Dance Course Descriptions

TECHNIQUE AND ENSEMBLE COURSES TAKEN FOR ACADEMIC CREDIT RECEIVE .5 CREDIT PER SEMESTER.  ADVANCE CHOREOGRAPHY AND SUPERVISED WORK CAN EARN FROM .5 TO 1.0 CREDIT PER SEMESTER.

New Course!
ARTD B 138 (sections 001, 002)  An introduction to dance techniques I 
Students select one full semester of elementary modern (section 001) or ballet (section 002) and, concurrently, another full semester of technique selected from approved Dance Program courses. This may be a full semester course, for example African, or two half-semester courses, for example, Tap I and Flamenco.  Before enrolling, students must get approval of class selection from the Dance Program. The schedule of technique courses is listed on the Dance Program website and, at the beginning of each semester, on VRO under Physical Education. Additional requirements: attendance at and written responses to two mandatory lectures (TBA) and one live dance performance. Course offered on a Pass/Fail basis.

New Course!
ARTD B 139 An introduction to dance techniques II
This course continues the introduction to dance techniques.  Students select one full semester of elementary modern (section 001) or ballet (section 002) and, concurrently, another full semester of technique selected from approved Dance Program courses (See ARTD B 138 for further description). Before enrolling, students must get approval of class selection from the Dance Program. The schedule of technique courses is listed on the Dance Program website and, at the beginning of each semester, on VRO under Physical Education. Additional requirements include attendance at and critique of one live dance event and a short writing assignment on a topic selected in consultation with the faculty coordinator. Course offered on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: ARTD B 138.


ARTD B140 Approaches to Dance: Themes and Perspectives
This course introduces students to dance as a multilayered, significant and enduring human behavior that ranges from art to play to ritual to politics and beyond. It engages students in the creative, critical and conceptual processes that emerge in response to the study of dance. It also explores the research potential that arises when other areas of academic inquiry, including criticism, ethnology, history and philosophy, interact with dance and dance scholarship. Lectures, discussion, film, video, and guest speakers are included.
(Caruso-Haviland, Division III: Humanities)

ARTD B142 Dance Composition I
In this introduction to the art of making dances, an array of compositional tools and approaches is used to evolve and refine choreographic ideas. Basic concepts such as space, phrasing, timing, image, energy, density and partnering are introduced and explored alongside attention to the roles of inspiration and synthesis in the creative process. Improvisation is used to explore choreographic ideas and students learn to help and direct others in generating movement. Discussion of and feedback on weekly choreographic assignments and readings contributes to analyzing and refining choreography. Concurrent attendance in any level technique course is required.
(Brick, Division III: Humanities)

ARTD B223 Anthropology of Dance
This course surveys ethnographic approaches to the study of dance in a variety of contemporary and historical contexts. Recognizing dance as a kind of shared cultural knowledge and drawing on theories and literature in anthropology, dance and related fields, students will examine the relationship of dance to social structure, ethnicity, gender, spirituality and politics. Some of the ethical and practical issues related to field research of expressive culture will also be introduced. Lectures, discussion, media and guest speakers are included. Pre-requisite: any anthropology course, any Dance lecture/seminar course, or permission of the instructor.

ARTD B230 Intermediate Technique: Modern
ARTD B231 Intermediate Technique: Ballet
ARTD B232 Intermediate Technique: Jazz
Intermediate level dance technique courses focus on expanding the movement vocabulary, on introducing movement phrases that are increasingly complex and demanding, and on further attention to motional dynamics and spatial contexts. Students at this level are also expected to begin demonstrating an intellectual and kinesthetic understanding of these technical challenges and their actual performance. Students will be evaluated on their openness and commitment to the learning process, increased understanding of the particular technique, and demonstration in class of their technical and stylistic progress as articulated within the field.
(Modern: Stortz, Cantor, Division III: Humanities)
(Ballet: Laico, Mintzer, Division III: Humanities)
(Jazz: Goodman, Division III: Humanities)

ARTD B240 Dance History I: Roots of Western
Theater Dance
This course investigates the historical and cultural forces affecting the development and functions of pre-20th-century dance. It will examine nontheatrical forms and applications as well, but will give special emphasis to the development of theatre dance forms.  The course, of necessity, will give some consideration to global interchange in the development of Western dance but will examine more fully its relationship to and impact on Western culture.  It will also introduce students to a selection of traditional and more contemporary models of historiography with particular reference to the changing modes of documenting, researching and analyzing dance In addition to lectures and discussion, the course will include film, video, slides, and some movement experiences.

(Caruso-Haviland, Division III: Humanities)
Not offered in 2010-11.

ARTD B241 Dance History II: A History of
Contemporary Western Theater Dance
The study of the history of dance with particular emphasis on its development in the twentieth century as a Theatre Art form within the broader context of both Western and global art and culture. The course investigates the historical and cultural forces that shape both the form and function of dance as well as its reciprocal relationship to or impact on those same forces. Dance will be considered both chronologically and theoretically as cultural, social, aesthetic, and personal phenomena. In addition to lectures and discussion, the course will include film, video, slides, and some movement experiences.
(Caruso-Haviland,
Division III: Humanities)
Not offered in 2010-11.

solo dancerARTD B242 Dance Composition II
This course builds on work accomplished in Composition I and develops an understanding of and skill in the theory and craft of choreography. This includes deepening movement invention skills; exploring form and structure; investigating sources for sound, music, text and language; developing group design; and broadening critical understanding. Students will work on a selected number of projects and will have some opportunity to revise and expand work. Readings and viewings will be assigned and related production problems will be considered.
Concurrent attendance in any level technique course is required.
(Cantor, Division III: Humanities)

ARTD B250 Performing the Political Body
Artists, activists, intellectuals, and ordinary people have used dance and performance to support political goals and ideologies or to perform social or cultural interventions
in the private and public spheres. We will focus on how dance is a useful medium for both embodying and analyzing ideologies and practices of power particularly with reference to gender, class, and ethnicity. In addition to literary, anthropological, and political texts, the course
includes introductory group improvisation and performance exercises and an in-class mini-performance project; willingness to research topics and to explore movement or other performance approaches is more important than prior training or experience.
(Caruso-Haviland, Division III: Humanities)
Not offered in 2010-11.

ARTD B254 Nation, Gender and Class in Latin
American Dance
Social and theatrical dance in Latin America, focusing on salsa, tango and ballet as samples of native, imported and exported forms practiced on the continent. Highlights how dance embodies issues of nationality, class and gender relevant to Latin American countries. Readings, visual media, class discussions and presentations, guest lectures, field trip, and some instruction in
salsa/tango. Prerequisite: a Dance academic course or a course in Anthropolgy, Sociology or Hispanic-American Studies, or permission of the instructor.
(Tome, Division III: Humanities)
Not offered in 2010-11.

ARTD B330 Advanced Technique: Modern
ARTD B331 Advanced Technique: Ballet

Advanced level technique courses continue to expand movement vocabulary and to introduce increasingly challenging movement phrases and repertory. Students are also expected to begin recognizing and incorporating the varied gestural and dynamic markers of styles and genres, with an eye to both developing their facility for working with various choreographic models and for beginning to mark out their individual movement preferences. There is also a continuing emphasis on cultivating the relationship between an intellectual and kinesthetic understanding and command of technical challenges and their actual performance. Students in the advanced Ballet class may take the additional (optional) pointe section with consent of the instructor.
(Modern: Malcolm-Naib, Interim Division III: Humanities)
(Ballet: Mintzer, Interim Division III: Humanities)

ARTD B342 Advanced Choreography
Independent study in choreography under the guidance of the instructor. Students are expected to produce one major choreographic work and are responsible for all production considerations. Concurrent attendance in any level technique course is required.
(Cantor, Caruso-Haviland, Division III: Humanities)

ARTD B345 Dance Ensembles
Dance ensembles are offered in Ballet, Modern, Jazz, and African and are designed to offer students significant opportunities to develop dance technique, particularly in relationship to dance as a performance art. Students audition for entrance into individual ensembles. Original works choreographed by faculty or guest choreographers or works reconstructed/restaged from classic or contemporary repertories are rehearsed and performed in concert. This course is suitable for intermediate and advanced level dancers. These and additional ensembles, such as Hip-hop, may be taken, instead, for Physical Education credit.
(Cantor, Interims, Division III: Humanities)

ARTD B390 Senior Project/Thesis
Majors develop, in conjunction with a faculty advisor, a senior capstone experience that is complementary to and will expand and deepen their work and interest thus far. This can range from a significant research or expository paper to a substantial choreographic work that will be supported in a full studio performance. Students who elect to do choreographic or performance work must also submit a portfolio (10 pages) of written work on dance. Work begins in the Fall semester and should be completed by the middle of the Spring semester. One outside evaluator will be invited to offer additional comment.
(Cantor, Caruso-Haviland)

solo dancerARTD B403 Supervised Work
Research in a particular topic of dance under the guidance of an instructor, resulting in a significant final paper or project.
(Cantor, Caruso-Haviland, Division III: Humanities)

ADDITIONAL TECHNIQUE COURSES:
In addition to our core technique courses at the intermediate and advanced levels, the Dance Program offers a full range of dance instruction including introductory level courses in ballet, modern, jazz, African, and conditioning as well as techniques developed from other cultural art and social forms including Flamenco, Classical Indian, Hip-hop, Latin Social dance, and Tap, among others. All technique courses may be taken for Physical Education credit but students may elect to take intermediate and advanced level courses for academic credit.
Courses offered FALL, 2010 are listed below. First half indicates first half of the semester, second half indicates second half of the semester. Course continuing through both halves do not start over mid-semester; they continue to progress across the semester.
FALL - 2010
Ballet I - First Half & Second Half
Ballet II - First Half & Second Half
Ballet III - First Half & Second Half
Modern I - First Half & Second Half
Modern II - First Half & Second Half
Modern III - First Half & Second Half
Jazz II - 1 First Half & Second Half
African Dance - First Half & Second Half
Modern Ensemble – Full Semester (by audition)
Ballet Ensemble - Full Semester (by audition)
Dance Outreach Ensemble - Full Semester
Hip-Hop Ensemble – 8 Week rehearsal session (by audition)
Intro to Hip-Hop - First Half
Class'l Indian Dance-1st Half
Salsa - Second Half
Intro Pointe - Second Half

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