Contact Us
Department of East Asian Studies
Bryn Mawr College
101 North Merion Avenue
Bryn Mawr, PA 19010-2899
Phone: (610) 526-5332
FAX: (610) 526-7479

Haverford College
Founders 123
370 Lancaster Avenue
Haverford, PA 19041
Phone: (610) 795-1756

Courses

East Asian Studies Courses at Bryn Mawr:
East Asian Studies Courses at Haverford:
Chinese Courses at Bryn Mawr
Chinese Courses at Haverford
Japanese Courses at Haverford

Bryn Mawr East Asian Studies Courses

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
EAST B131-001 Chinese Civilization Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Taylor Hall D Jiang,Y.
EAST B240-001 Topics in Chinese Film: The Fifth Generation Semester / 1 LEC: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Carpenter Library 17 Kwa,S.
Film Screening: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM M Thomas Hall 224
EAST B325-001 Topics in Chinese History and Culture: Legal Culture in Chinese History Semester / 1 LEC: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM M Taylor Hall B Jiang,Y.
EAST B398-001 Senior Seminar Semester / 0.5 Lecture: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM M Dept. staff, TBA

Spring 2015

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
EAST B212-001 Introduction to Chinese Literature: Dream of the Red Chamber Semester / 1 LEC: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Kwa,S., Wang,M.
EAST B345-001 Topics in East Asian Culture: Food and Culture in East Asia Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM T Thomas Hall 118 Kwa,S.
Film: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM SU Thomas Hall 118
EAST B362-001 Environment in Contemporary East Asia: China and Japan Semester / 1 Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM M Jiang,Y.

Fall 2015

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

Haverford East Asian Studies Courses

Fall 2013

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/UNITS MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
EASTH120A01 Chinese Perspectives on the Individual and Society Semester 1/1 TTH 2:30-4:00 Hall 107 Paul Smith
EASTH219A01 Modern and Contemporary East Asian Art and Visual Culture Semester 1/1 TTH 2:30-4:00 Hall 112

Erin Schoneveld

 

EASTH299A01 Modern Japanese Literature and Film Semester 1/1 TTH 11:30-1:00 Hires/Video Room Erin Schoneveld
EASTH347A01 War and Warriors in Chinese History Semester 1/1 F 1:30-4:00 Hall 107 Paul Smith

 

Spring 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/UNITS MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
EASTH132B01 Japanese Civilization Semester 2/1 TTH 11:30-1:00   Erin Schoneveld
EASTH200B01 Methods and Approaches in East Asian Studies Semester 2/1 F 1:30-4:00  

Paul Smith /

Erin Schoneveld

EASTH265B01 Modern Japan Semester 2/1 TTH 2:30-4:00   Paul Smith
EASTH382B01 Topics in Chinese Syntax and Semantics Semester 2/1 TH 1:30-4:00   Shizhe Huang

 

Bryn Mawr Chinese Language Courses

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
CNSE B003-001 Second-year Chinese Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWF Dalton Hall 6 Chiang,T.
Drill at Haverford: 10:00 AM-11:00 AM TTH
Drill at Haverford: 11:00 AM-12:00 PM TTH
Drill at Haverford: 12:00 PM- 1:00 PM TTH
CNSE B007-001 First-Year Chinese Non-Intensive Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWF Dalton Hall 6 Chiang,T.

Spring 2015

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
CNSE B004-001 Second-Year Chinese Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWF Dalton Hall 6 Chiang,T.
CNSE B008-001 First Year Chinese (Non-intensive) Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWF Dalton Hall 6 Chiang,T.

Fall 2015

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

Haverford Chinese Language Courses

Fall 2013

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/UNITS MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
H001A01 Intensive First-year Chinese Semester 1/1.5

Master class @ Haverford

 MWF 9:30-10:30

Drills @ Bryn Mawr:

TTH

8:15-9:45
or
9:45-11:15
or
12:45-2:15

Stokes 016

Master Class:
Changchun Zhang

 

Drills:
Tz'u Chiang

H001A02 Intensive First-Year Chinese Semester 1/1.5

Master class @ Haverford:

 MWF 10:30-11:30

Drills @
Bryn Mawr:

TTH

8:15-9:45
or
9:45-11:15
or
12:45-2:15

  Changchun Zhang
H101A01 Third-Year Chinese Semester 1/1

Master class @ Haverford:

TTH 1:00-2:30

Stokes 207 Shizhe Huang

Spring 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/UNITS MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
H002B01 Intensive First-year Chinese Semester 2/1.5 

Master class @ Haverford

 MWF 9:30-10:30

Drills @ Bryn Mawr:

TTH

8:15-9:45
or
9:45-11:15
or
12:45-2:15

  Changchun Zhang
H002B02

Intensive First-year Chinese

Semester 2/1.5

Master class @ Haverford

MWF 10:30-11:30

Drills @ Bryn Mawr:

TTH

8:15-9:45
or
9:45-11:15
or
12:45-2:15

  Changchun Zhang
H102B01 Third-Year Chinese Semester 2/1

TTH 1:00-2:30

  Changchun Zhang
H202B01 Adv Chinese: Chinese Theater and Drama Semester 2/1.5

T 1:30-4:00

  Shizhe Huang

 

Haverford Japanese Language Courses

Fall 2013

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/UNITS MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
H001A01 First-year Japanese (Intensive) Semester 1/1.5

Master Class:

MWF 8:30-9:30

 

Drills:

TTH

8:30-10:00
or
10:00-11:30

Stokes 018 Tetsuya Sato
H001A02 First-year Japanese (Intensive) Semester 1/1.5

Master Class:

MWF 9:30-10:30

Drills:

TTH

8:30-10:00
or
10:00-11:30

 

Stokes 018 Tetsuya Sato
H003A01 Second-Year Japanese Semester 1/1

Master Class:

MWF 8:30-9:30

Drills:

TTH

10:15-11:15
or
11:45-12:45

Stokes 014 Kimiko Suzuki
H003A02 Second-Year Japanese Semester 1/1

Master Class:

MWF 10:30-11:30

Drills:

TTH

10:15-11:15
or
11:45-12:45

Stokes 014 Kimiko Suzuki
H101A01 Third-Year Japanese Semester 1/1

Master Class:

MWF 11:30-12:30

+ one hour of drills TBA

Stokes 014 Tetsuya Sato
H201A01

Advanced Japanese I
Discerning Hidden Meanings in Japanese Media

Semester 1/1 MF 1:00-2:30  

Kimiko Suzuki

Spring 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/UNITS MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
H002A01 First-year Japanese (Intensive) Semester 2/1.5

Master Class:

MWF 8:30-9:30

 

Drills:

TTH

8:30-10:00
or
10:00-11:30

 

  Tetsuya Sato
H002A02 First-year Japanese (Intensive) Semester 2/1.5

Master Class:

MWF 9:30-10:30

 

Drills:

TTH

8:30-10:00
or
10:00-11:30

  Tetsuya Sato
H004A01 Second-Year Japanese Semester 2/1

Master Class:

MWF 8:30-9:30

 

Drills:

TTH

10:15-11:15
or
11:45-12:45

  Kimiko Suzuki
H004A02 Second-Year Japanese Semester 2/1

Master Class:

MWF 10:30-11:30

 

Drills:

TTH

10:15-11:15
or
11:45-12:45

  Kimiko Suzuki
H102A01 Third-Year Japanese Semester 2/1

Master Class:

MWF 11:30-12:30

 

+ one hour of drills TBA

  Kimiko Suzuki
H201B01

Advanced Japanese II
School and Society

Semester 2/1 MF 1:30-2300  

 

Tetsuya Sato

 

Bryn Mawr East Asian Studies Courses

2014-15 Catalog Data

EAST B110 Intro to Chinese Literature (in English) Not offered 2014-15 Students will study a wide range of texts from the beginnings through the Qing dynasty. The course focuses on the genres of poetry, prose, fiction and drama, and considers how both the forms and their content overlap and interact. No knowlege of Chinese is assumed or expected. Critical Interpretation (CI)

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EAST B131 Chinese Civilization Fall 2014 A broad chronological survey of Chinese culture and society from the Bronze Age to the 1800s, with special reference to such topics as belief, family, language, the arts and sociopolitical organization. Readings include primary sources in English translation and secondary studies. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as HIST B131

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EAST B200 Major Seminar: Methods and Approaches in East Asian Studies Not offered 2014-15 This course introduces current and prospective majors to the scope and methods of East Asian Studies. It employs readings on East Asian history and culture as a platform for exercises in critical analysis, bibliography, cartography and the formulation of research topics and approaches. It culminates in a substantial research essay. Required of East Asian Studies majors, but open to others by permission, the course should be taken before the senior year. Prerequisite: One year of Chinese or Japanese. Writing Intensive Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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EAST B212 Introduction to Chinese Literature
Section 001 (Spring 2015): Dream of the Red Chamber
Section 001 (Fall 2013): The Films of Wong Karwai Spring 2015 This is a topics course. Topics may vary.
Current topic description: This class examines the material world of the Qing dynasty novel Hongloumeng, or Dream of the Red Chamber. Using literary theory and material culture studies, we will situate the novel in relation to ideas of circulation in late imperial China and contemporaneous cultures in other world regions. Topics include global trade, exchange, technology, etc.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Film Studies

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EAST B218 Topics in World Cities Not offered 2014-15 An introduction to contemporary issues related to the urban environment. This is a topics course. Course content varies. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Cross-listed as CITY B218

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EAST B225 Topics in Modern Chinese Literature
Section 001 (Spring 2014): Chinese Litr the 20th Century Not offered 2014-15 This a topics course. This course explores modern China from the early 20th century to the present through its literature, art and films, reading them as commentaries of their own time. Topics vary. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI)

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EAST B240 Topics in Chinese Film
Section 001 (Fall 2014): The Fifth Generation Fall 2014 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisite: At least one course approved as an EAST core course or permission of instructor.
Current topic description: Zhang Yimou and Chen Kaige - This semester we will be examining films and related literature of two directors from the Peoples' Republic of China. We will consider representative works that extend from the 1980's to the present day.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Film Studies

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EAST B250 Topics: GrowthOrg of Cities Not offered 2014-15 An introduction to growth & spatial organization of cities. Topics vary. Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as CITY B250

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EAST B260 The History and Rhetoric of Buddhist Meditation Not offered 2014-15 While Buddhist meditation is often seen as a neutral technology, free of ties to any one spiritual path or worldview, we will examine the practice through the cosmological and soteriological contexts that gave rise to it. This course examines a great variety of discourses surrounding meditation in traditional Buddhist texts. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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EAST B263 The Chinese Revolution Not offered 2014-15 Places the causes and consequences of the 20th century revolutions in historical perspective, by examining its late-imperial antecedents and tracing how the revolution has (and has not) transformed China, including the lives of such key revolutionary supporters as the peasantry, women, and intellectuals. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as HIST B262

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EAST B264 Human Rights in China Not offered 2014-15 This course will examine China's human rights issues from a historical perspective. The topics include diverse perspectives on human rights, historical background, civil rights, religious practice, justice system, education, as well as the problems concerning some social groups such as migrant laborers, women, ethnic minorities and peasants. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as HIST B260 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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EAST B315 Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & Film Not offered 2014-15 This interdisciplinary course focuses on a critical survey of literary and visual texts by and about Chinese women. We will begin by focusing on the cultural norms that defined women's lives beginning in early China, and consider how those tropes are reflected and rejected over time and geographical borders (in Japan, Hong Kong and the United States). No prior knowledge of Chinese culture or language necessary. Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Film Studies

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EAST B325 Topics in Chinese History and Culture
Section 001 (Fall 2014): Legal Culture in Chinese History Fall 2014 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course examines the cultural dimensions of law in Chinese history. Topics will include legal philosophy, legal institutions, law-society interaction, legal discourse, and the interaction between Chinese and Western legal values. We will read translated primary sources, including historical accounts and original law code texts, as well as secondary works of scholarship.
Cross-listed as HIST B326

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EAST B345 Topics in East Asian Culture
Section 001 (Spring 2015): Food and Culture in East Asia Spring 2015 This is a topics course. Course contents vary. Prerequisite: At least one course approved as an EAST core course and sophomore standing.
Current topic description: Everything but the table: This advanced-level seminar explores how East Asian culture has been defined at home and abroad through the medium of food. We will think about food and food practices from different and interdisciplinary perspectives.

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EAST B352 China's Environment Not offered 2014-15 This seminar explores China's environmental issues from a historical perspective. It begins by considering a range of analytical approaches , and then explores three general periods in China's environmental changes, imperial times, Mao's socialist experiments during the first thirty years of the People's Republic, and the post-Mao reforms. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Cross-listed as HIST B352 Counts toward Environmental Studies

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EAST B362 Environment in Contemporary East Asia: China and Japan Spring 2015 This seminar explores environmental issues in contemporary East Asia from a historical perspective. It will explore the common and different environmental problems in Japan and China, and explain and interpret their causal factors and solving measures in cultural traditions, social movements, economic growth, political and legal institutions and practices, international cooperation and changing perceptions. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. Counts toward Environmental Studies

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EAST B380 Readings in Advanced Chinese
Section 001 (Fall 2013): Literature and Revolution Not offered 2014-15 This course prepares advanced readers of Chinese for the practice of reading, translating and analyzing primary source texts in early-modern and modern Chinese literature. This class is conducted in English, and all readings and screenings are in the original language. The course assumes advanced reading knowledge of Chinese and requires successful completion of 3rd year Chinese or equivalent as a prerequisite. Majors are strongly encouraged to take this course. Cross-listed as CNSE B380

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EAST B398 Senior Seminar A research workshop culminating in the writing and presentation of a senior thesis. Required of all majors; open to concentrators and others by permission.

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EAST B399 Senior Seminar A research workshop culminating in the writing and presentation of a senior thesis. Required of all majors.

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EAST B403 Supervised Work

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EAST B403 Supervised Work

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Haverford East Asian Studies Courses

EAST H120 Chinese Perspectives on the Individual and Society

A survey of philosophical, literary, legal, and autobiographical sources on Chinese notions of the individual in traditional and modern China . Particular emphasis is placed on identifying how ideal and actual relationships between the individual and society vary across class and gender and over time. Special attention will be paid to the early 20th century, when Western ideas about the individual begin to penetrate Chinese literature and political discourse. (Smith)

EAST H129 The Lotus Sutra: Text, Image, and Practice

An exploration of the Lotus Sutra, arguably the most important text in the history of East Asian Buddhism. We will examine its narrative and doctrinal dimensions, study artistic representations of its stories, and explore the practice and cult of the text. (Glassman, Division III; cross-listed in Writing Program and Religion.)

EAST H132 Japanese Civilization

A broad chronological survey of Japanese culture and society from the earliest times to the present, with special reference to such topics as belief, family, language, the arts and sociopolitical organization. Readings include primary sources in English translation and secondary studies. (Kelley, Division I or III)

EAST H201 Introduction to Buddhism

Focusing on the East Asian Buddhist tradition, the course examines Buddhist philosophy, doctrine and practice as textual traditions and as lived religion. (Glassman, Division III)

EAST H218 Chinese Calligraphy as an Art Form

Studio art course. Students learn fundamental techniques of the art of Chinese calligraphy. Considers its impact on Western artists. Students create art projects inspired by Chinese calligraphy. No knowledge of the Chinese language is necessary. Cross listed in Fine Arts. (Li, Division III)

EAST H228 The Logos and the Tao

This course challenges the postmodern construction of " China " as the (feminine) poetic " Other " to the (masculine) metaphysical " West " by analyzing postmodern concepts of word, image and writing in relation to Chinese poetry, painting and calligraphy. (Wright)

EAST B229 Comparative Urbanism: Colonial and Postcolonial Cities

This course exams the issues of colonialism, postcolonialism, and urbanism in a Chinese context. As Chinese society transformed in the 19th and early 20th centuries, cities were at the forefront of change, becoming symbols of both the promise and the discontents of modernity. At the same time, Chinese cities maintained their roles as centers of economic, political, and religious activity. How did these shifts affect urban life? We will consider answers to these questions with reference to hygiene, markets, military bases, crime, imperialism and labor. (McDonogh, Division I; cross-listed as CITY B229, ANTH B229, and HART B229) Not offered in 2009-10.

EAST H235 Early Chinese Philosophy
An introduction to the lively and sharp disputes between competing schools of philosophy in ancient Chinese philosophy, that is, philosophy in the pre-Han period prior to the syncretism that marks “Confucianism,” neo-Confucianism, and most recently New Confucianism. (Kathleen Wright)

Prerequisite: One 100-level course in philosophy or EAST 131 Chinese Civilization or by permission of the instructor
Enrollment limited to 25 students.

EAST H240 Economic Development and Transformation: China vs. India

A survey of the economic development and recent transitional experience in China and India, giant neighboring countries, accounting for roughly one third of total world population. The course will examine the economic structure and policies in the two countries, with a focus on comparing China and India's recent economic successes and failures, their development policies and strategies, institutional changes, and factors affecting the transformation process in the two countries. (Jilani, Division I; cross-listed as Economics H240)

EAST H242 Buddhist Philosophy

An introduction to classical Indian Buddhist thought in a global and comparative context. The course begins with a meditative reading of the classical text -- The Dhamapada -- and proceeds to an in depth critical exploration of the teachings of Nagarjuna, the great dialectician who founded the Madhyamika School. (Gangadean)

EAST H244 Anthropology of China
Recent work on the anthropology of China will be the focus of this course. Readings and discussion will emphasize issues of socio-cultural, economic, and political change from the early decades of the twentieth century to the present. Special attention will be given to family and gender, religious practice and belief, revolution and reform, migration, consumption and materialism, and individualism and civil society. Students will be asked to reflect on the relationship between political-economic change and changes in social formations. Cross-listed in Anthropology. Prerequisite: One course in ANTH or EAST or consent. (Watson)

 

EAST H256 Zen Thought, Zen Culture, Zen History
What are we talking about when we talk about Zen? This course is an introduction to the intellectual and cultural history of the style of Buddhism known as Zen in Japanese. We will examine the development and expression of this religious movement in China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam. (Glassman)

EAST H261 Mid-Imperial China, 1600-1900

Surveys Chinese culture and society at the height of the imperial era through the 18th century and the ensuing political and cultural crises catalysed by institutional decline and Western imperialism in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Cross-listed in History. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and one course in either History or East Asian Studies. (Smith)

EAST H262 Chinese Social History: Gods, Ghosts and Ancestors in Traditional Chinese Society

Surveys a rotating series of topics in the Chinese social and cultural history. (Smith, Division III; cross-listed as History H262)

EAST H265 Modern Japan

Explores selected topics in the rise of modern Japan from the late-16th century to the Pacific War, including the creation of the centralized Tokugawa state, the urban culture of the 17th and 18th centuries, the Meiji Restoration and modernization in the late-19th and early-20th centuries, and the sources and consequences of Japanese imperialism. (Walsh, Division III; cross-listed as History H265)

EAST H282 Structure of Chinese

This course is designed to provide an overview of the historical development of the Chinese language and its structures in terms of phonetics/phonology, syntax and semantics. Students of linguistics will have an opportunity to enrich and broaden their understanding of linguistic theories and methodologies, and to develop skills in analyzing a non-Indo-European language, while students who have completed at least second-year Chinese will be exposed to systematic analyses of the language to learn the general patterns. Prerequisites: at least two of the following three: Introduction to Syntax, Introduction to Semantics or second-year Chinese or above; or consent of the instructor. (Huang)

EAST H299 Modern Japanese Literature and Its Encounter with the West

Agnes Chen Memorial Lectureship in East Asian Studies, established in honor of his sister by Francis J. Chen '40. One of the defining features of Japanese literature is an absorption of styles and concepts drawn from the West; yet Japanese aesthetics and literary techniques have deep roots and continue to be fertile in the literary soil of Japan . We will explore some of the cross-cultural phenomena, such as the aesthetic ambitions of imported romanticism; intellectualism and anti-intellectualism; and the agonies of forging new literary traditions in the wake of a cataclysmic world war. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. (Schoneveld)

EAST H310 Sex and Gender in Premodern Japanese Literature

In this seminar we will examine the intersection of religion & gender in Japanese literature from the 8th to the 16th centuries. The course assumes no prior academic experience in gender, literature, religion, or Japanese culture. It does require openness, curiosity, and a willingness to talk and listen. In this seminar we will examine the intersection of religion & gender in Japanese literature from the 8th to the 16th centuries. The course assumes no prior academic experience in gender, literature, religion, or Japanese culture. It does require openness, curiosity, and a willingness to talk and listen. (Glassman, Division III; cross-listed as Religion H310)

EAST B325 Topics in Chinese History and Culture: China’s Environment:History, Policy, and Rights

Most commentators link China’s environmental issues to the country’s post-1978 economic growth and overlook the historical roots of many of these ecological problems. This course will investigate key topics in the environmental history of China over the last three thousand years. We will begin by considering a range of analytical approaches, including environmental history, institutional politics, human rights, and political ecology, and will then explore three general periods in China’s environmental changes: imperial times, Mao’s socialist experiments, and the post-Mao reforms. (Jiang, Division III; cross-listed as HIST B326)

EAST H342 Topics in Asian Philosophy: Buddhism in a Global Context

This advanced seminar focuses on the development of Zen (Japanese) Buddhism culminating in the work of Nishida and his influential Kyoto School of Zen Philosophy. The background in the Indian origins of Madhyamika dialectic introduced by Nagarjuna is traced through the Zen Master Dogen and into the flourishing of the modern Kyoto School founded by Nishida. The seminar focuses on texts by Dogen and on selected writings in the Kyoto School: Nishida, Nishitani and Abe. Nishida's thought is developed in dialogue with thinkers such as Aristotle, Descartes, Kant, Hegel, Husserl, Sartre and Heidegger, Nagarjuna and others. (Gangadean)

EAST H347 Topics in East Asian History
Topic: China at the Center. An exploration of China's place in the current world history from the 1st through the late 19th centuries, with equal focus on theoretical debates and primary-source observations. Prerequisite: Upper-class standing. Recommended for junors and seniors with prior courses in history. Recommended for junors and seniors with prior courses in history. Cross-listed in History and Comparative Literature(Smith)


EAST H349 The Medieval Transformation of Eurasia, circa 1000-1400
This course surveys the nature of and linkages between changes in Europe, the Islamic world, China and Japan , with a primary focus on such literary sources as The Canterbury Tales (Europe), The Arabian Nights (Middle East), Tale of the Heike (Japan) and The Story of the Western Wing (China). (Smith)

EAST H370 Topics in Buddhist Studies: The Lotus Sutra

The purpose of this course is to give students with a basic background in Buddhist Studies deeper conversancy with a particular textual, thematic, or practice tradition in the history of Buddhism. Cross-listed in Religion. Prerequisite: EAST 201 or PHIL 242 or permission. (Glassman)

EAST H382 Syntax and Semantics of Mandarin Chinese

An examination of the core issues in the study of Chinese syntax and semantics, such as phrase structure, modification structure, quantification, or event semantics. The aim is to examine a rich array of data as analyzed by specialists and study the inner workings of the language and its theoretical implications. Prerequisite: Intro to Syntax & Intro to Semantics. Cross-listed in Linguistics.

EAST H415 Theory and Experience

This advanced research seminar is about Chinese material culture in its historical and contemporary manifestations. Particular attention will be paid to Chinese ceramics. Students will design & complete individual research projects centered on objects, architectural installations, and other manifestations of Chinese material culture available in the Philadelphia area. (Gillette; cross-listed as Anthropology H415)

Bryn Mawr Chinese Language Courses

2014-15 Catalog Data

CNSE B001 Intensive First-Year Chinese Not offered 2014-15 An intensive introductory course in modern spoken and written Chinese. The development of oral-aural skills is integrated through grammar explanations and drill sessions designed to reinforce new material through active practice. Six hours a week of lecture and oral practice plus one-on-one sessions with the instructor. This is a year-long course; both semesters are required for credit. (Offered at Haverford)

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CNSE B002 Intensive First Year Chinese Not offered 2014-15 An intensive introductory course in modern spoken and written Chinese. The development of oral-aural skills is integrated through grammar explanations and drill sessions designed to reinforce new material through active practice. Six hours a week of lecture and oral practice plus one-on-one sessions with the instructor. This is a year-long course; both semesters are required for credit. (Offered at Haverford)

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CNSE B003 Second-year Chinese Fall 2014 Second-year Chinese aims for further development of language skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Five hours of class plus individual conference. This is a year-long course; both semesters (CNSE 003 and 004) are required for credit. Prerequisite: First-year Chinese or a passing score on the Placement Exam. Course does not meet an Approach

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CNSE B004 Second-Year Chinese Spring 2015 Second-year Chinese aims for further development of language skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Five hours of class plus individual conference. This is a year-long course; both semesters (CNSE 003 and 004) are required for credit. Prerequisite: First-year Chinese or a passing score on the Placement Exam. Course does not meet an Approach

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CNSE B007 First-Year Chinese Non-Intensive Fall 2014 This course is designed for students who have some facility in listening, speaking, reading and writing Chinese but have not yet achieved sufficient proficiency to take Second Year Chinese. It is a year-long course that covers the same lessons as the intensive First Year Chinese, but the class meets only three hours a week. Students must place into Chinese B007 through the Chinese Language Placement exam. Course does not meet an Approach

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CNSE B008 First Year Chinese (Non-intensive) Spring 2015 This course is designed for students who have some facility in listening, speaking, reading and writing Chinese but have not yet achieved sufficient proficiency to take Second Year Chinese. It is a year-long course that covers the same lessons as the intensive First Year Chinese, but the class meets only three hours a week. Prerequisite: CNSE B007 Course does not meet an Approach

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CNSE B101 Third-Year Chinese: Readings in the Modern Chinese Short Story and Theater Not offered 2014-15 A focus on overall language skills through reading and discussion of modern short stories, as well as on students facility in written and oral expression through readings in modern drama and screenplays. Readings include representative works from the May Fourth Period (1919-27) to the present. Audio- and videotapes of drama and films are used as study aids. Prerequisite: Second-Year Chinese or consent of instructor. (Offered at Haverford)

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CNSE B102 Third-Year Chinese: Readings in the Modern Chinese Short Story and Theater Not offered 2014-15 A focus on overall language skills through reading and discussion of modern short stories, as well as on students facility in written and oral expression through readings in modern drama and screenplays. Readings include representative works from the May Fourth Period (1919-27) to the present. Audio- and videotapes of drama and films are used as study aids. Prerequisite: Second-Year Chinese or consent of instructor. (Offered at Haverford)

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CNSE B201 Advanced Chinese Not offered 2014-15 Development of language ability by readings in modern Chinese literature, history and/or philosophy. Speaking and reading skills are equally emphasized through a consideration of the intellectual, historical and social significance of representative works. May be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisite: Third-year Chinese or permission of instructor. (Offered at Haverford) Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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CNSE B380 Readings in Advanced Chinese
Section 001 (Fall 2013): Literature and Revolution Not offered 2014-15 This course prepares advanced readers of Chinese for the practice of reading and using primary source texts in early-modern and modern Chinese literature. Students will engage in critical reading and analysis of Chinese texts in class discussion and writing assignments. Part of each class meeting will be dedicated to reading and translating from the text to discuss issues of translation and grammar. This class is conducted in English, and all readings and screenings are in the original language. The course assumes advanced reading knowledge of Chinese and requires successful completion of 3rd year Chinese as a prerequisite. Majors are strongly encouraged to take this course. Prerequisites: Successful completion of 3rd-year Chinese or equivalent. Cross-listed as EAST B380

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Haverford Chinese Language Courses

CNSE H003, H004 Second-year Chinese

Second-year Chinese aims for further development of language skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Five hours of class plus one-on-one sessions with the instructor. This is a year-long course; both semesters are required for credit. (Chiang, Zhang, Language Level 2)

CNSE H201 Advanced Chinese: Music in Chinese Culture
Development of language ability in the areas of modern Chinese literature, history and/or philosophy. Speaking and reading skills are equally emphasized through a consideration of the intellectual, historical and social significance of representative works. Pre-requisites: Third-year Chinese or permission of instructor. ( Zhao)

CNSE H202 Advanced Chinese: Food in Chinese Culture

Development of language ability in the areas of modern Chinese literature, history and/or philosophy. Speaking and reading skills are equally emphasized through a consideration of the intellectual, historical and social significance of representative works. (Huang)

Haverford Japanese Language Courses


JNSE H001A01&02:  First-Year Japanese

Class meets five days a week:  one hour on MWF and 90 minutes on TTH; students must choose either the TTH 8:30-10:00 slot or TTH 10:00-11:30 slot.  An introduction to the four basic skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening), with special emphasis on the development of conversational fluency in socio-cultural contexts.  This is a year-long course; both semesters (001 and 002) are required for credit.

 JNSE H002B01&02: First-Year Japanese
Class meeets five days a week:  one hour on MWF and 90 minutes on TTH; students must choose either the TTH 8:30-10:00 slot or TTH 10:00-11:30 slot.  An introduction to the four basic skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening), with special emphasis on the development of conversational fluency in socio-cultural contexts.  This is a year-long course; both semesters (001 and 002) are required for credit

JNSE H003A01&02:  Second-Year Japanese
Class meets five days a week:  students must choose either the TTH 10:15-11:15 slot or TTH 11:45-12:45 slot.  A continuation of first-year Japanese, with a focus on the further development of oral proficiency, along with reading and writing skills.
(Students are not required to take both semesters.)

JNSE H004B01&02:  Second-Year Japanese
Class meets five days a week:  students must choose either the TTH 10:15-11:15 slot or TTH 11:45-12:45 slot.  A continuation of first-year Japanese, with a focus on the further development of oral proficiency, along with reading and writing skills.
(Students are not required to take both semesters.)


JNSE H101A01: Third-Year Japanese
A continuation of language study with further development of oral proficiency and reading/writing skills.  Emphasis on reading and discussing simple texts. Advanced study of grammar and kanji; more training in opinion essay and report writing.
Additional oral practice outside of classroom expected.

JNSE H202B01: Third-Year Japanese

A continuation of language study with further development of oral proficiency and reading/writing skills.  Emphasis on reading and discussing simple texts. Advanced study of grammar and kanji; more training in opinion essay and report writing.
Additional oral practice outside of classroom expected.

JNSE H201A01:  Advanced Japanese
Continued training in modern Japanese, with particular emphasis on reading texts, mastery of the kanji, and expansion of vocabulary. Explores a variety of genres and text types using authentic materials.

JNSE H201B01:  Advanced Japanese
Continued training in modern Japanese, with particular emphasis on reading texts, mastery of the kanji, and expansion of vocabulary. Explores a variety of genres and text types using authentic materials.