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Film Studies Program
Bryn Mawr College
101 North Merion Ave
Bryn Mawr, PA 19010
610.526.5334

Tri-College Courses

CURRENT COURSE OFFERINGS

Bryn Mawr Schedule | Bryn Mawr Descriptions
Swarthmore Schedule | Swarthmore Descriptions
University of Pennsylvania Cinema Studies

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Students must choose a major subject and may choose a minor subject. Students may also select from one of seven concentrations, which are offered to enhance a student's work in the major or minor and to focus work on a specific area of interest.

Concentrations are an intentional cluster of courses already offered by various academic departments or through general programs. These courses may also be cross-listed in several academic departments. Therefore, when registering for a course that counts toward a concentration, a student should register for the course listed in her major or minor department. If the concentration course is not listed in her major or minor department, the student may enroll in any listing of that course.

Fall 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
ARTW B266-001 Screenwriting Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM F English House I Doyne,N.
COML B306-001 Film Theory Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TH Carpenter Library 15 King,H.
Film: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM T Carpenter Library 25
EALC B240-001 Topics in Chinese Film: The Fifth Generation Semester / 1 LEC: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Carpenter Library 17 Kwa,S.
Film Screening: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM M Thomas Hall 224
ENGL B205-001 Introduction to Film Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Carpenter Library 25 Tratner,M.
Film: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM SU Thomas Hall 224
ENGL B299-001 History of Narrative Cinema, 1945 to the Present Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Carpenter Library 21 King,H.
Film: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM M Carpenter Library 21
ENGL B306-001 Film Theory Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TH Carpenter Library 15 King,H.
Film: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM T Carpenter Library 25
GEOL B125-001 Focus: Geology in Film First Half / 0.5 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Park 25 Marenco,P.
Screening: 8:00 PM-10:00 PM W Park 25
GNST B255-001 Video Production Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM T Bettws Y Coed 127 Romberg,D.
Screening: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM TH Bettws Y Coed 127
HART B205-001 Introduction to Film Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Carpenter Library 25 Tratner,M.
Film: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM SU Thomas Hall 224
HART B299-001 History of Narrative Cinema, 1945 to the present Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Carpenter Library 21 King,H.
Film: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM M Carpenter Library 21
HART B306-001 Film Theory Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TH Carpenter Library 15 King,H.
Film: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM T Carpenter Library 25
HIST B284-001 Movies and America Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Thomas Hall 224 Ullman,S.
Film Screening: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM T Carpenter Library 21
ITAL B229-001 Food in Italian Literature, Culture, and Cinema Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Thomas Hall 118 Rusin,N.
Screenings: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM TH Thomas Hall 224
Extra Language Hour: 12:10 PM- 1:00 PM M Thomas Hall 118
PSYC B375-001 Movies and Madness: Abnormal Psychology Through Films Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM W Bettws Y Coed 106 Rescorla,L.
RUSS B258-001 Soviet and Eastern European Cinema of the 1960s Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Taylor Hall F Harte,T.
Screening: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM M Dalton Hall 25

Spring 2015

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
COML B110-001 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the Cinema Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWF Carpenter Library 25 King,H.
Film: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM SU
EALC B212-001 Topics: Introduction to Chinese Literature: Dream of the Red Chamber Semester / 1 LEC: 1:40 PM- 3:30 PM TH Thomas Hall 118 Kwa,S., Wang,M.
GNST B302-001 Topics in Video Production: DocuFiction Workshop Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM T Dalton Hall 300 Romberg,D.
HART B110-001 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the Cinema Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWF Carpenter Library 25 King,H.
Film: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM SU Carpenter Library 25
HART B214-001 Topics: Introduction to Chinese Literature: Dream of the Red Chamber Semester / 1 LEC: 1:40 PM- 3:30 PM TH Thomas Hall 118 Kwa,S., Wang,M.
RUSS B217-001 The Cinema of Andrei Tarkovsky Semester / 1 LEC: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Taylor Hall D Harte,T.

Fall 2015

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

Courses at Haverford Fall 2014

COURSE

TITLE MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
EALC 230 Postwar Japanese Cinema TTh 2:30-4pm

Stokes 014

Schoneveld
GERM 262 European Film TTh 11:30am-1pm Gest 103 Henkel
ICPR 243 Documentary Video Production W 1:30-4pm Stokes 106 Funari
PEACH 297 Time after Time: Temporality in Film and Continental Philosophy MW 2:30-4pm Stokes 102 Ben-Shai

Courses at Swarthmore Fall 2014

COURSE

TITLE MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
FMST 001 Introduction to Film & Media Studies T Th 9:55-11:10am, screenings T 7-10pm

Trotter Hall 301,

Lang Center 101

P. White
FMST 013 Experimental Animation

T Th 11:20am-12:35pm,
screenings T 7-10pm

McCabe Library 306, McCabe Library 306 E. Cho
FMST 035 Histories of Water T Th 2:40-3:55pm Trotter Hall 203 F. Azfar
FMST 046 Queer Media

W 1:15-4pm, screenings M 7-10pm

Kohlberg 116 P. White
FMST 052 The French New Wave T Th 1:15-2:30pm, screenings W 7-10pm Kohlberg 116 C. Yervasi
FMST 055 Contemporary Chinese Cinema T Th 1:15-2:30pm Kohlberg 328 H. Kong
FMST 097 Independent Study      

 

2014-15 Catalog Data

ARTW B266 Screenwriting Fall 2014 An introduction to screenwriting. Issues basic to the art of storytelling in film will be addressed and analyzed: character, dramatic structure, theme, setting, image, sound. The course focuses on the film adaptation; readings include novels, screenplays, and short stories. Films adapted from the readings will be screened. In the course of the semester, students will be expected to outline and complete the first act of an adapted screenplay of their own. Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Film Studies

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COML B110 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the Cinema Spring 2015 An introduction to the analysis of film through particular attention to the role of the spectator. Why do moving images compel our fascination? How exactly do film spectators relate to the people, objects, and places that appear on the screen? Wherein lies the power of images to move, attract, repel, persuade, or transform its viewers? In this course, students will be introduced to film theory through the rich and complex topic of identification. We will explore how points of view are framed in cinema, and how those viewing positions differ from those of still photography, advertising, video games, and other forms of media. Students will be encouraged to consider the role the cinematic medium plays in influencing our experience of a film: how it is not simply a film's content, but the very form of representation that creates interactions between the spectator and the images on the screen. Film screenings include Psycho, Being John Malkovich, and others. Course is geared to freshman and those with no prior film instruction. Fulfills History of Art major 100-level course requirement, Film Studies minor Introductory course or Theory course requirement. Syllabus is subject to change at instructor's discretion. Writing Intensive Critical Interpretation (CI) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as HART B110 Counts toward Film Studies

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COML B214 Italy Today: New Voices, New Writers, New LiteratureItaly Today Not offered 2014-15 This course, taught in English, will focus primarily on the works of the so-called "migrant writers" who, having adopted the Italian language, have become a significant part of the new voice of Italy. In addition to the aesthetic appreciation of these works, this course will also take into consideration the social, cultural, and political factors surrounding them. The course will focus on works by writers who are now integral to Italian canon - among them: Cristina Ali-Farah, Igiaba Scego, Ghermandi Gabriella, Amara Lakhous. As part of the course, movies concerned with various aspects of Italian Migrant literature will be screened and analyzed. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as ITAL B212 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Film Studies

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COML B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945
Section 001 (Fall 2013): Silent Film: From U.S. to Soviet Russia&Beyond Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as ENGL B238 Cross-listed as RUSS B238 Cross-listed as HART B238 Counts toward Film Studies

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COML B306 Film Theory Fall 2014 An introduction to major developments in film theory and criticism. Topics covered include: the specificity of film form; cinematic realism; the cinematic "author"; the politics and ideology of cinema; the relation between cinema and language; spectatorship, identification, and subjectivity; archival and historical problems in film studies; the relation between film studies and other disciplines of aesthetic and social criticism. Each week of the syllabus pairs critical writing(s) on a central principle of film analysis with a cinematic example. Class will be divided between discussion of critical texts and attempts to apply them to a primary cinematic text. Cross-listed as HART B306 Cross-listed as ENGL B306 Counts toward Film Studies

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EALC B212 Topics: Introduction to Chinese Literature
Section 001 (Spring 2015): Dream of the Red Chamber
Section 001 (Fall 2013): The Films of Wong Karwai Spring 2015 This is a topics course. Topics may vary.
Current topic description: This class examines the material world of the Qing dynasty novel Hongloumeng, or Dream of the Red Chamber. Using literary theory and material culture studies, we will situate the novel in relation to ideas of circulation in late imperial China and contemporaneous cultures in other world regions. Topics include global trade, exchange, technology, etc.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as HART B214 Counts toward Film Studies

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EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film
Section 001 (Fall 2014): The Fifth Generation Fall 2014 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisite: At least one course approved as an EAST core course or permission of instructor.
Current topic description: Zhang Yimou and Chen Kaige - This semester we will be examining films and related literature of two directors from the Peoples' Republic of China. We will consider representative works that extend from the 1980's to the present day.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Film Studies

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EALC B315 Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & Film Not offered 2014-15 This interdisciplinary course focuses on a critical survey of literary and visual texts by and about Chinese women. We will begin by focusing on the cultural norms that defined women's lives beginning in early China, and consider how those tropes are reflected and rejected over time and geographical borders (in Japan, Hong Kong and the United States). No prior knowledge of Chinese culture or language necessary. Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Film Studies

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EDUC B320 Topics in German Literature and Culture Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Previous topics include: Romantic Literary Theory and Literary Modernity; Configurations of Femininity in German Literature; Nietzsche and Modern Cultural Criticism; Contemporary German Fiction; No Child Left Behind: Education in German Literature and Culture, German Literary Culture in Exile (1933-1945). Cross-listed as GERM B320 Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B205 Introduction to Film Fall 2014 This course is intended to provide students with the tools of critical film analysis. Through readings of images and sounds, sections of films and entire narratives, students will cultivate the habits of critical viewing and establish a foundation for focused work in film studies. The course introduces formal and technical units of cinematic meaning and categories of genre and history that add up to the experiences and meanings we call cinema. Although much of the course material will focus on the Hollywood style of film, examples will be drawn from the history of cinema. Attendance at weekly screenings is mandatory. Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as HART B205 Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945
Section 001 (Fall 2013): Silent Film: From U.S. to Soviet Russia& Beyond Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as RUSS B238 Cross-listed as HART B238 Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B261 Topics: Film and the German Literary Imagination Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as GERM B262 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B299 History of Narrative Cinema, 1945 to the Present Fall 2014 This course surveys the history of narrative film from 1945 through contemporary cinema. We will analyze a chronological series of styles and national cinemas, including Classical Hollywood, Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, and other post-war movements and genres. Viewings of canonical films will be supplemented by more recent examples of global cinema. While historical in approach, this course emphasizes the theory and criticism of the sound film, and we will consider various methodological approaches to the aesthetic, socio-political, and psychological dimensions of cinema. Readings will provide historical context, and will introduce students to key concepts in film studies such as realism, formalism, spectatorship, the auteur theory, and genre studies. Fulfills the history requirement or the introductory course requirement for the Film Studies minor. Critical Interpretation (CI) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as HART B299 Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B306 Film Theory Fall 2014 This course covers a selection of key texts in film theory. Our primary method of inquiry will be close analysis of primary theoretical texts. Topics of discussion may include: the ontology of the photographic image, the ethics of cinema, cinematic space and temporality, and film theory's relationship to other forms of visual media. Film screenings will serve to illustrate and complicate theoretical concepts. Fulfills the theory requirement for Film Studies minors. Cross-listed as HART B306 Cross-listed as COML B306 Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B323 Movies, Fascism, and Communism Not offered 2014-15 Movies and mass politics emerged together, altering entertainment and government in strangely similar ways. Fascism and communism claimed an inherent relation to the masses and hence to movies; Hollywood rejected such claims. We will examine films alluding to fascism or communism, to understand them as commenting on political debates and on the mass experience of movie going. Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B334 Topics in Film Studies
Section 001 (Spring 2014): Black Independent Cinema
Section 001 (Fall 2013): Middle East on Film Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course. Content varies. Cross-listed as HART B334 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B336 Topics in Film Not offered 2014-15 This course examines experimental film and video from the 1930's to present. It will concentrate on the use of found footage: the reworking of existing imagery in order to generate new aesthetic frameworks and cultural meanings. Key issues to be explored include copyright, piracy, archive, activism, affect, aesthetics, interactivity and fandom. Cross-listed as HART B336 Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B353 Queer Diasporas: Empire, Desire, and the Politics of Placement Not offered 2014-15 Looking at fiction and film from the U.S. and abroad through the lenses of sexuality studies and queer theory, we will explore the ways that both current and past configurations of sexual, racial, and cultural personhood have inflected, infringed upon, and opened up spaces of local/global citizenship and belonging. Prerequisites: An introductory course in film, or GNST B290, or ENGL B250. Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Film Studies

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GEOL B125 Focus: Geology in Film Fall 2014 This is a half semester Focus course. Geologic processes make for great film storylines, but filmmakers take great liberty with how they depict scientific "facts" and scientists. We will explore how and why filmmakers choose to deviate from science reality. We will study and view one film per week and discuss its issues from a geologist's perspective. Course does not meet an Approach Counts toward Film Studies

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GERM B262 Topics: Film and the German Literary Imagination Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as ENGL B261 Counts toward Film Studies

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GERM B320 Topics in German Literature and Culture
Section 001 (Spring 2014): Austrian Cinema Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Previous topics include: Romantic Literary Theory and Literary Modernity; Configurations of Femininity in German Literature; Nietzsche and Modern Cultural Criticism; Contemporary German Fiction; No Child Left Behind: Education in German Literature and Culture, German Literary Culture in Exile (1933-1945). Cross-listed as EDUC B320 Counts toward Film Studies

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GNST B255 Video Production Fall 2014 This course will explore aesthetic strategies utilized by low-budget film and video makers as each student works throughout the semester to complete a 7-15 minute film or video project. Course requirements include weekly screenings, reading assignments, and class screenings of rushes and roughcuts of student projects. Prerequisites: Some prior film course experience necessary, instructor discretion. Counts toward Film Studies

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GNST B302 Topics in Video Production
Section 001 (Spring 2015): DocuFiction Workshop
Section 001 (Spring 2014): The Documentary Body Spring 2015 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisite: GNST B255 or ENGL/HART B205 or ICPR H243 or ICPR H343 or ICPR H278 or ANTH H207 or an equivalent Video Production course, such as Documentary Production or an equivalent critical course in Film or Media Studies. Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B110 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the Cinema Spring 2015 An introduction to the analysis of film through particular attention to the role of the spectator. Why do moving images compel our fascination? How exactly do film spectators relate to the people, objects, and places that appear on the screen? Wherein lies the power of images to move, attract, repel, persuade, or transform its viewers? In this course, students will be introduced to film theory through the rich and complex topic of identification. We will explore how points of view are framed in cinema, and how those viewing positions differ from those of still photography, advertising, video games, and other forms of media. Students will be encouraged to consider the role the cinematic medium plays in influencing our experience of a film: how it is not simply a film's content, but the very form of representation that creates interactions between the spectator and the images on the screen. Film screenings include Psycho, Being John Malkovich, and others. Course is geared to freshman and those with no prior film instruction. Fulfills History of Art major 100-level course requirement, Film Studies minor Introductory course or Theory course requirement. Syllabus is subject to change at instructor's discretion. Writing Intensive Critical Interpretation (CI) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as COML B110 Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

HART B205 Introduction to Film Fall 2014 This course is intended to provide students with the tools of critical film analysis. Through readings of images and sounds, sections of films and entire narratives, students will cultivate the habits of critical viewing and establish a foundation for focused work in film studies. The course introduces formal and technical units of cinematic meaning and categories of genre and history that add up to the experiences and meanings we call cinema. Although much of the course material will focus on the Hollywood style of film, examples will be drawn from the history of cinema. Attendance at weekly screenings is mandatory. Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as ENGL B205 Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

HART B214 Topics: Introduction to Chinese Literature
Section 001 (Spring 2015): Dream of the Red Chamber Spring 2015 This is a topics course. Topics may vary.
Current topic description: This class examines the material world of the Qing dynasty novel Hongloumeng, or Dream of the Red Chamber. Using literary theory and material culture studies, we will situate the novel in relation to ideas of circulation in late imperial China and contemporaneous cultures in other world regions. Topics include global trade, exchange, technology, etc.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as EALC B212 Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B215 Russian Avant-Garde Art, Literature and Film Not offered 2014-15 This course focuses on Russian avant-garde painting, literature and cinema at the start of the 20th century. Moving from Imperial Russian art to Stalinist aesthetics, we explore the rise of non-objective painting (Malevich, Kandinsky, etc.), ground-breaking literature (Bely, Mayakovsky), and revolutionary cinema (Vertov, Eisenstein). No knowledge of Russian required. Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as RUSS B215 Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945
Section 001 (Fall 2013): Silent Film: From U.S. to Soviet Russia &Beyond Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as ENGL B238 Cross-listed as RUSS B238 Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B299 History of Narrative Cinema, 1945 to the present Fall 2014 This course surveys the history of narrative film from 1945 through contemporary cinema. We will analyze a chronological series of styles and national cinemas, including Classical Hollywood, Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, and other post-war movements and genres. Viewings of canonical films will be supplemented by more recent examples of global cinema. While historical in approach, this course emphasizes the theory and criticism of the sound film, and we will consider various methodological approaches to the aesthetic, socio-political, and psychological dimensions of cinema. Readings will provide historical context, and will introduce students to key concepts in film studies such as realism, formalism, spectatorship, the auteur theory, and genre studies. Fulfills the history requirement or the introductory course requirement for the Film Studies minor. Critical Interpretation (CI) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as ENGL B299 Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B306 Film Theory Fall 2014 An introduction to major developments in film theory and criticism. Topics covered include: the specificity of film form; cinematic realism; the cinematic "author"; the politics and ideology of cinema; the relation between cinema and language; spectatorship, identification, and subjectivity; archival and historical problems in film studies; the relation between film studies and other disciplines of aesthetic and social criticism. Each week of the syllabus pairs critical writing(s) on a central principle of film analysis with a cinematic example. Class will be divided between discussion of critical texts and attempts to apply them to a primary cinematic text. Cross-listed as ENGL B306 Cross-listed as COML B306 Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B334 Topics in Film Studies
Section 001 (Spring 2014): Black Independent Cinema
Section 001 (Fall 2013): Middle East on Film Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Cross-listed as ENGL B334 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B336 Topics in Film Not offered 2014-15 This course examines experimental film and video from the 1930's to present. It will concentrate on the use of found footage: the reworking of existing imagery in order to generate new aesthetic frameworks and cultural meanings. Key issues to be explored include copyright, piracy, archive, activism, affect, aesthetics, interactivity and fandom. Cross-listed as ENGL B336 Counts toward Film Studies

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HIST B284 Movies and America Fall 2014 Movies are one of the most important means by which Americans come to know - or think they know--their own history. This class examines the complex cultural relationship between film and American historical self fashioning. Critical Interpretation (CI) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B212 Italy Today: New Voices, New Writers, New Literature Not offered 2014-15 This course, taught in English, will focus primarily on the works of the so-called "migrant writers" who, having adopted the Italian language, have become a significant part of the new voice of Italy. In addition to the aesthetic appreciation of these works, this course will also take into consideration the social, cultural, and political factors surrounding them. The course will focus on works by writers who are now integral to Italian canon - among them: Cristina Ali-Farah, Igiaba Scego, Ghermandi Gabriella, Amara Lakhous. As part of the course, movies concerned with various aspects of Italian Migrant literature will be screened and analyzed. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as COML B214 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B225 Italian Cinema and Literary Adaptation Not offered 2014-15 The course will discuss how cinema conditions literary imagination and how literature leaves its imprint on cinema. We will "read" films as "literary images" and "see" novels as "visual stories." The reading of Italian literary sources will be followed by evaluation of the corresponding films by well-known directors, including female directors. We will study, through close analysis, such issues as Fascism, nationhood, gender, sexuality, politics, regionalism, death, and family within the European context of WWII and post-war Italy Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B229 Food in Italian Literature, Culture, and Cinema Fall 2014 Taught in English. A profile of Italian literature/culture/cinema obtained through an analysis of gastronomic documents, films, literary texts, and magazines. We will also include a discussion of the Slow Food Revolution, a movement initiated in Italy in 1980 and now with a world-wide following, and its social, economic, ecological, aesthetic, and cultural impact to counteract fast food and to promote local food traditions. Course taught in English. One additional hour for students who want Italian credit . Prerequisite: ITAL 102 Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B255 Uomini d'onore in Sicilia: Italian Mafia in Literature and Cinema
Section 001 (Fall 2013): The Italian Mafia in Cinema and Literature Not offered 2014-15 This course aims to explore representations of Mafia figures in Italian literature and cinema, with reference also to Italian-American films, starting from the 'classical' example of Sicily. The course will introduce students to both Italian Studies from an interdisciplinary prospective and also to narrative fiction, using Italian literature written by 19th, 20th, and 21st Italian Sicilian authors. Course is taught in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL B102 or permission of the instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B299 Grief, Sexuality, Identity: Emerging Adulthood Not offered 2014-15 Adolescence is an important time of personality development as a result of changes in the self-concept and the formation of a new moral system of values. Emphasis will be placed on issues confronting the role of the family and peer relationships, prostitution, drugs, youth criminality/gangsters/violence, cultural diversity, pregnancy, gender identity, mental/moral/religious development, emotional growth, alcoholism, homosexuality, sexual behavior. Prerequisite: ITAL B102. Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Film Studies

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PSYC B375 Movies and Madness: Abnormal Psychology Through Films Fall 2014 This writing-intensive seminar (maximum enrollment = 16 students) deals with critical analysis of how various forms of psychopathology are depicted in films. The primary focus of the seminar will be evaluating the degree of correspondence between the cinematic presentation and current research knowledge about the disorder, taking into account the historical period in which the film was made. For example, we will discuss how accurately the symptoms of the disorder are presented and how representative the protagonist is of people who typically manifest this disorder based on current research. We will also address the theory of etiology of the disorder depicted in the film, including discussion of the relevant intellectual history in the period when the film was made and the prevailing accounts of psychopathology in that period. Another focus will be how the film portrays the course of the disorder and how it depicts treatment for the disorder. This cinematic presentation will be evaluated with respect to current research on treatment for the disorder as well as the historical context of prevailing treatment for the disorder at the time the film was made. Prerequisite: PSYC B209. Writing Intensive Counts toward Film Studies Counts toward Health Studies

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RUSS B215 Russian Avant-Garde Art, Literature and Film Not offered 2014-15 This course focuses on Russian avant-garde painting, literature and cinema at the start of the 20th century. Moving from Imperial Russian art to Stalinist aesthetics, we explore the rise of non-objective painting (Malevich, Kandinsky, etc.), ground-breaking literature (Bely, Mayakovsky), and revolutionary cinema (Vertov, Eisenstein). No knowledge of Russian required. Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as HART B215 Counts toward Film Studies

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RUSS B217 The Cinema of Andrei Tarkovsky Spring 2015 This course will probe the cinematic oeuvre of the great Soviet filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky, who produced some of the most compelling, significant film work of the 20th century. Looking at not only Tarkovsky's films but also those films that influenced his work, we will explore the aesthetics, philosophy, and ideological pressure underlying Tarkovsky's unique brand of cinema. Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Film Studies

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RUSS B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945
Section 001 (Fall 2013): Silent Film: From U.S. to Soviet Russia & Beyond Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as ENGL B238 Cross-listed as HART B238 Counts toward Film Studies

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RUSS B258 Soviet and Eastern European Cinema of the 1960s Fall 2014 This course examines 1960s Soviet and Eastern European "New Wave" cinema, which won worldwide acclaim through its treatment of war, gender, and aesthetics. Films from Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Russia, and Yugoslavia will be viewed and analyzed, accompanied by readings on film history and theory. All films shown with subtitles; no knowledge of Russian or previous study of film required. Writing Attentive Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Film Studies

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Fall 2014 Course Descriptions at Swarthmore College

FMST 001. Introduction to Film and Media Studies

Provides groundwork for further study in the discipline and is recommended before taking additional FMST courses. Introduces students to concepts, theories, and histories of film and other moving-image media, treating cinema as a dominant representational system that shapes other media forms. Topics include the formal analysis of image and sound, aesthetics, historiography, genres, authorship, issues of gender, race, ethnicity, and nation, economics, technology, and reception and audience studies. Emphasis is on developing writing, analytical, and research skills. Required weekly evening screenings of works from diverse periods, countries, and traditions.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. White.

FMST 013. Experimental Animation

This course is an introduction to analog and digital animation concepts and techniques and includes workshops on cut-out animation, stop-motion, and hybrid computer based forms using Adobe After Effects and Adobe Photoshop. The course emphasizes technical and aesthetic experimentation, with the goal of developing a personal vision through the creation of high-quality, experimental works. Through reading, discussion, and exposure to a variety of artistic practices within film, video art, and animation, the course promotes a critical understanding of these media. The class concludes with a public screening of final projects.
Prerequisites: FMST 01 and FMST 02 or permission of the instructor. Students with knowledge of Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and strong drawing skills are encouraged to contact instructor.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Cho.

FMST 035. Histories of Water

no description available

FMST 046. Queer Media

(Cross-listed as ENGL 090)
The history of avant-garde and experimental media has been intertwined with that of gender non-conformity and sexual dissidence, and even the most mainstream media forms have been “queered” by subcultural reception. How do lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender (lgbt) filmmakers queer sexual norms and standard media forms? How are sexual identities mediated by popular culture? Challenging classic Hollywood’s heterosexual presumption and mass media appropriations of lgbt culture, we will examine lgbt aesthetic strategies and modes of address in contexts such as the American and European avant-gardes, AIDS activism, and transnational and diasporan film through the lens of queer theory.
Eligible for GSST or INTP credit.
1 credit.
Fall 2014. White.

FMST 052. The French New Wave

(Cross-listed as LITR 073F)
We will focus on French novels and films as they reflect, reinforce, and critique French society from the early 1950s thorough the end of the 1960s. We will study these texts in relation to modernization, decolonization, and the growing discontent of youth culture in the 1960s. Close readings will allow us to draw conclusions about the relationship of new cultural and social movements - postwar consumer culture, radical political movements, and the women’s movement – to France and French society. (Writers and directors include Lefebvre, Godard, Truffaut, Melville, Etcherelli, Rochefort, Varda, Akerman).
1 credit.
Fall 2014. Yervasi.

FMST 055. Contemporary Chinese Cinema

(Cross-listed as CHIN 055)
Cinema has become a special form of cultural mirror representing social dynamics and drastic changes in mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan since the mid-1980s. The course will develop a better understanding of changing Chinese culture by analyzing cinematic texts and the new wave in the era of globalization.
1 credit.
Fall 2012. Kong.

FMST 097. Independent Study

Students must apply for preregistration approval in writing.
0.5 to 1 credit.

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