2017-18 Catalog

Comparative Literature

Students may complete a major or minor in Comparative Literature.

Faculty

Chair and Adviser: Maud McInerney, Associate Professor of English (Haverford College)

Steering Committee

Bryn Mawr College

Martín Gaspar, Assistant Professor of Spanish
Jennifer Harford Vargas, Associate Professor of English on the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Change Master Fund and Co-Director of the Latin American, Latina/o and Iberian Studies Program (on leave semesters I & II)
Timothy Harte, Chair and Associate Professor of Russian on the Myra T. Cooley Lectureship in Russian
Shiamin Kwa, Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies
María Cristina Quintero, Chair and Professor of Spanish
Roberta Ricci, Chair and Associate Professor of Italian
Azade Seyhan, Fairbank Professor in the Humanities and Chair and Professor of German and Comparative Literature

Haverford

Imke Brust, Assistant Professor of German
Israel Burshatin, Professor of Spanish
Roberto Castillo Sandoval, Associate Professor of Spanish & Comparative Literature
Maud McInerney, Associate Professor of English
Jerry Miller, Associate Professor of Philosophy
Deborah Roberts, Professor of Classics and Comparative Literature
Ulrich Schoenherr, Professor of German and Comparative Literature
David Sedley, Associate Professor of French

The study of Comparative Literature situates literature in an international perspective; examines transnational cultural connections through literary history, literary criticism, critical theory, and poetics; and works toward a nuanced understanding of the socio-cultural functions of literature. The structure of the program allows students to engage in such diverse areas of critical inquiry as East-West cultural relations, global censorship and human rights, diaspora studies, film history and theory, and aesthetics of modernity. Therefore, interpretive methods from other disciplines also play a role in the comparative study of literature; among these are anthropology, ethnology, philosophy, history, history of art, religion, classical studies, area studies (Africana studies, Middle Eastern studies, Latin American studies, among others), gender studies, and other arts.

Comparative Literature students are required to have a reading knowledge of at one language other than English, adequate to the advanced study of literature in that language. Some Comparative Literature courses may require reading knowledge of a foreign language as a prerequisite for admission. Students considering graduate work in Comparative Literature should also study a second language other than English.

Major Requirements

Requirements for the Comparative Literature major are:

  • COML 200: Introduction to Comparative Literature (normally taken in the sophomore year)
  • Six literature courses at the 200 or 300-levels taken in the original languages and balanced between two literature departments (of which English may be one)*—at least two of these (one in each national literature) must be at the 300 level or above, or its equivalent as approved in advance by the adviser; one course in critical theory; two electives; COML 398: Theories and Methods in Comparative Literature and 399: Senior Seminar in Comparative Literature.

Students must further complete a writing requirement in the major.  Students will work with their major advisors in order to identify either two writing attentive or one writing intensive course within their major plan of study.
*In the case of languages for which literature courses in the original language are not readily available in the Tri-Co, students may on occasion be allowed to count a course taught in English translation for which they do at least part of the reading in the original language.

Honors

Students who, in the judgment of the advisory committee, have done distinguished work in their courses and in the senior seminar will be considered for departmental honors.

Minor Requirements

Requirements for the minor are COML 200 and 398, plus four additional courses—two each in the literature of two languages. At least one of these four courses must be at the 300 level. Students who minor in comparative literature are encouraged to choose their national literature courses from those with a comparative component.

Both majors and minors are encouraged to work closely with the chairs and members of the advisory committee in shaping their programs.

NOTE: Please note that not all topics courses (B223, 299, 321, 325, 326, 340) count toward COML elective requirements. See adviser.

COURSES

COML B200 Introduction to Comparative Literature
This course explores a variety of approaches to the comparative or transnational study of literature through readings of several kinds: texts from different cultural traditions that raise questions about the nature and function of storytelling and literature; texts that comment on, respond to, and rewrite other texts from different historical periods and nations; translations; and readings in critical theory.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Kwa,S.
(Fall 2017)

COML B225 Censorship: Historical Contexts, Local Practices and Global Resonance
The course is in English. It examines the ban on books and art in a global context through a study of the historical and sociopolitical conditions of censorship practices. The course raises such questions as how censorship is used to fortify political power, how it is practiced locally and globally, who censors, what are the categories of censorship, how censorship succeeds and fails, and how writers and artists write and create against and within censorship. The last question leads to an analysis of rhetorical strategies that writers and artists employ to translate the expression of repression, trauma, and torture into idioms of resistance. German majors/minors can get German Studies credit. Prerequisite: EMLY B001 or a 100-level intensive writing course.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies; Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

COML B293 The Play of Interpretation
Designated theory course. A study of the methodologies and regimes of interpretation in the arts, humanistic sciences, and media and cultural studies, this course focuses on common problems of text, authorship, reader/spectator, and translation in their historical and formal contexts. Literary, oral, and visual texts from different cultural traditions and histories will be studied through interpretive approaches informed by modern critical theories. Readings in literature, philosophy, popular culture, and film will illustrate how theory enhances our understanding of the complexities of history, memory, identity, and the trials of modernity.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: International Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

COML B398 Theories and Methods in Comparative Literature
This course, required of all senior comparative literature majors in preparation for writing the senior thesis in the spring semester, has a twofold purpose: to review interpretive approaches informed by critical theories that enhance our understanding of literary and cultural texts; and to help students prepare a preliminary outline of their senior theses. Throughout the semester, students research theoretical paradigms that bear on their own comparative thesis topics in order to situate those topics in an appropriate critical context. This is a required for majors and minors.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Seyhan,A.
(Fall 2017)

COML B399 Senior Seminar in Comparative Literature
Thesis writing seminar. Research methods. This course will be offered at Haverford College in 2017-18.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

COML B403 Supervised Work
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2017)

ARCH B217 Captive Greece, Captor Rome?
The Western classical tradition is not monolithic, but contains elements from both ancient Greek and Roman culture. This course examines the relationship between the two, from the Hellenistic era through the Roman Empire, and its later consequences, emphasizing the primary evidence of the visual arts and contemporary texts. Suggested preparation: 100-level coursework in history of art, classics, archaeology, or comparative literature.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Donohue,A.
(Spring 2018)

ARCH B303 Classical Bodies
An examination of the conceptions of the human body evidenced in Greek and Roman art and literature, with emphasis on issues that have persisted in the Western tradition. Topics include the fashioning of concepts of male and female standards of beauty and their implications; conventions of visual representation; the nude; clothing and its symbolism; the athletic ideal; physiognomy; medical theory and practice; the visible expression of character and emotions; and the formulation of the “classical ideal” in antiquity and later times.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ARTW B261 Writing Poetry I
In this course students will learn to “read like a writer,” while grappling with the work of accomplished poets, and providing substantive commentary on peers’ work. Through diverse readings, students will examine craft strategies at work in both formal and free verse poems, such as diction, metaphor, imagery, lineation, metrical patterns, irony, and syntax. The course will cover shaping forms (such as elegy and pastoral) as well as given forms, such as the sonnet, ghazal, villanelle, etc. Students will discuss strategies for conveying the literal meaning of a poem (e.g., through sensory description and clear, compelling language) and the concealed meaning of a text (e.g., through metaphor, imagery, meter, irony, and shifts in diction and syntax). By the end of the course, students will have generated new material, shaped and revised draft poems, and significantly grown as writers by experimenting with various aspects of craft.
Prerequisite: Students interested in a Creative Writing course must register for ARTW B999 and turn in the creative writing questionnaire by the end of registration.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Matthews,A.
(Fall 2017)

CSTS B274 Greek Tragedy in Global Cinema
This course explores how contemporary film, a creative medium appealing to the entire demographic spectrum like Greek drama, looks back to the ancient origins. Examining both films that are directly based on Greek plays and films that make use of classical material without being explicitly classical in plot or setting, we will discuss how Greek mythology is reconstructed and appropriated for modern audiences and how the classical past continues to be culturally significant. A variety of methodological approaches such as film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist theory will be applied in addition to more straightforward literary-historical interpretation.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

CSTS B375 Interpreting Mythology
The myths of the Greeks have provoked outrage and fascination, interpretation and retelling, censorship and elaboration, beginning with the Greeks themselves. We will see how some of these stories have been read and understood, recounted and revised, in various cultures and eras, from ancient tellings to modern movies. We will also explore some of the interpretive theories by which these tales have been understood, from ancient allegory to modern structural and semiotic theories. The student should gain a more profound understanding of the meaning of these myths to the Greeks themselves, of the cultural context in which they were formulated. At the same time, this course should provide the student with some familiarity with the range of interpretations and strategies of understanding that people of various cultures and times have applied to the Greek myths during the more than two millennia in which they have been preserved. Preference to upperclassmen, previous coursework in myth required.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Edmonds,R.
(Fall 2017)

EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Kwa,S.
(Spring 2018)

EALC B255 Understanding Comics: Introduction to Reading the Graphic Novel
The graphic narrative form has proliferated at a breathtaking rate in the last several decades. Called “comics,” “graphic novels,” and many other terms in between, these word-image hybrids have been embraced by both popular and critical audiences. But what is a graphic novel? How do we conceive of these texts and, more importantly, how do we read, interpret and write about them? This course is focused on approaches to reading the graphic novel, with a focus on a subgenre called the “literary comic.” Our first approach is to consider different kinds of primary source texts and ask if and how they fulfill our understanding of the graphic narrative. This consideration will include various test cases, from wordless comics, to texts used as images, to the many varieties of word-image hybrids that are called comic books. Our second approach is to examine different scholarly approaches to analyzing graphic narratives, base d in different disciplines such as memoir studies, trauma studies, visual and material culture, history, semiotics, and, especially, narratology. Primary source readings include texts by Ware, Barry, Clowes, and Burns. Secondary readings include Hirsch, McCloud, Barthes, Iser, and Groensteen.Three short assignments due during the semester, and a final project due at the end of exam period (see description below). Students will also rotate responsibilities for starting discussions with small presentations aimed at discussing readings in depth. Students taking this course for their major in EALC or COML should meet with the instructor to discuss specific requirements.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Kwa,S.
(Spring 2018)

EALC B281 Food in Translation: Theory and Practice
This semester we will explore the connections between what we eat and how we define ourselves in the context of global culture. We will proceed from the assumption that food is an object of culture, and that our contemplation of its transformations and translations in production, preparation, consumption, and distribution will inform our notions of personal and group identity. This course takes Chinese food as a case study, and examines the way that Chinese food moves from its host country to diasporic communities all over the world, using theories of translation as our theoretical and empirical foundation. From analyzing menu and ingredient translations to producing a short film based on interviews, we will consider the relationship between food and communication in a multilingual and multicultural world. Readings include theoretical texts on translation (Apter), recipe books and menus, Chinese and Chinese-American literature (Classic of Poetry, Mo Yan, Hong Kingston). Films include Ian Cheney’s “Searching for General Tso,” Wayne Wang’s “Soul of a Banquet” and “Eat a Bowl of Tea,” Ang Li’s “Eat Drink Man Woman,” and Wong Karwai’s “In the Mood for Love.”
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

EALC B355 Animals, Vegetables, Minerals in East Asian Literature
This semester, we will explore how artists question, explore, celebrate, and critique the relationships between humans and the environment. Through a topics-focused course, students will examine the ways that narratives about environment have shaped the way that humans have defined themselves. We will be reading novels and short stories and viewing films that contest conventional binaries of man and animal, civilization and nature, tradition and technology, and even truth and fiction. “Animals, Vegetables, Minerals” does not follow chronological or geographical frameworks, but chooses texts that engage the three categories enumerated as the major themes of our course. We will read and discuss animal theory, theories of place and landscape, and theories of modernization or mechanization; and there will be frequent (and intentional) overlap between these categories. We will also be watching films that extend our theoretical questions of thes e themes beyond national, linguistic, and generic borders. You are expected to view this course as a collaborative process in which you share responsibility for leading discussion. There are no prerequisites or language expectations, but students should have some basic knowledge of East Asian, especially Sinophone, history and culture, or be willing to do some additional reading (suggested by the instructor) to achieve an adequate contextual background for exploring these texts.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Kwa,S.
(Fall 2017)

ENGL B229 Movies and Mass Politics
Movies and mass politics emerged together, altering entertainment and government in strangely similar ways. Fascism and Communism claimed an inherent relation to the masses and hence to movies; Hollywood rejected such claims. We will examine films that allude to Communism and Fascism, seeking to understand how they join in political debates and comment upon the mass experience of movie going.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Tratner,M.
(Spring 2018)

ENGL B234 Postcolonial Literature in English
This course will survey a broad range of novels and poems written while countries were breaking free of British colonial rule. Readings will also include cultural theorists interested in defining literary issues that arise from the postcolonial situation.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ENGL B279 Introduction to African Literature
Taking into account the oral, written, aural, and visual forms of African “texts” over several thousand years, this course will explore literary production, intertextuality, translation, and audience/critical reception. Representative works to be studied include oral traditions, the Sundiata and Mwindo epics, the plays of Wole Soyinka and his Burden of History, the Muse of Forgiveness; and the work of Sembène Ousmane, Bessie Head, Ayi Kwei Armah, Mariama Bâ, Naguib Mahfouz, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Yvonne Vera, and others.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ENGL B345 Topics in Narrative Theory
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ENGL B381 Post-Apartheid Literature
South African texts from several language communities which anticipate a post-apartheid polity and texts by contemporary South African writers which explore the complexities of life in “the new South Africa.” Several films emphasize the minefield of post-apartheid reconciliation and accountability.
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ENGL B388 Contemporary African Fiction
Noting that the official colonial independence of most African countries dates back only half a century, this course focuses on the fictive experiments of the most recent decade. A few highly controversial works from the 90’s serve as an introduction to very recent work. Most works are in English. To experience depth as well as breadth, there is a small cluster of works from South Africa. With novels and tales from elsewhere on the huge African continent, we will get a glimpse of “living in the present” in history and letters.
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Beard, L-S.
(Spring 2018)

FREN B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
By bringing together the study of major theoretical currents of the 20th century and the practice of analyzing literary works in the light of theory, this course aims at providing students with skills to use literary theory in their own scholarship. The selection of theoretical readings reflects the history of theory (psychoanalysis, structuralism, narratology), as well as the currents most relevant to the contemporary academic field: Post-structuralism, Post-colonialism, Gender Studies, and Ecocriticism. They are paired with a diverse range of short stories (Poe, Kafka, Camus, Borges, Calvino, Morrison, Djebar, Ngozi Adichie) that we discuss along with our study of theoretical texts. The class will be conducted in English with an additional hour in French for students wishing to take it for French credit.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sanquer,M.
(Fall 2017)

FREN B302 Le printemps de la parole féminine: femmes écrivains des débuts
This study of selected women authors from Latin CE-Carolingian period through the Middle Ages, Renaissance and 17th century—among them, Perpetua, Hrotswitha, Marie de France, the trobairitz, Christine de Pisan, Louise Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, and Madame de Lafayette—examines the way in which they appropriate and transform the male writing tradition and define themselves as self-conscious artists within or outside it. Particular attention will be paid to identifying recurring concerns and structures in their works, and to assessing their importance to women’s writing in general: among them, the poetics of silence, reproduction as a metaphor for artistic creation, and sociopolitical engagement. Prerequisite: two 200-level courses or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

FREN B325 Topics: Etudes avancées
An in-depth study of a particular topic, event or historical figure in French civilization. This is a topics course. Course content varies. The seminar topic rotates among many subjects: La Révolution française: Histoire, littérature et culture; L’environnement naturel dans la culture française; Mal et valeurs éthiques; Le Cinéma et la politique, 1940-1968; Le Nationalisme en France et dans les pays francophones; Étude socio-culturelle des arts du manger en France du Moyen Age à nos jours; Crimes et criminalité; Ecrire la Grande Guerre: 1914-10; Le “Rentrée Littéraire”; Proustl Baudelaire.
Prerequisite: Two 200-level courses.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Le Menthéour,R., Sanquer,M.

Fall 2017: Les femmes au Maghreb. This course offers an insight into Francophone North-African colonial and post-colonial literature by focusing on the role of women in society, particularly through the lens of topics such as politics, religion and sexuality. In addition to literary texts by Moroccan, Algerian and Tunisian writers, we will study historical and sociological sources as well as North African feminist traditions. Course will be taught in French.

Spring 2018: Les Monstres. Ce cours examinera les raisons pour lesquelles la monstruosité physique et morale a fondé une nouvelle esthétique littéraire en France, du XVIIème au XIXème siècle. Pourquoi préférer la peinture de la difformité physique et morale à l’idéal classique de la beauté? Quels sont les effets affectifs et esthétiques recherchés: horreur, indignation, sentiment du sublime? Nous lirons des œuvres de Perrault, Racine, Cazotte, Musset, Barbey d’Aurevilly et Baudelaire.

FREN B350 Voix médiévales et échos modernes
A study of selected 19th- and 20th-century works inspired by medieval subjects, such as the Grail and Arthurian legends and the Tristan and Yseut stories, and by medieval genres, such as the roman, saints’ lives, or the miracle play. Among the texts and films studied are works by Bonnefoy, Cocteau, Flaubert, Genevoix, Giono, and Gracq.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Armstrong,P.
(Spring 2018)

GERM B223 Topics in German Cultural Studies
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Recent topics include Remembered Violence, Global Masculinities, and Crime and Detection in German.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

GERM B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile
This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Julia Alvarez, Albert Camus, Ana Castillo, Sigmund Freud, Eva Hoffman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, W. G. Sebald, Kurban Said, and others.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies; International Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

GERM B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture
This is a topics course. Taught in English. Course content varies. Previous topics include, Women’s Narratives on Modern Migrancy, Exile, and Diasporas; Nation and Identity in Post-War Austria. Current topic: Crime and Courtroom Drama. This is a film-based course about political trials at critical junctures of German history. Current topic description: This is a film-based course about political trials at critical junctures of German history.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Shen,Q.
(Spring 2018)

GERM B320 Topics in German Literature and Culture
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Previous topics include: Romantic Literary Theory and Literary Modernity; Configurations of Femininity in German Literature; Nietzsche and Modern Cultural Criticism; Contemporary German Fiction; German Literary Culture in Exile (1933-1945). Taught in English. Students wanting German credit will meet for additional hour per week. Current topic description: This course focuses on the development of strong international and cross-cultural trends in German literature of modernity.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Units: 1.0
(Spring 2018)

HART B110 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the Cinema
An introduction to the analysis of film through particular attention to the role of the spectator. Why do moving images compel our fascination? How exactly do film spectators relate to the people, objects, and places that appear on the screen? Wherein lies the power of images to move, attract, repel, persuade, or transform its viewers? In this course, students will be introduced to film theory through the rich and complex topic of identification. We will explore how points of view are framed in cinema, and how those viewing positions differ from those of still photography, advertising, video games, and other forms of media. Students will be encouraged to consider the role the cinematic medium plays in influencing our experience of a film: how it is not simply a film’s content, but the very form of representation that creates interactions between the spectator and the images on the screen. Film screenings include Psycho, Being John Malkovich, and others. Course is geared to freshman and those with no prior film instruction. Fulfills History of Art major 100-level course requirement, Film Studies minor Introductory course or Theory course requirement.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): King,H.
(Spring 2018)

HART B306 Film Theory
An introduction to major developments in film theory and criticism. Topics covered include: the specificity of film form; cinematic realism; the cinematic “author”; the politics and ideology of cinema; the relation between cinema and language; spectatorship, identification, and subjectivity; archival and historical problems in film studies; the relation between film studies and other disciplines of aesthetic and social criticism. Each week of the syllabus pairs critical writing(s) on a central principle of film analysis with a cinematic example. Class will be divided between discussion of critical texts and attempts to apply them to a primary cinematic text. Prerequisite: A course in Film Studies (HART B110, HART B299, ENGL B205, or the equivalent from another college by permission of instructor).
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

HART B340 Topics in Baroque Art
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ITAL B211 Primo Levi, the Holocaust, and Its Aftermath
A consideration, through analysis and appreciation of his major works, of how the horrific experience of the Holocaust awakened in Primo Levi a growing awareness of his Jewish heritage and led him to become one of the dominant voices of that tragic historical event, as well as one of the most original new literary figures of post-World War II Italy. Always in relation to Levi and his works, attention will also be given to Italian women writers whose works are also connected with the Holocaust. Course is taught in English. An extra hour will be scheduled for those students taking the course for Italian or Romance Languages credit.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ITAL B212 Italy Today: New Voices, New Writers, New Literature
This course, taught in English, will focus primarily on the works of the so-called “migrant writers” who, having adopted the Italian language, have become a significant part of the new voice of Italy. In addition to the aesthetic appreciation of these works, this course will also take into consideration the social, cultural, and political factors surrounding them. The course will focus on works by writers who are now integral to Italian canon – among them: Cristina Ali-Farah, Igiaba Scego, Ghermandi Gabriella, Amara Lakhous. As part of the course, movies concerned with various aspects of Italian Migrant literature will be screened and analyzed. One additional hour for students who want Italian credit.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Film Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Kubati,R.
(Spring 2018)

ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
An examination in English of leading theories of interpretation from Classical Tradition to Modern and Post-Modern Time. This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ITAL B214 The Myth of Venice (1800-2000)
In English. The Republic of Venice existed for over a millennium. This course begins in the year 1797 at the end of the Republic and the emerging of an extensive body of literature centered on Venice and its mythical facets. Readings will include the Romantic views of Venice (excerpts from Lord Byron, Fredrick Schiller, Wolfang von Goethe, Ugo Foscolo, Alessandro Manzoni) and the 20th century reshaping of the literary myth (readings from Thomas Mann, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Gabriele D’Annunzio, Henry James, and others). A journey into this fascinating tradition will shed light on how the literary and visual representation of Venice, rather than focusing on a nostalgic evocation of the death of the Republic, became a territory of exploration for literary modernity. The course is offered in English; all texts are provided in translation. One additional hour for students who want Italian credit. Suggested Preparation: Counts toward Comp Lit. Counts toward Film Studies.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

ITAL B310 Detective Fiction
In English. Why is detective fiction so popular? What explains the continuing multiplication of detective texts despite the seemingly finite number of available plots? This course will explore the worldwide fascination with this genre beginning with European writers before turning to the more distant mystery stories from around the world. The international scope of the readings will highlight how authors in different countries have developed their own national detective typologies while simultaneously responding to international influence of the British-American model. Italian majors taking this course for Italian credit will be required to meet for an additional hour with the instructor and to do the readings and writing in Italian. Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or permission by the instructor. One additional hour for students who want Italian credit.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

PHIL B323 Culture and Interpretation
This course will discuss these questions. What are the aims of interpretation? Must we assume that, for cultural objects—like artworks, music, or literature—there must be a single right interpretation? If not, what is to prevent one from sliding into an interpretive anarchism? What is the role of a creator’s intentions in fixing upon admissible interpretations? Does interpretation affect the identity of the object of interpretation? If an object of interpretation exists independently of interpretive practice, must it answer to only one right interpretation? In turn, if an object of interpretation is constituted by interpretive practice, must it answer to more than one right interpretation? This course encourages active discussions of these questions.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Counts towards: International Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

RUSS B214 Anna Karenina and the Tasks of Literature
This course takes Lev Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina as its centerpiece and most sustained point of interest. We will begin with a few of Tolstoy’s important early works (notably, his Childhood. Boyhood. Youth.), then read Anna Karenina slowly and in detail, identifying its chief formal and thematic characteristics and thinking about the novel’s aesthetics in relation to the ethical questions it raises. These questions traverse a broad range of topics from marital infidelity and legally recognized forms of kinship to a critique of Russian imperial geopolitics and military interventions from a standpoint that prefigures Tolstoy’s late-in-life radical pacifism. Next, we will read three novels (Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, Alexander Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin) that, much as they predate Tolstoy’s masterpiece, help us bring the central preoccupations of Anna Karenina into sharper focus. We will conclude the course with Tolstoy’s late short works, a short story by Anton Chekhov, and Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, which we will contemplate as a reply to and a potential re-writing of Anna Karenina, since the English modernist famously declared that she had “nearly every scene of Anna Karenina branded in [her.]” All readings in English.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Grigoryan,B.
(Spring 2018)

RUSS B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Attentive
Counts towards: Film Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SPAN B211 Borges y sus lectores
Primary emphasis on Borges and his poetics of reading; other writers are considered to illustrate the semiotics of texts, society, and traditions. Prerequisite: SPAN B110 and/or B120 (previously SPAN B200/B202); or another SPAN 200-level course.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SPAN B260 Ariel/Calibán y el discurso americano
A study of the transformations of Ariel/Calibán as images of Latin American culture. Prerequisite: SPAN B110 and/or B120 (previously SPAN B200/B202); or another SPAN 200-level course.
Approach: Critical Interpretation (CI); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sacerio-Garí,E.
(Fall 2017)

SPAN B311 Crimen y detectives en la narrativa hispánica contemporánea
An analysis of the rise of the hard-boiled genre in contemporary Hispanic narrative and its contrast to classic detective fiction, as a context for understanding contemporary Spanish and Latin American culture. Discussion of pertinent theoretical implications and the social and political factors that contributed to the genre’s evolution and popularity. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SPAN B317 Poéticas del deseo y el poder en la lírica del Siglo de Oro
A study of the evolution of the lyric in Spain during the Renaissance and Baroque periods beginning with the oral tradition and the imitation of Petrarch. Topics include: the representation of women as objects of desire and pre-texts for writing, the political and national subtexts for lyric production, the self-fashioning and subjectivity of the lyric voice, theories of parody and imitation, and the feminine appropriation of the Petrarchan tradition. Although concentrating on the poetry of Spain, reading will include texts from Italy, France, England and Mexico. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: at least one 200-level course. Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latina/o Studies
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SPAN B322 Queens, Nuns, and Other Deviants in the Early Modern Iberian World
The course examines literary, historical, and legal texts from the early modern Iberian world (Spain, Mexico, Peru) through the lens of gender studies. The course is divided around three topics: royal bodies (women in power), cloistered bodies (women in the convent), and delinquent bodies (figures who defy legal and gender normativity). Course is taught in English and is open to all juniors or seniors who have taken at least one 200-level course in a literature department. Students seeking Spanish credit must have taken BMC Spanish 110 and/or 120 and at least one other Spanish course at a 200-level, or received permission from instructor.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SPAN B332 Novelas de las Américas
What do we gain by reading a Latin American or a US novel as “American” in the continental sense? What do we learn by comparing novels from “this” America to classics of the “other” Americas? Can we find through this Panamericanist perspective common aesthetics, interests, conflicts? In this course we will explore these questions by connecting and comparing major US novels with Latin American classics of the 20th and 21st century. We will read these works in clusters to illuminate aesthetic, political and cultural resonances and affinities. This course is taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SPAN B370 Literatura y delincuencia
A study of the origins, development and transformation of the picaresque genre from its origins in 16th- and 17th-century Spain through the 21st century. Using texts, literature, painting, and film from Spain and Latin America, we will explore topics such as the construction of the fictive self, the poetics and politics of criminality, transgression in gender and class. Among the topics to be discussed: criminalization of poverty, prostitution, and the feminine picaresque. Prerequiste: At least one SPAN 200-level course.
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Quintero,M.
(Fall 2017)