view of Nemea Valley  

FROM THE DIRT TO THE MUSEUM

a website sponsored by
the National Endowment for the Humanities
and Bryn Mawr College

 

 
  

 
 
 

 
 
HOW WAS THE SITE FOUND?

 

A few years ago, Jim Wright, a professor and archaeologist, learned that there had been some looting happening at 2 of the tombs at Ayia Sotira. Looting is when people steal archaeological evidence. The people who live nearby, the people who work at the Nemea Archaeological Museum, and the staff at the Greek Archaeological Service were very worried about this.

The Greek Archaeological Service began an excavation on the site, trying to save any artifacts. They finished excavating a tomb that the tomb robbers had tried to dig up. In that chamber tomb, they found 11 skeletons, some pottery, and even small figurines.

Soon after, Jim and his wife Mary (who is also an archaeologist) began an excavation at Ayia Sotira. They were working with 3 other directors -- Angus from Canada, Sevi from England, and Eva from the Greek Archaeological Service. There were also many students (including me) who helped out in the summers of 2006 and 2007. 

 


 

 

THE GREEK ARCHEOLOGICAL SERVICE
The first tomb at Ayia Sotira was excavated by the Greek Archaeological Service.

HOW TOMB ROBBERS FIND TOMBS
The looters have many ways of finding tombs. Sometimes they shoot shotgun shells into the ground and listen for reverberations, sometimes they hammer long rods into the ground, and sometimes they dig really deep holes.

 


 
 
 
Copyright © 2007 Johanna Best