Contact Us
Department of German
Bryn Mawr College
101 North Merion Avenue
Bryn Mawr, PA 19010-2899

Phone: (610) 526-5198
FAX: (610) 526-7479

Department of German
Haverford College
370 Lancaster Avenue
Haverford, PA 19041

Phone: (610) 795-1756
bremerhaven

Courses at Bryn Mawr

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2016

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
GERM B001-001 Elementary German Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWF Taylor Hall B Shen,Q.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTH Taylor Hall B
GERM B001-002 Elementary German Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWF Taylor Hall C Kenosian,D., Kenosian,D.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTH Taylor Hall C
GERM B101-001 Intermediate German Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWF Dalton Hall 212E Seyhan,A.
GERM B320-001 Topics in German Literature and Culture: German Lit as World Lit Semester / 1 LEC: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM M Dalton Hall 212E Seyhan,A.
GERM B321-001 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies: Representing Diversity in German Cinema Semester / 1 LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TH Taylor Hall, Seminar Room Shen,Q.
GERM B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
GERM B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
COML B225-001 Censorship: Historical Contexts, Local Practices and Global Resonance Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Dalton Hall 212E Seyhan,A.
FREN B213-001 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities: Critic Approaches to the World Semester / 1 LEC: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Thomas Hall 223 Sanquer,M.

Spring 2017

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
GERM B002-001 Elementary German Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWF Shen,Q.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTH
GERM B002-002 Elementary German Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWF Interim,R.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTH
GERM B102-001 Intermediate German Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWF Shen,Q.
GERM B202-001 Introduction to German Studies Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Seyhan,A.
GERM B231-001 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Seyhan,A.
GERM B320-001 Topics in German Literature and Culture: Berlin in Literature and Film Semester / 1 LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM W Shen,Q.
GERM B399-001 Senior Seminar Semester / 1 Lecture: Date/Time TBA Dept. staff, TBA
GERM B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
GERM B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA

Fall 2017

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)


Courses at Haverford Fall 2016

COURSE

TITLE SCHEDULE/UNITS MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
GERMH001A001 Elementary German Semester 1/1

MWF 9:30-10:30: TTh 9-10

  Schlichting-Artur, Simone
GERMH101A001 Intermediate German Semester 1/1

MWF 10:30-11:30

 

Schoenherr, Ulrich

GERMH201A01 Advanced Training: Language, Text, and Context Semester 1/1

MW 12:45-2:15

 

 

Schoenherr, Ulrich

GERMH399B01

Senior Conference

Semester 2/1

TBA

 

Schoenherr, Ulrich

 


Courses at Haverford Spring 2016

COURSE

TITLE SCHEDULE/UNITS MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)

GERMH002B01

Elementary German

Semester 2/1

MWF 9:30-10:30;

TTh 9-10

 

Brook Henkel

GERMH102B01

Intermediate German

Semester 2/1

MWF 10:30-11:30

 

Imke Brust

GERMH215B01

Survey of Literature in German

Semester 2/1

MW 1:00-2:30

 

Imke Brust

GERMNH/COMLH 320B01 Science as Fiction Semester 2/1 TH 1:30pm - 4:00pm   Brook Henkel
GERMH 321B01 German Colonialism and World War I Semester 2/1 T 1:30-4:00   Imke Brust

GERMH399B01

Senior Conference

Semester 2/1

TBA

 

Schönher/Brust/Henkel

 

2016-17 Catalog Data

GERM B000 German TA Sessions Not offered 2016-17

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GERM B001 Elementary German Fall 2016 Meets five hours a week with the individual class instructor, two hours with student drill instructors. Strong emphasis on communicative competence both in spoken and written German in a larger cultural context. Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B002 Elementary German Spring 2017 Meets five hours a week with the individual class instructor, two hours with student drill instructors. Strong emphasis on communicative competence both in spoken and written German in a larger cultural context. Prerequisite: GERM 001 or its equivalent or permission of instructor Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B101 Intermediate German Fall 2016 Thorough review of grammar, exercises in composition and conversation. Enforcement of correct grammatical patterns and idiomatic use of language. Study of selected literary and cultural texts and films from German-speaking countries. Prerequisite: Completion of GERM 002 or its equivalent as decided by the department and/or placement test. Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B102 Intermediate German Spring 2017 This course is the continuation of GERM 101 (Intermediate German). We will concentrate on all four language skills--speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. We will build on the knowledge that students gained in the elementary-level courses and then honed in GERM 101. This course will also provide students with an introduction to selected aspects of German culture. Prerequisite: GERM 101 or its equivalent as decided by the department Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B202 Introduction to German Studies Spring 2017 In this course, we will concentrate on all four language skills - speaking, reading, writing and listening comprehension. However, special emphasis will be placed on reading and writing skills. In addition, students will be introduced to different literary and non-literary texts and practice writing in different genres. Through newspaper articles, film reviews, short stories, poetry, and selected film screenings, this course also offers an introduction to some of the most compelling debates about multiculturalism in Germany and exemplary representations of cultural diversity in contemporary German life. Course taught in German. Writing Intensive Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI)

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GERM B212 Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and the Rhetoric of Modernity Not offered 2016-17 This course examines selected writings by Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud as pre-texts for a critique of cultural reason and underlines their contribution to questions of language, representation, history, ethics, and art. These three visionaries of modernity have translated the abstract metaphysics of "the history of the subject" into a concrete analysis of human experience. Their work has been a major influence on the Frankfurt School of critical theory and has also led to a revolutionary shift in the understanding and writing of history and literature now associated with the work of modern French philosophers Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Julia Kristeva, and Jacques Lacan. Our readings will, therefore, also include short selections from these philosophers in order to analyze the contested history of modernity and its intellectual and moral consequences. Special attention will be paid to the relation between rhetoric and philosophy and the narrative forms of "the philosophical discourse(s) of modernity" (e.g., sermon and myth in Marx; aphorism and oratory in Nietzsche, myth, fairy tale, case hi/story in Freud). Course is taught in English. One additional hour will be added for those students wanting German credit. Cross-listed with Philosophy 204. Writing Attentive Critical Interpretation (CI) Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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GERM B223 Topics in German Cultural Studies
Section 001 (Fall 2015): Remembered Violence Not offered 2016-17 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Recent topics include Remembered Violence, Global Masculinities, and Crime and Detection in German. The current topic will be taught in English with an additional meeting for students taking the class as a German course. Current topic is Remembered Violence. Description: As Germany was rebuilding from two world war wars and the Holocaust, its history was being redefined in an international context where non-Germans were also confronting the legacy of violent conflict with Germany. We will explore the conditions that raise the question of a central feature of memory in the modern era: does a common sense of history emerge from this international dialogue or does the cultural legacy of violence come out of an ongoing contest over divergent memories? Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI)

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GERM B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile Spring 2017 This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Felipe Alfau, Julia Alvarez, Sigmund Freud, Eva Hoffman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, W. G. Sebald, and others. Writing Attentive Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies Counts toward International Studies

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GERM B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture Not offered 2016-17 This is a topics course. Taught in English. Course content varies. Previous topics include, Women's Narratives on Modern Migrancy, Exile, and Diasporas; Nation and Identity in Post-War Austria. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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GERM B303 Modern German Prose Not offered 2016-17 This is a topics course. Taught in German. Previous topics include: Romantic Literary Theory and Literary Modernity; Configurations of Femininity in German Literature; Nietzsche and Modern Cultural Criticism; Contemporary German Fiction; No Child Left Behind: German Literary Culture in Exile (1933-1945). Taught in English. Students wanting German credit will meet for additional hour per week.

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GERM B320 Topics in German Literature and Culture
Section 001 (Spring 2017): Berlin in Literature and Film
Section 001 (Fall 2016): German Lit as World Lit Fall 2016, Spring 2017 This is a topics course. Course content varies. Previous topics include: Romantic Literary Theory and Literary Modernity; Configurations of Femininity in German Literature; Nietzsche and Modern Cultural Criticism; Contemporary German Fiction; No Child Left Behind: Education in German Literature and Culture, German Literary Culture in Exile (1933-1945). Taught in English. Students wanting German credit will meet for additional hour per week.
Current topic description: This course investigates the connection of modern German Literature from the 18th century onward with world literatures through literary trends, cultural networks, and translational contracts. The study of these sources illustrates how German literary trends have crossed linguistic and cultural boundaries and interacted with other cultural worlds. Readings range from the works of German Romanticism to postwar German writing and contemporary German-based trans-cultural and linguistic texts.
Current topic description: The major focus of this course is the spatialization of memory and history in exemplary novels and films on Berlin. These works analyze the palimpsestic sites of the city as a mini archive of political upheavals, public life, fine arts, the star-crossed German-Jewish symbiosis, World War II, and the cultures of the two German post-war states.
Writing Attentive

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GERM B321 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies
Section 001 (Fall 2016): Representing Diversity in German Cinema Fall 2016 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course examines a wide-ranging repertoire of transnational films produced in contemporary Germany. It presents an introduction to modern German cinema through a close analysis of visual material and identity construction in the worlds of the real and the reel.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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GERM B399 Senior Seminar Senior Seminar. Students are required to write a long research paper with an annotated bibliography.

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GERM B403 Supervised Work

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GERM B403 Supervised Work

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GERM B421 German for Reading Knowledge This course will provide graduate and undergraduate students with the skills to read and translate challenging academic texts from German into English. We will quickly cover the essentials of German grammar and focus on vocabulary and constructions that one can encounter in scholarly writing from a variety of disciplines. Does not fulfill the Language Requirement.

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COML B225 Censorship: Historical Contexts, Local Practices and Global Resonance Fall 2016 The course is in English. It examines the ban on books and art in a global context through a study of the historical and sociopolitical conditions of censorship practices. The course raises such questions as how censorship is used to fortify political power, how it is practiced locally and globally, who censors, what are the categories of censorship, how censorship succeeds and fails, and how writers and artists write and create against and within censorship. The last question leads to an analysis of rhetorical strategies that writers and artists employ to translate the expression of repression, trauma, and torture into idioms of resistance. German majors/minors can get German Studies credit. Prerequisite: EMLY B001 or a 100-level intensive writing course. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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FREN B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2016): Critic Approaches to the World
Section 001 (Fall 2015): Critical Theories Fall 2016 An examination in English of leading theories of interpretation from Classical Tradition to Modern and Post-Modern Time. This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: FREN 102 or 105.
Current topic description: This course will be taught in English and focus on works of French feminist, postcolonial and post-structuralist theory. While our primary critical texts will draw from a particular linguistic tradition (namely French), and more or less distinctly circumscribed fields, we will also look at the broader transcultural and translinguistic influences that brought these "schools" into being and, most importantly, what fields of thinking they have subsequently inspired across language traditions.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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Course Descriptions at Haverford College

 

GERMH 001/002 Elementary German ( Schlichting-Artur, Simone)
Meets five hours a week with the individual class instructor, one hour with student drill instructors. Strong emphasis on communicative competence both in spoken and written German in a larger cultural context. This is a year-long course; both semesters (001 and 002) are required for credit.; Enrollment Limit: 18
Div: Lang 1; Humanities (HU)

GERMH 101/102 Intermediate German (Schoenherr, Ulrich)
Meets three hours a week with the individual class instructor, one hour with student drill instructor. Thorough review of grammar, exercises in composition and conversation. Enforcement of correct grammatical patterns and idiomatic use of language. Study of selected literary and cultural texts and films from German-speaking countries.

GERMH 201 Advanced Training: Languag, Tet and Context (Schoenherr, Ulrich)
This course is intended for students who wish to refine their speaking, writing, and reading skills beyond the Intermediate level. Designed as a comprehensive introduction to modern German culture, we will discuss a variety of literary, political, historical and philosophical texts, including feature films and video materials. In addition, students have the opportunity to enrich the curriculum, by giving class reports on current events of their choice. Weekly grammar reviews will complement these activities.

GERMH215 Survey of Literature in German
The seminar is designed to give a broad overview of the various aesthetic trends which have shaped contemporary German-speaking literature. Focusing on representative works--including prose, drama, and poetry--this course will retrace and engage with the historical role of literature in the German speaking world over time, and access the importance of German literature in the current era of globalization and mass communication.

GERMH 223 Writing Nations: Africa and Europe
This course will explore ideas of nation-building in regard to the transnational relations between Europe and Africa. We will discuss African and European experiences of nation-creation to distinguish between exclusionary and inclusionary visions of nation states, and focus in particular on literary texts from Great Britain, Germany, and France in comparison with literary texts from Nigeria, South Africa, and Algeria.

GERMH 262 Post-Wall German Fill
This course provides a brief introduction to film studies and explores in particular post-wall German film. We will investigate how the selected films represent ideas of the nation visually, and how they aim to create or deconstruct certain myths of the German nation. Furthermore, this course will scrutinize in what ways the films depict issues of gender and race as part of the German national narrative struggle. In conclusion, we will focus on the role of memory within the national consciousness, and how certain post-wall German films fit within the heated discussion about a normalization of German history, which the reunification entailed. (Taught in English with an extra session in German.)

GERMH 305 German Theatre: A Moral Compass?
In 1784 Friedrich Schiller started a discussion about theatre as a moral institution. With this in mind, this course will provide an overview of the historical development of drama within the German-speaking world and also explore foreign influences on German drama. We will read and watch a variety of different plays from Lessing to Brecht, and engage with different theatrical genres: classical, epic, documentary, absurd, and feminist theatre. In addition, we will discuss the function of the institutionalization of theatre within the German national imaginary, with a particular focus on gender and race. This course is taught in German.

GERMH 319 Intermedial Transformations: Musico-Acoustic (Schönherr, U.)
Cross-listed with COML, Music, and Gender & Sexuality Studies
How could an apparently innocent medium such as music become the contested subject of cultural-political debates over the last 2000 years, upon which even the decline and/or continuation of civilization depends? How shall we understand the longevity of the myth of music’s power, even though mythological figures such as Orpheus already demonstrated its ultimate powerless­ness? Why did literary authors so often favor music over their own medium, and even regarded music as a utopia of expression capable of representing the ineffable? How can we explain the gendering of music as the other of male reason and patriarchal order that threatens the socio-cultural monopoly of men? And how shall we explain the persistence of these questions after the emergence of new audio-visual media of recording, reproduction, and transmission that dissolved the natural connection between voice and body, instrument and sound, time and space, that led to a radical transformation of our culture? The course intends to explore these questions, by drawing on the rich and diverse representation of music in all its socio-aesthetic complexity from antiquity to the present. The thematic scope will range from mythological, philosophical, and religious interpretations of music through issues of gender, race, and politics in literature, opera, and film, to theories of intermediality, and psycho-analytical implications of voice and sound. Focusing on exemplary models, we will reconstruct the changing social functions and highly ambiguous attitudes towards music in Western culture, oscillating between fear and fascination. In addition, we will also continuously confront the semiotic question of whether literature can justifiably be read in analogy to musical forms, and whether music as a language is also plausible in reverse.

GERMH 320 (A)  Contemporary German Fiction (in German) (Henkel, B.)
Taught in German. One of the most interesting and exciting aspects of contemporary German-speaking literature is its aesthetic diversity, which eludes any clear-cut literary-historical definition. Instead, we are confronted with the co-existence of multiple aesthetic models, including documentary, feminist, meta-fictional, autobiographical, and immigrant literatures -- compelling evidence that the notion of a single German literature has become totally obsolete. The course is designed to reflect this aesthetic plurality that has shaped German-speaking culture over the past several decades. Focusing on exemplary texts, the seminar will closely examine the diverging literary concepts and writing practices, characteristic of the literary scene today. Readings include texts and films by Kehlmann, Hubert Fichte, Weiss, Kirchhoff, Judith Herrmann, Haneke, Jelinek, Handke, Wenders, Sebald, Ledig, Timm, Ransmayr, Herta Müller, and Ingo Schulze.
Div: III; Humanities (HU)

GERMH 320 / COMLH 320(B)   Science as Fiction
Taught in English. How does scientific knowledge inform and influence literature? How do scientific texts make use of literary strategies and rhetorical devices in order to produce and disseminate new knowledge? Bringing together primary texts from the history of science with key literary works from Goethe to cyberpunk, this seminar will introduce students to the interdisciplinary study of relations between science and literature. Despite disciplinary divisions, literature and the sciences converge strikingly in terms of their shared objects of inquiry, theoretical assumptions, and representational strategies. We will investigate how foundational concepts in the fields of chemistry, biology, physics, psychology, and cybernetics have profoundly shaped modern fiction. While taking seriously scientific claims of truth and objectivity, we will also discuss how scientists have historically drawn on the resource of fiction as a form of knowing and communicating. Primary texts will include works by Goethe, Mary Shelley, Poe, Mesmer, Darwin, Zola, Bram Stoker, Ernst Mach, Musil, Kafka, Einstein, Calvino, Norbert Wiener, Pynchon, and William Gibson.     

GERMH 321 / COMLH321  German Colonialism and World War
This course will provide a historical overview of German colonial history in Africa, and critically engage with its origins, processes, and outcomes. We will first scrutinize colonial efforts by individual German states before the first unification of Germany in 1871, and then investigate the colonialism of Imperial Germany. In particular, we will focus on the time after the 1884/1885 Berlin Conference that sought to regulate the so-called “Scramble for Africa” and explore how the First World War was related to Germany’s colonial ambitions. Moreover, we will engage with the parallel development of the German national and colonial project and the Social Darwinist thinking that influenced and contributed to the racialization of German national identity.

GERMH 399 Senior Seminar (Schönherr, U.)