2017-18 Catalog

Sociology

Students may complete a major or minor in Sociology.

Faculty

Piper Coutinho-Sledge, Assistant Professor of Sociology
David Karen, Professor of Sociology
Veronica Montes, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Co-Director of the Latin American, Latina/o and Iberian Studies Program
Mary Osirim, Provost and Professor of Sociology
Robert Washington, Professor of Sociology
Nathan Wright, Chair and Associate Professor of Sociology

The major in Sociology aims to provide understanding of the organization and functioning of modern society by analyzing its major institutions, social groups, and values, and their connections to culture and power. To facilitate these analytical objectives, the department offers rigorous preparation in social theory and problem-focused training in quantitative as well as qualitative methodologies.

Major Requirements

Requirements for the major are SOCL 102, 265, 302, 303 (Junior Seminar), which fulfills the College writing intensive requirement, 398 (Senior Seminar), five additional courses in sociology (one of which may be at the 100 level and at least one of which must be at the 300 level). In addition, the student must take two additional courses in sociology or an allied subject; the allied courses are to be chosen in consultation with the faculty adviser. The department strongly recommends that majors take a history course focused on late 19th and 20th century American history. Students with an interest in quantitative sociology are encouraged to elect as allied work further training in mathematics, statistics and computer science. Those with an interest in historical or theoretical sociology are encouraged to elect complementary courses in history, philosophy, and anthropology. In general, these allied courses should be chosen from the social sciences.

Senior Experience

The Senior Seminar is required of all senior sociology majors regardless of whether or not they wish to do a thesis. Depending on the number of students, in some years the Senior Seminar will have two sections. The content of the two sections may differ, but the structure of the seminars will be the same. Students will focus on their writing in a series of assignments, emphasizing, as the new college-wide writing requirement suggests, the process and elements of good writing.

Senior Thesis

During senior year, seniors will have the option of doing a one-semester thesis in the fall, a one-semester thesis in the spring, or a two-semester thesis (one grade for the year). To become eligible to write a senior thesis, a student must have a minimum 3.0 GPA in sociology (this will also be the minimum GPA for a student to do an independent study in sociology). Junior sociology majors will need to approach a faculty member as early as possible about the possibility of advising their thesis and will need to indicate in their thesis proposal their preferred adviser. The department will attempt to follow these preferences but will take responsibility for assigning an adviser.

Rising seniors who wish to write a senior thesis will need to submit by June 30 to the Chair of sociology a 1-2 page thesis proposal that includes the following information:

  1. Proposed term of thesis-writing: fall semester; spring semester; both semesters
  2. Timeline: brief indication of when the data will be collected, when/how it will be analyzed, when the write-up will take place, etc.
  3. Preferred adviser
  4. Thesis proposal (should include the research question, its sociological significance, the proposed method, plan of analysis, and anticipated value)

a. The thesis proposal should also state clearly whether the research will require IRB approval, if approval has already been secured, or when it will be secured
b. Please indicate if you have any previous preparation/work in the thesis topic area.

The chair will distribute the proposals to department members, collect their comments, and inform the student of a yes/no decision by July 15. Please note that students who are not selected to do a senior thesis may still pursue independent work with a faculty member (if their GPA in the major is 3.0 or above). If you are unsure of whether your topic is really a thesis you should discuss this with a faculty member. The following broad categories of work have been considered in the past to be theses: students conduct an analysis of empirical data (this can be qualitative or quantitative; collected by the student or by someone else; contemporary or historical; etc.) or students undertake to research a question using already published evidence (so the thesis could be a very focused, extensive literature review). Students would be welcome to propose developing further a research paper that they wrote in a course. This kind of proposal needs to be very specific as to what the new/additional goals are.

The Department of Sociology offers concentrations in gender and society and African American studies. In pursuing these concentrations, majors should inquire about the possibility of coursework at Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges and the University of Pennsylvania.

Minor Requirements

Requirements for the minor are SOCL 102, 265, 302, and three additional courses within the department. Students may choose electives from courses offered at Haverford College. Bryn Mawr majors should consult their department about major credit for courses taken at other institutions.

Honors

Honors in Sociology are available to those students who have a grade point average in the major of 3.5 or higher and who write a senior thesis that is judged outstanding by the department. The thesis would be written under the direction of a Sociology faculty member.

Concentrations Within the Sociology Major

Gender and Society

Three courses are required for this concentration; at least two of these courses must be in sociology. The remaining course can be in sociology or an allied social science field. Students who pursue this concentration are required to take at least one of the core courses in this area offered by the department: The Study of Gender in Society (SOCL 201) or Women in Contemporary Society: The Southern Hemisphere (SOCL 225). The department encourages students in this concentration to take courses that focus on the study of gender in both the Global North and the Global South. In addition to taking courses in this field at Bryn Mawr, students may also take courses towards this concentration in their study abroad programs or at Haverford, Swarthmore, and the University of Pennsylvania. Any course taken outside of the Bryn Mawr Department of Sociology must be approved by the department for concentration credit.

African American Studies

Three courses are required for this concentration; at least two of these courses must be in sociology. The remaining course can be in either sociology or an allied field. Students who pursue this concentration are required to take the core course offered by the Bryn Mawr Department of Sociology: Black America In Sociological Perspective (SOCL 229). Students are encouraged to take courses on Black America listed under the Bryn Mawr and Haverford Africana Studies Programs. Courses taken outside the Bryn Mawr Department of Sociology must be approved by the department for concentration credit. Majors interested in this concentration should consult Robert Washington for further information.

COURSES

SOCL B102 Society, Culture, and the Individual
Analysis of the basic sociological methods, perspectives, and concepts used in the study of society, with emphasis on social structure, education, culture, the self, and power. Theoretical perspectives that focus on sources of stability, conflict, and change are emphasized throughout.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; International Studies
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2017, Spring 2018)

SOCL B130 Sociology of Harry Potter
J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series is a worldwide phenomenon that has sold hundreds of millions of books and been translated into dozens of languages. Over the last decade, academic studies of Harry Potter have taken root in English and Theology departments, but very few sociologists have taken a scholarly look at the rich society Rowling has created. This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts of sociology using the lens of the Harry Potter series. We will explore questions of hierarchy, inequality, terrorism, consumption, race, class, and gender, and we will discuss the ways in which stratification in the wizarding world compares and contrasts to similar issues in the Muggle world. Class discussions and exercises will assume that students have read all seven Harry Potter books.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SOCL B201 The Study of Gender in Society
The definition of male and female social roles and sociological approaches to the study of gender in the United States, with attention to gender in the economy and work place, the division of labor in families and households, and analysis of class and ethnic differences in gender roles. Of particular interest in this course is the comparative exploration of the experiences of women of color in the United States.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sledge,P.
(Fall 2017)

SOCL B205 Social Inequality
Introduction to the major sociological theories of gender, racial-ethnic, and class inequality with emphasis on the relationships among these forms of stratification in the contemporary United States, including the role of the upper class(es), inequality between and within families, in the work place, and in the educational system.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2017)

SOCL B217 The Family in Social Context
A consideration of the family as a social institution in the United States, looking at how societal and cultural characteristics and dynamics influence families; how the family reinforces or changes the society in which it is located; and how the family operates as a social organization. Included is an analysis of family roles and social interaction within the family. Major problems related to contemporary families are addressed, such as domestic violence and divorce. Cross-cultural and subcultural variations in the family are considered.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SOCL B218 Sociology of International Development
This course examines the persistent gap between the Global North and Global South around problems such as poverty, food insecurity, and access to health and education. We will examine theories and perspectives that address this disparity and explore alternatives to Western models of social organization, as put forth by social movements in the Global South. Throughout the course, we will read key primary texts (manifestos, communiqués, oral histories, and world financial institution reports) to understand the role of different players in the international development field, including global economic and governance institutions, non-governmental organizations, and—most importantly—feminist, afro-descendant, indigenous, and other voices emerging in the Global South.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SOCL B225 Women in Society
A study of the contemporary experiences of women of color in the Global South. The household, workplace, community, and the nation-state, and the positions of women in the private and public spheres are compared cross-culturally. Topics include feminism, identity and self-esteem; globalization and transnational social movements and tensions and transitions encountered as nations embark upon development.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Montes,V.
(Spring 2018)

SOCL B227 Sports in Society
Using a sociological, historical, and comparative approach, this course examines such issues as the role of the mass media in the transformation of sports; the roles played in sports by race, ethnicity, class, and gender; sports as a means of social mobility; sports and socialization; the political economy of sports; and sports and the educational system.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SOCL B229 Black America in Sociological Perspective
This course presents sociological perspectives on various issues affecting black America as a historically unique minority group in the United States: the legacy of slavery and the Jim Crow era; the formation of urban black ghettos; the civil rights reforms; the problems of poverty and unemployment; the problems of crime and other social problems; the problems of criminal justice; the continuing significance of race; the varied covert modern forms of racial discrimination; and the role of race in American politics.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SOCL B235 Mexican-American Communities
For its unique history, the number of migrants, and the two countries’ proximity, Mexican migration to the United States represents an exceptional case in world migration. There is no other example of migration with more than 100 years of history. The copious presence of migrants concentrated in a host country, such as we have in the case of the 11.7 million Mexican migrants residing in the United States, along with another 15 million Mexican descendants, is unparalleled. The 1,933-mile-long border shared by the two countries makes it one of the longest boundary lines in the world and, unfortunately, also one of the most dangerous frontiers in the world today. We will examine the different economic, political, social and cultural forces that have shaped this centenarian migration influx and undertake a macro-, meso-, and micro-levels of analysis. At the macro-level of political economy, we will investigate the economic interdependency that has developed between Mexico and the U.S. over different economic development periods of these countries, particularly, the role the Mexican labor force has played to boosting and sustaining both the Mexican and the American economies. At the meso-level, we will examine different institutions both in Mexico and the U.S. that have determined the ways in which millions of Mexican migrate to this country. Last, but certainly not least, we will explore the impacts that both the macro-and meso-processes have had on the micro-level by considering the imperatives, aspirations, and dreams that have prompted millions of people to leave their homes and communities behind in search of better opportunities. This major life decision of migration brings with it a series of social transformations in family and community networks, this will look into the cultural impacts in both the sending and receiving migrant communities. In sum, we will come to understand how these three levels of analysis work together.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Montes,V.
(Fall 2017)

SOCL B246 Sociology of Migration: A Cross-Cultural Overview of Contemporary Challenges
The twenty-first century began much as the twentieth century did for the United States with high levels of immigration. This has affected not only the nation, but the discipline of sociology. Just as early twentieth century Chicago School sociology focused on immigration and settlement issues, so too the first decade of the twenty-first century shows a flurry of sociological imagination devoted to immigration scholarship. This course will center on the key texts, issues, and approaches coming out of this renovated sociology of immigration, but we will also include approaches to the study of immigration from history, anthropology, and ethnic studies. While we will consider comparative and historical approaches, our focus will be on the late twentieth century through the present, and we will spend a good deal of time focusing on the longest running labor migration in the world, Mexican immigration to the U.S., as well as on Central American migrant communities in the U.S. Students with an interest in contemporary U.S. immigration will be exposed to a survey of key theoretical approaches and relevant issues in immigration studies in the social sciences. Current themes, such as globalization, transnationalism, gendered migration, immigrant labor markets, militarization of the U.S.-Mexican border, U.S. migration policy, the new second generation and segmented assimilation, and citizenship will be included. Prerequisite: SOCL 235
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Montes,V.
(Spring 2018)

SOCL B257 Marginals and Outsiders: The Sociology of Deviance
An examination of non-normative and criminal behavior viewed from the standpoint of different theoretical perspectives on deviance (e.g., social strain, anomie, functionalism, social disorganization, symbolic interaction, and Marxism) with particular emphasis on social construction and labeling perspectives; and the role of subcultures, social movements and social conflicts in changing the normative boundaries of society. Topics include robbery, homicide, Black inner city violence, sexual deviance, prostitution, white collar crime, drug addiction and mental disorders.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SOCL B258 Sociology of Education
Major sociological theories of the relationships between education and society, focusing on the effects of education on inequality in the United States and the historical development of primary, secondary, and post-secondary education in the United States. Other topics include education and social selection, testing and tracking, and micro- and macro-explanations of differences in educational outcomes. This is a Praxis I I course; placements are in local schools.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Karen,D.
(Fall 2017)

SOCL B262 Public Opinion
This course explores public opinion: what it is, how it is measured, how it is shaped, and how it changes over time. Specific attention is given to the role of elites, the mass media, and religion in shaping public opinion. Examples include racial/ethnic civil rights, abortion, gay/lesbian/transgendered sexuality, and inequalities.
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC); Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Wright,N.
(Fall 2017)

SOCL B265 Quantitative Methods
An introduction to the conduct of empirical, especially quantitative, social science inquiry. In consultation with the instructor, students may select research problems to which they apply the research procedures and statistical techniques introduced during the course. Using SPSS, a statistical computer package, students learn techniques such as cross-tabular analysis, ANOVA, and multiple regression. Required of Bryn Mawr Sociology majors and minors. Non-sociology majors and minors with permission of instructor.
Approach: Quantitative Methods (QM); Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Wright,N.
(Fall 2017)

SOCL B275 Introduction to Survey Research Methods
The purpose of this course is to give the students the tools necessary to critically evaluate survey collection processes and the resulting data, as well as equip them with the skills to develop, execute, and analyze their own surveys to produce meaningful results. Topics include: proposal development, instrument design, question design, measurement, sampling techniques, survey pretesting, survey collection media, interviewing, index and scale construction, data analysis, interpretation and report writing. The course also examines the effects of demographic and socioeconomic factors in contemporary survey data collection.
Approach: Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SOCL B302 Social Theory
This course focuses primarily on the works of classical social theorists. The theorists include: George Herbert Meade, Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx, and Max Weber; and secondarily their influences on the works of more contemporary theorists: C. Wright Mills, Shulamith Firestone, Antonio Gramsci, Erving Goffman, Randall Collins, Robert Bellah, Howard Becker, and Pierre Bourdieu. Among the theoretical conceptions examined: culture, religion, the sacred, power, authority, modernization, deviance, bureaucracy, social stratification, social class, status groups, social conflict, and social conceptions of the self.
Prerequisite: BM undergraduate Sociology major or minor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sledge,P., Washington,R.
(Fall 2017, Spring 2018)

SOCL B303 Junior Conference: Discipline-Based Intensive Writing
This course will introduce students to a range of qualitative methods in the discipline and will require students to engage, through reading and writing, a wide range of sociological issues. The emphasis of the course will be to develop a clear, concise writing style, while maintaining a sociological focus. Substantive areas of the course will vary depending on the instructor. Prerequisite: Required of and limited to Bryn Mawr Sociology Major, Junior Standing
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Wright,N., Montes,V.
(Fall 2017, Spring 2018)

SOCL B309 Sociology of Religion
This course will investigate what sociology offers to an historical and contemporary understanding of religion. Most broadly, the course explores how religion has fared under the conditions of modernity given widespread predictions of secularization yet remarkably resilient and resurgent religious movements the world over. The course is structured to alternate theoretical approaches to religion with specific empirical cases that illustrate, test, or contradict the particular theories at hand. It focuses primarily on the West, but situated within a global context.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SOCL B313 Sociology of Terrorism and Counterterrorism
Terrorism -- the use or threat of violence to achieve political, religious, or social goals -- is a centuries-old phenomenon, but terrorism has become a distressing feature of social life during the last three decades in particular. Since the early 1980s, the world has seen over 10,000 separate acts of terror that have caused thousands of deaths and billions of dollars in damage. This seminar, taught by a former CIA counterterrorism officer, will give students a sociological perspective on terrorism, including the ways in which the threat of terrorism has changed over time, the motivations of different terrorist groups, and the circumstances under which terrorism succeeds and fails. We will also explore America’s counterterrorism efforts and grapple with some of the most challenging questions facing the U.S. intelligence community today: what are the best ways to combat terrorism? How do we define and recognize success and failure in the War on Terror? Prerequisite: One Social Science course: Sociology, psychology, political science, and anthropology (students should assume a lot of sociology knowledge)
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SOCL B317 Comparative Social Policy: Cuba, China, US, Scandinavia
This course will examine different countries’ policy choices to address different societal challenges. Four societal types - socialist (Cuba), post-socialist (China), capitalist (US), and social-democratic (Scandinavia) - will be studies to help us understand how these different kinds of societies conceive of social problems and propose and implement attempted solutions. We will examine particular problems/solutions in four domains: health/sports; education; environment; technological development. As we explore these domains, we will attend to methodological issues involved in making historical and institutional comparisons
Counts towards: Education; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SOCL B318 Comparative Study of Deviance
Deviant behaviors are among the most intriguing and controversial aspects of human societies. This course is organized as a theoretically oriented seminar which explores selected topics of deviance. Its aims are threefold: to compare cross national variations in conceptions of deviant behavior such as homosexuality, abortion, prostitution, and domestic violence; to examine the punishments for those behaviors; and to determine how social forces are challenging and changing national conceptions of deviance in the contemporary era of globalization.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SOCL B321 The Black American Intellectual Community
Viewing black American intellectuals from the perspective of the sociology of knowledge, this course examines the patterns of development and conflict in the black American intellectual community, from early 20th century to the 21st century. It highlights the social and historical influences that shaped black intellectuals’ world views on racism, black social problems,racial integration, black culture and black identity. Prerequisites: At least one previous sociology course or a course focused on black Americans or race relations. Open only to sophomores, juniors, or seniors.
Counts towards: Africana Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Washington,R.
(Fall 2017)

SOCL B326 Feminist Perspectives on Hlth
Increasingly, an individual’s sense of self and worth as a citizen turn on their health identity. In this course we will draw on theories of gender, sexuality, medicalization, and biocitizenship to unravel the ways in which gender structures and medical institutions are mutually constitutive and to explore how this relationship, in turn, impacts individual identity. The course will take a global approach to feminist engagement with health issues with an emphasis on human rights and bodily autonomy.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sledge,P.
(Spring 2018)

SOCL B331 Global Sociology: Capital, Power, and Protest in World-Historical Perspective
This course examines the social, economic and political dynamics underlying globalization. Through an analysis of global capitalism, the inter-state system, and transnational social movements, we will trace the local-global connections at the basis of contemporary issues like natural resource extraction, human rights violations, and labor insecurity. Prerequisite: Previous course in social science; permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Montes,V.
(Spring 2018)

SOCL B342 Bodies in Social Life
Can social life exist without bodies? How can attention to the body influence our understanding of social processes of subjectivity, interaction, and practice? While the body has long been an “absent presence” in sociology, multiple approaches to theorizing and researching the body have emerged in recent decades. A sociological approach to the body and embodiment provides an opportunity to bridge the gap between everyday experience and analyses of broad social structures which can seem disconnected from daily life. In this course, we will examine the processes by which individual bodies are shaped by and, in turn, shape social life. Key questions to be explored include: how are bodies regulated by social forces; how do individuals perform the body and how does interactional context influence this performance; what is the meaning of the body in social life; and is there a “right” body? Suggested preparation: At least one course in the social sciences.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Health Studies
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Sledge,P.
(Fall 2017)

SOCL B350 Movements for Social Justice in the US
Throughout human history, powerless groups of people have organized social movements to improve their lives and their societies. Powerful groups and institutions have resisted these efforts in order to maintain their own privilege. Some periods of history have been more likely than others to spawn protest movements. What factors seem most likely to lead to social movements? What determines their success/failure? We will examine 20th-century social movements in the United States to answer these questions. Includes a film series. Prerequisite: At least one prior social science course or permission of the instructor.
Counts towards: Gender and Sexuality Studies; Peace, Justice and Human Rights
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Karen,D.
(Fall 2017)

SOCL B358 Higher Education: Structure, Dynamics, Policy
This course examines the structure and dynamics of the “non-system” of higher education in the US in historical and comparative perspective. Focusing on patterns of access, graduation, and allocation into the labor market, the course examines changes over time and how these vary at different types of institutions and cross-nationally. Issues of culture, diversity (especially with respect to class, race/ethnic, and gender), and programming will be examined. The main theoretical debates revolve around the relationship between higher education and the society (does it reproduce or transform social structure) in which it is embedded. Prerequisites: at least one social science course or permission of instructor.
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Karen,D.
(Spring 2018)

SOCL B398 Senior Conference
This capstone course for the sociology major focuses on major concepts or areas in sociology and requires students to develop their analytical and synthetic skills as they confront both theoretical and empirical materials. The Key emphasis in the course will be on students’ writing. Through a variety of assignments (of different lengths and purposes), students will practice the process (drafts) and elements (clarity and concision) of good writing. Specific topical content will vary by semester according to the expertise of the instructor and the interests of students. Writing Attentive.
Prerequisite: BM undergraduate Sociology major.
Major Writing Requirement: Writing Intensive
Units: 1.0
Instructor(s): Karen,D., Washington,R.
(Fall 2017, Spring 2018)

SOCL B403 Supervised Work
Students have the opportunity to do individual research projects under the supervision of a faculty member.
Units: 1.0
(Fall 2017)

SOCL B425 Praxis III: Independent Study
Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community.
Counts towards: Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

EDUC B266 Schools in American Cities
This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal “case” that students investigate through documents and school placements. This is a Praxis II course (weekly fieldwork in a school required)
Approach: Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts towards: Africana Studies; Child and Family Studies; Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Spring 2018)

POLS B273 Race and the Law in the American Context
An examination of the intersection of race and law, evaluating the legal regulations of race, the history and meanings of race, and how law, history and the Supreme Court helped shape and produce those meanings. It will draw on materials from law, history, public policy, and critical race theory.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

POLS B354 Comparative Social Movements: Power and Mobilization
A consideration of the conceptualizations of power and “legitimate” and “illegitimate” participation, the political opportunity structure facing potential activists, the mobilizing resources available to them, and the cultural framing within which these processes occur. Specific attention is paid to recent movements within and across countries, such as feminist, environmental, and anti-globalization movements, and to emerging forms of citizen mobilization, including transnational and global networks, electronic mobilization, and collaborative policymaking institutions. Prerequisite: one course in POLS or SOCL or permission of instructor.
Counts towards: Environmental Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

POLS B374 Education Politics & Policy
This course will examine education policy through the lens of federalism and federalism through a case study of education policy. The dual aims are to enhance our understanding of this specific policy area and our understanding of the impact that our federal system of government has on policy effectiveness.
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

POLS B375 Gender, Work and Family
As the number of women participating in the paid workforce who are also mothers exceeds 50 percent, it becomes increasingly important to study the issues raised by these dual roles. This seminar will examine the experiences of working and nonworking mothers in the United States, the roles of fathers, the impact of working mothers on children, and the policy implications of women, work, and family.
Counts towards: Child and Family Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)

SOWK B554 Social Determinants of Health and Health Equity
The purpose of this course is to provide students with knowledge and an understanding of how structural factors (racism, sexism, homophobia, classism, discrimination, the built environment, poverty, working conditions, and the unequal distribution of power, income, goods, and services) contribute to racial/ ethnic and gender disparities in health and well-being.
Counts towards: Praxis Program
Units: 1.0
(Not Offered 2017-2018)