Faculty 2014-2015

Dilruba Ahmed
Nancy Doyne
Nomi Eve
Lauren Feldman
Tom Ferrick
Cordelia Jensen
Karl Kirchwey
Cynthia Reeves
Marco Roth
J.C. Todd
Daniel Torday

Ahmed
Dilruba Ahmed

Lecturer

Dilruba Ahmed’s debut book, Dhaka Dust (Graywolf, 2011), won the Bakeless Literary Prize.  Ahmed is the recipient of The Florida Review’s Editors’ Award, a Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Prize, a Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference fellowship & scholarship, and a Pushcart Prize nomination.  Her work has been anthologized in Becoming: What Makes A Woman (University of Nebraska), Another and Another (Bull City Press), Indivisible:  Contemporary South Asian American Poetry (University of Arkansas), and the Best of the Net Anthology (Sundress Publications). Ahmed’s poems have appeared in Poetry, Blackbird, Cream City Review, New England Review, New Orleans Review, The Drunken Boat, and elsewhere.  Her writing has also appeared online with the Michigan Quarterly Review, The Kenyon Review, and the National Book Foundation.  Her first book manuscript was a semi-finalist for prizes from Alice James Books, BOA Editions, and Tupelo Press.

A writer with roots in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Bangladesh, Ahmed holds a BPhil in English Writing/Poetry and an MAT in Instruction and Learning from the University of Pittsburgh.  A former project coordinator with The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, she has worked in K-12 and higher education settings for many years. Most recently, she has served as a lecturer for Chatham University’s Low-Residency MFA program.  She is a graduate of Warren Wilson College’s MFA Program for Writers.

Course List:
261: Writing Poetry I

Nancy Doyne

Lecturer

Nancy Doyne is a writer. Her screenplays include What Maisie Knew, based on the novel by Henry James and The Eustace Diamonds based on the novel by Anthony Trollope. Teleplays for television include adaptations of a short story by Frederic Brown as well as an adaptation of an EC Comic. In addition to Bryn Mawr College, she has taught at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She lives and works in New York City, where her screenplay What Maisie Knew was released in 2013.

Course List:
ArtW 266: Screening Writing

 



eve

Nomi Eve

Lecturer
Nomi Eve
is the author of the novel, The Family Orchard , (Knopf) and the forthcoming Henna , (Scribner’s). Her short stories and book reviews have appeared in many publications, including Glimmer Train Stories , The Village Voice Literary Supplement and Conjunctions . Eve holds a B.A. from Penn State and an M.F.A. in fiction writing from Brown University. She has taught fiction writing at Brown, Wheaton College, and at Penn State. Website: nomi-eve.com

Course List:
ArtW260: Writing Short Fiction I

Lauren Feldman

Lauren Feldman

Lecturer

Lauren Feldman's plays include AMANUENSIS (Northwoods Ramah Theatre Company commission); ANOTHER KIND OF SILENCE (Drama League New Directors/New Works Fellowship); THE EGG-LAYERS (National Playwrights Conference Finalist, New Georges/Barnard College co-commission); A PEOPLE (Jewish Plays Project NYC Residency); FILL OUR MOUTHS (New Theatre, Carbonell Nomination); GRACE, OR THE ART OF CLIMBING (Denver Center Theatre Company, Nice People Theatre Company, ATCA/Steinberg New Play Award Nomination, Barrymore Nomination, The Kilroys’ “The List 2014”); several ensemble-devised works, including AND IF YOU LOSE YOUR WAY, OR A FOOD ODYSSEY (The Invisible Dog), LADY M (Philadelphia Live Arts Festival), and THE APOCRYPHAL PROJECT (Yale Cabaret), among others; as well as a dozen short plays and an autobiographical solo piece. Lauren has been nominated for the Barrie and Bernice Stavis Playwright Award, Wendy Wasserstein Prize, Susan Smith Blackburn Prize, the Doric Wilson Independent Playwright Award, and she was a 2014-15 Jerome Fellowship Finalist. She was selected as an American playwright delegate for the Royal Court Theatre’s “Crossing the Borders” project and for Australia’s World Interplay Festival, and she has been an artist-in-residence at Terra Firma, SPACE at Ryder Farm, the School of Making Thinking, Tofte Lake Center, Montana Artists Refuge, Montana Repertory Theatre, Sewanee University of the South, Cornell University, and Theater Emory/Brave New Works Festival. A graduate of the Yale School of Drama and the New England Center for Circus Arts, Lauren is also a New Georges Affiliated Artist, a teacher of playwriting, and a creator/performer of theatrical circus (solo and duo static trapeze, handbalancing). She served as a panelist on Circus Dramaturgy at the 2014 Chicago Contemporary Circus Festival. She is in the midst of creating an evening-length ensemble theater/circus show called Tinder & Ash, and she is writing two new plays. Website: www.tinderandash.com.

ferrick

Tom Ferrick

Lecturer

Tom Ferrick, Jr. is a journalist with 40 years experience as a reporter, editor and columnist. He spent most of his career at the Philadelphia Inquirer and his assignments included City Hall bureau chief, national reporter, chief political writer, investigative reporter and poverty writer. He also helped establish the paper's Computer Assisted Reporting unit. For nine years, he was an Inquirer metro columnist.

Ferrick is winner of a number of major local and national journalism awards, including a Polk Award for investigative reporting, a World Hunger Award for his reporting on the homeless, and a Pulitzer Prize as a member of a team of Inquirer reporters for coverage of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island. He currently serves as senior editor of Metropolis (www.plmetropolis.com), an in-depth news and information web site based in Philadelphia.

Course List
ArtW 264: News and Feature Writing
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Jensen Cordelia Jensen

Lecturer

Cordelia Allen Jensen's young adult novel in verse, Skyscraping, is forthcoming from Philomel/Penguin Random House in Summer 2015. Jensen was Poet Laureate of Perry County, PA, in 2006-2007. She owns her own business, Story Corners, which specializes in creative writing workshops for kids and teens, she teaches at The Big Blue Marble Bookstore, where she is a writer in residence. Jensen graduated with a MFA in Writing for Children & Young Adults from Vermont College of Fine Arts, a Masters in Education from Shippensburg University in 2004 and she graduated magna cum laude from Kenyon College in 1998. You can find her at www.cordeliajensen.com and on Twitter @cordeliajensen.

Course list:
ArtW 269: Writing for Children

Kirchwey

Karl Kirchwey

Professor of the Arts, Director of the Creative Writing Program
Resume

Karl Kirchwey holds degrees in English Literature from Yale College (B.A.) and Columbia University (M.A.). He is the author of six books of poems: A Wandering Island (Princeton University Press, 1990; recipient of the Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America), Those I Guard (Harcourt Brace and Company, 1993), The Engrafted Word (Henry Holt, 1998; a New York Times “Notable Book of the Year”), At the Palace of Jove (Putnam, 2002), The Happiness of This World: Poetry and Prose (2007), and Mount Lebanon (Marian Wood Books/Putnam, 2011). Poems Under Saturn, his translation of Paul Verlaine's Poemes saturniens, was published by Princeton University Press in 2011. Kirchwey's play in verse entitled Airedales & Cipher, based on the Alcestis of Euripides, received the 1997 Paris Review Prize for Poetic Drama and has been presented in public readings at An Appalachian Summer Festival (Boone, North Carolina) and at the 92nd Street Y Unterberg Poetry Center in New York. His poems have appeared in periodicals such as Grand Street, The Kenyon Review, Little Star, The Nation, The New Criterion, The New Republic, The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, Parnassus, Partisan Review, Poetry, Slate, The Southwest Review, Tin House, The Yale Review, and elsewhere. His poems and translations have been anthologized in works including The KGB Bar Book of Poems (2000), The Best of the Best American Poetry, 1987-1998 (1998), Twentieth Century Latin American Poetry: a Bilingual Anthology (1996), Twentieth Century Poems on the Gospels: an Anthology (1996), After Ovid: New Metamorphoses (1995).

Karl Kirchwey has been the recipient of grants from the Ingram Merrill Foundation and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation as well as from the National Endowment for the Arts, and also received a Rome Prize in Literature in 1994-95. From 1987 to 2000, he was Director of the 92nd Street Y Unterberg Poetry Center in New York City. He has taught creative writing and literature at Smith College, Yale and Wesleyan Universities, and in the M.F.A. program at Columbia University. He received the Rosalind Schwartz Teaching Award from Bryn Mawr College in 2003.


Course List
CSem 002 - Classical Myth and the Contemporary Imagination
Engl 202 - Understanding Poetry
Engl 231 - Modernism in Anglo-American Poetry
Engl 232 - Voices In and Out of School: American Poetry Since World War II
ArtW 159 - Introduction to Creative Writing
ArtW 236 - Contemporary Literature Seminar
ArtW 240 - Literary Translation Workshop
ArtW 261 - Writing Poetry I
ArtW 263 - Writing Memoir I
ArtW 361 - Writing Poetry II
ArtW 366 - Writing Memoir II
ArtW 367 - Advanced Fiction & Nonfiction (coordinator)
ArtW 382 - Poetry Master Class (coordinator)

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Cynthia Reeves

Cynthia Reeves

Lecturer

Cynthia Reeves’s novella, Badlands (MU Press 2008), was the winner of Miami University Press’s Novella Prize. Her fiction, essays and poetry have appeared in Colorado Review, Crab Orchard Review, Ontario Review, Potomac Review, the experimental prose anthologies Wreckage of Reason (Volumes I and II), and elsewhere. “A Letter to My Mother,” published in Ellipsis, was performed as part of the InterAct Theatre’s Writing Aloud series. Reeves has won numerous awards and honors, including several Pushcart Prize nominations and prizes in the Columbia Fiction Contest, the 2006 and 2008 DeMott Short Prose Contests (Quarter After Eight), New Millennium Writings Short Short Fiction Contest, and Potomac Review’s Fiction Contest.

A graduate of Warren Wilson College’s M.F.A. program, Reeves received her B.A. from Bryn Mawr College and spent a year studying economics and urban development at the London School of Economics.

Course List
ArtW 159: Introduction to Creative Writing
ArtW 260: Writing Short Fiction

Marco Roth

Marco Roth is a co-founding editor of n+1 magazine, where he's published essays on a range of subjects from the dialogue between contemporary literature and science ("The Rise of the Neuronovel" and "Attack of the Clones") to the intersections of politics and everyday life ("On Torture and Parenting" and "The Drone Philosopher"). His memoir, "The Scientists: A Family Romance" (FSG 2012) deals with his growing up in the shadow of his father's battle with HIV and other unforeseen transmissions. Educated at Columbia and Yale, Roth is also a recipient of the Roger Shattuck prize for literary criticism.

Course List
ArtW 263: Writing Memoir

Todd

J.C. Todd

Lecturer

J. C. Todd holds a B. A. in Literature from Duquesne University and  an M. F. A. in Creative Writing (Poetry) from the Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.  She is the author of a book of poems, What Space This Body (Wind Publications, 2008) and two chapbooks, Entering Pisces (Pine Press, 1985) and Nightshade (Pine Press, 2000; finalist for the Flume Press Chapbook Award).  Her poems have appeared in such periodicals as American Poetry Review, Atlanta Review, The Beloit Poetry Journal, The Paris Review, Prairie Schooner, The Virginia Quarterly Review, and elsewhere. Her poems and translations have been anthologized in What’s Your Exit? (2010), Poetinus Druskininku Ruduo (2002, 2004, 2005), Poezijos Pavasaris (2001), and SHADE (2004). As a contributing editor for The Drunken Boat, she edited translation features on contemporary poetry from Latvia, Lithuania and Slovenia, and she has been a guest poetry editor for the Bucks County Review (Summer, 2005).

She is a recipient of fellowships and grants for poetry from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, the Leeway Foundation, and the Latvian Cultural Capital Fund, as well as an International Artist Exchange Award from the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and a scholarship to the Baltic Centre for Writers and Translators. She has received five Pushcart Prize nominations for poetry and one for creative non-fiction and was a finalist for the Lucille Medwick Award from the Poetry Society of America. She has been a lecturer in graduate English at Rosemont College and in creative and expository writing at The College of New Jersey and Kutztown University. In 2004, she was a guest lecturer in American Studies for various universities in Germany under the sponsorship of the United States Embassy in Berlin.

Course List
ArtW 159:  Introduction to Creative Writing
ArtW  261:  Poetry I
ArtW 361: Poetry II
EMLY 001.001: The Journey: Act and Metaphor
ENG 125  Writing Workshop

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torday

Daniel Torday

Visiting Assistant Professor
Director of Creative Writing

Daniel Torday's novella,The Sensualist, won the National Jewish Book Award for debut fiction. His debut novel, The Last Flight of Poxl West, will be published by St. Martin's Press in 2015, and has received early praise from Karen Russell, Rivka Galchen, Gary Shteyngart, Jim Shepard, Robin Black, Phil Klay, Edan Lepucki and Daniel Smith. George Saunders has called the novel "a wonderful accomplishment of storytelling verve: tender, lyrical, surprising, full of beautifully rendered details. Torday is a prodigiously talented writer, with a huge heart." Torday's fiction, essays and criticism have appeared in Esquire Magazine, Five Chapters, Fifty-Two Stories, Harvard Review, Glimmer Train, The Kenyon Review, and The New York Times. You can find more about him at: http://www.danieltorday.com/

A former editor at Esquire, Torday serves as a Book Review Editor at The Kenyon Review. He is a member of the Editorial Board of Literary Imagination, and a consulting editor at Hunger Mountain.

Torday holds a B.A. from Kenyon College and an M.F.A. from Syracuse University, where he taught literature and writing.


Course List
ArtW 260 - Writing Short Fiction I
ArtW 360 - Writing Short Fiction II
ArtW 265 - Creative Nonfiction
ArtW 364 - Longer Fictional Forms

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Faculty Archive 2005-2006

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Faculty Archive 2008-2009

Faculty Archive 2009-2010

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Faculty Archive 2011-2012

Faculty Archive 2012-2013

Faculty Archive 2013-2014