Contact Us
Department of German
Bryn Mawr College
101 North Merion Avenue
Bryn Mawr, PA 19010-2899

Phone: (610) 526-5198
FAX: (610) 526-7479

Department of German
Haverford College
370 Lancaster Avenue
Haverford, PA 19041

Phone: (610) 795-1756
bremerhaven

Courses at Bryn Mawr

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
GERM B001-001 Elementary German Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWF Dalton Hall 25 Kenosian,D.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTH Dalton Hall 25
GERM B101-001 Intermediate German Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWF Taylor Hall C Burri,M.
GERM B213-001 Theory in Practice: Critical Discourses in the Humanities Semester / 1 LEC: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Carpenter Library 17 Monserrati,M.
GERM B225-001 Censorship: Historical Contexts, Local Practices and Global Resonance Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Dalton Hall 212E Seyhan,A.
LEC: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM TH Dalton Hall 212E
GERM B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
GERM B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
GERM B421-001 German for Reading Knowledge Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Dalton Hall 25 Kenosian,D.

Spring 2015

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
GERM B002-001 Elementary German Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWF Dalton Hall 25 Kenosian,D.
Lecture: 8:55 AM-10:15 AM TTH Dalton Hall 25
Drill: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWF Dalton Hall 25
Drill: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTH Dalton Hall 25
GERM B102-001 Intermediate German Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWF Taylor Hall C Kenosian,D.
GERM B202-001 Introduction to German Studies Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Taylor Hall B Burri,M.
GERM B245-001 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Thomas Hall 102 Kenosian,D.
GERM B321-001 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies: Exile in Translation Semester / 1 LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM T Dalton Hall 212A Seyhan,A.
GERM B399-001 Senior Seminar Semester / 1

Fall 2015

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)


Courses at Haverford Fall 2014

COURSE

TITLE SCHEDULE/UNITS MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
GERMH001A01 Elementary German Semester 1/1

MWF 9:30-10:30: TTh 9-10

  Brook Henkel
GERMH101A01 Intermediate German Semester 1/1

MWF 10:30-11:30

  Ulrich Schönherr
GERMH201A01 Advanced Training: Language, Text, and Context Semester 1/1

MW 11:30-1:00

 

  Ulrich Schönherr
GERMH262A01 European Film Semester 1/1 TTh 11:30-1:00   Brook Henkel
GERMH320A01 Sex-Crime-Madness: The Birth of Modern Literature and the Aesthetics of Transgression (in German) Semester 1/1

TH 1:30-4:00

Gest 103 Ulrich Schönherr
GERMH399 Senior Conference Semester1/1 HTBA   Ulrich Schönherr

 


Courses at Haverford Spring 2015

COURSE

TITLE SCHEDULE/UNITS MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)

GERMH002B01

Elementary German

 

MWF 9:30-10:30;

TTh 9-10

 

Brook Henkel

GERMH102B01

Intermediate German

 

MWF 10:30-11:30

 

Ulrich Schönherr

GERMH215B01

Survey of Literature in German

 

MW 11:30-1:00

 

Brook Henkel

GERMNH320B01 Impossible Representations: The Holocaust in Literature and Film   T 7:30pm - 10:00pm   Brook Henkel
GERMH 321 Literature and New Media: From the Gutenberg- Galaxy to Cyberspace   W 1:30-4:00   Ulrich Schönherr

GERMH399B01

Senior Conference

 

TBA

 

Ulrich Schönherr

 

2014-15 Catalog Data

GERM B001 Elementary German Fall 2014 Meets five hours a week with the individual class instructor, two hours with student drill instructors. Strong emphasis on communicative competence both in spoken and written German in a larger cultural context. Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B002 Elementary German Spring 2015 Meets five hours a week with the individual class instructor, two hours with student drill instructors. Strong emphasis on communicative competence both in spoken and written German in a larger cultural context. Prerequisite: GERM 001 or its equivalent or permission of instructor Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B101 Intermediate German Fall 2014 Thorough review of grammar, exercises in composition and conversation. Enforcement of correct grammatical patterns and idiomatic use of language. Study of selected literary and cultural texts and films from German-speaking countries. Prerequisite: Completion of GERM 002 or its equivalent as decided by the department and/or placement test. Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B102 Intermediate German Spring 2015 This course is the continuation of GERM 101 (Intermediate German I). We will concentrate on all four language skills--speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. We will build on the knowledge that students gained in the elementary-level courses and then honed in GERM 101. This course will also provide students with an introduction to selected aspects of German culture. Prerequisite: GERM 101 or its equivalent as decided by the department. Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B202 Introduction to German Studies Spring 2015 In this course, we will concentrate on all four language skills - speaking, reading, writing and listening comprehension. However, special emphasis will be placed on reading and writing skills. In addition, students will be introduced to different literary and non-literary text genres and practice writing in different genres.. We will read newspaper articles, film reviews, fairy tales, short stories, and poetry. We will also screen a film. Writing Intensive Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI)

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GERM B212 Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and the Rhetoric of Modernity Not offered 2014-15 This course examines selected writings by Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud as pre-texts for a critique of cultural reason and underlines their contribution to questions of language, representation, history, ethics, and art. These three visionaries of modernity have translated the abstract metaphysics of "the history of the subject" into a concrete analysis of human experience. Their work has been a major influence on the Frankfurt School of critical theory and has also led to a revolutionary shift in the understanding and writing of history and literature now associated with the work of modern French philosophers Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Julia Kristeva, and Jacques Lacan. Our readings will, therefore, also include short selections from these philosophers in order to analyze the contested history of modernity and its intellectual and moral consequences. Special attention will be paid to the relation between rhetoric and philosophy and the narrative forms of "the philosophical discourse(s) of modernity" (e.g., sermon and myth in Marx; aphorism and oratory in Nietzsche, myth, fairy tale, case hi/story in Freud). Cross-listed with Philosophy 204. Critical Interpretation (CI) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as PHIL B204

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GERM B213 Theory in Practice: Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2013): Rhetoric and Interpretation after Post-Modernism Fall 2014 An examination in English of leading theories of interpretation from Classical Tradition to Modern and Post-Modern Time. This is a topics course. Course content varies. Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as ITAL B213 Cross-listed as RUSS B253 Cross-listed as PHIL B253

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GERM B223 Topics in German Cultural Studies
Section 001 (Spring 2014): Remembered Violence Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Recent topics include Remembered Violence, Global Masculinities, and Crime and Detection in German. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as HIST B247 Cross-listed as COML B223

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GERM B225 Censorship: Historical Contexts, Local Practices and Global Resonance Fall 2014 The course is in English. It examines the ban on books and art in a global context through a study of the historical and sociopolitical conditions of censorship practices. The course raises such questions as how censorship is used to fortify political power, how it is practiced locally and globally, who censors, what are the categories of censorship, how censorship succeeds and fails, and how writers and artists write and create against and within censorship. The last question leads to an analysis of rhetorical strategies that writers and artists employ to translate the expression of repression, trauma, and torture into idioms of resistance. German majors/minors can get German Studies credit. Prerequisite: EMLY B001 or a 100-level intensive writing course. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Cross-listed as COML B225 Counts toward Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures Counts toward Middle East Studies

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GERM B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile Not offered 2014-15 This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Felipe Alfau, Julia Alvarez,, Sigmund Freud, Eva Hoffman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, W. G. Sebald, and others. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as COML B231 Cross-listed as ANTH B231 Counts toward Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures Counts toward International Studies Major

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GERM B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture Spring 2015 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Taught in English. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as COML B245 Counts toward Gender/Sex Studies (Min/Conc)

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GERM B262 Topics: Film and the German Literary Imagination Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as ENGL B261 Counts toward Film Studies

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GERM B320 Topics in German Literature and Culture
Section 001 (Spring 2014): Austrian Cinema Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Previous topics include: Romantic Literary Theory and Literary Modernity; Configurations of Femininity in German Literature; Nietzsche and Modern Cultural Criticism; Contemporary German Fiction; No Child Left Behind: Education in German Literature and Culture, German Literary Culture in Exile (1933-1945). Cross-listed as EDUC B320 Counts toward Film Studies

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GERM B321 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies
Section 001 (Spring 2015): Exile in Translation
Section 001 (Spring 2014): Migration and Mobility in Culture, Cinema, and Pol Spring 2015 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: In the condition of exile, the writers, whose works were banned or censored in their own countries, cannot pursue their craft, unless their works are translated, either by professional translators or by themselves. Many writers who are in exile in Germany today write directly in German as a form of self-translation. This course will examine how works of diverse cultures survive in German translation and contribute to German culture.
Cross-listed as HART B348 Cross-listed as COML B321 Counts toward Gender/Sex Studies (Min/Conc)

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GERM B329 Wittgenstein Not offered 2014-15 Wittgenstein is notable for developing two philosophical systems. In the first, he attempted to show that there is a single common structure underlying all language, thought and being. In the second, he denied the idea of such a structure and claimed that the job of philosophy was to free philosophers from bewitchments due to misunderstandings of ordinary concepts in language. The course begins by sketching the first system. We then turn to his rejection of the earlier ideas as outlined in Philosophical Investigations and On Certainty. We also examine contemporary interpretations of Wittgenstein's later work. Cross-listed as PHIL B329

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GERM B399 Senior Seminar

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GERM B403 Supervised Work

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GERM B403 Supervised Work

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GERM B421 German for Reading Knowledge This course will provide graduate and undergraduate students with the skills to read and translate challenging academic texts from German into English. We will quickly cover the essentials of German grammar and focus on vocabulary and constructions that one can encounter in scholarly writing from a variety of disciplines. Does not fulfill the Language Requirement.

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Course Descriptions at Haverford College

COMLH 200 Introduction to Comparative Literature (Schönherr, U.)
The course offers a comprehensive introduction to literary history from the Renaissance period to the present, by focusing on a) the changing relationship between literature and religion, b) the construction of identities (class, gender, race), c) the representation of history, and d) models of literary self-referentiality. In addition, the class will introduce a variety of literary and cultural theories necessary for the analysis of (non)fictional texts.

GERMH 001/002 Elementary German ( Henkel, B.)

GERMH 101/102 Intermediate German (Schönherr, U.)
Meets three hours a week with the individual class instructor, one hour with student drill instructor. Thorough review of grammar, exercises in composition and conversation. Enforcement of correct grammatical patterns and idiomatic use of language. Study of selected literary and cultural texts and films from German-speaking countries.

GERMH 201 Advanced Training: Languag, Tet and Context (Schönherr, U.)
This course is intended for students who wish to refine their speaking, writing, and reading skills beyond the Intermediate level. Designed as a comprehensive introduction to modern German culture, we will discuss a variety of literary, political, historical and philosophical texts, including feature films and video materials. In addition, students have the opportunity to enrich the curriculum, by giving class reports on current events of their choice. Weekly grammar reviews will complement these activities.

GERMH215B01 Survey of Literature in German(Henkel, B)
The seminar is designed to give a broad overview of the various aesthetic trends which have shaped contemporary German-speaking literature. Focusing on representative works--including prose, drama, and poetry--this course will retrace and engage with the historical role of literature in the German speaking world over time, and access the importance of German literature in the current era of globalization and mass communication.

GERMH 223 Writing Nations: Africa and Europe (Brust, I.)
This course will explore ideas of nation-building in regard to the transnational relations between Europe and Africa. We will discuss African and European experiences of nation-creation to distinguish between exclusionary and inclusionary visions of nation states, and focus in particular on literary texts from Great Britain, Germany, and France in comparison with literary texts from Nigeria, South Africa, and Algeria.

GERMH 262 European Film (Henkel, B.)
Beginning with key works of European cinema and the historical avant-garde from the 1920s and 30s (Lang, Vertov, Renoir), this class will go on to explore the post-WWII developments of Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, and New German Cinema (alongside examples of British and Scandinavian film) up to more recent works like those of Lars von Trier and the Berlin School. Throughout the semester, we will challenge such national identifications of European films (imposed largely by critics and the international film-market) and instead stress their shared concerns with history, politics, social transformation, and formal experimentation. We will also discuss the considerable (if contentious) overlaps between European art cinema and Hollywood films. Screenings will be paired with relevant, primary and secondary film-historical texts as well as key readings in film theory. Films shown with subtitles; readings and discussions in English.

GERMH 305 German Theatre: A Moral Compass?(Brust, I.)
In 1784 Friedrich Schiller started a discussion about theatre as a moral institution. With this in mind, this course will provide an overview of the historical development of drama within the German-speaking world and also explore foreign influences on German drama. We will read and watch a variety of different plays from Lessing to Brecht, and engage with different theatrical genres: classical, epic, documentary, absurd, and feminist theatre. In addition, we will discuss the function of the institutionalization of theatre within the German national imaginary, with a particular focus on gender and race. This course is taught in German.

GERMH 319 Intermedial Transformations: Musico-Acoustic (Schönherr, U.)
Cross-listed with COML, Music, and Gender & Sexuality Studies
How could an apparently innocent medium such as music become the contested subject of cultural-political debates over the last 2000 years, upon which even the decline and/or continuation of civilization depends? How shall we understand the longevity of the myth of music’s power, even though mythological figures such as Orpheus already demonstrated its ultimate powerless­ness? Why did literary authors so often favor music over their own medium, and even regarded music as a utopia of expression capable of representing the ineffable? How can we explain the gendering of music as the other of male reason and patriarchal order that threatens the socio-cultural monopoly of men? And how shall we explain the persistence of these questions after the emergence of new audio-visual media of recording, reproduction, and transmission that dissolved the natural connection between voice and body, instrument and sound, time and space, that led to a radical transformation of our culture? The course intends to explore these questions, by drawing on the rich and diverse representation of music in all its socio-aesthetic complexity from antiquity to the present. The thematic scope will range from mythological, philosophical, and religious interpretations of music through issues of gender, race, and politics in literature, opera, and film, to theories of intermediality, and psycho-analytical implications of voice and sound. Focusing on exemplary models, we will reconstruct the changing social functions and highly ambiguous attitudes towards music in Western culture, oscillating between fear and fascination. In addition, we will also continuously confront the semiotic question of whether literature can justifiably be read in analogy to musical forms, and whether music as a language is also plausible in reverse.

GERMH 320 (A)   Sex-Crime-Madness: The Birth of Modern Literature and the Aesthetics of Transgression (in German) (Schönherr, U.)
The emancipation from rule-bound poetics, didactic, and moral constraints led to a redefinition of literature around 1800, for which the classic/classicist triad of the true, the good, and the beautiful was no longer valid. The successful separation from extra-aesthetic determinants opened up new representational possibilities, in which the “beautiful” became boring and the "ugly" became interesting. Focusing on major literary figures from Goethe to Jelinek, the seminar will examine the 'paradigm shift' towards a modern aesthetics of trans­gression in which social, racial, and sexual deviancy take center stage.

GERMH 320 (B)   Impossible Representations: The Holocaust in Literature and Films (Henkel, B.)
Representing the Holocaust has often been posed as a limit or impossibility within the literary and visual arts. Despite such statements, we find numerous instances of artists turning to literature, film, and other aesthetic media in order to recall, confront, and grapple with the atrocities committed by Germans and Austrians during the Nazi period. How do we understand such “impossible” representations––their different, representational strategies, as well as their ethical, political, and historical status? Covering an international range of literary texts and films along with examples from the visual arts, this seminar will investigate works that attempt to represent the traumatic experiences, historical events, and lasting consequences of the Holocaust through various genres and perspectives. Students will gain familiarity with recent developments in trauma and memory studies, as well as key debates on artistic representations and historical understandings of German fascism, anti-Semitism, and the Nazi genocide. Writers, filmmakers, and artists covered will likely include Celan, Adorno, Arendt, J. Améry, J. Renoir, W. Staudte, A. Kluge, A. Kiefer, Ch. Wolf, P. Levi, C. Lanzmann, Sebald, Spiegelman, J. Littell, and Q. Tarantino. Texts and discussions in English, with additional sessions for German-speakers.

GERMH 321 / COMLH321  Literature and New Media: From the Gutenberg- Galaxy to Cyberspace (Schönherr, U.)
Cross-listed in Comparative Literature
The emergence of new acoustic, visual, and electronic media since the late 19th-century has dramatically changed the status of writing, textuality, and literature. Focusing on modernist as well as contemporary texts, the seminar will reconstruct the changing intermedial relationship between the book and its technologically advanced ‘other’ from the print-based medium to the latest digital ‘Hypertext’ novel. The challenges posed by photography, phonography, radio, film, and electronic media prompted writers to rethink and redefine their declining position vis-à-vis the new technologies which have successfully dethroned the book as the primary storage system of modern society. Oscillating between critical resistance and enthu­sias­tic adaptation, the seminar will examine the various responses and strategies of literature in the age of its technological obsolescence. Excerpts from historical and contemporary theories of media (Benjamin, McLuhan, Baudrillard, Kittler et.al.) will provide the conceptual framework for the analysis of literary models. Readings will include texts (and films) by Villiers de l’Isle-Adam, F. Lang, Brecht, Th. Mann, M. Duras, A. Resnais, Cortazar, M. Antonioni, F. Truffaut, Delillo, Beyer, L. Riefenstahl, G. Perec, and Geoff Ryman.

GERMH 399 Senior Seminar (Schönherr, U..)