The History of Place:

The Development of an Image Through Time



Taylor's Image

[TAYLOR]


The Growth of an Image Through Time: The Subject and Purpose of This Site

This webpage was created as part of a class assignment in City 306, a course within the Growth and Structure of Cities Department at Bryn Mawr College. The assignment required the students to uncover the social and architectural forces that led to the construction of the buildings in a given image, and then to unfold the site's history that takes place in the years after the image's creation. Also integral to the project is the history of the surrounding buildings.

The above image was assigned and thus frames the narration of the story. The image, a Taylor Watercolor from 1861, depicts 726 and 258 Market Street (today these buildings are 726 and 728). Click here for more information about Taylor. The large difference in building numbers at the time results from a change in the street numbering system that occurred in 1857, four years before Taylor painted the image. For an explanation of the changes in address, click here. To maintain consistency, this webpage uses the contemporary street numbers throughout.

In looking at the history of the buildings in Taylor's image, this webpage delves into the individual histories of 726 and 728 Market Street. These locations can only be researched individually until 1891, however, and this site looks at the properties as one starting in 1891. In addition to the individual history of this location, the "Market Street, South Side of 700s Block" link below analyzes the site in the context of the surrounding buildings.


The Components of Taylor's Image

726 and 728 Market Street Until 1891

726 and 728 Market Street From 1891 to Present

Market Street, South Side of 700s Block



Sources

Image taken from: http://www.brynmawr.edu/cities/archx/taylor61/75x47-p18.jpg

Taylor's Watercolors found at Winterthur Library. More information at: http://www.brynmawr.edu/iconog/uphp/taylocs.html


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Last revised on 20 March 2006, MG Feedback