WEBSITE REVIEWS

http://www.cambridge2000.com/ [cr]
Using the most basic text format with left-justified photographs, this site links to several (7) collections of architectural photography in and around Cambridge, England. For example, within the Cambridge2000 section itself, photos can be searched by architect / builder, date built, date photographed, category and location. The Cambridge 1950 section provides photographic evidence of the city and tidbits of city planning discussion of the time.

http://www.cambridgehistory.org/ [cr]
This site turned up while I was researching Cambridge, England. The site for the Cambridge Historical Society (Cambridge, MA) includes events, volunteer opportunities, publications and research links. It also includes information and a virtual tour of its headquarters in the Hooper-Lee-Nichols house (1685-1689). Graphically not very interesting, it delivers useful information in a simple, straightforward manner and would be a good jumping off point for further research into the history and architecture of Cambridge and New England.

http://www.trytel.com/~tristan/towns/towns.html/ [cr]
A UK-based site, this resource focuses on the medieval history of English towns. While architecture is not its focus, some attention is paid to urban development and planning through time. It includes on-line links to primary documents and their modern English translations, as well as brief histories of selected towns. This also site provides an exhaustive list of links to UK urban history sites and historical sources at the local level. It is well worth a bookmark for anyone interested in English history and heritage.

http://www.theplumber.com/pom.html/ [cr]
It is as if someone intended to prove that there's a site for everything. This site includes a review of the history of plumbing and public toilets around the world. In particular, the link above will direct the viewer to the history of plumbing on Pompeii and Herculaneum. You can even shop on-line (though I don't recommend it). Some of the site's content was based on a paper presented at an international symposium on public toilets. Truly unbelievable.


Sources for research in Maine:

Maine Historical Society: http://www.mainehistory.org/library_overview.shtml [pfj]
This is an incredible resource for sources related to the history of Maine; included are manuscripts dating from the 15th Century to the present, photographs and plates, census records, architectural drawings, voter registrations, and an extensive database of books and pamphlets.

Maine Geneology Links: http://www.cyndislist.com/me.htm#Records [pfj]
This serves primarily as a source for geneological searching within Maine. It has an extensive resource list including federal population censuses, various forms of cemetary searches, birth, marriage and death record searches, and general church records.

Maine Maps (type "Maine" in search bar): http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/gmdquery.html [pfj]
This site has links to maps dating from 1500 to the present, including 20 regions or locations in Maine.


From Mining To Skiing
A History of the Towns

Park City, Utah [img] This historical site provides information of the town, including architectural types, a timeline and photographs. [ac]

Aspen, Colorado [img] The history of this town is shown through a timeline with related links and wonderful photographs. lined up with their contemporaries. [ac]

Telluride Colorado [img] This site provides a pictorial history of the town. A timeline of the town can also be viewed. [ac]


The Newtown Historic Association website www.newtownhistoric.org provides a brief history of the town, its main historic buildings and native folk artist, Issac Hicks (1780 - 1849), known for his paintings of the Peaceable Kingdom. Of more interest to those interested in historical research, the site provides information on the Association's research center, headquartered in the Court Inn, a repository of deeds, wills, diaries, books, maps, photos, genealogies and other documents relating to Newtown and the surrounding area, especially strong in the period when Newtown was the County Seat (1725-1813). These documents are made available to the public a few hours a week and are currently being scanned for future digital access to the holdings [jos]

The PhillyRoads website www.phillyroads provides information about the Roadway system in Philadelphia including the planning history, current condtions and historic precedents. Links to information about historic bridges, crossings, and maps provides a good clue to how development occured in this region. Links to Boston Roads and NYC roads expands research options. The site is heavily supported by advertising which adversly affects the visuals and may have some impact on the content. [jos]

The Historic Fallsington website www.historicfallsington.org chronicles the history of the town, the first desingated historic district in Pennsylvannia, as well as it's buildings,and annual events. Resources located at the site include manuscripts and geneological records,and a list of title (not body text) is listed on the site. Links to other historic sites along the Delaware River and westward into Bucks County as well as information on historic roadways in the area make it a valuble resource for those researching facets of Bucks County History. [jos]

The Rural History Confederation (RHC) is an association of nineteen museums and historic sites. They are dedicated to preserving the past and promoting historical awareness of the region. A visit to one or all of these unique historical museums will give you a comprehensive view of how southeastern Pennsylvania blossomed since colonial times through the industrial age. Nineteen historic sites and museums in the surrounding PHiladelphia region are briefly described and links to their websites (of varying quality and content) are provided. [jos]


http://www.eticomm.net/%7Ekelta/haddonfield/
http://www.historicalsocietyofhaddonfield.org/index.htm

This site provides information on historic Haddonfield, NJ. Portions of the
site are dedicated to the history of the town's libraries and fire company.
Links also point the visitor to sites related to historic buildings in and
around Haddonfield, including the Indian King Tavern and the Peter Mott
House, as well as to the Historical Society of Haddonfield. [jb]

http://mapmaker.rutgers.edu/MAPS.html

Rutgers University maintains this website, which provides images of many
historic New Jersey maps, including Revolutionary War maps, railroad maps,
and forest maps. Another section organizes the maps by county, showing
differences in specific areas of the state over time. [jb]

http://strathmere.tripod.com/1.html

This website is devoted to the Jersey shore town of Strathmere, NJ. The site
provides a brief history of the town, aerial photographs, and pages dedicated
to historic buildings and important local families. [jb]



1. Knox Heritage Inc.
http://www.knoxheritage.org/index.html

The Knox heritage group is a non-profit group who is dedicated to the
preservation of historic buildings and places in Knoxville, Tennessee. The
website contains a list of the most endangered building in the area as well as
links to more detailed websites of individual neighborhoods. Pictures and
brief descriptions of the building are available for listed buildings. The
site is easy to navigate but lacks the ability to search for a specific
address. [fw]

2. Vernacular buildings in Historic Chinese Cities: Qaunzhou
http://www.scarp.ubc.ca/plan545b/quanzhou/qzcontnt.htm

This website is the effort of Tsinghua University in Beijing. It offers
pictures and descriptions of urban vernacular architecture in the city of
Quanzhou. China is currently in a state of rapid change and consequently
rapid construction that allows little time for the preservation of the
country^"s historic fabric. This website offers awareness and a record of the
importance of the tradition building type. The idea of preservation is
relatively new and China and the website is currently still under
construction. The locations of the photos are indicated on a neighborhood map
linked to a larger map of the area that orients the viewer whom is not
familiar with the city. The background graphics of bricks is distracting when
there is a lot of text on the screen. [fw]

3. Vernacular Architecture Society- South Africa
http://www.museums.org.za/vassa/

The Vernacular Architecture Society of South Africa is an effort to promote
the value of traditional building as well as provide a database of building
information for students and professionals. The website guides the reader to
libraries and holding of more information but has very few photographs and
drawings on the website. [fw]


Research Alexandria's Past: Resources for Historic Research in Alexandria provides a listing of means to obtain information about deeds, census records, business/biographical references, newspapers and the like. Go to Research Alexandria's Past. [cpl]


This web site provides a condense history of the development of the downtown area of St. Louis which encompasses the locale and topography, residential locations, commercial development, schools, churches, ... Images are also included i.e., a map of the local and topography. The wonderful aspect of this web site is the bibliography, which is another avenue for information about downtown St. Louis. Go to History of St. Louis neighborhood. [cpl]


National Historic Places can provide a host of information. The Web site for National Historic Place in South Carolina lists various historic districts providing information about the number of buildings, the architect, style of architecture, period of significance, owner, historic function and current function. Go to Sumter Historic District of South Carolina. [cpl]


History of the Miami Circle
Miami, Florida

In 1998 workers were demolishing an apartment building near the mouth of
the Miami River when they bumped into remnants of pre-historic Miami.
After a battle over the rights of the land, archaeologists finally began
digging and soon determined it was the site of the Miami Circle.
Click here for link to learn more about the Miami Circle from the
Historical Museum of Southern Florida.
Image of Miami Circle Archaeological Site [ecb]

Archaeologists concluded the circle was the location of a Tequesta Indian
Village. To learn more about Miami Tribe History click here. [ecb]

Mural depicting the Miami Circle under construction
Click here to read article by Jerald T. Milanich, curator in archaeology
at the Florida Museum of Natural History, who argues that the Miami
Circle was merely a septic tank!
Aerial view from Milanich's article "American Scene: Much Ado About a
Circle " in Archaeology magazine, Volume 52 Number 5, September/October
1999 [ecb]


Resources for the Urbanistic History of Detroit, Michigan

City of Detroit Real Property Inquiry System
This website will allow you to search for tax assesment information on
properties within the city of Detroit. The site offers limited
information, but the user can determine the current owners, date property
was constructed as well as subdivision name and plat number. [edw]

The Fabulous Ruins of Detroit
An artist and resident of Detroit turned his photography hobby and love
for Detroit into a detailed visual history of the city. After you finally
figure out how to navigate through the site, you can find the current
state of several abandoned buildings within the city. The significance of
the building and a brief history of each building is also included.  [edw]

Center for Geographic Information
The State Historic Preservation Office of Michigan has created a
searchable online database for Michigan historic sites. A user can search
perform a keyword search as well community search (e.g. Rosedale Park,
Detroit). Some of the information for each listing in the database
includes a picture of the historic site, property type, the historic and
current use of the site, narrative information and period of significance.
A great deal of information is available, but the search tool is difficult
to use and the the results are not very specific. [edw]

Rearview Mirror
The Detroit News maintains an archive of articles that they ran on the
metropolitan Detroit area. The site is divided up into major categories,
such as "Locations", "Notable Events" and "Government and Istitutions".
The user can also enter the name of a particular building or community to
search for articles. This site is very useful overall, but one is limited
to one newspaper's bent on a story. [edw]


Guide to historic homes in Salem Massachusetts
[img] This web site gives examples of historic homes in Salem with links to more detailed information on the homes' distinct architectural style. [gg]

Brandy Station Foundation
[img] This website is the homepage for the Brandy Station Foundation. It includes announcements, upcoming events, and links to information on historic sites. [gg]

Historical Medical sites in Washington D.C.
[img] This page introduces the history of medical institutions in Washington DC with links to historic photos and historical information on specific sites. [gg]


http://www.dearborncounty.org/history/histlocl.html. This site features historic sites in Aurora, Indiana. There are links to houses within the town and then throughout the county of Dearborn. [abc]

http://bangorinfo.com/history.html This site gives a brief summery of the history
of Bangor, Maine. The side bar includes links to area museums, historic places, and
population history. The history places listing provides address as well key notes
of interest. [abc]

http://www.historicmobile.org/
This a website providing information about the Historic Mobile Preservation Society. [abc]


St. Michael's
The history of the town of St.Michael's Maryland on the Eastern Shore dating back
before colonian settlements. [at]
Watermen
A history of life on the water and it's industries today and when they originated. [at]
Web Pages about the City of Atlanta, Georgia

National Register's Web Page for Atlanta
The National Register's web page for Atlanta provides an excellent history of
Atlanta, maps, a list of historic sites with a link for a summary of each site, and more.
It's layout is attractive and easy to follow. [da]

Atlanta Time Machine
Atlanta resident Greg Germani created and maintains this web page as a hobby. He
finds old pictures of Atlanta buildings, streets, and neighborhoods, then he takes
photgraphs of present-day Atlanta from the same location and perspective as the old
photographs and shows them side-by-side. The site's layout is rather basic, but the photographs are
wonderful and easy to find. [da]

Atlanta's Emerald Necklace
Urban Planner Alexander Garvin was hired to create a proposal for a series of parks
andrecreation areas that would create a loop around Atlanta, most of which are to be
connected by a rail system. This site details his plan. The site has an attractive layout,
but it could be improved by dividing all of its information into separate pages. [da]

Atlanta Preservation Center
The Atlanta Preservation Center is an independent non-profit organization that
advocates for the preservation and the restoration of Atlanta's historic buildings and
neighborhoods. The site has an attractive layout that is easy to follow. [da]

Downtown Atlanta Improvement District
The Downtown Atlanta Improvement District is a public-private organization that
works to develop Atlanta's downtown area. Their web page is well designed and easy to
follow. [da]

Trees Atlanta
Trees Atlanta is a non-profit organization that strives to improve Atlanta's urban
environment by planting and maintaining trees throughout the city. While they do much to
improve Atlanta's green environment, their site is a little basic, and the front page needs the be
fixed. [da]


The Chestnut Hill Historical Society
http://www.chhist.org/

This site is disappointing considering how nice a job the Chestnut Hill
Historical Society has done with their print material. I have seen a copy of
a map they published that essentially guides the public through some of the
most important (architecturally speaking) buildings in the neighborhood. The
houses are mapped on an attractive, easy to read map. A brief description of
each house is also included in order to give the public a better context and
understanding of what they are seeing. The only sign of this same information
that I found on the website was a list of the major architects who had built
in Chestnut Hill, and then, totally separately, a map of the neighborhood. It
is a shame not to see the map that they published available in a digitized
format on their website.

The rest of the site is helpful enough, but only to the viewer who already
knows that they need information abour Chestnut Hill. Rather than digitize
their collection of photographs and publications, the Chestnut Hill Historical
Society seems to have decided to use their website to tell people about the
resources they have available onsite. Had I stumbled upon the site rather
than searched specifically for it, it would not have kept my attention. [cms]

Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection
http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/history_americas.html

I wasted a ton of time getting lost in this website. The access that they
give the public to their amazing collection of maps is well worth yout time.
I decided to browse maps of Mexico and saw maps about the Conquest, maps about
the population of Mexico City over the past 100 years, maps in color, maps in
black and white. This is a wonderful resource and a user-friendly website. [cms]

Fundación Centro Histórico/ Historic Downtown Mexico City Foundation
http://www.viveelcentro.com/docs/index.php

and

The Historic Preservation Society of Charleston South Carolina
http://www.preservationsociety.org/

While at first glance these sites may not appear to have anything to do with
one another, I found that one shared detail really stuck out at me: real
estate listings.

The Fundación Centro Histórico is not officially an "Historic Society" website
(mainly because they do not exist in Mexico the way the do here) but it does
attempt to educate the public about both the history of the area as well as
about the ongoing cultural events taking place there every day. As I looked
around I was surprised to see a real estate section pop up with hotlinks
mapped on the downtown grid taking the public to web pages showing futuristic
floor plans of apartments available to buy/ rent and the contact information
of the listing agent. One gets the feeling that the "Fundación Centro
Histórico" has something to do with the real estate sales....(One thing to
note is that the URL actually says "Live the Center.")

The Historic Preservation Society of Charleston South Carolina presents a
rather simple and pleasant website informing the public about their
activities, about the gift shop, about some of their recent events, and
about....the real estate currently for sale in and around beautiful downtown
Charleston. These hotlinks take you mostly to real estate agents or agencies
who seem to specialize in historic properties, but it surprised me
nonetheless. [cms]


Historic Resource Documentation Sources for Loudoun County, Virginia

Property Search
This website allows you to research property ownership, deed information, legal
description, sales information, assessment values and house characteristics.
Parcels are linked to the Loudoun County GIS, with map overlays displaying boundary
and environmental information such as topography, soils, flood plain, and major
roads. [awd]

Historic Sites & Museums in Loudoun County, Virginia
A useful site that provides information regarding historic sites and museums
throughout Loudoun County. [awd]

Virginia Department of Historic Resources
Link to the Virginia Department of Historic Resources [awd]


HISTORY OF PLACES AND ARCHITECTURAL/URBANISTIC RESOURCES

This website is a guide to several useful reseach links pertaining to different
cities in the United States

Fredericksburg, Virginia

HistoryPoint.org is a fantastic starting point for the researcher looking to find
detailed resources on the history of the City of Fredericksburg and Stafford,
Spotsylvania and Westmoreland counties in Virginia. The resources include digitized Sanborn maps, business
directories, burial indexes and census', among other things. Furthermore, the
webite is tied in with the Central Rappahanock Regional Library. The library catalog is extensive and includes
many other local resources within its Virginiana Room, located in Fredericksburg
Go to HistoryPoint.org . [msd]

New York, New York

The New York Public Library has an excellent website that provides several links on
historic resources regarding general New York history, digitized collections and
links specific to the boroughs of New York. The links are wideranging and include archaeology,
museums, historical societies, cemeteries and factories.
Go to NYPL History Resources. [msd]

Baltimore, Maryland

The Baltimore County Public Library provides detailed sources for the historic
researcher. Links include local newspaper archives, regional history, museums and
historic sites as well as ships and other research sites. Another interesting aspect of this site are the
"quick facts." Go to Baltimore County Public Library. [msd]



Useful Resources for Site Research in New York City

Place Matters   This organization is associated with the Municipal Arts Society of New York. It provides information and community resources for the documentation and maintainance of informal and overlooked places that are important to New Yorkers. [as]

Landmarks Preservation Commission   The LPC is the city agency that is responsible for identifying and designating the city's landmarks and the buildings in the city's historic districts. The website is helpful for providing information these landmarks and districts. [as]

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture   This research library of the New York Public Library has archives, collections and other materials for academic research focusing on African Americans. Much of the materials are dedicated to black communities in New York City and State. [as]


Historical resources in New Hampshire:

The New Hampshire Historical Society: http://www.nhhistory.org/whatsnew.html

The NH Historical Society is based in Concord, NH, and this website provides information about the Society itself and the two other buildings it runs: the Tuck Library and the Museum of New Hampshire History. Information about who the Society is, where they are, and what they do is listed here, as well as current and upcoming exhibits, programs, volunteer and educational opportunities can be found through the different links on their website. Specific information and historical facts about New Hampshire is not on the website. [rb]

New Hampshire Archives and Records Management: http://www.sos.nh.gov/archives/default.html

The NH state department of Archives and Records is also located in Concord, and it holds records for over 200 state government agencies. The website gives an overview of the Archive's holdings, as well as links to indexes to several collections of land surveyors' plans and architectural drawings. Guidelines for researching genealogy and Civil War history are given, though none of the research materials are available online. [rb]

New Hampshire State Library: http://www.nh.gov/nhsl/

The website for the state library is full of links to information about the library, information for NH librarians and educators, their catalog and holdings, but more importantly indexes for NH newspapers and magazines, information on history and genealogy resources, and links to internet resources. Not many of the archival research materials are available online, but many records and newspaper articles are searchable from computers inside the library, and they have a separate section with research assistance available at the library. [rb]

Historic Houses of Seacoast NH: http://www.seacoastnh.com/101nh/houses.html

This website highlights historic houses on New Hampshire's seacoast, mostly in Portsmouth, NH, but also homes in other small towns dotting the coast. Several houses are highlighted on the homepage, but a link on the homepage also takes you to a larger, more comprehensive list of historic houses in the area with information, maps, and links to their websites (if they have one). This larger list is split into categories such as historic houses, museums, lighthouses, research archives, historical societies, etc. [rb]


Place histories in Charlottesville, VA.

http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/aas~405b/home.html
The website is very simple, not that attractive, but easy to understand and use. Links direct the user to more specific
information such as maps and sources. [jfg]

http://www3.iath.virginia.edu/schwartz/cville/cville.history.html
Althought the website is titled Charlottesville: A Brief Urban History, the text is anything but brief. Long paragraphs make the website visually overwhelming at first. However, embedded in the text are hot links so that the user can quickly find out more information or see other images within the scope of their interest. This website is by far the most useful and contains the most information, but could be better formatted to eliminate the large amount of white space and break up the text into smaller easier to digest pieces. [jfg]

http://www.virginia.edu/art/Lawntour/Welcome.html
The sole purpose of this website is to guide visitors through an interactive tour of the Accademical Village at UVA. History of the site is handed out in small doses along with the many images. The site index allows the user to select the portions of most interest to view without having to navigate through the whole tour. Present day pictures are supplented with original architectual drawings. For such a visual website I was surprised at the poor quality of some of the images. [jfg]


This website provides links to some of my favorite websites about the history of places in the West.

WASHINGTON STATE

Historylink.org provides an abundance of information on the history of Washington State and its cities. Check out a brief history of my hometown Kent . Historylink.org also features several interactive features, including this cybertour of the Seattle Center , home of the 1962 World's Fair. The Seattle Center has undergone a number of changes in recent years --which unfortunately are not documented on Historylink.org-- such as the addition of Frank Gehry's Experience Music Project. [pf]

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

The University of Southern California's website "LA Past, Present & Future" provides links to several good sites on greater Los Angeles history. Highlights include Brent Dickerson's A Visit to Old Los Angeles and Environs which in addition to featuring plenty of pictures of old Los Angeles, also offers some entertaining (if somewhat silly) sound effects. USC's website also offers links to Important Organizations for the study of Los Angeles. [pf]

CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL COAST

Ahhh... Santa Barbara. Check out this website about one of Santa Barbara's most historic sites, the Presidio . The Legacy Foundation of Santa Barbara County also maintains a good website for the historic Santa Barbara County Courthouse , which was built in 1929 shortly after the 1926 earthquake leveled the City's first courthouse.

While you're touring the Central Coast, check out Santa Barbara Wine Country . Not much on the history of the region...but plenty of info on how to find the wineries. And isn't that more important? [pf]


CHICAGO, ST. LOUIS, ARCHITECTURE DB
http://www.geocities.com/icebulls23/HSPV600homepage.html [nk]

BOSTON WEBSITES
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/~jchenowe/Websites.html [jc]

NTHP, CA HPO:
http://www.michaelmcduffee.com/ashley.html [aa]

DoHistory, OR, SFPL [af]
http://www.brynmawr.edu/cities/archx/05-600/stwk/af.htm

SC, Cities/Buildings, HABS [lrh]
http://www.brynmawr.edu/cities/archx/05-600/stwk/lrh1.htm

Getty, LA HP, Archivists
http://www.brynmawr.edu/cities/archx/05-600/stwk/tsd1.html
webrev.html; last rev. 3 Oct 05 jc