GREEK 639

Gender and Rhetoric in the Attic Orators

 

Professor Radcliffe G. Edmonds III

Office: Thomas 245  

Office Phone: 610-526-5046

redmonds@brynmawr.edu

Carpenter 17 

Th 2:00-4:00

Office Hours: MWF 10-11

or by appointment

 

Required Texts:  

Demosthenes, Orationes III, ed. Rennie, Oxford University Press, 1931.

Aeschines, Orationes, ed. Dilts, K. G. Saur Verlag, 1998.

Cohen, David, Law, Sexuality, and Society: The enforcement of morals in classical Athens, Cambridge University Press:  Cambridge, 1991.

Dover, Kenneth, Greek Homosexuality, Harvard University Press: Cambridge, 1978.

 

Recommended Texts:

Davidson, James The Greeks and Greek Love: A Bold New Exploration of the Ancient World, Random House, 2009.

Gagarin M. & Cohen, D., Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law, Cambridge University Press, 2005.

Hamel, Debra, Trying Neaira:  The True Story of a Courtesan's Scandalous Life in Ancient Greece, Yale University Press:  New Haven, 2003.

MacDowell, D. M., The Law in Classical Athens. London, 1978.

 

 

Course Description:   

                  The Attic orators provide a rich array of evidence for the social structures of men and women in ancient Athens, giving insights into aspects of personal life that literary texts rarely touch upon.  In this seminar, we will explore the ideas of gender and citizenship as they are expressed in a number of the orations from 4th century Athens.  We will examine the ways in which rhetoric is used in the speeches, with close attention to the kind of social and personal dynamics that were central to the forensic arena of this time period.  A close reading of the texts themselves in the original Greek will help provide insight into the language of the courts, while the readings from modern scholarship will allow us to probe more deeply into some of the issues raised by the texts.

 

Course Requirements:

Class participation: 

                  Each week's assignment will include readings from the orators as well as some secondary interpretations.  The first part of the seminar each week will consist of a close reading of the ancient Greek text, with attention to the vocabulary and the rhetoric of the speeches.  Every student is expected to be prepared to translate from the selection designated for the week.  The second part will involve discussion about the interpretation of the text, using the secondary readings as a springboard for discussion.  One or more students will be assigned to write and present a short reaction for each of the secondary readings for the week.  Such reactions should consist, not of a summary of the selection, but rather of points of agreement and disagreement and of questions for further discussion.  Every student is expected to contribute actively to the discussion of the readings.

                  The readings not in the required textbooks will be available on Blackboard or indirectly through a link from the online version of the syllabus http://www.brynmawr.edu/classics/redmonds/grek63910.html.

 

Written Assignments:  
                  In addition to the brief reactions to the readings, there will be two other written projects.  The first will be a brief presentation in the third week of one oration (of the student's choice but not on the syllabus), outlining the nature and context of the speech.  In addition, there will be one long (around 25 pages) final paper for the course.  Each student should select a topic in consultation with the professor before the middle of the term, and a rough outline and preliminary bibliography should be handed in by the end of the first week after spring break.  Every student will present a short version of the project in the final weeks of the term, and the final version of the paper will be due before the end of the finals period.  Students are encouraged to submit rough drafts for comments before the end of classes.

 

 

Schedule of Readings:

 

Week 1: January 21 – Introduction to the course

Lysias 1 On the Killing of Eratosthenes

Cohen, D. (1991). Law, Sexuality, and Society: The enforcement of morals in classical Athens, Cambridge University Press:  Cambridge.

 

 

Week 2: January 28 – Lysias

Lysias 1 On the Killing of Eratosthenes

Cohen, D. (1991). Law, Sexuality, and Society: The enforcement of morals in classical Athens. Cambridge University Press:  Cambridge.

Harris, E. (1990). Did the Athenians Regard Seduction as a Worse Crime Than Rape? Classical Quarterly 40.2: 370-377.

Herman, G. (1993). ‘Tribal and Civic Codes of Behaviour in Lysias 1’. Classical Quarterly 43: 406–19.

 

 

Week 3:– Gorgias & presentations - reschedule for February 9?

Gorgias, Defense of Helen

Plato, Gorgias

Schiappa, E. (1999). The Beginnings of Rhetorical Theory in Classical Greece. Yale University Press: 85-132.

 

 

Week 4: February 11 – Apollodoros

Apollodoros, Against Neaira 1-32

Davidson, J. (1997) Courtesans and Fishcakes:  The Consuming Passions of Classical Athens. St. Martin's Press: ch. III-IV.

Kapparis, K. (1999). Apollodoros 'Against Neaira' [59]. Walter de Gruyter: 1-47.

Supplemental: Hamel, D. (2003) ch. I-II

 

Week 5: February 18 – Apollodoros

Apollodoros, Against Neaira 33-63

Kurke, L. (1997). Inventing the 'hetaira': sex, politics, and discursive conflicts in archaic Greece. Classical Antiquity 16.1: 106-45.

Miner, J. (2003). Courtesan, Concubine, Whore:  Apollodorus' Deliberate Use of Terms for Prostitutes. American Journal of Philology 124: 19-37.

Omitowoju, R. (1997). Regulating Rape: Soap Operas and Self Interest in the Athenian Courts. Rape in Antiquity, Deacy, S. and Pierce, K. F. (eds.). London: 1–24.

Supplemental: Hamel, D. (2003) ch. III-V

 

Week 6: February 25 – Apollodorus

Apollodoros, Against Neaira 64-93

Cohen, E. (2000). Whoring under Contract: The Legal Context of Prostitution in Fourth-Century Athens. Law and Social Status in Classical Athens, Hunter, V. J. and Edmondson, J. (eds.). Oxford: 113–48.

Gilhuly, K. (2009). Collapsing Order: Typologies of Women in the Speech ‘Against Neaira’. The Feminine Matrix of Sex and Gender in Classical Athens. Cambridge: 29-57.

Patterson, C. (1994) The Case against Neaira and the Public Ideology of the Athenian Family. Athenian Identity and Civic Ideology, ed. A. Boegehold & A. Scafuro, The Johns Hopkins University Press: 199-216.

Supplemental: Hamel, D. (2003) ch. VI-IX

 

 

Week 7: March 4 –  Apollodoros

Apollodoros, Against Neaira 94-126

Foxhall, L. (1996). The Law and the Lady:  Women and Legal Proceedings in Classical Athens. Greek Law in its Political Setting: Justifications not Justice. L. a. L. Foxhall, A. D. E. Oxford, Clarendon Press: 133-152.

Glazebrook, A. (2005). The Making of a Prostitute:  Apollodoros's Portrait of Neaira.  Arethusa 38: 161-187.

Trevett, J. (1990). History in [Demosthenes] 59. Classical Quarterly 40.2: 407-420.

 

 

 

Spring break March 8-12

 

 

 

Week 8: March 18 – Aeschines

Against Timarchus 1-70

Dover, K. (1978). Greek Homosexuality, Harvard University Press.

Fisher, N. (2001). Aeschines:  Against Timarchos. Oxford University Press.

Lane Fox, R., (1994). Aeschines and Athenian Politics. Ritual, Finance, Politics: Athenian Democratic Accounts Presented to David Lewis, Osborne, R. G. and Hornblower, S. (eds.). Oxford: 137–55.

 

 


Week 9: March 25 – Aeschines

Against Timarchus 71-116

Halperin, D. (1997). Questions of Evidence: Comments on Koehl, De Vries and Williams. Queer Representations: Reading Lives, Reading Cultures. Duberman, M. B. New York, New York University Press: 39–54.

Hubbard, T. (1998). Popular Perceptions of Elite Homosexuality in Classical Athens. Arion 6.1: 48-78.

Winkler, J. (1990) Laying Down the Law: The Oversight of Men's Sexual Behavior in Classical Athens. Before Sexuality: The Construction of Erotic Experience in the Ancient Greek World, eds. Halperin, Winkler, & Zeitlin, Princeton University Press: 257-308.

 

 

Week 10: April 1 – Aeschines

Against Timarchus 117-176

Ford, A. (1999). Reading Homer from the Rostrum: Poems and Laws in Aeschines’ Against Timarchus. Performance Culture and Athenian Democracy, Goldhill, S. and Osborne, R. G. eds.. Cambridge, 231–56.

Cohen, D. (2004).  Law, society, and homosexuality in classical Athens. Studies in Ancient Greek and Roman Society, ed. Robin Osborne, Cambridge University Press: 61-77.

Davidson, J. (2004). Dover, Foucault and Greek homosexuality: penetration and the truth of sex. Studies in Ancient Greek and Roman Society, ed. Robin Osborne, Cambridge University Press:78-118.

 

 

Week 11: April 8 – Aeschines

Against Timarchus 177-196

Cartledge, P. (1998). The machismo of the Athenian empire - or the reign of the phaulus? When Men Were Men:  Masculinity, power and identity in classical antiquity. L. F. a. J. Salmon. London and New York, Routledge: 54-67.

Fox, M. (1998). The constrained man. Thinking Men:  Masculinity and its Self-Representation in the Classical Tradition. L. a. J. S. Foxhall. London and New York, Routledge: 6-22.

Sissa, G. (1999). Sexual Bodybuilding:  Aeschines Against Timarchus. Constructions of the Classical Body, ed. James I. Porter, University of Michigan Press: 147-168.

 

 

Week 12: April 15 – Lycurgus

Lycurgus, Against Leocrates

Allen, D. (2000). Changing the Authoritative Voice: Lycurgus' Against Leocrates. Classical Antiquity 19: 5-33.

Humphreys, S. (2004). Lycurgus of Boutidai: an Athenian aristocrat. The Strangeness of Gods: Historical perspectives on the interpretation of Athenian religion, Oxford University Press: 77-129.

 

 

Week 13: April 22 – Lycurgus / presentations

Lycurgus, Against Leocrates

 

Week 14: April 29 – presentations


Bibliography of Readings on Blackboard

 

 

Allen, D. (2000). Changing the Authoritative Voice: Lycurgus' Against Leocrates. Classical Antiquity 19: 5-33.

Carey, C. (1995). Rape and Adultery in Athenian Law. Classical Quarterly 45.2:407-417.

Cartledge, P. (1998). The machismo of the Athenian empire - or the reign of the phaulus? When Men Were Men:  Masculinity, power and identity in classical antiquity. L. F. a. J. Salmon. London and New York, Routledge: 54-67.

Cohen, D. (1991). Law, Sexuality, and Society: The enforcement of morals in classical Athens. Cambridge University Press:  Cambridge.

Cohen, D. (2004).  Law, society, and homosexuality in classical Athens. Studies in Ancient Greek and Roman Society, ed. Robin Osborne, Cambridge University Press: 61-77.

Cohen, E. (2000). Whoring under Contract: The Legal Context of Prostitution in Fourth-Century Athens. Law and Social Status in Classical Athens, Hunter, V. J. and Edmondson, J. (eds.). Oxford: 113–48.

Davidson, J. (1997). Courtesans and Fishcakes:  The Consuming Passions of Classical Athens. St. Martin's Press: .

Davidson, J. (2004). Dover, Foucault and Greek homosexuality: penetration and the truth of sex. Studies in Ancient Greek and Roman Society, ed. Robin Osborne, Cambridge University Press:78-118.

De Vries, K. (1997). The 'Frigid Eromenoi' and their Wooers Revisited: A Closer Look at Greek Homosexuality in Vase Painting. Queer Representations: Reading Lives, Reading Cultures. Duberman, M. B. New York, New York University Press: 14-24.

Dover, K. (1978). Greek Homosexuality. Harvard University Press.

Fisher, N.  (1998). Violence, Masculinity, and the Law in Classical Athens. When Men Were Men:  Masculinity, power and identity in classical antiquity. L. F. a. J. Salmon. London and New York, Routledge: 68-97.

Fisher, N. (2001). Aeschines:  Against Timarchos. Oxford University Press.

Ford, A. (1999). Reading Homer from the Rostrum: Poems and Laws in Aeschines’ Against Timarchus. Performance Culture and Athenian Democracy, Goldhill, S. and Osborne, R. G., eds. Cambridge, 231–56.

Fox, M. (1998). The constrained man. Thinking Men:  Masculinity and its Self-Representation in the Classical Tradition. L. a. J. S. Foxhall. London and New York, Routledge: 6-22.

Foxhall, L. (1996). The Law and the Lady:  Women and Legal Proceedings in Classical Athens. Greek Law in its Political Setting: Justifications not Justice. L. a. L. Foxhall, A. D. E. Oxford, Clarendon Press: 133-152.

Gilhuly, K. (2009). Collapsing Order: Typologies of Women in the Speech ‘Against Neaira’. The Feminine Matrix of Sex and Gender in Classical Athens. Cambridge: 29-57.

Glazebrook, A. (2005). The Making of a Prostitute:  Apollodoros's Portrait of Neaira.  Arethusa 38: 161-187.

Goldhill, S. (1998). The seductions of the gaze:  Socrates and his girlfriends. Kosmos, Essays in Order, Conflict and Community in Classical Athens. P. A. Cartledge, Millet P. C. and von Reden, S. Cambridge, Cambridge: 105-124.

Halperin, D. (1997). Questions of Evidence: Comments on Koehl, De Vries and Williams.  Queer Representations: Reading Lives, Reading Cultures. Duberman, M. B. New York, New York University Press: 39–54.

Hamel, D. (2003). Trying Neaira:  The True Story of a Courtesan's Scandalous Life in Ancient Greece. Yale University Press.

Harris, E. (1990). Did the Athenians Regard Seduction as a Worse Crime Than Rape? Classical Quarterly 40.2: 370-377.

Herman, G. (1993). Tribal and Civic Codes of Behaviour in Lysias 1. Classical Quarterly 43: 406–19.

Hubbard, T. (1998). Popular Perceptions of Elite Homosexuality in Classical Athens. Arion 6.1: 48-78.

Humphreys, S. (1985a).  Law as discourse. History and Anthropology 1.1: 241-264.

Humphreys, S. (1985b). Social relations on stage: Witnesses in Classical Athens. History and Anthropology  1.2: 313-369.

Humphreys, S. (2004). Lycurgus of Boutidai: an Athenian aristocrat in The Strangeness of Gods: Historical perspectives on the interpretation of Athenian religion. Oxford University Press: 77-129.

Kapparis, K. (1999). Apollodoros 'Against Neaira' [59]. Walter de Gruyter: 1-47.

Koehl, R. B. (1997). Ephoros and Ritualized Homosexuality in Bronze Age Crete. Queer Representations: Reading Lives, Reading Cultures. Duberman, M. B. New York, New York University Press: 7-13.

Kurke, L. (1997). Inventing the 'hetaira': sex, politics, and discursive conflicts in archaic Greece. Classical Antiquity 16.1: 106-45.

Lane Fox, R., (1994). Aeschines and Athenian Politics. Ritual, Finance, Politics: Athenian Democratic Accounts Presented to David Lewis, Osborne, R. G. and Hornblower, S., eds. Oxford: 137–55.

Miner, J. (2003). Courtesan, Concubine, Whore:  Apollodorus' Deliberate Use of Terms for Prostitutes. American Journal of Philology 124: 19-37.

Omitowoju, R. (1997). Regulating Rape: Soap Operas and Self Interest in the Athenian Courts. Rape in Antiquity, Deacy, S. and Pierce, K. F., eds. London: 1–24.

Osborne, R. (2004). Law, the democratic citizen and the representation of women in classical Athens. Studies in Ancient Greek and Roman Society, ed. Robin Osborne. Cambridge University Press: 38-60.

Patterson, C. (1994). The Case against Neaira and the Public Ideology of the Athenian Family. Athenian Identity and Civic Ideology, ed. A. Boegehold & A. Scafuro. The Johns Hopkins University Press: 199-216.

Schiappa, E. (1999). The Beginnings of Rhetorical Theory in Classical Greece. Yale University Press: 85-132.

Sissa, G. (1999). Sexual Bodybuilding:  Aeschines Against Timarchus. Constructions of the Classical Body, ed. James I. Porter. University of Michigan Press: 147-168.

Todd, S. C. (1990). The Purpose of Evidence in Athenian Courts. Nomos: Essays in Athenian law, Politics and Society. Cartledge, Millett, and Todd, eds. Cambridge: 19–40.

Trevett, J. (1990). History in [Demosthenes] 59. Classical Quarterly 40.2: 407-420.

Williams, C. (1997). Pudicitia and Pueri:  Roman Concepts of Male Sexual Experience. Queer Representations: Reading Lives, Reading Cultures. Duberman, M. B. New York, New York: 25-38.

Winkler, J. (1990). Laying Down the Law: The Oversight of Men's Sexual Behavior in Classical Athens. Before Sexuality: The Construction of Erotic Experience in the Ancient Greek World, eds. Halperin, Winkler, & Zeitlin, Princeton University Press: 257-308.

Wooten, Cecil W. Clarity and Obscurity in the Speeches of Aeschines. American Journal of Philology 109 (1988): 40-43.