Courses Offered

Please note: enrollment in the Creative Writing workshop is a three step process. Students must:
(1) preregister
(2) download and print a Creative Writing Program questionnaire, complete this and drop it off (hard copy) to Professor Karl Kirchwey’s faculty mailbox in English House by the end of the pre-registration period.
(3) attend the first meeting of the class in the Fall term. Note: Students applying to 300-level courses without having completed the corresponding 200-level course must submit a writing sample.

Spring Registration Information:
Please note, enrollment in the Creative Writing workshop is a three step process. Students must:
(1) preregister
(2) download and print a Creative Writing Program questionnaire from the Creative Writing homepage, complete this and drop it off (hard copy) to Professor Karl Kirchwey’s faculty mailbox in English House by the end of the pre-registration period.
(3) attend the first meeting of the class in the Spring term. Note: Students applying to 300-level courses without having completed the corresponding 200-level course must submit a writing sample.

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Spring 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
ARTW B159-001 Introduction to Creative Writing Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH English House I Todd,J.
ARTW B240-001 Literary Translation Workshop Semester / 1 LEC: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH English House III Kirchwey,K.
ARTW B260-001 Writing Short Fiction I Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Dalton Hall 1 Torday,D.
ARTW B262-001 Playwriting I Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM F English House I Guha,D.
ARTW B268-001 Writing Literary Journalism Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM M English House III Kjellberg,A.
ARTW B360-001 Writing Short Fiction II Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TH Russian Center Conference Room Eve,N.
ARTW B361-001 Writing Poetry II Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM W English House III Kirchwey,K.
ARTW B364-001 Longer Fictional Forms Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM W English House Lecture Hall Torday,D.

Fall 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
ARTW B260-001 Writing Short Fiction I Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH English House III Torday,D.
ARTW B261-001 Writing Poetry I Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH English House III
ARTW B264-001 News and Feature Writing Semester / 1 Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM T English House II Ferrick,T.
ARTW B266-001 Screenwriting Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM F English House I Doyne,N.
ARTW B269-001 Writing for Children Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH English House I Dept. staff, TBA
ARTW B360-001 Writing Short Fiction II Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM W English House III Torday,D.
ARTW B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
ARTW B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA

Spring 2015

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
ARTW B159-001 Introduction to Creative Writing Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH English House III Todd,J.
ARTW B260-001 Writing Short Fiction I Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM M English House III Eve,N.
ARTW B262-001 Playwriting I Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM F English House I Guha,D.
ARTW B263-001 Writing Memoir I Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH English House III Kirchwey,K.
ARTW B361-001 Writing Poetry II Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM W English House III Kirchwey,K.
ARTW B364-001 Longer Fictional Forms Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM W Russian Center Seminar Room Torday,D.
ARTW B365-001 Creative Nonfiction II Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM T English House I Torday,D.

2014-15 Catalog Data

ARTW B159 Introduction to Creative Writing Spring 2015 This course is for students who wish to experiment with three genres of creative writing: short fiction, poetry and drama, and techniques specific to each of them. Priority will be given to interested first- and second-year students; additional spaces will be made available to upper-year students with little or no experience in creative writing. Students will write or revise work every week; roughly four weeks each will be devoted to short fiction, poetry, and drama. There will be individual conferences with the instructor to discuss their progress and interests. Half of class time will be spent discussing student work and half will be spent discussing syllabus readings. Division III: Humanities Division III: Humanities Course does not meet an Approach

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ARTW B240 Literary Translation Workshop Not offered 2014-15 Open to creative writing students and students of literature, the syllabus includes some theoretical readings, but the emphasis is practical and analytical. Syllabus reading includes parallel translations of certain enduring literary texts (mostly poetry) as well as books and essays about the art of translation. Literary translation will be considered as a spectrum ranging from Dryden's "metaphrase" (word-for-word translation) all the way through imitation, adaptation, and reimagining. Each student will be invited to work with whatever non-English language(s) s/he has, and to select for translation short works of poetry, prose, or drama. The course will include class visits by working literary translators. The Italian verbs for "to translate" and "to betray" sound almost alike; throughout, the course concerns the impossibility and importance of literary translation. Division III: Humanities Cross-listed as COML B240

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ARTW B260 Writing Short Fiction I Fall 2014, Spring 2015 An introduction to fiction writing, focusing on the short story. Students will consider fundamental elements of fiction and the relationship of narrative structure, style, and content, exploring these elements in their own work and in the assigned readings in order to develop an understanding of the range of possibilities open to the fiction writer. Weekly readings and writing exercises are designed to encourage students to explore the material and styles that most interest them, and to push their fiction to a new level of craft, so that over the semester their writing becomes clearer, more controlled, and more absorbing. Division III: Humanities Course does not meet an Approach

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ARTW B261 Writing Poetry I Fall 2014 This course will provide a semester-long survey of the formal resources available to students wishing to write print-based poems in English, beginning with syllabic verse, accentual verse and accentual-syllabic (metered) verse, as well as free verse. Students in this course will gain experience writing in forms including cinquains, syllabics, Anglo-Saxon accentual verse, and sonnets. The course is writing-intensive, and students will write, or rewrite, work every week. Through in-class discussions, they will also become capable critics of each other's work. The objective of the course will be to provide students with a sense of poetic subject and with the skills to find a form and a voice with which to express themselves on the printed page. The purchase of a course packet will be required, not to exceed $20.00. Division III: Humanities Course does not meet an Approach

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ARTW B262 Playwriting I Spring 2015 An introduction to playwriting through a combination of reading assignments, writing exercises, discussions about craft and ultimately the creation of a complete one-act play. Students will work to discover and develop their own unique voices as they learn the technical aspects of the craft of playwriting. Short writing assignments will complement each reading assignment. The final assignment will be to write an original one-act play. Division III: Humanities Course does not meet an Approach Cross-listed as ARTT B262

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ARTW B263 Writing Memoir I Spring 2015 The purpose of this course is to provide students with practical experience in writing about the events, places and people of their own lives in the form of memoir. Initial class discussions attempt to distinguish memoir from related literary genres such as confession and autobiography. Writing assignments and in-class discussion of syllabus readings explore the range of memoirs available for use as models (excerpts by writers including James Baldwin, Lorene Cary, Annie Dillard, Arthur Koestler, Rick Moody, Lorrie Moore, and Tim O'Brien) and elements such as voice and perspective, tone, plot, characterization and symbolic and figurative language. Division III: Humanities Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ARTW B264 News and Feature Writing Fall 2014 Students in this class will learn how to develop, report, write, edit and revise a variety of news stories, beginning with the basics of reporting and writing the news and advancing to longer-form stories, including personality profiles, news features and trend stories, and concluding with point-of-view journalism (columns, criticism, reported essays). The course will focus heavily on work published in The Philadelphia Inquirer and The New York Times. Several working journalists will participate as guest speakers to explain their craft. Students will write stories that will be posted on the class blog, the English House Gazette. Division III: Humanities Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ARTW B265 Creative Nonfiction Not offered 2014-15 This course will explore the literary expressions of nonfiction writing by focusing on the skills, process and craft techniques necessary to the generation and revision of literary nonfiction. Using the information-gathering tools of a journalist, the analytical tools of an essayist and the technical tools of a fiction writer, students will produce pieces that will incorporate both factual information and first person experience. Readings will include a broad group of writers ranging from E.B. White to Anne Carson, George Orwell to David Foster Wallace, Joan Didion to James Baldwin, among many others. Division III: Humanities Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ARTW B266 Screenwriting Fall 2014 An introduction to screenwriting. Issues basic to the art of storytelling in film will be addressed and analyzed: character, dramatic structure, theme, setting, image, sound. The course focuses on the film adaptation; readings include novels, screenplays, and short stories. Films adapted from the readings will be screened. In the course of the semester, students will be expected to outline and complete the first act of an adapted screenplay of their own. Division III: Humanities Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Film Studies

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ARTW B268 Writing Literary Journalism Not offered 2014-15 This course will examine the tools that literary writers bring to factual reporting and how these tools enhance the stories they tell. Readings will include reportage, polemical writing and literary reviewing. The issues of point-of-view and subjectivity, the uses of irony, forms of persuasion, clarity of expression and logic of construction will be discussed. The importance of context--the role of the editor and the magazine, the expectations of the audience, censorship and self-censorship--will be considered. Division III: Humanities

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ARTW B269 Writing for Children Fall 2014 In this course, students have the opportunity to hone the craft of writing for children and young adults. Through reading, in-class discussion, peer review of student work, and private conferences with the instructor, we will examine the specific requirements of the picture book, the middle-grade novel, and the young adult novel. This analytical study of classic and contemporary literature will inspire and inform students' creative work in all aspects of storytelling, including character development, plotting, world building, voice, tone, and the roles of illustration and page composition in story narration. Division III: Humanities Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ARTW B360 Writing Short Fiction II Fall 2014 An exploration of approaches to writing short fiction designed to strengthen skills of experienced student writers as practitioners and critics. Requires writing at least five pages each week, workshopping student pieces, and reading texts ranging from realist stories to metafictional experiments and one-page stories to the short novella, to explore how writers can work within tight confines. Suggested Preparation: ARTW B260 or work demonstrating equivalent expertise in writing short fiction. Students without the ARTW B260, must submit a writing sample of 10-15 pages in length (prose fiction) to the Creative Writing Program during the preregistration period to be considered for this course. Division III: Humanities

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ARTW B361 Writing Poetry II Spring 2015 This course assumes that reading and writing are inextricably linked, and that the only way to write intelligent and interesting poetry is to read as much of it as possible. Writing assignments will be closely connected to syllabus reading, including an anthology prepared by the instructor, and may include working in forms such as ekphrastic poems (i.e. poems about works of visual art or sculpture), dramatic monologues, prose poems, translations, imitations and parodies. Suggested Preparation: ARTW B261 or work demonstrating equivalent familiarity with the basic forms of poetry in English. For students without ARTW B261, a writing sample of 5-7 poems must be submitted to the instructor to be considered for this course. A course packet will be required for this course; cost to not exceed $30.00. Division III: Humanities

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ARTW B364 Longer Fictional Forms Spring 2015 An advanced workshop for students with a strong background in fiction writing who want to write longer works: the long short story, novella and novel. Students will write intensively, and complete a long story, novel or novella (or combination thereof) totaling up to 20,000 words. Students will examine the craft of their work and of published prose. Suggested Preparation: ARTW B260 or proof of interest and ability. For students without ARTW B260, students must submit a writing sample of 10-15 pages in length (prose fiction) to the Creative Writing Program during the preregistration period to be considered for this course. Division III: Humanities

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ARTW B365 Creative Nonfiction II Spring 2015 An exploration of approaches to writing personal essays and lyric essays designed to strengthen skills of experienced student essayists as practitioners and critics. Requires writing at least five pages each week, workshopping student essays, and reading texts ranging from long personal essays to book-length essays, to explore how writers can work within the broader parameters of the long essay. Suggested Preparation: ARTW B265 or work demonstrating equivalent expertise in writing personal and lyric essays. Students without the ARTW B265, must submit a writing sample of 10-15 pages in length (nonfiction prose) to the Creative Writing Program during the preregistration period to be considered for this course. Division III: Humanities Course does not meet an Approach

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ARTW B403 Supervised Work Students who have had a Creative Writing Major approved through the Independent Major Program will work with a member of the Creative Writing Program faculty on a semester-long 403 (Independent Study) as a final project their senior year. Highly qualified Creative Writing minors and concentrators may petition the program to complete an independent study, subject to the availability of faculty to supervise such projects.

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ARTW B403 Supervised Work Students who have had a Creative Writing Major approved through the Independent Major Program will work with a member of the Creative Writing Program faculty on a semester-long 403 (Independent Study) as a final project their senior year. Highly qualified Creative Writing minors and concentrators may petition the program to complete an independent study, subject to the availability of faculty to supervise such projects.

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ARTW B425 Praxis III: Independent Study Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community. Counts toward Praxis Program

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