Current Students in Archaeology


Maggie Beeler

Maggie Beeler is a Ph.D. student whose research interests center on material modes of production and the intersection of cross-craft with cross-cultural interactions in Aegean prehistory. Maggie received a B.A. in Classics and an M.A. in Religious Studies from New York University before obtaining her M.A. in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology from Bryn Mawr College. She has excavated in Greece and the United Arab Emirates. Maggie will be a Regular Member at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens in the 2013-14 academic year.

Allia Benner

Allia received her B.A. in Classical Archaeology from Dartmouth College in 2010 and a postbaccalaureate certificate in Classics from Columbia University in 2012.  She interned in the Greek and Roman Department at the Metropolitan Museum of Art from 2010 to 2012.  Her research interests include architecture, iconography, history, Romanization, Roman religion, and Etruscology.  In 2009, she excavated at Gabii in Italy with the University of Michigan’s Field Program.  She is now a second-year student in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology.


Wesley Bennett

Wesley graduated from Texas A&M University (College Station) with a double major in Classical Studies and History in 2010 and is now in his third-year of graduate studies in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology at Bryn Mawr College. He is primarily interested in ancient cultural interactions, specifically the relations early Greece developed with its Mediterranean neighbors, especially in pre-Roman southern Italy and Sicily. He thus necessarily has a great deal of interest in the early colonization of Magna Graecia and the physical manifestations of the interactions between Greeks and native Italics. He is also deeply interested in potential geographic information systems (GIS) applications in the field of archaeology. Wesley would eventually like to pursue a topic that looks further into the changes that occur in such Greco-Italic interaction as Rome’s power and influence spreads throughout the Italic peninsula. He realizes that archaeology is an imperfect science and that the written word—both in Greek and Latin—is vitally important in his pursuits, since it offers a different (but, in its own ways, also problematic) perspective. He therefore strives (with varying success!) not only to master archaeological theory and method, but also those of the historian. Wesley has worked on projects in the United States (Poplar Forest, VA), Turkey (Tarsus-Gözlükule, Mersin Province), and Italy (Upper Sabina Tiberina Project near the Commune of Vacone, Lazio Province), the last of which he is currently working to map digitally using GIS.

Johanna Best

Johanna is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology.  Her research interests include Greek religion, architecture, archaeological computing, and educational outreach to the community. She got her B.A. in Classical Languages and Literature from Earlham College, and later received her M.A. from Bryn Mawr in 2008, with a thesis about the role of green spaces in Greek sanctuaries. Johanna was a Regular Member at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA) in 2009-2010 and a Fulbright fellow at the ASCSA in 2012-2013.  She is currently an Associate Member at the ASCSA, where she is working on her dissertation about roadside religious sites in Athens and Attica.


Nicole Marie Colosimo


Nicole Colosimo is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology. She received a B.A. in Anthropology and Religious Studies from Agnes Scott College and later a B.A. in Classical Culture from the University of Georgia.  In 2009 at Bryn Mawr College, Nicole completed her M.A. thesis which focused on the function and reception of the goddess Hera at the Argive Heraion and the Heraion of Perachora. She is currently researching her dissertation on the dedication of votive objects in ancient Greek sanctuaries. Her areas of interest include Greek religion, Greek architecture, Greek historians and the archaeology of ancient Mesopotamia.

Lauren Crampton

Lauren Crampton (A.B.D.)
B.A. University of Florida
M.A. Bryn Mawr College
Interests: Ancient Art, Reception

 

 

 

 

Stella Diakou

She received her B.A. in History and Archaeology from the University of Cyprus in 2005 and her M.A. from Bryn Mawr College in 2008 with a thesis on Middle Bronze Age Cyprus. She was a Regular Member at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens in 2008-2009. She is now working on her dissertation on Early Iron Age Cyprus, focusing on the Geometric cemeteries of Lapithos. Her research interests include: Cypriot archaeology, Bronze Age and Early Iron Age in the eastern Mediterranean, antiquities law, cultural heritage/property debate.

Steven Thomas Karacic

Steve is working on his dissertation in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology.  In his dissertation, he is addressing the socio-economic organization of Cilicia during the period of Hittite political domination. His research interests include ceramic analysis, the role of material objects in the (re)creation of society and culture, and imperial strategies of control.  He is currently involved in field projects in Turkey and the United Arab Emirates.  In the past, he has also excavated in Crete.

Christina Marinelli

Christina Marinelli is a first-year student in the Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology Department. She received her B.A. in Classical Archaeology from Macaulay Honors College at Hunter College, and has participated in field work at Mycenae, Greece. Her current research interests include cross-cultural interactions and issues of gender in the Mycenaean world.

 

 


Emily N. Moore

Emily is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern
Archaeology. She received her B.A. in Art History and Classics from the University of Rhode Island in 2009 and her M.A. from Bryn Mawr in 2011. She has excavated in Italy and interned at several art museums.


 

Sam Palumbo

 

 

 

 



Hollister Nolan Pritchett

Holly received her BA from Indiana University in 2007, her MA from Indiana University in 2009, and an MA from Bryn Mawr College in 2011. Having passed her preliminary examinations to become a Ph.D candidate, she is currently working on her dissertation.  Holly's dissertation will examine and interpret various aspects of the stages of childhood development depicted on Archaic and Classical Athenian art with a main focus on pottery. Her special emphasis on the early stages of childhood brings attention to the biological and behavioral development in the depictions of infants.

Zachary Silvia

Zach is a first year graduate student in the department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology. He received his B.A. from the University of Rhode Island in 2010 with a triple major in History, Classics, and Anthropology. In 2012, he received a M.Sc. in Archaeology from the University of Edinburgh. He has worked on various colonial American sites in New England. His main interests include Achaemenid and Hellenistic urban development and foundations, central Asian archaeology, architectural history in antiquity, the Hellenistic "oikoumene", archaeological theory, and gender archaeology.

Megan Sligar

Megan Sligar

Megan is a first-year student in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology.  She received her B.A. in Archaeology from Tufts University in 2011 and completed a postbaccalaureate program in Classical Languages at Georgetown University in 2013.  Her interests include Roman Thrace, Late Antiquity, the Black Sea Region, and issues of identity among nomadic and sedentary populations.  She has excavated in England, Italy, and Bulgaria.


Danielle Cherie Smotherman

Danielle is PhD candidate in the department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology. She earned her BA in Art History and Archaeology at the University of Missouri in 2009. In 2011, Danielle received her MA in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology from Bryn Mawr College. She has taken part in field work in England, Turkey, and Greece. She is currently researching for her dissertation, which will look aspects of communication on ancient Greek vase-paintings and how these visual and written elements convey meaning on multiple levels. Her research interests include Greek vase painting, the interconnections between ancient Greece and the Near East, and gender in the ancient world.

Rachel Starry

Rachel is a third-year graduate student in the department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology. She earned her BA in Classical Civilization in 2011 from the University of Richmond in Virginia, and she received her MA from Bryn Mawr College in 2013. In the past her research has explored such issues as visual narrative, iconography, and burial practice, but she is currently preparing for her PhD examinations on the topics of Classical Athens, the urban development of Rome, Greek and Roman architectural sculpture, and the archaeology of empire. She has participated in fieldwork in Italy as well as in the American Academy in Rome’s Classical Summer School, and she has held internships at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (Richmond, VA) and the Collections Department at Bryn Mawr College.


Emily E. Stevens

Emily is a PhD Candidate in the department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology. She received her BA in Classical Studies from Barnard College, and her MA from Bryn Mawr in 2009. She spent the 2010-2011 academic year as a Regular Member at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, and has done field work in the Cyclades, the Greek mainland, and Crete. She is currently researching her dissertation topic, which will address the Pre- to Protopalatial transition on Crete in light of the island's foreign interactions. Research interests: Aegean Prehistory; Interactions between the Aegean and Near East during the Bronze Age; Iron Age and Archaic Greece.


Andrew Tharler

Andrew is a first-year graduate student in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology.  He received his B.A. in Classical Languages from Duke University in 2011.  His current research interests include Greek vase painting, architecture, urbanization, and colonization.