which remained remarkably influential in the Greek world for centuries. Prerequisite: One year of college level Greek or equivalent.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Spring 2018)

GREK B201 Plato and Thucydides
This course is designed to introduce the student to two of the greatest prose authors of ancient Greece, the philosopher, Plato, and the historian, Thucydides. These two writers set the terms in the disciplines of philosophy and history for millennia, and philosophers and historians today continue to grapple with their ideas and influence. The brilliant and controversial statesman Alcibiades provides a link between the two texts in this course (Plato’s Symposium and Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War), and we examine the ways in which both authors handle the figure of Alcibiades as a point of entry into the comparison of the varying styles and modes of thought of these two great writers. Suggested Prerequisites: At least 2 years of college Greek or the equivalent.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Edmonds,R.
(Fall 2017)

GREK B202 The Form of Tragedy
This course will introduce the student to two of the three great Athenian tragedians—Sophocles and Euripides. Their dramas, composed two-and-a-half millenia ago, continue to be performed regularly on modern stages around the world and exert a profound influence on current day theatre. We will read Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannos and Euripides’ Bacchae in full, focusing on language, poetics, meter, and performance studies.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

GREK B403 Supervised Work
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2017)

GREK B653 Athens in the Hellenistic Period
Surveys of Athenian history tend to conclude if not at the Battle of Chaeronea at any rate at the death of Alexander. Yet Athens did not disappear with the imposition of the Macedonian garrison in 322. Democracy resurfaced periodically over the course of the next century (in 318, 307, 288, and 229), and, more to the point, even under periods of oligarchic rule and Macedonian control, Athenian institutions remained intact, and Athenians continued to make significant contributions to the greater Greek world. Indeed, the century that followed Alexander’s death saw the flowering of Athenian historiography (e.g. Demochares, Diyllus, Philochorus, Timaeus, and Phylarchus) and new comedy (e.g. Menander and Poseidippus), as well as the advent of important philosophical schools (Epicureanism and Stoicism). This course will focus on Athens between the Battle of Chaeronea (338 BCE) and its liberation from Macedonian rule ca. 229 BCE. By way of a variety of contemporary sources, we shall have the opportunity to familiarize ourselves both with the historical narrative and with the intellectual climate of the polis in the early Hellenistic period.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

GSEM B623 Figures of Resistance: Classical and Modern
The GSem will explore classical figures of resistance such as Prometheus, Antigone, Electra, Medea, and Lysistrata and their reception in modern art and cinema. The focus will be on films and other works of art that re-appropriate and transform the ancient characters and their stories. We will discuss in particular how modern filmmakers re-contextualize the classical figures to shed light on contemporary historical, political, and social issues. Films will include Tony Harrison, Prometheus (Great Britain, 1998), Liliana Cavani, The Year of the Cannibals (Italy, 1970), Amy Greenfield, Antigone/Rites of Passion (USA, 1991), Ingmar Bergman, Persona (Sweden, 1966), Miklós Jancsó, Electra, My Love (Hungary, 1974), Arthur Ripstein, Asi Es La Vida (Mexico, 2000), and Spike Lee, Chi-raq (USA, 2015). Readings will be drawn from texts on reception studies, film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and political theory.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): King,H., Baertschi,A.
(Fall 2017)

HIST B123 The Early Medieval World
The first of a two-course sequence introducing medieval European history. The chronological span of this course is from the early 4th century and the Christianization of the Roman Empire to the early 10th century and the disintegration of the Carolingian Empire. This course number was previously HIST B223.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Truitt,E.
(Fall 2017)

HIST B124 High Middle Ages
This course will cover the second half of the European Middle Ages, often called the High and Late Middle Ages, from roughly 1000-1400. The course has a general chronological framework, and is based on important themes of medieval history. These include feudalism and the feudal economy; the social transformation of the millennium; monastic reform; the rise of the papacy; trade, exchange, and exploration; urbanism and the growth of towns. The course number was previously HIST B224.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

HIST B231 Medicine, Magic & Miracles in the Middle Ages
A lecture and discussion course on the therapeutic systems (humoral theory, faith healing, natural magic), the medical marketplace, and the social context for understanding health and disease in the medieval period. Topics covered include Greek, Arabic, and Latin medical textual traditions, the rise of hospitals and public health, and the Black Death.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Truitt,E.
(Fall 2017)

HIST B231 Medicine, Magic & Miracles in the Middle Ages
A lecture and discussion course on the therapeutic systems (humoral theory, faith healing, natural magic), the medical marketplace, and the social context for understanding health and disease in the medieval period. Topics covered include Greek, Arabic, and Latin medical textual traditions, the rise of hospitals and public health, and the Black Death.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Truitt,E.
(Fall 2017)

HIST B364 Magical Mechanisms
A reading and research seminar focused on different examples of artificial life in medieval cultures. Primary sources will be from a variety of genres, and secondary sources will include significant theoretical works in art history, critical theory and science studies. Prerequisite: at least one course in medieval history, or the permission of the instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Truitt,E.
(Spring 2018)

HIST B368 Topics in Medieval History
This is a topics course. Topics vary. Current topic description: A reading and research-based seminar on the intellectual and cultural history of medieval magic, including natural and demonic magic, astral science, alchemy, and other forms of “the occult sciences.” Primary sources will be from a variety of genres, including visual culture, and secondary sources will include significant works in philosophy, religious studies, and medieval historiography. Prerequisite: at least one course in medieval history, or the permission of the instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Truitt,E.
(Spring 2018)

LATN B110 Intermediate Latin
Intensive review of grammar, reading in classical prose and poetry. For students who have had the equivalent of several years of high school Latin or are not adequately prepared to take LATN 101. This course meets three times a week with a required fourth hour to be arranged. Prerequisite: One year of college level Latin or equivalent.
Approach: Course does not meet an Approach
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Fall 2017)

LATN B112 Latin Literature
In the second semester of the intermediate Latin sequence, readings in prose and poetry are frequently drawn from a period, such as the age of Augustus, that illustrate in different ways the leading political and cultural concerns of the time. The Latin readings and discussion are supplemented by readings in the secondary literature. This course meets three times a week with a required fourth hour to be arranged. Prerequisite: LATN 101 or 110 or placement by the department.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Baertschi,A.
(Spring 2018)

LATN B201 Topics: Advanced Latin Literature
This is a topics course, course content varies. In this course typically a variety of Latin prose and poetry of the high and later Roman empire (first to fourth centuries CE) is read. Single or multiple authors may be featured in a given semester. Suggested Preparation: two years of college Latin or equivalent.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

LATN B202 Topics: Advanced Latin Literature
In this course typically a variety of Latin prose and poetry of the high and later Roman empire (first to fourth centuries CE) is read. Single or multiple authors may be featured in a given semester. This is a topics course, course content varies. Prerequisite: At least one 200-level Latin course or equivalent. Current topic description: Readings will be drawn from the following authors: Lucan, De Bello Civili Book 7, Seneca’s Letters to Lucillius, and Cornelius Tacitus, the Agricola and the Histories (Selections).
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Scott,R.
(Spring 2018)

LATN B312 Roman Satire
Satire is the most slippery and subversive of genres. It is richly entertaining to read, but if we engage with it seriously it is often abrasive, shocking, shattering. Reading Roman satire requires an energetic exercise in cultural translation: we are confronted with the alienness of the Roman world, as well as its perverse literary vigour. This course will span four turbulent centuries of Roman imperialism in its reading of Roman satire. We will range from the sharp minutiae of social observation in Horace’s Sermones to the calculated public abuse of a eunuch consul in Claudian’s In Eutropium; from the swirling filthy riches of Persius and Juvenal to the nastily eloquent Christian condemnation of riches (and much else) in St Jerome. Students are warned: the language is difficult, the content often excoriating, even if exquisitely expressed. Reading this material challenges any comfortable separation between “literature” and “life”.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

LATN B350 Topics in Latin Literature
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Prerequisites: At least two 200-level Latin courses or permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Mulligan,B.
(Spring 2018)

LATN B403 Supervised Work
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2017)

LATN B637 Vergil Aeneid
A complete reading and close study of Virgil, whose “afterlife,” it has been said with little exaggeration, “is Western literature.” We read all of the certain poems--Eclogues (c. 39 BCE), Georgics (c. 29 BCE), and Aeneid (c. 19 BCE)--completely in English, substantial portions of each in the Latin, and scholarship and criticism. Aiming at increased fluency in reading Latin poetry, we also seek to deepen our capacity to respond to this astonishing ancient poet rigorously and meaningfully. Attention is paid to some of Virgil’s models in Latin and Greek and to some imitators especially in the European epic tradition.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)