Fields of Study -Graduate Degrees in Classics Graduate Degrees in Classics

 

Program in Greek Language

Prerequisites
  • An undergraduate major or minor in Classics, based on at least three, preferably four years of college Greek (or the equivalent), with representative reading from Greek literature and history which, in the opinion of the department, provides an adequate basis for graduate work. It is expected that all graduate students in Greek will have some knowledge of Latin. All candidates must submit scores in the aptitude test of the Graduate Record Examinations. Candidates for the PhD degree must first complete an MA degree.
Allied Subjects
  • Any literature, ancient or modern;
  • ancient history;
  • ancient philosophy;
  • classical archaeology;
  • linguistics.
Program and Examination for the M. A.
  • The program consists of six units of graduate work in Greek or four units in Greek and two units in an allied field.
  • Before admission to the final examination candidates must pass an examination in Greek sight translation and complete the M.A. paper. The final examination is an oral examination of one hour on the field of the paper.
Program and Examinations for the Ph.D.
  • Candidates will complete eight units of graduate work in Greek in addition to the MA

  • four units of graduate work in an allied field, which may include two units of supervised work on the dissertation.

  • Before admission to the preliminary examinations, candidates must complete the requirements for the M.A. as well as pass a rigorous examination in Greek sight translation. The preliminary examinations consist of four written papers, one of which shall be on an allied subject, and an oral examination. The fields from which the three major papers may be selected include: epic poetry (with emphasis on Homer), lyric poetry (with emphasis on Pindar), tragedy, comedy, the orators, the historians, the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Hellenistic poetry, Greek religion, Greek epigraphy, and various periods of Greek history. The final examination is devoted to the dissertation and the field in which it has been written.

For more information, e-mail: cconybea@brynmawr.edu (Professor Catherine Conybeare, Director of Graduate Studies)

Program in Greek Studies (Greek Archaeology & Greek)
Prerequisites

An undergraduate major or minor in Classics, based on at least three, preferably four years of college Greek (or the equivalent), and at least one course in Classical archaeology. All candidates must submit scores in the aptitude test of the Graduate Record Examinations. Candidates for the PhD degree must first complete an MA degree.

Program and Examinations for the M. A.

The program consists of six units of graduate work more or less equally divided between Greek archaeology and Greek history and literature. Before admission to the final examination candidates must pass an examination in Greek sight translation and complete the MA paper. The final examination is an oral examination of one hour on the field of the paper.

Program and Examinations for the Ph.D.

Twelve units of graduate work equally divided between Greek and Archaeology, which may include two units of supervised work on the dissertation. Before admission to the preliminary examinations candidates must complete the requirements for the M.A. as well as pass a rigorous examination in Greek sight translation. The preliminary examinations consist of four written papers, two on Greek and two on archaeology, and an oral examination. The fields from which the two Greek papers may be selected include: epic poetry (with emphasis on Homer), lyric poetry (with emphasis on Pindar), tragedy, comedy, the orators, the historians, the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Hellenistic poetry, Greek religion, Greek epigraphy, and various periods of Greek history. The fields from which the two archaeology papers may be selected include: Athenian topography, Macedonian archaelogy, the Athenian Acropolis, Greek architecture, Greek vase painting, monumental painting and mosaics, Greek sculpture, Greek sanctuaries, and Hellenistic archaeology. The final examination is devoted to the dissertation and the field in which it has been written.

For more information, e-mail: cconybea@brynmawr.edu (Professor Catherine Conybeare, Director of Graduate Studies)

Program in Latin Language & Roman Studies
Prerequisites

An undergraduate major or minor consisting of at least three years of Latin in college. All graduate students in Latin are expected to have begun the study of Greek. Scores in the aptitude test of the Graduate Record Examinations should be submitted.

Allied Subjects

The department recommends Greek and linguistics as allied subjects for students whose interests are primarily literary and philological. For those with a special interest in the medieval period, medieval history, art history or a vernacular literature are recommended. For students whose primary interests are in Roman Studies, the study of Roman history, art and archaeology are recommended. Co-operative arrangements exist for seminar work in these areas at Bryn Mawr and with neighboring institutions.

Program and Examinations for the M.A.

Candidates will normally offer four units in Latin and two units in an allied field. Before admission to the final examination, candidates must pass a test in Latin sight translation and complete the M.A. paper. The final examination consists of a one-hour oral examination on the field of the M.A. paper.

Program and Examinations for the Ph.D.

Candidates will normally complete a two–year program of eight units of work in Latin and four in an allied field, which may include two units of supervised work on the dissertation. Six of these units may be offered for the MA degree, which usually forms part of the doctoral program, Candidates should then undertake a program of independent reading to enable them to pass the preliminary examinations as soon as possible, after which they will concentrate on the dissertation. In some instances it may be advisable for students to carry two to four more units of work in the third year. Before admission to the preliminary examinations all students must pass tests in sight translation of Latin and Greek, as appropriate.

The preliminary examinations for candidates in Latin consist of two four-hour written papers on Latin literature; one four-hour paper on a special field within the literature or the works of a special author or a particular period of Roman history; one four-hour paper in the field of the allied subject; and a general oral examination.

Candidates whose major interest is in the mediaeval period will take the two examinations in Latin literature, one in mediaeval Latin literature, and a fourth in a field related to the Middle Ages or to the classical tradition.

Candidates in Roman Studies will ordinarily take two examinations in Latin literature, one of which treats specifically of prose authors and Roman historiography; and two four-hour papers on topics in Roman history and archaeology.

For more information, e-mail: cconybea@brynmawr.edu (Professor Catherine Conybeare, Director of Graduate Studies)

Program in Classical Languages (Greek and Latin)
Prerequisites

An undergraduate major in classics, with a good reading knowledge of both languages and representative reading in both literatures.

Program and Examinations for the M.A.

Six units of graduate work divided equally between Greek and Latin; sight translation examinations in both Greek and Latin; an M.A. paper combining material from the two languages; and an oral examination of one hour on the field of the paper.

Program and Examinations for the Ph.D.

Twelve units of graduate work equally divided between Greek and Latin, which may include two units of supervised work on the dissertation. Rigorous sight translation examinations in both languages must be passed before the preliminary examinations, which consist of four written papers (two to be chosen from fields offered in Greek and two from those offered in Latin). The dissertation must combine, to some degree, material from both languages. The final examination is devoted to the dissertation and the field in which it has been written.

For more information, e-mail: cconybea@brynmawr.edu (Professor Catherine Conybeare, Director of Graduate Studies)