Contact Us
Growth and Structure of Cities Program
Bryn Mawr College
101 N. Merion Ave.
Bryn Mawr. PA 19010-2899
Phone: 610-526-5334
Fax: 610-526-7955

Courses & Requirements

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2016

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
CITY B185-001 Urban Culture and Society Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Thomas Hall 110 McDonogh,G., Raddatz,L.
CITY B201-001 Introduction to GIS for Social and Environmental Analysis Semester / 1 LEC: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Canaday Computer Lab Raddatz,L.
CITY B226-001 Introduction to Architectural Design Semester / 1 Lecture: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM T Rockefeller Drafting Studio Olshin,S., Voith,D.
LEC: 9:10 AM-11:00 AM F Rockefeller Drafting Studio
CITY B250-001 Topics: Growth & Spatial Organization of the City: History of American Urbanism Semester / 1 LEC: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MW Thomas Hall 116 Cohen,J.
CITY B254-001 History of Modern Architecture Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Taylor Hall F Morton,T.
CITY B298-001 Topics: Advanced Research Methods: Junion Seminar Semester / 0.5 LEC: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM T Thomas Hall 118 Cohen,J.
CITY B325-001 Topics in Social History: Migration Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM TH Thomas Hall 118 Raddatz,L.
CITY B360-001 Topics: Urban Culture and Society: City of Rome Semester / 1 LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TH Taylor Hall B Morton,T.
CITY B398-001 Senior Seminar Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM T Thomas Hall 118 Dept. staff, TBA
LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM T Thomas Hall 104
CITY B403-001 Independent Study Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
CITY B403-001 Independent Study Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
CITY B415-001 Teaching Assistant Semester / 1
CITY B425-001 Praxis III: Independent Study Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
ANTH B210-001 Medical Anthropology Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Park 243 Pashigian,M.
ARCH B203-001 Ancient Greek Cities and Sanctuaries Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Carpenter Library 25 Tasopoulou,E.
ARCH B215-001 Classical Art Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:10 PM- 1:00 PM MWF Thomas Hall 104 Donohue,A.
ARCH B244-001 Great Empires of the Ancient Near East Semester / 1 LEC: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Carpenter Library 25 Helft,S.
ARCH B305-001 Topics in Ancient Athens: Acropolis Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM T Carpenter Library 15 Lindenlauf,A.
ARCH B505-001 Topics in Ancient Athens: Acropolis Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM T Carpenter Library 15 Lindenlauf,A.
ECON B225-001 Economic Development Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Taylor Hall D Rock,M.
ECON B242-001 Economics of Local Environmental Programs Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Dalton Hall 25 Ross,D.
ECON B253-001 Introduction to Econometrics Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MW Dalton Hall 25 Ross,D.
ECON B324-001 The Economics of Discrimination and Inequality Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MW Dalton Hall 10 Nutting,A.
GERM B321-001 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies: Representing Diversity in German Cinema Semester / 1 LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TH Taylor Hall, Seminar Room Shen,Q.
HART B355-001 Topics in the History of London Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TH Carpenter Library 15 Cast,D.
HIST B325-001 Topics in Social History: Unruly Bodies and Forbidden Desires Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TH Thomas Hall 251 Butler-Wall,K.
SOCL B205-001 Social Inequality Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Taylor Hall D Nolan,B.

Spring 2017

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
CITY B190-001 The Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the Present Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Taylor Hall F Morton,T.
CITY B190-002 The Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the Present Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Taylor Hall F Morton,T.
CITY B227-001 Topics in Modern Planning: Urban Policy Issues Semester / 1 LEC: 10:10 AM-11:25 AM MW Raddatz,L.
CITY B228-001 Problems in Architectural Design Semester / 1 Lecture: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM T Rockefeller Drafting Studio Olshin,S., Voith,D.
CITY B229-001 Topics in Comparative Urbanism: Colonial and Post-Colonial Cities Semester / 1 LEC: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Taylor Hall F McDonogh,G.
CITY B255-001 Survey of American Architecture Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Thomas Hall 116 Cohen,J.
CITY B298-001 Topics: Advanced Research Methods: Junion Seminar Semester / 0.5 LEC: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM W Thomas Hall 223 Cohen,J.
CITY B306-001 Advanced Fieldwork Techniques: Places in Time Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM T Thomas Hall 223 Cohen,J.
CITY B318-001 Topics in Urban Social and Cultural Theory: "Public" in Policy & Planning Semester / 1 LEC: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM F Thomas Hall 118 Hurley,J.
CITY B335-001 Topics in City and Media: Public/Private/Control/Freedom Semester / 1 LEC: 1:00 PM- 4:00 PM TH Thomas Hall 102 McDonogh,G.
CITY B345-001 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society: Sustainable Cities Semester / 1 LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM M Raddatz,L.
CITY B403-001 Independent Study Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
CITY B403-001 Independent Study Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
CITY B415-001 Teaching Assistant Semester / 1
ARCH B104-001 Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban Revolutions Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:00 PM MW Carpenter Library 25 Magee,P.
ARCH B104-00A Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban Revolutions Semester / 1 TA Session: 12:10 PM- 1:00 PM F Carpenter Library 15 Magee,P.
ARCH B104-00B Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban Revolutions Semester / 1 TA Session: 1:10 PM- 2:00 PM F Carpenter Library 15 Magee,P.
ARCH B104-00C Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban Revolutions Semester / 1 TA Session: 2:10 PM- 3:00 PM F Carpenter Library 15 Magee,P.
ARCH B260-001 Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:10 PM- 1:00 PM MWF Thomas Hall 104 Donohue,A.
ECON B208-001 Labor Economics Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Dalton Hall 1 Nutting,A.
ECON B213-001 Taming the Modern Corporation Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Dalton Hall 25 Sfekas,A.
ECON B234-001 Environmental Economics Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Dalton Hall 25 Ross,D.
ECON B253-001 Introduction to Econometrics Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Taylor Hall F Ross,D.
EDUC B266-001 Schools in American Cities Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Bettws Y Coed 127 Cohen,J.
HART B212-001 Medieval Art & Architecture Semester / 1 LEC: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Doyle,M.
HART B253-001 Survey of Western Architecture Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Carpenter Library 21 Cast,D.
HART B311-001 Topics in Medieval Art: Discovering Medieval Manuscripts Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 3:00 PM F Canaday 205 (Special Collect.) Doyle,M.
HIST B237-001 Topic: Modern African History: African Economic Development Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Taylor Hall B Ngalamulume,K.
HIST B325-001 Topics in Social History: Queering Popular Culture Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TH Thomas Hall 223 Butler-Wall,K.
POLS B222-001 Environmental Issues: Movements and Policy Making in Comparative Perspective: Movements, Controversies and Policy Making Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Taylor Hall G Hager,C.
POLS B321-001 Technology and Politics Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TH Dalton Hall 212A Hager,C.
SOCL B229-001 Black America in Sociological Perspective Semester / 1 LEC: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Carpenter Library 25 Washington,R.
SOWK B554-002 Social Determinants of Health and Health Equity Semester / 1 LEC: 11:00 AM- 1:20 PM W SW G7 Smith,R.

Fall 2017

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2016-17 Catalog Data

CITY B185 Urban Culture and Society Fall 2016 Examines techniques and questions of the social sciences as tools for studying historical and contemporary cities. Topics include political-economic organization, conflict and social differentiation (class, ethnicity and gender), and cultural production and representation. Philadelphia features prominently in discussion, reading and exploration as do global metropolitan comparisons through papers involving fieldwork, critical reading and planning/problem solving using qualitative and quantitative methods. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B190 The Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the Present Spring 2017 This course studies the city as a three-dimensional artifact. A variety of factors--geography, economic and population structure, politics, planning, and aesthetics--are considered as determinants of urban form. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B201 Introduction to GIS for Social and Environmental Analysis Fall 2016 This course is designed to introduce the foundations of GIS with emphasis on applications for social and environmental analysis. It deals with basic principles of GIS and its use in spatial analysis and information management. Ultimately, students will design and carry out research projects on topics of their own choosing. Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing Quantitative Readiness Required (QR) Counts toward Environmental Studies

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CITY B207 Topics in Urban Studies
Section 001 (Fall 2015): Philadelphia Architecture Not offered 2016-17 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Critical Interpretation (CI) Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B217 Research Methods in the Social Sciences
Section 001 (Spring 2016): Investigating Inequalities Not offered 2016-17 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: In this course, we will focus on the processes of research and on "learning by doing." The course encompasses quantitative and qualitative techniques, and we will compare the strengths and weaknesses of each. We will calculate descriptive statistics and basic statistical analyses manually and with statistical software, followed by engagement with various methods (interviews, ethnographic observations, document analysis).
Quantitative Methods (QM)

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CITY B218 Topics in World Cities Not offered 2016-17 This is a topics course. Course content varies. An introduction to contemporary issues related to the urban environment. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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CITY B226 Introduction to Architectural Design Fall 2016 This studio design course introduces the principles of architectural design. Suggested Preparation: drawing, some history of architecture, and permission of instructor. Critical Interpretation (CI)

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CITY B227 Topics in Modern Planning
Section 001 (Spring 2017): Urban Policy Issues
Section 001 (Fall 2015): Visual and Historical Methods Spring 2017 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course explores major policy approaches that shape cities and metropolitan regions and familiarizes students with key areas of urban public policy such as economic and community development, housing, environmental sustainability and health. Following an interdisciplinary approach, we seek to understand how macro-processes have changed policymaking contexts and the role of governments in the U.S. and beyond. We further analyze the implications of different policy strategies from social justice, sustainability and economic perspectives.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B228 Problems in Architectural Design Spring 2017 A continuation of CITY 226 at a more advanced level. Prerequisites: CITY B226 or permission of instructor. Course does not meet an Approach

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CITY B229 Topics in Comparative Urbanism
Section 001 (Spring 2017): Colonial and Post-Colonial Cities
Section 001 (Spring 2016): Global Suburbia Spring 2017 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: Probing the relations of power at the heart of power and society in many cities worldwide, this class uses case studies to test urban theory, forms and practice. In order to grapple with colonialism and its aftermaths, we will focus on cities in North Africa, France, Ireland, Hong Kong and Cuba, systematically exploring research, writing and insights from systematic interdisciplinary comparisons.
Writing Intensive Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

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CITY B241 Building Green: Sustainable Design Past and Present Not offered 2016-17 At a time when more than half of the human population lives in cities, the design of the built environment is of key importance. This course is designed for students to investigate issues of sustainability in architecture. A close reading of texts and careful analysis of buildings and cities will help us understand the terms and practices of architectural design and the importance of ecological, economic, political, cultural, social sustainability over time and through space. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Counts toward Environmental Studies Counts toward Praxis Program

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CITY B250 Topics: Growth & Spatial Organization of the City
Section 001 (Fall 2015): 20th C Urban Enviro History
Section 001 (Fall 2016): History of American Urbanism Fall 2016 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Inquiry into the Past (IP) Counts toward Environmental Studies

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CITY B254 History of Modern Architecture Fall 2016 A survey of the development of modern architecture since the 18th century. The course focuses on international networks in the transmission of architectural ideas since 1890. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B255 Survey of American Architecture Spring 2017 This survey course examines architecture within the global framework of "the modern." Through an introduction to an architectural canon of works and figures, it seeks to foster a critical consideration of modernity, modernization, and modernism. The course explores each as a category of meaning that framed the theory and practice of architecture as a cultural, political, social, and technological enterprise. It also uses these conjugates to study the modes by which architecture may be said to have framed history. We will study practical and discursive activity that formed a dynamic field within which many of the contradictions of "the modern" were made visible (and visual) through architecture. In this course, we will engage architectural concepts and designs by studying drawings and buildings closely within their historical context. We will examine spheres of reception for architecture and its theoretical, discursive, and cultural life through a variety of media: buildings of course, but also journals, books, and film. We will also investigate architecture as a site and subject for critical inquiry. In particular, we will see what it may tell us about the globalization and politics of the twentieth century, and about history, theory, and criticism as epistemological tracks. Critical Interpretation (CI) Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B298 Topics: Advanced Research Methods
Section 001 (Fall 2015): Junion Seminar
Section 001 (Spring 2016): Junion Seminar
Section 001 (Fall 2016): Junion Seminar
Section 001 (Spring 2017): Junion Seminar Fall 2016, Spring 2017 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: We will focus on bringing together methods, theories, data and research ethics in preliminary preparation for your senior thesis and/or summer research projects (HHG/CPGC). Class will for the first quarter/the first half of the semester. Weekly mini-assignments and in-class exercises are designed to help you prepare for your final project - a research proposal.
Current topic description: For Cities juniors. We will focus on bringing together methods, theories, data and research ethics in preliminary preparation for your senior thesis and/or summer research projects (HHG/CPGC). Class will for the first quarter/the first half of the semester. Weekly mini-assignments and in-class exercises are designed to help you prepare for your final project - a research proposal.
Course does not meet an Approach

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CITY B304 Disaster, War and Rebuilding in the Japanese City Not offered 2016-17 Natural and man-made disasters have destroyed Japanese cities regularly. Rebuilding generally ensued at a very rapid pace, often as a continuation of the past. Following a brief examination of literature on disaster and rebuilding and a historical overview of architectural and urban history in Japan, this course explores the reasons for historical transformations large and small. It specifically argues that rebuilding was mostly the result of traditions, whereas transformation of urban space occurred primarily as a result of political and socio-economic change. Focusing on the period since the Meiji restoration of 1868, we ask: How did reconstruction after natural and man-made disasters shape the contemporary Japanese landscape? We will explore specifically the destruction and rebuilding after the 1891 Nobi earthquake, the 1923 Great Kanto earthquake that leveled Tokyo and Yokohama, the bombing of more than 200 cities in World War II and their rebuilding, as well as the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake that destroyed Kobe and its reconstruction. In the context of the long history of destruction and rebuilding we will finally explore the recent disaster in Fukushima 2011. Through the story of disaster and rebuilding emerge different approaches to permanence and change, to urban livability, the environment and sustainability.

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CITY B306 Advanced Fieldwork Techniques: Places in Time Spring 2017 A workshop for research into the histories of places, intended to bring students into contact with some of the raw materials of architectural and urban history. A focus will be placed on historical images and texts, and on creating engaging informational experiences that are transparent to their evidentiary basis.

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CITY B318 Topics in Urban Social and Cultural Theory
Section 001 (Spring 2017): "Public" in Policy & Planning
Section 001 (Spring 2016): Brazil: City, Media, Nature Spring 2017 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: Public participation is a common part of the policy development, adoption, and implementation process in all levels of government and across a wide range of issues, including urban planning, transportation, environmental protection, education, and public health. This course will explore who that public is and how public participation interacts with the policy process, why it matters for the functioning of democracy, and how different ways of engaging the public serve different interests.

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CITY B325 Topics in Social History
Section 001 (Fall 2016): Migration Fall 2016 This a topics course that explores various themes in American social history. Course content varies.
Current topic description: We live in times of unprecedented human mobility. More people than ever before live outside their country of birth. And wherever migrants move in the world, they overwhelmingly settle in urban areas. This course explores how migration and migrants shape cities, and how cities in turn shape migrants' lives. The focus will be on the European and North American context.

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CITY B335 Topics in City and Media
Section 001 (Spring 2017): Public/Private/Control/Freedom Spring 2017 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: Cities demand and create information. Urbanism has thrived on, through and by varied media from monumental constructions through newspapers, film and mass media to today's social media. This seminar explores theoretical debates, global practices, social exclusions and resistance, and diasporic extensions of the mediated city. Looking through the prism of public, counter-public and private spheres we examine -and challenge --the dialectic of control and freedom these urbane connections embody.

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CITY B345 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society
Section 001 (Fall 2015): Environmental Justice
Section 001 (Spring 2017): Sustainable Cities Spring 2017 This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Current topic description: How can cities help address today's most pressing environmental problems? Are sustainable urban environments possible, and if so, what would they look like? This course explores these and other questions by examining theories, politics and practices of sustainability in urban contexts from a global perspective. Considering economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainability, we will explore key themes such as economic development, environmental justice, food systems, green building and architecture, transportation and climate change.
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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CITY B360 Topics: Urban Culture and Society
Section 001 (Fall 2015): Architecture of the Eternal City
Section 001 (Fall 2016): City of Rome
Section 001 (Spring 2016): Digital Rome Fall 2016 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: In this seminar we will study the city of Rome through time and space and will start with the city's mythical founding and work our way through contemporary Rome. Focal points will include: the Roman Empire, the urban planning of the Baroque popes, Mussolini's 'Third Rome,' and the contemporary city of Renzo Piano, Richard Meier, and Zaha Hadid. Throughout this discussion-based course we will examine innumerable issues, such as the use and abuse of the past throughout the city's long history.

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CITY B365 Topics: Techniques of the City
Section 001 (Spring 2016): New Urbanism Not offered 2016-17 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisite: Student must have taken at least one social science course.
Current topic description: This course is the social scientific examination of how the military and city interact. We will explore the social, cultural, political, and geographic processes, interactions, and consequences of the military.

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CITY B377 Topics in Modern Architecture
Section 001 (Spring 2016): Islamic Cities Not offered 2016-17 This is a topics course on modern architecture. Topics vary.

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CITY B378 Formative Landscapes: The Architecture and Planning of American Collegiate Campuses Not offered 2016-17 The campus and buildings familiar to us here at the College reflect a long and rich design conversation regarding communicative form, architectural innovation, and orchestrated planning. This course will explore that conversation through varied examples, key models, and shaping conceptions over time.

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CITY B398 Senior Seminar An intensive research seminar designed to guide students in writing a senior thesis.

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CITY B403 Independent Study

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CITY B403 Independent Study

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CITY B415 Teaching Assistant An exploration of course planning, pedagogy and creative thinking as students work to help others understand pathways they have already explored in introductory and writing classes. This opportunity is available only to advanced students of highest standing by professorial invitation.

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CITY B425 Praxis III: Independent Study Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community. Counts toward Praxis Program

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ANTH B210 Medical Anthropology Fall 2016 This course examines the relationships between culture, society, disease and illness. It considers a broad range of health-related experiences, discourses, knowledge and practice among different cultures and among individuals and groups in different positions of power. Topics covered include sorcery, herbal remedies, healing rituals, folk illnesses, modern disease, scientific medical perceptions, clinical technique, epidemiology and political economy of medicine. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or permission of instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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ARCH B104 Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban Revolutions Spring 2017 This course examines the archaeology of the two most fundamental changes that have occurred in human society in the last 12,000 years, agriculture and urbanism, and we explore these in Egypt and the Near East as far as India. We also explore those societies that did not experience these changes. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Counts toward Counts toward Geoarchaeology Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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ARCH B203 Ancient Greek Cities and Sanctuaries Fall 2016 A study of the development of the Greek city-states and sanctuaries. Archaeological evidence is surveyed in its historic context. The political formation of the city-state and the role of religion is presented, and the political, economic, and religious institutions of the city-states are explored in their urban settings. The city-state is considered as a particular political economy of the Mediterranean and in comparison to the utility of the concept of city-state in other cultures. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ARCH B215 Classical Art Fall 2016 A survey of the visual arts of ancient Greece and Rome from the Bronze Age through Late Imperial times (circa 3000 B.C.E. to 300 C.E.). Major categories of artistic production are examined in historical and social context, including interactions with neighboring areas and cultures; methodological and interpretive issues are highlighted. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ARCH B244 Great Empires of the Ancient Near East Fall 2016 A survey of the history, material culture, political and religious ideologies of, and interactions among, the five great empires of the ancient Near East of the second and first millennia B.C.E.: New Kingdom Egypt, the Hittite Empire in Anatolia, the Assyrian and Babylonian Empires in Mesopotamia, and the Persian Empire in Iran. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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ARCH B252 Pompeii Not offered 2016-17 Introduces students to a nearly intact archaeological site whose destruction by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E. was recorded by contemporaries. The discovery of Pompeii in the mid-1700s had an enormous impact on 18th- and 19th-century views of the Roman past as well as styles and preferences of the modern era. Informs students in classical antiquity, urban life, city structure, residential architecture, home decoration and furnishing, wall painting, minor arts and craft and mercantile activities within a Roman city.

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ARCH B260 Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome Spring 2017 The often-praised achievements of the classical cultures arose from the realities of day-to-day life. This course surveys the rich body of material and textual evidence pertaining to how ancient Greeks and Romans -- famous and obscure alike -- lived and died. Topics include housing, food, clothing, work, leisure, and family and social life. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ARCH B305 Topics in Ancient Athens
Section 001 (Fall 2016): Acropolis Fall 2016 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course is an introduction to the Acropolis of Athens, perhaps the best-know acropolis in the world. We will explore its history, understand and interpret specific monuments and their sculptural decoration and engage in more recent discussions, for instance, on the role of the Acropolis played in shaping the Hellenic Identity
Writing Attentive

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ARCH B316 Trade and Transport in the Ancient World Not offered 2016-17 Issues of trade, commerce and production of export goods are addressed with regard to the Bronze Age and Iron Age cultures of Mesopotamia, Arabia, Iran and south Asia. Crucial to these systems is the development of means of transport via maritime routes and on land. Archaeological evidence for traded goods and shipwrecks is used to map the emergence of sea-faring across the Indian Ocean and Gulf while bio-archaeological data is employed to examine the transformative role that Bactrian and Dromedary camels played in ancient trade and transport.

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ARCH B505 Topics in Ancient Athens
Section 001 (Fall 2016): Acropolis Fall 2016 This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Current topic description: This course is an introduction to the Acropolis of Athens, perhaps the best-known acropolis in the world. We will explore its history, understand and interpret specific monuments and their sculptural decoration and engage in more recent discussions, for instance, on the role the Acropolis played in shaping the Hellenic identity.

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ARCH B516 Trade and Transport in the Ancient World Not offered 2016-17 Issues of trade, commerce and production of export goods are addressed with regard to the Bronze Age and Iron Age cultures of Mesopotamia, Arabia, Iran and south Asia. Crucial to these systems is the development of means of transport via maritime routes and on land. Archaeological evidence for traded goods and shipwrecks is used to map the emergence of sea-faring across the Indian Ocean and Gulf while bio-archaeological data is employed to examine the transformative role that Bactrian and Dromedary camels played in ancient trade and transport.

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ARTD B310 Performing the City: Theorizing Bodies in Space Not offered 2016-17 Building on the premise that space is a concern in performance, choreography, architecture and urban planning, this course will interrogate relationships between (performing) bodies and (city) spaces. Using perspectives from dance and performance studies, urban studies and cultural geography, it will introduce space, spatiality and the city as material and theoretical concepts and investigate how moving and performing bodies and city spaces intersect in political, social and cultural contexts. Lectures, discussion of assigned readings, attendance at a live performance and 2-3 field trips are included. Prerequisites: One Dance lecture/seminar course or one course in relevant discipline e.g. cities, anthropology, sociology or permission of the instructor. Writing Attentive

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BIOL B262 Urban Ecosystems Not offered 2016-17 Cities can be considered ecosystems whose functions are highly influenced by human activity. This course will address many of the living and non-living components of urban ecosystems, as well as their unique processes. Using an approach focused on case studies, the course will explore the ecological and environmental problems that arise from urbanization, and also examine solutions that have been attempted. Prerequisite: BIOL B110 or B111 or ENVS B101. Course does not meet an Approach Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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CSTS B255 Show and Spectacle in Ancient Greece and Rome Not offered 2016-17 A survey of public entertainment in the ancient world, including theater and dramatic festivals, athletic competitions, games and gladiatorial combats, and processions and sacrifices. Drawing on literary sources and paying attention to art, archaeology and topography, this course explores the social, political and religious contexts of ancient spectacle. Special consideration will be given to modern equivalents of staged entertainment and the representation of ancient spectacle in contemporary film. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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ECON B136 Working with Economic Data Not offered 2016-17 Applies selected principles of economics to the quantitative analysis of economic data; uses spreadsheets and other tools to collect and judge the reliability of economic data. Topics may include measures of income inequality and poverty; unemployment, national income and other measures of economic well-being; cost-benefit of public and private investments; construction of price indices and other government statistics; evaluating economic forecasts; and the economics of personal finance. Prerequisites: Quantitative Readiness Required. Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)

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ECON B208 Labor Economics Spring 2017 Analysis of labor markets. Focuses on the economic forces and public policies that determine wage rates and unemployment. Specific topics include: human capital, family decision marking, discrimination, immigration, technological change, compensating differentials, and signaling. Prerequisite: ECON B105.

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ECON B213 Taming the Modern Corporation Spring 2017 Introduction to the economics of industrial organization and regulation, focusing on policy options for ensuring that corporations enhance economic welfare and the quality of life. Topics include firm behavior in imperfectly competitive markets; theoretical bases of antitrust laws; regulation of product and occupational safety, environmental pollution, and truth in advertising. Prerequisite: ECON B105.

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ECON B214 Public Finance Not offered 2016-17 Analysis of government's role in resource allocation, emphasizing effects of tax and expenditure programs on income distribution and economic efficiency. Topics include sources of inefficiency in markets and possible government responses; federal budget composition; social insurance and antipoverty programs; U.S. tax structure and incidence. Prerequisites: ECON B105. Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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ECON B225 Economic Development Fall 2016 Examination of the issues related to and the policies designed to promote economic development in the developing economies of Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Focus is on why some developing economies grow faster than others and why some growth paths are more equitable, poverty reducing, and environmentally sustainable than others. Includes consideration of the impact of international trade and investment policy, macroeconomic policies (exchange rate, monetary and fiscal policy) and sector policies (industry, agriculture, education, population, and environment) on development outcomes in a wide range of political and institutional contexts. Prerequisite: ECON B105. Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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ECON B234 Environmental Economics Spring 2017 Introduction to the use of economic analysis to explain the underlying behavioral causes of environmental and natural resource problems and to evaluate policy responses to them. Topics may include air and water pollution; the economic theory of externalities, public goods and the depletion of resources; cost-benefit analysis; valuing non-market benefits and costs; economic justice; and sustainable development. Prerequisites: ECON B105. Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ECON B236 The Economics of Globalization Not offered 2016-17 An introduction to international economics through theory, policy issues, and problems. The course surveys international trade and finance, as well as topics in international economics. It investigates why and what a nation trades, the consequences of such trade, the role of trade policy, the behavior and effects of exchange rates, and the macroeconomic implications of trade and capital flows. Topics may include the economics of free trade areas, world financial crises, outsourcing, immigration, and foreign investment. Prerequisites: ECON B105. The course is not open to students who have taken ECON B316 or B348. Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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ECON B242 Economics of Local Environmental Programs Fall 2016 Considers the determinants of human impact on the environment at the neighborhood or community level and policy responses available to local government. How can economics help solve and learn from the problems facing rural and suburban communities? The instructor was a local township supervisor who will share the day-to-day challenges of coping with land use planning, waste disposal, dispute resolution, and the provision of basic services. Prerequisite: ECON B105. Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies Counts toward Counts toward Praxis Program

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ECON B243 Economic Inequality and Government Policy Choices Not offered 2016-17 This course will examine the U.S. economy and the effects of government policy choices. The class will focus on the potential trade-offs between economic efficiency and greater economic equality. Some of the issues that will be explored include tax, education, and health care policies. Different perspectives on issues will be examined. Prerequisite: ECON B105.

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ECON B253 Introduction to Econometrics Fall 2016, Spring 2017 An introduction to econometric terminology and reasoning. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. Particular emphasis is placed on regression analysis and on the use of data to address economic issues. The required computational techniques are developed as part of the course. Prerequisites: ECON B105 and a 200-level elective. Quantitative Methods (QM)

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ECON B314 The Economics of Social Policy Not offered 2016-17 Introduces students to the economic rationale behind government programs and the evaluation of government programs. Topics include health insurance, social security, unemployment and disability insurance, and education. Additionally, the instructor and students will jointly select topics of special interest to the class. Emphasis will be placed on the use of statistics to evaluate social policy. Prerequisites: ECON 200; ECON 253 or 304. Writing Intensive

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ECON B324 The Economics of Discrimination and Inequality Fall 2016 Explores the causes and consequences of discrimination and inequality in economic markets. Topics include economic theories of discrimination and inequality, evidence of contemporary race- and gender-based inequality, detecting discrimination, identifying sources of racial and gender inequality, and identifying sources of overall economic inequality. Additionally, the instructor and students will jointly select supplementary topics of specific interest to the class. Possible topics include: discrimination in historical markets, disparity in legal treatments, issues of family structure, and education gaps. Prerequisites: At least one 200-level applied microeconomics elective; ECON 253 or 304; ECON 200 or 202. Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ECON B335 East Asian Development Not offered 2016-17 Identifies the core economic and political elements of an East Asian newly industrializing economies (NIEs) development model. Assesses the performance of this development model in Northeast (China, South Korea and Taiwan) and Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam) in a comparative perspective. Considers the debate over the impact of interventionist and selective development policies associated with this model on the development successes and failures of the East Asian NIEs. Evaluates the impact of democratization in several of these polities on both the core development model identified as well as on development performance. Prerequisite:ECON 225; ECON 200 or 202; and ECON 253 or 304; or permission of instructor. Writing Intensive

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EDUC B266 Schools in American Cities Spring 2017 This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal "case" that students investigate through documents and school placements. This is a Praxis II course (weekly fieldwork in a school required) Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies Counts toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Counts toward Praxis Program

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GEOL B209 Natural Hazards Not offered 2016-17 A quantitative approach to understanding the earth processes that impact human societies. We consider the past, current, and future hazards presented by geologic processes, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, and hurricanes. The course includes discussion of the social, economic, and policy contexts within which natural geologic processes become hazards. Case studies are drawn from contemporary and ancient societies. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: one semester of college science or permission of instructor. Quantitative Methods (QM) Quantitative Readiness Required (QR) Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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GERM B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture Not offered 2016-17 This is a topics course. Taught in English. Course content varies. Previous topics include, Women's Narratives on Modern Migrancy, Exile, and Diasporas; Nation and Identity in Post-War Austria. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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GERM B321 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies
Section 001 (Fall 2016): Representing Diversity in German Cinema Fall 2016 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course examines a wide-ranging repertoire of transnational films produced in contemporary Germany. It presents an introduction to modern German cinema through a close analysis of visual material and identity construction in the worlds of the real and the reel.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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GNST B245 Introduction to Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Peoples and Cultures Not offered 2016-17 A broad, interdisciplinary survey of themes uniting and dividing societies from the Iberian Peninsula through the contemporary New World. The class introduces the methods and interests of all departments in the concentration, posing problems of cultural continuity and change, globalization and struggles within dynamic histories, political economies, and creative expressions. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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HART B212 Medieval Art & Architecture Spring 2017 This course takes a broad geographic and chronological scope, allowing for full exposure to the rich variety of objects and monuments that fall under the rubric of "medieval" art and architecture. We focus on the Latin and Byzantine Christian traditions, but also consider works of art and architecture from the Islamic and Jewish spheres. Topics to be discussed include: the role of religion in artistic development and expression; secular traditions of medieval art and culture; facture and materiality in the art of the middle ages; the use of objects and monuments to convey political power and social prestige; gender dynamics in medieval visual culture; and the contribution of medieval art and architecture to later artistic traditions. Critical Interpretation (CI) Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HART B253 Survey of Western Architecture Spring 2017 The major traditions in Western architecture are illustrated through detailed analysis of selected examples from classical antiquity to the present. The evolution of architectural design and building technology, and the larger intellectual, aesthetic, and social context in which this evolution occurred, are considered. Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HART B311 Topics in Medieval Art
Section 001 (Spring 2017): Discovering Medieval Manuscripts
Section 001 (Fall 2015): Kings, Caliphs, and Emperors: Images of Authority Spring 2017 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: What can we learn from a medieval book? A book is much more than the text or images it contains: books reflect their own histories of creation and use, and books have the capacity to shape their readers' interpretations of their contents. This class focuses on medieval manuscripts, books written by hand, to study the makers and readers of medieval books and to consider the relationship between texts and images. Students will gain hands-on experience studying medieval books in Bryn Mawr College Special Collections and in other local collections to explore the history, art, and culture of the European Middle Ages.

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HART B323 Topics in Renaissance and Baroque Art Not offered 2016-17 This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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HART B355 Topics in the History of London Fall 2016 Selected topics of social, literary, and architectural concern in the history of London, emphasizing London since the 18th century.

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HIST B237 Topic: Modern African History
Section 001 (Spring 2016): African Economic Development
Section 001 (Spring 2017): African Economic Development
Section 001 (Fall 2015): Urbanization in Africa Spring 2017 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course examines the political economy of African development in historical perspectives. We will address the following questions: Why is the African continent, which is rich in natural resources, so poor? What are the causes of poverty in Africa? The course will analyze the environmental, economic, political, and historical factors that have affected the development of Africa. We will discuss the impact of slavery, colonial exploitation, foreign interventions, foreign aid, trade, and democratic transitions on African development. We will also explore the theories of development and underdevelopment.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B249 History of Global Health Not offered 2016-17 This course examines the interrelated histories of public health, international health, and global health from the late 18th to the 21st centuries as part of a broader history of epidemics, empire, and global mobility. We will pay particular attention this semester to the use of architectural and spatial strategies for managing crises of contagion, disaster, and epidemic. The architectural spaces to be examined will include urban-based hospitals, public health infrastructure, and quarantine buildings as well as mobile architectural technologies such as incubators, wartime pop-up surgical tents, and floating hospitals in both Western and non-Western environments. The course will trace the role of health and medicine in mediating the relationships between metropolis and colony, state and citizen, research practice and human subject. Inquiry into the Past (IP) Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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HIST B325 Topics in Social History
Section 001 (Fall 2015): Queering History
Section 001 (Spring 2017): Queering Popular Culture
Section 001 (Spring 2016): Technology and the Politics of Reproductive'Space'
Section 001 (Fall 2016): Unruly Bodies and Forbidden Desires Fall 2016, Spring 2017 This a topics course that explores various themes in American social history. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course explores how various forms of gender and sexual nonconformity have historically served both as sites of regulation and as modes of resistance. From nineteenth-century cross-dressing and anarchist "free love" movements to sex work and BDSM, we will investigate how certain practices, identities, and communities have come to be seen as "problems" in particular historical moments, as well as how individuals have developed their own strategies for working with and against dominant gender and sexual norms. Focusing on historical contestation over the meanings of sexual "normality" and "deviance," we will trace the transformations in the cultural meanings, politics, and social organization of sexual and gender nonconformity over time.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B368 Topics in Medieval History Not offered 2016-17 This is a topics course. Topics vary.

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ITAL B215 The City of Naples Not offered 2016-17 The city of Naples emerged during the Later Middle Ages as the capital of a Kingdom and one of the most influential cities in the Mediterranean region. What led to the city's rise, and what effect did the city as a cultural, political, and economic force have on the rest of the region and beyond? This course will familiarize students with the art, architecture, culture, and institutions that made the city one of the most influential in Europe and the Mediterranean region during the Late Middle Ages. Topics include court painters in service to the crown, female monastic spaces and patronage, and the revival of dynastic tomb sculpture. Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ITAL B219 Multiculturalism in Medieval Italy Not offered 2016-17 This course examines cross-cultural interactions in medieval Italy played out through the patronage, production, and reception of works of art and architecture. Sites of patronage and production include the cities of Venice, Palermo, and Pisa. Media examined include buildings, mosaics, ivories, and textiles. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ITAL B330 Architecture and Identity in Italy: Renaissance to the Present Not offered 2016-17 How is architecture used to shape our understanding of past and current identities? This course looks at the ways in which architecture has been understood to represent, and used to shape regional, national, ethnic, and gender identities in Italy from the Renaissance to the present. The class focuses on Italy's classical traditions, and looks at the ways in which architects and theorists have accepted or rejected the peninsula's classical roots. Subjects studied include Baroque Architecture, the Risorgimento, Futurism, Fascism, and colonialism. Course readings include Vitruvius, Leon Battista Alberti, Giorgio Vasari, Jacob Burckhardt, and Alois Riegl, among others.

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ITAL B340 The Art of Italian Unification Not offered 2016-17 Following Italian unification (1815-1871), the statesman, novelist, and painter Massimo d'Azeglio remarked, "Italy has been made; now it remains to make Italians." This course examines the art and architectural movements of the roughly 100 years between the uprisings of 1848 and the beginning of the Second World War, a critical period for defining Italiantà. Subjects include the paintings of the Macchiaioli, reactionaries to the 1848 uprisings and the Italian Independence Wars, the politics of nineteenth-century architectural restoration in Italy, the re-urbanization of Italy's new capital Rome, Fascist architecture and urbanism, and the architecture of Italy's African colonies. Writing Intensive

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POLS B222 Environmental Issues: Movements and Policy Making in Comparative Perspective
Section 001 (Spring 2017): Movements, Controversies and Policy Making Spring 2017 An exploration of the ways in which different cultural, economic, and political settings have shaped issue emergence and policy making. We examine the politics of particular environmental issues in selected countries and regions, paying special attention to the impact of environmental movements. We also assess the prospects for international cooperation in addressing global environmental problems such as climate change. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B256 Global Politics of Climate Change Not offered 2016-17 This course will introduce students to important political issues raised by climate change locally, nationally, and internationally, paying particular attention to the global implications of actions at the national and subnational levels. It will focus not only on specific problems, but also on solutions; students will learn about some of the technological and policy innovations that are being developed worldwide in response to the challenges of climate change. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B321 Technology and Politics Spring 2017 A multi-media analysis of the complex role of technology in political and social life. We focus on the relationship between technological change and democratic governance. We begin with historical and contemporary Luddism as well as pro-technology movements around the world. Substantive issue areas include security and surveillance, electoral politics, economic development and women's empowerment, warfare, social media, net neutrality, GMO foods and industrial agriculture, climate change and energy politics. Writing Attentive Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B348 Culture and Ethnic Conflict Not offered 2016-17 An examination of the role of culture in the origin, escalation, and settlement of ethnic conflicts. This course examines the politics of culture and how it constrains and offers opportunities for ethnic conflict and cooperation. The role of narratives, rituals, and symbols is emphasized in examining political contestation over cultural representations and expressions such as parades, holy sites, public dress, museums, monuments, and language in culturally framed ethnic conflicts from all regions of the world. Prerequisites: two courses in the social sciences. Counts toward Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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SOCL B205 Social Inequality Fall 2016 Introduction to the major sociological theories of gender, racial-ethnic, and class inequality with emphasis on the relationships among these forms of stratification in the contemporary United States, including the role of the upper class(es), inequality between and within families, in the work place, and in the educational system. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B229 Black America in Sociological Perspective Spring 2017 This course presents sociological perspectives on various issues affecting black America as a historically unique minority group in the United States: the legacy of slavery and the Jim Crow era; the formation of urban black ghettos; the civil rights reforms; the problems of poverty and unemployment; the problems of crime and other social problems in black communities; the problems of criminal justice; the continuing significance of race; the varied covert modern forms of racial discrimination experienced by black Americans; and the role of race in American politics. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies Counts toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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SOCL B231 Punishment and Social Order Not offered 2016-17 A cross-cultural examination of punishment, from mass incarceration in the United States, to a widened "penal net" in Europe, and the securitization of society in Latin America. The course addresses theoretical approaches to crime control and the emergence of a punitive state connected with pervasive social inequality. Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o

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SOCL B238 Perspectives on Urban Poverty Not offered 2016-17 This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to 20th century urban poverty knowledge. The course is primarily concerned with the ways in which historical, cultural, political, racial, social, spatial/geographical, and economic forces have either shaped or been left out of contemporary debates on urban poverty. Of great importance, the course will evaluate competing knowledge systems and their respective implications in terms of the question of "what can be known" about urban poverty in the contexts of social policy and practice, academic research, and the broader social imaginary. We will critically analyze a wide body of literature that theorizes and explains urban poverty. Course readings span the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, critical geography, urban studies, history, and social welfare. Primacy will be granted to critical analysis and deconstruction of course texts, particularly with regard to the ways in which poverty knowledge creates, sustains, and constricts channels of action in urban poverty policy and practice interventions. Critical Interpretation (CI)

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SOCL B242 Urban Field Research Methods Not offered 2016-17 This Praxis course intends to provide students with hands-on research practice in field methods. In collaboration with the instructor and the Praxis Office, students will choose an organization or other group activity in which they will conduct participant observation for several weeks. Through this practice, students will learn how to conduct field-based primary research and analyze sociological issues. Counts toward Counts toward Praxis Program

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SOCL B259 Comparative Social Movements in Latin America Not offered 2016-17 An examination of resistance movements to the power of the state and globalization in three Latin American societies: Mexico, Columbia, and Peru. The course explores the political, legal, and socio-economic factors underlying contemporary struggles for human and social rights, and the role of race, ethnicity, and coloniality play in these struggles. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o

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SOWK B554 Social Determinants of Health and Health Equity Spring 2017 The purpose of this course is to provide students with knowledge and an understanding of how structural factors (racism, sexism, homophobia, classism, discrimination, the built environment, poverty, working conditions, and the unequal distribution of power, income, goods, and services) contribute to racial/ ethnic and gender disparities in health and well-being. Prerequisite: junior or senior status. Counts toward Counts toward Praxis Program

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