1839

JANUARY

1 January 1839. It was a clear day.

The Baltimore firemen in the City went away today and the soldiers on duty for the disturbance in Harrisburg were dismissed. It was cloudy this evening. Baltimore co. - Mechanics & Union.

2 January 1839. It was cloudy all day and it thawed very much. The rivers froze up. There were sleighs out today.

3 January 1839. Foggy all day and thawed very much. It rained in the evening. Down at the river persons were walking over. [The] Schuylkill has been froze[n] for two weeks and [they] are cutting ice.

I finished a deed tonight; it was the first I ever wrote.

4 January 1839. It began to snow last night and it snowed until 11 o'clock. It made no sleighing, as it thawed very much all day and was very slushy.

5 January 1839. It was cloudy all day and it hailed a little. Down at the river, men, horses and sleighs were going over the ice. I got a very bad headache. I got my velvet vest tonight. It was cloudy tonight. I was out with Phineas Fletcher.

6 January 1839. It was clear and rather cold today. Early in the evening it was starlight. After part cloudy.

I went to Grace Church in morning and afternoon; Mr. Suddards(1) preached. This evening I went with Chester to Dr. Cuyler's.

7 January 1839. It was cloudy all day and it rained in the evening. I was down at Miss Buck's with Chester White; it was very bad walking. Uncle gave me 23 cents to go to the Chinese Museum.

8 January 1839. It was clear all day and the evening was starlight. 18 of us went to the Chinese Museum. The Montezuma was towed down the river by the Philadelphia ice boat.

9 January 1839. It was clear through the morning, but got cloudy about 1/2 past 2. It began to snow about 1/4 past 6 in the evening.

10 January 1839. It was clear in the morning, but began to get cloudy about 3 o'clock. It was starlight part of the evening. The snow last night did not make sleighing. I got my cloth vest tonight.

11 January 1839. It was clear all day until 1/4 of 5. It was cloudy then until about 7 and then starlight until 9 when it got cloudy again. The river was open these 3 days. I was down at Miss James' tonight.

12 January 1839. It was clear this morning, but it got cloudy about 4 o'clock. It was the same this evening.

I went out to Aunt Nancy's today with our old gray horse. It was so warm today and yesterday that we had to have the doors and windows open. The river broke up.

13 January 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was cloudy.

I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning. He preached from the 30th chapter of Isaiah, the 1st verse. He also preached this evening from the 4th chapter of John, the 4th verse. Uncle is here this evening.

14 January 1839. It was cloudy and rainy all day, and it rained very hard all evening.

Went up to Mrs. Ramboe's in our carriage. They were hiring. Uncle is here tonight.

15 January 1839. It was cloudy all day. It began to snow last night about 11 o'clock and it snowed until about 12 today - it made very good sleighing.

I did not go to school today. I was at Miss James' to supper.

16 January 1839. It was clear and cold all day. It was very good sleighing.

I got a bad pain in my breast. I went up to Kensington this afternoon with Papa.

17 January 1839. It was clear and cold all day and cloudy in the evening.

I was down at the Exchange with Chester White. I got a new picture today. There was good sleighing.

18 January 1839. It was clear and cold in the morning and cloudy in the afternoon.

19 January 1839. It was clear and cold early in the morning. It got cloudy soon, then snowed and rained. It got clear again about 1/2 past 4 p.m.. It was moonlit this evening.

I was up at Mr. Roberts' this evening. Fin got mad at me today.

20 January 1839. It was clear and cold all day and this evening was cloudy.

I went to Mr. Suddards' church this morning. The text was the 19th chapter of Genesis, the 21st verse. The words were "but the Lord was with Joseph and showeth him mercy." In the afternoon, the same. The text was the 3rd chapter Proverbs, the 17th verse. The words were "Her ways are ways of pleasantness and all her paths are peace." I was at Methodist meeting tonight with Chester.

21 January 1839. It snowed very hard in the morning and it got clear in the afternoon. The early part of the evening was moonlit and the latter part of the day cloudy.

I was not in school this afternoon. It was clear in the later part of the evening.

22 January 1839. It was clear early in the morning and the latter part of the day was cloudy. This evening was cloudy and snowy, moonlit in the latter part.

I ran a knife in my hand today.

23 January 1839. It was clear early in the morning and it began to snow about 8 a.m. It was one of the greatest hurricanes I even saw; you could not see across the street. It cleared up about 1/4 of 12 very cold. It was moonlit in the evening and very cold.

24 January 1839. It was clear and very cold all day. The Schuylkill froze again; [they] cut ice off about 9 inches thick. In the evening it was moonlight and very cold.

I was out with Chester White in the evening.

25 January 1839. It was clear until about 10 a.m. and then it got cloudy. It was not very cold this evening. It began to rain about 1/2 past 10 p.m.

26 January 1839. It poured rain until about 1/2 past 3 p.m. It then got very cold and blew so hard that it blew the covering off Mr. Mitchell's house.

I got two new pair of pants and an umbrella. The pants are 1 brown striped the other blue and black.

The tide & wind were so high as to carry away the middle of railroad bridge at Gray's Ferry - and the floating bridge also. It was one of the greatest freshets ever known.

27 January 1839. It was clear all day.

I went to Mr. Suddards' twice. He preached in the morning. The text in the morning was the 39th chapter of Genesis, the 21st verse. Bishop Onderdonk(2) preached in the afternoon from the 2nd chapter of Romans, the 16th verse. It is snowing tonight.

28 January 1839. It was clear and very cold all day.

I went out in the afternoon with cousins Gainor & Tacy,(3) and Ma, to see the destruction of the freshet of the Schuylkill [the destruction done by the freshet at the Schuylkill]. We went down to the point house. We broke down when coming back at the corner of Queen and Front Streets, and we all had to walk back. I went around to cousins' this afternoon.

29 January 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was cloudy. I went down on horseback to see if our carriage was done. On Saturday 26th, it [the freshet] carried away all the bridges on the cricks and rivers & mills and everything else.

30 January 1839. It was cloudy all day, excepting a little while in the afternoon. It got very foggy at 3 p.m, but after part of the evening it was moonlight.

I was out at Fountain Green this afternoon with two of the cousins.

31 January 1839. It was clear in the morning. This afternoon and evening were cloudy.

FEBRUARY

1 February 1839. It was cloudy all day. It began to snow at 5 min past 4 p.m. It was snowing this evening and was starlight.

2 February 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was starlight. I got my gun today.

3 February 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was clear.

I was at Mr. Suddards' Church this morning. He preached text the same as last Sunday. This afternoon was the same. I was at the Methodist Church tonight with Chester.

4 February 1839. It was clear all day and very cold. This evening was the same.

5 February 1839. Same.

6 February 1839. Do

7 February 1839. Do

8 February 1839. It was cloudy all day. I was out skating with the boys at the store.

9 February 1839. It was rainy early in the morning and cloudy until 1/2 past 10 a.m. It then got clear and warm.

I went out a riding. I went down to Fin's after I came home and was down there to supper. This evening was clear.

10 February 1839. It was clear and cold all day and this evening was clear.

I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning - he preached. In the afternoon, I was down at Fin's and St. Andrew's. In the evening I was at Mr. Suddards' - he preached.

11 February 1839. It was clear in the morning and in the afternoon cloudy. It began to snow about 1/4 past 4 p.m. and it snowed until 8 p.m. The latter part of the evening was clear.

I wrote a deed for Pa this evening and was up until almost one o'clock.

12 February 1839. It was clear and cold all day and this evening was clear.

13 February 1839. Do. I wrote a deed for Papa.

14 February 1839. It was clear and mild all day and this evening was clear.

15 February 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was starlight and foggy. Lydia had company today.

16 February 1839. It was very foggy early in the morning. The latter part of the day was clear and this evening was clear.

I got my gun changed for a handsome hass(?)-mounted single barrel gun and a powder flask and a box of caps to boot. I got a new hat too.

17 February 1839. It snowed and rained most all day. I went to Grace Church in the morning and Mr. Suddards' preached.

18 February 1839. It was cloudy in the morning and after the heart of the day it was clear and warm. This evening was clear.

19 February 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was clear. I wrote a deed for papa.

20 February 1839. It was clear and warm all day. This evening was clear.

21 February 1839. It was clear and cloudy all day and this evening was clear.

22 February 1839. Washington's Birthday. It was cloudy in the morning and this afternoon was clear and warm.

I was out at Fountain Green in the afternoon. This evening was cloudy and I was down at Fin's.

23 February 1839. It was cloudy and rainy early in the morning. It was clear part of the day and the other part was cloudy.

I was down at the office in the afternoon. This evening was cloudy. I was at Fin's.

24 February 1839. It was first cloudy, then clear and this evening was rainy.

I was at Grace Church in the morning - Mr. Suddards' did not preach. In the afternoon I was at home and this evening I was at Friends Meeting with Sarah [Roberts].

25 February 1839. It was rainy early in the morning. It was cloudy until 1/2 past 4, and then got clear. This evening was clear. I was down at Fin's. Mama was at the concert this evening.

26 February 1839. It was clear early in the morning, but got cloudy about 1/2 past 8 a.m. It began to rain about 11 a.m. and poured rain all day. This evening was rainy.

I was down at Fin's this evening; he went to the Menagerie.

27 February 1839. It was cloudy in the morning, afternoon clear. Part of the evening was moonlight and the other part was cloudy and rainy. I was at the concert in the evening.

28 February 1839. It was clear part of the morning, but it got cloudy about 1/2 past 11 a.m. It began to rain about 3 p.m. and poured rain until about 9 p.m. It snowed in the night sometime.

MARCH

1 March 1839. It was clear all day and evening.

I went to hear the ventriloquist with Lydia this evening.

2 March 1839. It was clear all day.

I was out at Aunt Nancy's in the afternoon.

3 March 1839. It snowed early in the morning and the rest of the day was clear.

I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning - he preached. In the afternoon I was at Christ Church(4) and this evening I was at Mr. Waterman's. This evening was clear and cold.

4 March 1839. It was clear and very cold all day and night.

5 March 1839. It was clear all day and night and very cold.

6 March 1839. It was clear and moderate all day and evening.

7 March 1839. It was clear all day and warm. This evening was the same.

I was out a riding in the afternoon. Mama went to the museum.

8 March 1839. It was clear part of the day and the other part was cloudy. It was raining in the evening.

9 March 1839. It was cloudy in the morning and in the afternoon it was raining. This evening was cloudy.

10 March 1839. It was clear all day and evening. In the morning I was at Mr. Suddards' Church and he preached. In the afternoon I was at the Tabernacle. This evening I was at Mr. Suddards' and he preached.

11 March 1839. It was clear all day and evening.

12 March 1839. It was clear all day and evening. I began to take The Public Ledger today.

13 March 1839. It was clear all day and evening and rather cold.

14 March 1839. It was cloudy in the morning. This afternoon was clear and this evening was the same.

15 March 1839. It was clear all day and evening.

16 March 1839. Do

17 March 1839. The evening was changeable. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning - he preached.

I was at home in the afternoon and evening. I wrote to Grandmama.

18 March 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was changeable.

19 March 1839. It was clear all day and evening.

20 March 1839. It was cloudy all day and rainy in the afternoon and evening.

21 March 1839. It was cloudy and rainy all day.

22 March 1839. It was rainy part of the day and cloudy the rest. This evening was cloudy.

23 March 1839. It was cloudy part of the day and this evening was clear.

24 March 1839. It was clear all day. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning - 53 were confirmed.

25 March 1839. It was clear all day and evening.

26 March 1839. The North American Newspaper came out today.

27 March 1839. Do

28 March 1839. Do.

29 March 1839. Do.

30 March 1839. It was raining in the morning, but was clear in the afternoon and evening.

31 March 1839. It was clear all day and evening. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon - he did not preach.

APRIL

1 April 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was clear.

2 April 1839. Do.

3 April 1839. Do.

4 April 1839. Do.

5 April 1839. Do.

6 April 1839. Do

7 April 1839. I was out at Warner Roberts'(5) all morning. I went out to Warner Jones' all day.

8 April 1839. It was clear all day and evening.

9 April 1839. Do

10 April 1839. Do.

11 April 1839. It was cloudy and rainy all day and this evening was cloudy.

12 April 1839. Do.

13 April 1839. It was rainy and cloudy all day.

Henry Borden(6) got on today.

14 April 1839. It was cloudy in the morning and this afternoon was clear.

I was at Mr. Suddards' in the morning. In the afternoon I was at Mr. Grant's and this evening at Grace Church [Mr. Suddards' Church].

15 April 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was clear.

16 April 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was clear.

17 April 1839. Do.

18 April 1839. Do. Mrs. Williams was here from Pittsburgh.

19 April 1839. Do. The Dr. made me go to bed for my sore leg.

20 April 1839. Do.

21 April 1839. Do. I was in the house all day for my sore leg.

22 April 1839. Do.

23 April 1839. Do.

24 April 1839. Do.

25 April 1839. Do.

26 April 1839. Do.

27 April 1839. Do.

28 April 1839. Do. I was in the house all day for my sore leg.

29 April 1839. Do.

30 April 1839. It was cloudy and rainy with thunder and lightning in the night.

MAY

1 May 1839. It was cloudy and rainy all day.

2 May 1839. It was clear all day. In the evening it rained and there was thunder and lightning.

3 May 1839. It was clear all day.

4 May 1839. Do.

5 May 1839. Do.

6 May 1839. Do.

7 May 1839. Do.

8 May 1839. Do.

9 May 1839. Do.

10 May 1839. Same.

11 May 1839. Same.

12 May 1839. Do.

13 May 1839. Do.

14 May 1839. Do.

15 May 1839. Do. Wrote to Algernon.(7)

16 May 1839. It was clear in the morning and fore part of the afternoon. The latter part [of the afternoon] was cloudy and the night was rainy.

I went down to Wilmington in the afternoon.

17 May 1839. I was out at the Brandywine in the morning. It was clear all day.

18 May 1839. It was cloudy early in the morning, but after part of the day it was clear. I was out at the Brandywine in the afternoon. I caught a coon out there.

19 May 1839. It was clear all day.

I was at Quaker Meeting in the morning. In the afternoon I came up from Wilmington. We started at 1 o'clock p.m. and we were up at 1/2 past 3 p.m. by the steamboat Telegraph.

20 May 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was clear.

21 May 1839. Do.

22 May 1839. Do.

23 May 1839. It was cloudy and rainy all day and evening. It was so cold that I had to wear an overcoat.

24 May 1839. It rained very hard in the morning. The other part of the day was clear.

25 May 1839. It was clear most of the day and it rained a little about 11 p.m.

26 May 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was cloudy.

27 May 1839. Today was changeable. Hail stones fell as large as peas.

28 May 1839. It was raining today. I planted my Morus Multicaulis (Mulberry tree) today.

29 May 1839. It was cloudy all day.

30 May 1839. Do.

31 May 1839. Changeable.

JUNE

1 June 1839. It was cold and rainy.

2 June 1839. It was clear in the morning and this evening was cloudy. I wore my check pants for the first time today.

3 June 1839. Changeable.

4 June 1839. Do.

5 June 1839. Clear.

6 June 1839. Do.

7 June 1839. Do.

8 June 1839. Do.

9 June 1839. It was cloudy early in the morning and then clear until about 2 when it rained a little. It cleared up fine.

Pa and I went to Salem, NJ at 7 in the morning per steamboat Clifton. We arrived there at 12. We went up into the town to look for Mr. Suddards' house and found it. It is a very pleasant place. We went to the tavern and got our dinner. When eating our dinner, we saw a man get up to his middle in a mud hole with white pants on. After dinner, went down to the boat. We started at 1/2 past 3 o'clock. A gentleman and his lady left. We got up to New Castle about 5 p.m. When we landed there, we walked up into the town and saw the Sheriff there. We started off to walk to Wilmington and got there about 7. We got supper, went to Church and then to the boat.

10 June 1839. I went up to Mrs. Gibbons' and came down with her in the gig. We went down to the boat, met Mama's cousins, and took a walk up to the Brandywine as far as the paper mills. We returned about 1/2 past 11 a.m., stopped and got some ice cream, and then went to Mrs. Reynolds' and got lunch. I came up in the steam boat Robert Morris with the Washington light infantry. I got here at 1/2 past 4 p.m.

11 June 1839. Clear.

12 June 1839. Changeable. Elizabeth Laurece and Charles Gibbons were married.

13 June 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was rainy.

14 June 1839. Clear.

15 June 1839. Do.

16 June 1839. Do.

17 June 1839. Do.

18 June 1839. Do.

19 June 1839. Do.

20 June 1839. It was clear. I went out to Fairmount in the evening. I got home about 1 o'clock.

21 June 1839. It was rainy early in the morning, but very warm. It was clear the rest of the day.

22 June 1839. Clear. Philip went to Wilmington. I began to take The I.C.E. today.

23 June 1839. Clear.

24 June 1839. Do.

25 June 1839. Do.

26 June 1839. Do.

27 June 1839. Do.

28 June 1839. Do.

29 June 1839. Do.

30 June 1839. Do.

JULY

1 July 1839. Clear

2 July 1839. Changeable.

3 July 1839. Same.

4 July 1839. It was clear all day. I went up to Germantown and up in the Schuylkill.

5 July 1839. Clear.

6 July 1839. Clear.

7 July 1839. Clear.

8 July 1839. It was clear part of the day.

9 July 1839. It was clear all day. The dog catchers got my dog

"Bravo" today at about 9 in the morning.

10 July 1839. Clear.

11 July 1839. Clear.

12 July 1839. Do.

13 July 1839. Do.

14 July 1839. Do.

15 July 1839. Do.

16 July 1839. It was clear. There was a bad fire about 7 p.m. in the gorge near Schuylkill.

17 July 1839. It was clear part of the day.

18 July 1839. It was clear all day.

I went to Burlington per steamboat Burling's Lineus at 8 o'clock a.m. We arrived there at 25 min past 10 a.m. with the tide against us. I left there at 10 minutes of 4 p.m. and arrived in Philadelphia at 25 min. past 6 p.m. Papa had the headache.

19 July 1839. It was clear. School broke up today.

20 July 1839. It was cloudy early in the morning and the rest of the day was clear.

I got up at 1/2 past 3 a.m. I got my white pants today. It rained very hard in the night.

21 July 1839. It was cloudy early in the morning and rained very hard at 9 o'clock a.m. It then got clear till about 3 p.m. when it got cloudy again until 10 p.m. when it then cleared up.

22 July 1839. It was clear and very warm all day. This evening cloudy and warm and it rained very hard in the night.

I went to see Mr. Adrian in the evening at the Museum.

23 July 1839. It was clear all day.

24 July 1839. Today was clear.

B.G. Mitchell went to the Falls of Niagara. I went over to the Schuylkill in the afternoon. It was cloudy part of the afternoon and this evening. Ma and Lid went to Aunt Nancy's.

25 July 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was rainy.

26 July 1839. It was clear all day. Papa's house on 8th St. near Arch caught fire by a rocket about 11 p.m., but did not burn much.

27 July 1839. It was clear all day. I got my coarse brown pants today. Lydia went out to Fountain Green today.

28 July 1839. It was clear in the morning. This afternoon and evening were cloudy.

29 July 1839. It was cloudy all day.

30 July 1839. Cloudy.

31 July 1839. Do.

AUGUST

1 August 1839. It was clear all day. Flora and Lid [Lydia] went over to Camden.

2 August 1839. It rained all day. Mrs. Gibbons' son Frank was up today.

3 August 1839. It was clear all day. I went to Mr. Aaron Gordon's in the evening.

4 August 1839. It was clear all day. I went to Fountain Green in the morning. I got home about 1/4 past 7 p.m.

5 August 1839. Today was clear. Sheridan's Stables was burnt today.

15 August 1839. It was clear all day. I was at the Museum to see Mr. Adrian.

16 August 1839. Today there was a very great storm and it was so cold that we had to wear overcoats. I went to see Mr. Adrian tonight.

17 August 1839. It was cloudy and cold today. I went down to Wilmington at 8 o'clock a.m.

18 August 1839. It was cloudy part of the day.

19 August 1839. Do.

20 August 1839. Clear and warm.

21 August 1839. Do.

22 August 1839. Do.

23 August 1839. Do.

24 August 1839. Do.

25 August 1839. It was cloudy in the morning and after part of the day it was clear.

26 August 1839. Clear.

27 August 1839. Clear. I learned how to swim in the Brandywine at the first dam from the mouth.

28 August 1839. Clear.

29 August 1839. Clear. It rained in the night.

30 August 1839. It was very stormy and cold.

31 August 1839. I came home from Wilmington and Lydia went down.

SEPTEMBER

1 September 1839. Clear all day.

2 September 1839. Clear.

3 September 1839. Do.

4 September 1839. Clear.

5 September 1839. Do.

6 September 1839. Do.

7 September 1839. It was cloudy and it rained in the afternoon. Papa & Mama went down to Wilmington at 4 p.m.

8 September 1839. Today was changeable. I was up at Aunt Erwin's in the afternoon.

9 September 1839. It was clear and very warm. Papa came home from Wilmington.

10 September 1839. It was clear all day and warm.

11 September 1839. It was clear until about 6 p.m, and then it got cloudy.

12 September 1839. It was clear and cool in the morning. It got cloudy about 2 p.m. and began to rain about 10 p.m.(8)

13 September 1839. It was cloudy early in the morning and the latter part of the day and evening was clear.

14 September 1839. It was clear all day.

I went out a gunning in the morning. I shot about 1 dozen birds and then broke my gun. I got home about 5 p.m.

15 September 1839. It was clear all day. I went to Burlington in the morning per steamer New Philadelphia. We arrived there at 10 min. before 10 a.m. with the tide against us. We started from there at 1/4 of 4 p.m. and arrived at Philadelphia at 1/2 past 5 p.m.

16 September 1839. It was foggy in the morning and the rest of the day was clear.

17 September 1839. It was clear all day and this evening it was cloudy. It rained very hard in the night.

18 September 1839. It was cloudy in the morning and in the afternoon it rained very hard and hailed. Ma, Lydia and Mrs. Gibbons came up from Wilmington. This evening was clear.

19 September 1839. It was clear all day and evening. Went to see Mr. Forrest play Metamorah, which was very handsome.

20 September 1839. Clear all day and warm. Mama went to Horticultural Society this evening.

21 September 1839. Clear all day.

22 September 1839. Clear all day. Got my first Frock Coat today. Went up to Burlington in the morning; came home in the afternoon.

23 September 1839. Clear and warm all day; rained about 10 p.m.

25 September 1839 The was a very bad fire about 20 minutes of 3 this morning at a factory for printing calico below the Navy Yard. Today was clear and warm. I got my wide pants home this evening.

26 September 1839. Clear all day and cool.

27 September 1839. Clear all day and cool. It was cloudy in the evening and rained.

28 September 1839. It was clear with a very cool frost this morning.

29 September 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was so cold that we had to have a fire. I was at church twice today. Chester was here.

30 September 1839. It was raining very hard this morning and it was very cold. The latter part of the day was clear. Mr. Wood killed his daughter today by shooting two balls through her head.

OCTOBER

1 October 1839. It was clear and cool all day. Papa lost $30 today.

2 October 1839. It was clear and cold all day and in the evening it was cloudy. There was a bad fire in the night.

3 October 1839. It was misty in the morning and clear in the latter part of the day and evening.

4 October 1839. Clear and warm. One of the greatest fires that ever occurred in Philadelphia broke out about 11 p.m. in the night. It burnt about 40 houses. It broke out on the wharf between Market and Chestnut streets. Chester White slept here.

5 October 1839. It was cloudy early in the morning and cold. The latter part of the day was clear.

I went out a gunning with Chester White. The fire is burning yet.

6 October 1839. It was clear and cool all day.

7 October 1839. It was cloudy all day. There was a bad fire down on 2nd below Dock St.

8 October 1839. It was clear all day and warm. There was a bad fire in the evening up in the alley by the Museum.

9 October 1839. It was clear and warm in the morning, in the afternoon it was cloudy and in the evening it was clear. Banks stopped special payment.

10 October 1839. It was changeable.

11 October 1839. It was clear all day and cool.

12 October 1839. It was cloudy and rainy all day.

13 October 1839. It was cloudy all day and it rained very hard in the afternoon -- I had to stand under an awning for about an hour and a 1/2.

14 October 1839. It was cloudy all day. The President(9) visited the City and we had a procession.

15 October 1839. It was cloudy all day and evening.

16 October 1839. It was clear and warm all day.

17 October 1839. Today was changeable.

18 October 1839. It was foggy early in the morning and in the latter part of the day misty. It began to rain about 1/4 past 8 p.m.

19 October 1839. It was raining very hard in the morning, but it stopped about 1 p.m. It was clear in the evening.

20 October 1839. It was changeable. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning. I was out with Chester White in the afternoon and in the evening I was at home. It was clear and very cold all day.

21 October 1839. It was clear all day and cold.

22 October 1839. It was clear and cold all day. I wrote a Deed for Papa. H.E. to W. Simmons.

23 October 1839. Today was changeable. Ma and Pa went to Wilmington.

24 October 1839. They came home today.

25 October 1839. It was clear all day and evening.

26 October 1839. It was foggy early in the morning and the rest of the day was clear.

27 October 1839. It was cloudy early in the morning, but it cleared off about 11 a.m. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning - he preached. I was out with Papa in the afternoon and with Chester White in the evening. This evening was clear.

28 October 1839. It was cloudy in the morning. This afternoon was changeable and this evening clear.

29 October 1839. It was clear all day and this evening was clear.

30 October 1839. It was cloudy in the morning. The latter part of the day was changeable and rather cold, and this evening was cloudy. It rained in the night.

31 October 1839. It was cloudy early in the morning and after part of the day, clear. Chester slept here.

NOVEMBER

1 November 1839. It was clear in the morning and this afternoon was cloudy.

2 November 1839. It was clear in the morning and this afternoon was cloudy. I was not in the office today. This evening was cloudy. Mr. Elliott was at our house this evening.

3 November 1839. It was changeable and cold all day. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning. In the afternoon I was at home and this evening I was around at cousins' on 9th St.

4 November 1839. It was cloudy and cold all day. I began to wear my overcoat. It was clear this evening and cold.

5 November 1839. It was cloudy in the morning and cold. It began to rain at about 1/4 past 12 in the day and it rained very hard all afternoon. It was raining when I went to bed at about 1/4 past 9 p.m.

6 November 1839. It was changeable and cool. This evening was clear. I wore my red scarf.

7 November 1839. It was changeable and cold and in the early part of the evening it hailed. The remainder was clear and cold.

8 November 1839. It was changeable and cold and this evening was the same. Mama was around at cousins' in the evening.

9 November 1839. It was changeable and cold all day. I got my new hat from Freeman's. This evening was cloudy.

10 November 1839. It was changeable and very cold. Eliza Anne McClung was at our house. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon and he preached. This evening I was at home.

11 November 1839. It was clear all day and evening and cold. Mr. and Mrs. Jewell were at our house this evening.

12 November 1839. It was cloudy and cold all day and this evening was the same.

13 November 1839. It was changeable and cool. Papa went to Wilmington this afternoon and Ma was at Aunt Lydia's this evening.

14 November 1839. It was cloudy and rainy all day and this evening was cloudy. Papa got home from Wilmington.

15 November 1839. It was changeable all day. I went down to Miss James' and Mrs. Fletcher and Tim were in.

16 November 1839. It was clear and cool all day. Ma, Pa and Lydia were out at Aunt Nancy's this afternoon.

17 November 1839. It was clear in the morning and in the afternoon and evening it was cloudy. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon. Miss Alrich and S.A. Hedges were here today.

18 November 1839. It was clear all day.

19 November 1839. It was clear and windy all day and this evening it was clear and cold.

20 November 1839. It was clear early in the morning and the latter part of the day was cloudy. It was the coldest day that we have had this fall and there was ice this morning for the first time this year.

21 November 1839. It was clear early in the morning. The rest of the day was cloudy and very cold. The gutters froze for the first time this season. The large fire out at the inclined plane burned 5 locomotives and the depot.

22 November 1839. It was clear and very cold all day. There was a very bad fire this morning on Dock St. below 2nd.

23 November 1839. It was clear early in the morning and the rest of the day and evening were cloudy. I was out skating for the first time at Parker's Woods. It was very fine skating. I broke my skates.

24 November 1839. It was raining hard all day. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning. In the afternoon I was at home and in the evening I was St. Augustine Catholic Church.

25 November 1839. It was cloudy and rainy in the morning and the afternoon and evening were cold and clear. I was at the cousins' on Chestnut St. near 9th.

26 November 1839. It was clear and cold all day and evening. Mr. Bruce gave me a pair of red squirrels today.

27 November 1839. It was clear and cold all day. Flora went to the [blank] tonight.

28 November 1839. It was cloudy and foggy in the morning, in the afternoon it was clear, and in the evening misty. I was down at Mrs. Torrance's in the afternoon with our black horse.

29 November 1839. It was changeable all day. Miss Fanny Torrance died this afternoon.

30 November 1839. It was changeable. I got my two new waistcoats, double and single breasted, dark and red.

DECEMBER

1 December 1839. It was cloudy in the morning and in the afternoon and evening it poured rain. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon and he preached. This evening I was at St. Andrew's.

2 December 1839. It was cloudy all day and this evening was rainy. Mr. Reynolds was here today. Aaron Thompson came to our office today.

3 December 1839. It was cloudy all day and evening. Michael Israel(10) shot himself in New Jersey today at about 10 a.m. in the ear, but did not kill himself.

4 December 1839. It was raining in the morning and changeable the rest of the day. I began to go to Mr. Fife's writing school this evening.

5 December 1839. It was clear and warm all day and evening. John Hendricks was married to my cousin Elizabeth J. Erwin this evening at 25 minutes past 7 p.m. at Mr. Ellis' house on Madison St. All of us were at the wedding.

6 December 1839. It was clear, warm, and pleasant all day and this evening was cloudy. Papa went to New York. Mrs. Fletcher and Amelia came in today.

7 December 1838. It was rainy all day. Papa got home from New York about 1/2 past 11 p.m.

8 December 1839. It was rainy all day. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and evening, he preached. I was at St. Andrew's in the afternoon. We had the gas lit for the first time in our Church.

9 December 1839. It was raining all day very hard.

10 December 1839. It was clear and cool all day and evening, until about 9 p.m. when it rained and snowed a little until about 10 p.m.when it cleared up again. Mr. Israel died this morning about 10 o'clock.

11 December 1839. It was foggy very early in the morning and the rest of the morning was clear. The afternoon and evening were cloudy and it was raining about 10 p.m.

12 December 1839. It was clear in the morning, in the afternoon cloudy, and the evening changeable. Mr. M. Israel was buried today at Laurel Hill. I got my boots heeled today.

13 December 1839. It was clear and cold all day and evening. Henry Stump went a gunning today with my gun. Mama and Sally Anne Hedges were around at cousins' this evening.

14 December 1839. It was cloudy all day and this evening it rained very hard. A thief came into our parlor and stole our two glass cologne bottles of the pier table.

15 December 1839. It was cloudy and rainy and cold all day. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and he preached. I was at Mr. Brainard's in the afternoon, and this evening I was at St. Paul's. It blew very hard in the night. Uncle was here this evening.

16 December 1839. It was cloudy and cold all day and it blew very hard all day. One of my squirrels died today.

17 December 1839. It was changeable all day and evening. The thief sent our bottles back today about 1 o'clock. Mama was around at cousins'. The Schuylkill bank broke today.

18 December 1839. It was cloudy and cold all day.

19 December 1839. I wrote a letter to Grandma. It was clear and cold all day.

20 December 1839. It was clear and cold all day and evening.

21 December 1839. It was cloudy and cold all day and evening. I was out a skating in the afternoon at Parker's Pond.

22 December 1839. It began to snow at about 1/2 past 7 a.m. and snowed until about 10 a.m. It then rained. It began to snow again about 2 p.m. and it snowed and blew very hard. The snow was about 6 inches thick this morning and made good sleighing. I was at Grace Church in the morning, in the afternoon at St. Andrew's, and I was at home in the evening.

23 December 1839. It was cloudy all day and it snowed between 1/2 past 11 and 12. It thawed very much all day and there were sleighs out today.

24 December 1839. It was cloudy all day and it thawed very much. There were sleighs out today. This evening was clear.

25 December 1839. Christmas. It was changeable and very warm and in the evening it was clear. I went to the office 1/2 past 9 a.m. I then went out and walked about town in the morning. In the afternoon I went to the Circus and in the evening I was out with Henry Borden. Chester White made Mama a present of a prayer book. There were many sleighs out today.

26 December 1839. It was changeable in the morning, and this afternoon and evening were clear. I was at the Museum to see the Miss Shaws with Miss Ellen and Mr. Campbell and Lydia in the evening.

27 December 1839. It was cloudy in the morning until about 11 o'clock. It then began to rain and poured rain all afternoon and evening.

28 December 1839. It was cloudy all day. It snowed a little at 10 a.m., at 11, and at 12. It was cloudy in the afternoon and evening.

29 December 1839. It was changeable and very cold all day and in the evening it was cloudy. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I was out with Chester White. There were two bad fires this morning - one on Library St. and the other on 2nd St. near Chestnut.

30 December 1839. It was changeable all day and this evening was clear and cold.

31 December 1839. It was cloudy and cold all day and evening. I was down at Miss James' in the evening. I wrote a letter to Tim. It was very cold all day.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Notes:

(1) The Reverend William Suddards, D.D. (d.1883), rector, Grace Protestant Episcopal Church 1834-1883. Scharf and Westcott, p. 1352. A brilliant preacher, Suddards remained rector for 44 years. Francis James Dallett (hereafter cited as FJD).

(2) The Right Reverend Henry Ustick Onderdonk (1789-1858), second Protestant Episcopal Bishop of Pennsylvania, 1836-1844. Scharf and Westcott, p. 1336. DAB, Vol. XIV, p. 40.

(3) Probably Tacy Roberts (1805-1847) and Gainor Roberts (1821-1889).

(4) Christ Church, 2nd Street near Mulberry (now Arch Street) was probably designed by Dr. John Kearsley (1684-1782). One of the most impressive Georgian structures in the American colonies was begun in 1727 and finished in 1744. Many notable Philadelphians including Benjamin Franklin are buried in its cemetery on Arch Street between 3rd and 4th streets. Philadelphia a 300 Year History, W.W. Norton & Company, New York 1982, p 51.

(5) Isaac Warner Roberts (1789-1859).

(6) Henry Clay Borden the brother of Caroline Ann Borden, J. Warner Erwin's future wife.

(7) Algernon Sidney Roberts,Jr. (1827-1905).

(8) Joseph Warner Erwin was born on September 12, 1824. This was his 15th birthday.

(9) Martin VanBuren (1782-1862), seventh president of the United States 1837-1862.

(10) Michael E. Israel was the second son of Israel Israel and Hannah Erwin, J. Warner Erwin's great aunt.


1840

JANUARY

1 January 1840. It was cloudy early in the morning and the rest of the day clear and extremely cold. The river Delaware is full of ice. The Philadelphia ice boat went down it about 1/2 past 9 p.m.

2 January 1840. It was clear all day and evening. The thermometer at daylight was 8 degrees at 1 p.m., 20 degrees at 5 p.m., 19 degrees at 7 p.m. The river Delaware froze over last night. Round at cousins in the evening.

3 January 1840. It was changeable and cold all day. The former part of the evening was clear and the latter part was cloudy. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was 10 degrees.

4 January 1840. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was at 20 degrees and at 2 p.m. was at 56 degrees in the sun. It was cloudy in the morning and the afternoon was changeable.

5 January 1840. It was clear all day. I was at Mr. Suddards' church in the morning, this afternoon the same, and this evening I was at St. Andrews. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was at 22 degrees and at 2 p.m. was at 63 degrees in the sun.

6 January 1840. It was changeable all day and this evening was cloudy. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was at 26 degrees and at 11 p.m. was at 34 degrees. The Harmony sent her engine, tender and hose to Melton(?) today.

7 January 1840. It began to snow about daylight and snowed until about 9 a.m. It cleared up about 1/2 past 10 a.m. and this evening was clear. Mr. and Mrs. Roberts and Mrs. Reiford were here in the evening. There was a fire at the corner of Commerce and 4th St. this evening. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was at 28 degrees and at 11 p.m. 26 degrees.

8 January 1840. It was changeable this evening and cloudy until about 10. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was at 23 degrees, at 1/2 past 2 p.m. 41 degrees and at 1/4 of 9, it was 30 degrees.

9 January 1840. It was clear all day and evening. Lydia went to Bethlehem with Mama to Boarding School(1) at 4 a.m. I got up at 1/4 of 3 a.m. At 1/2 past 3, I went to a fire in Kensington. It was one of the biggest fires ever in Kensington. I was out a skating on the Schuylkill in the afternoon. I skated up to Mr. Roberts' at the falls. My skate broke coming back and I had to walk to the rest of the way.

10 January 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening. I got a letter from Grandmama.

11 January 1840. It was cloudy all day and raining in the evening. I was at the office today.

12 January 1840. It snowed early in the morning and was clear and cold the rest of the day. I was at Mr. Suddards' church in the morning and this evening the same. I was at Mr. Tyng's(2) in the afternoon. This evening was clear and cold.

13 January 1840. It snowed early in the morning, it was clear about the middle of the day and the rest of the day and evening was cloudy. The steamboat Lexington was burnt at Newport and about 120 persons lost. I sold my squirrel and cage at auction this evening. Mama got home from Bethlehem this evening about 7 p.m.

14 January 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening. Sarah E.

Gibbons came up from Wilmington today to a meeting of the Forrest Literary Association this evening. It was very mild all day.

15 January 1840. It was cloudy all day. It snowed at about 1/4 of 3 p.m. and snowed enough about 7 to 1/2 past 8 to cover the ground. Mr. and Mrs. Gibbons were here this evening. Clear this evening about 10.

16 January 1840. It was clear and very cold all day and evening. I was at Grace Church this evening. The thermometer at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. was 10 degrees. Chester White lent me Nicholas Nickelby.

17 January 1840. It was clear and very cold. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was 6 degrees. The river was frozen this morning, it has been frozen for several days up by Holmseburg so that horses and sleighs can go across.

18 January 1840. It was clear and cold all day and evening. I was at the circus in the evening to see Don Luiscote.

19 January 1840. It was clear and cold all day. I was at Grace Church in the morning, this afternoon I was at St. Andrew's, and this evening at St. Stephen's. It was cloudy in the evening. I was down at the river about 2 p.m. and there were hundreds of people skating.

20 January 1840. It was changeable all day and this evening was cloudy and very mild.

21 January 1840. It was cloudy all day and this evening was changeable.

22 January 1840. It began to snow sometime in the night and snowed until about 10 a.m., it then began to rain. It made the walking very bad. It poured rain all the evening.

23 January 1840. It was changeable in the morning and this afternoon was clear. It got very cold on the river in the afternoon. I was at Church in the evening.

24 January 1840. It was clear and cold all day and this evening clear.

25 January 1840. It was clear and cold all day and evening. I went to hear Mr. Kirk this evening. I was on the Delaware a skating this afternoon.

26 January 1840. It was clear all day and this evening was cloudy. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I was at Mr. Tyng's.

27 January 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening. I was at Church this evening on Spruce below 6th St.

28 January 1840. It snowed all the morning, this afternoon was cloudy, and this evening foggy. I went to hear Mr. Kirk at Shiner's Church on Arch above 10th St. that preaches to young men. We had the windows at the office painted white.

29 January 1840. It was cloudy and rainy all day and it poured rain all the evening.

30 January 1840. It was cloudy and rainy in the morning, in the afternoon it was cloudy. This evening it cleared up cold. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church this evening. Papa gave me my light cane today. I was down at the river and the Philadelphia ice boat was coming, breaking her way through the ice.

31 January 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening. I wrote a letter to Lydia today at Bethlehem.

FEBRUARY

1 February 1840. It began to snow in the night. It snowed very hard all the morning and made splendid sleighing. There was a bad fire this morning that burnt 11 houses. This evening was cloudy.

2 February 1840. It was clear and cold all day and fine sleighing. This evening was clear. I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I was at St. Andrew's.

3 February 1840. It was cloudy all day and this evening was cloudy. This afternoon I was out a sleighing. I was at the Museum this evening to hear Mr. William Burton et al. sing. It was cold this evening.

4 February 1840. It was clear and cold all day and evening. I went out to Fountain Green a sleighing.

5 February 1840. It was cloudy most of the day and cold and this evening was cloudy.

6 February 1840. It was clear all day and the beginning of the evening, the latter part was cloudy. Charles Erwin(3) came home yesterday. I was at Grace Church this evening. There has been good sleighing for 5 days. It thawed very much all day.

7 February 1840. It was cloudy most of the day and this evening was cloudy and rainy. I received a letter from Fin. It was very warm today.

8 February 1840. It was rainy all day and this evening was very foggy. It was mild all day.

9 February 1840. It was raining most all day and evening. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and evening and at St. Andrew's in the afternoon. I shaved for the first time today.

10 February 1840. It was changeable and very pleasant all day and there was a hard shower of rain in the afternoon. The former part of the evening was clear and the latter part cloudy. I was at cousins' in the evening.

11 February 1840. It was clear and cold all day and evening. I got my large hair red brush today.

12 February 1840. It was clear all day and clear until about 10 when it then got cloudy.

13 February 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening. I was at Grace Church this evening.

14 February 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening. It blew most tremendous all the evening and rained very hard in the night. John Mitchell had a son today.

15 February 1840. It was clear and cold all day and this evening was clear and cold.

16 February 1840. It was clear in the morning and pleasant. I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I was at St. Stephen's. This afternoon and evening were cloudy.

17 February 1840. Today was changeable and mild and this evening was cloudy. It rained at about 10 o'clock. I was at Marion Hose's benefit at the Museum in the evening. Papa gave me a silver Napoleon Bonaparte today.

18 February 1840. It was cloudy in the morning, this afternoon it poured rain, and this evening it drizzled rain. I was at the Athenaeum lecture in the evening.(4)

19 February 1840. It was cloudy, foggy and rainy all day and evening. I was at Grace Church this evening. Henry Borden went to Wilmington today. Cousins in 9th St. were here for supper this evening.

20 February 1840. It was clear in the morning and former part of the afternoon and the latter part and evening were cloudy. It began to rain very hard about 10 p.m. It was very warm all day and we had to have the windows and doors open. I was at Grace Church this evening.

21 February 1840. It was clear all day and warm and this evening was clear. I was at Grace Church this evening.

22 February 1840. Washington's Birthday. It was cloudy all day and evening and it rained a little in the afternoon. This evening I was at a meeting of the Forrest Literary Association.

23 February 1840. It was changeable and this evening was cloudy. I was at Grace Church in the morning, afternoon, and evening.

24 February 1840. It was changeable and this evening was cloudy.

25 February 1840. It was changeable, the former part of the evening was clear, and the latter part cloudy. I took a walk down town with P. Broes this evening. We stopped at Machie's auction store and he bought a box of cigars.

26 February 1840. It was changeable all day and this evening was same.

27 February 1840. It was cloudy all day, it rained for about an hour in the morning, and this evening was cloudy. I was at Grace Church in the evening.

28 February 1840. It was cloudy and cold all day and evening and it cleared off about 10 p.m.

29 February 1840. It was clear and pleasant all day and evening. A fellow was arrested for striking Jim Kelly about 11 o'clock this evening.

MARCH

1 March 1840. It was raining in the morning and the rest of the day was changeable. The first part of the evening was cloudy and the latter part was clear. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and the afternoon, and this evening I was at St. Andrew's.

2 March 1840. It was clear and warm all day and evening. There was a bad fire in water below Walnut St. this evening. Ma was at the Museum this evening.

3 March 1840. It was cloudy and warm all day and evening. Around at Cousin's this evening.

4 March 1840. It was clear and warm all day and evening - so warm as to have the windows and doors open all day.

5 March 1840. It was clear and rather colder than yesterday and this evening was clear. I was at Grace Church. There was a great Whig meeting at the Masonic Hall this evening. Mr. Wise and Mr. Nailor spoke.

6 March 1840. It was clear and pleasant all day and evening. Papa went to New York this afternoon at 3 o'clock. I was around at cousin's this evening. I got my iron cane.

7 March 1840. It was clear and very windy all day. I got my stock.

8 March 1840. It was clear all day and evening until about 1/2 past 9 when it got cloudy. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and evening and he preached. I was at St. Andrew's in the afternoon. There was ice made last night. Pa got home about 1 o'clock tonight.

9 March 1840. It was cloudy in the morning and the rest of the day and evening were clear.

10 March 1840. It was clear in the morning and this afternoon was cloudy. It began to snow at about 1/2 past 4 and it snowed very hard all the evening. Mr. Doolittle had his first sale in his new auction store on 4th Street this evening.

11 March 1840. It was clear and cold all day and evening. When I got up this morning the houses and the pavement on the south side of the way were covered with snow. Mr. Flake died this morning. Also, Governor Wolf dropped down in the street dead. Cousins were here for supper this evening. I got my second stock today with a seam in the middle of the bow.

12 March 1840. It was cloudy early in the morning and latter part of the afternoon, the rest of the day clear and the evening was cloudy. I was at Grace Church this evening and Mr. Suddards preached.

13 March 1840. Changeable all day and evening.

14 March 1840. It was changeable and this evening was cloudy. Pa and Mr. Roberts went up to Bethlehem this morning at 4 o'clock. I was at a meeting of the Uphradean Society this evening.

15 March 1840. It was snowing when I got up this morning and it was changeable the rest of the day. I went to Grace Church in the morning and the afternoon and this evening I was at St. Andrew's. This evening was cloudy until about 10 o'clock and it then cleared off.

16 March 1840. It was clear all day and this evening was cloudy. Pa got home from Bethlehem this evening about 6 o'clock.

17 March 1840. St. Patrick's Day. It snowed early in the morning. It rained about 5 o'clock and then cleared up. Chester White went to Fredericksburg today. This evening was clear.

18 March 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening. Dr. Parrish(5) died this morning with gout in the head.

19 March 1840. It rained most all day and this evening was cloudy. I was at Grace Church in the evening.

20 March 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening. Dr. Parish was buried today; he had a very long funeral.

21 March 1840. It was cloudy in the morning and this afternoon was clear. I went up to see a brig of 220 tons burden launched. Henry Borden and I were launched aboard her.

22 March 1840. It was clear all day. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I went to hear Mr. Kirk.

23 March 1840. It was cloudy all day. I was at Miss Shaw's farewell benefit for 2 years at the Museum this evening. I got my new powder flask today.

24 March 1840. It rained all day until about 4 p.m. and then stopped and snowed until about 10 p.m.

25 March 1840. When I got up this morning all the houses were covered with snow. It was cloudy, raw and cold all day and this evening was clear and cold. I was at the Museum this evening.

26 March 1840. It was clear and cool all day and this evening was the same. I was at Grace Church this evening.

27 March 1840. It was cloudy early in the morning and the rest of the day and evening were clear and warm. The firemen had a splendid parade today - it was about 9 miles long.

28 March 1840. It was raining in the morning, this afternoon was cloudy and this evening was rainy.

29 March 1840 It rained in the morning and the rest of the day was changeable and very warm. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I was at Dr. Tyng's.

30 March 1840. It poured rain all day but the middle of the day and evening were not so bad.

31 March 1840. Today was changeable. It snowed a little about the middle of the day, the beginning of the evening was clear, the latter part cloudy, snowed about 10 p.m. I was at Miss James' this evening.

APRIL

1 April 1840. It was changeable in the morning and in the afternoon it rained and hailed a little. Papa gave me two boxes of percussion caps.

2 April 1840. It was clear and pleasant and this evening was clear. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the evening. Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell and their two daughters were here this evening.

3 April 1840. It was clear all day and evening.

4 April 1840. It was changeable in the evening and the afternoon and evening were clear. This evening I was at the Museum to see Miss A.R. Mills the magicianess.

5 April 1840. It was clear and warm all day and evening and the latter part of the evening was cloudy. I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. 84 confirmed in the morning - Sarah Ellis and Mary Burr were confirmed. I was at St. Andrew's in the evening and about the same number confirmed there.

6 April 1840. It was cloudy all day and this evening was clear.

7 April 1840. It was clear all day and evening. Mrs. Reynolds came up from Wilmington today.

8 April 1840. It was changeable and cold and this evening was clear and cold. I wrote a letter to Lydia yesterday.

9 April 1840. It was clear all day. I went to the circus this evening. They had one of the longest performances ever performed in America. I got out at about 1/2 past 12. It was cloudy.

10 April 1840. It was clear all day and evening. Mrs. Reynolds went home today.

11 April 1840. It was clear in the morning and very warm and this afternoon and evening were cloudy. It began to rain about 1/2 past 9 and it rained very hard all night.

12 April 1840. It rained all day. It began to thunder and lightning and rain about dusk and it poured rain all the evening. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and evening, and this afternoon I was at St. Stephen's.

13 April 1840. It was clear all day and evening and very pleasant. The Ledger has the cornerstone laid for the new house at the corner of 3rd and Chestnut St. Ma got her new shawl (blue with flowers).

14 April 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening. The circus went away today.

15 April 1840. It was cloudy all day and this evening was clear.

16 April 1840. It was cloudy early in the morning and the latter part of the afternoon. The rest of the day and evening were clear. I was at Grace Church this evening.

17 April 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I was over in Camden this afternoon.

18 April 1840. It was clear in the morning. This afternoon was cloudy and it rained a little. This evening was cloudy. It was clear about 10 p.m. I was over in Camden where I took a walk up in the woods.

19 April 1840. It was cloudy early in the morning and the rest of the day was clear. This morning and afternoon I was at Mr. Suddards' Church and this evening I was at St. Paul's.

20 April 1840. It was clear all day and evening. Cousins were here this evening. Fin and Len came in from the country today; tomorrow they are going away to Hamilton, NY to live.

21 April 1840. It was clear all day. Ma and Pa went to New Castle and from there to Wilmington this morning at 1/2 past 6 on the Steamboat Robert Morris. The Washington and Franklin Squares were opened for the first time this season. Phineas Fletcher slept here tonight.

22 April 1840. It was cloudy and it rained most part of the day and evening. Ma and Pa got home this afternoon.

23 April 1840. It was clear all day and this evening was cloudy. I was at Grace Church this evening.

24 April 1840. It was clear in the morning, this afternoon was cloudy and it rained, and this evening was cloudy. We had no fire for the first time this season. We bought some black cloth and a satin vest pattern for me today.

25 April 1840. It was clear in the morning and the afternoon and evening were changeable. I was over in Camden this afternoon with the cousins and Mrs. Kaufman.

26 April 1840. It was clear in the morning and this afternoon it clouded over and rained very hard. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I was at home. It was cloudy this evening. I put on my white pants for the first time this season. It was very warm.

27 April 1840. It was clear all day and evening. Fin and his parents and sisters came in to go to Hamilton NY, to live. It was very cold.

28 April 1840. It was clear in the morning and this afternoon and evening were cloudy.

29 April 1840. It was cloudy and rainy all day and it poured rain all the evening. Mrs. Gibbons and Margaret came up from Wilmington today.

30 April 1840. It was clear all day and evening. Mrs. Gibbons went home today and her daughter Margaret went on to Poughkeepsie. Ma, Sarah Roberts, and I were at the concert of the Musical Fund Society this evening.

MAY

1 May 1840. It was cloudy until about 1/ 2 past 11 a.m. and then it began to rain and it rained about 3/4 of an hour very hard and then cleared up. I went over Schuylkill this morning; got over about 12 past 1 p.m. and then came over in the boat to Fairmount. I was at Harding's Tavern during the rain. I went to Fountain Green with Ma and the cousins and to 9th St. at 3 p.m. I came in the carriage in the evening and got in about 8 p.m. I brought in a large bunch of flowers. I was out in a boat for a while on the Schuylkill.

2 May 1840. It was clear and warm all day and evening. I got my black cloth pants and black satin vest today.

3 May 1840. It was clear for part of the morning and the rest of the day and evening were cloudy. I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon and in the evening at St. Andrew's. It blew very hard this evening.

4 May 1840. It was cloudy most all day and this evening was clear. I began to take the Daily Chronicle today.

5 May 1840. It was changeable and cold for this season of the year.

6 May 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I got my black cloth coat today - the second frock coat I ever had. Got my pink stripe suspenders.

7 May 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I was at Grace Church this evening - it was the last night of the lecture on Pilgrim's Progress for this season. The delegates from the Baltimore Convention came in today. They had a ball about 12 ft high rolling before them and a log cabin drawn by four white horses.

8 May 1840. It was cloudy all day. It began to rain about 1/2 past 5 p.m. and it rained all evening. A man was killed by falling off an old scaffold on Union St. near 3rd St.

9 May 1840. It was raining most all day. I got my black cloth pants home from Mr. Bates. Henry Stump was sick.

10 May 1840. It rained most all the morning. In the beginning of the afternoon it was cloudy and in the latter part the sun came out. In the evening there were fleeting clouds. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and evening. Mr. Cook preached in the morning. In the afternoon I was at St. Andrew's.

11 May 1840. It was clear all day except about 1 o'clock when it rained for about 5 minutes In the evening there were flying clouds and moonlight. I was at singing school tonight.

12 May 1840. It was clear all day and this evening there were flying clouds. We began to tear down the plastering, to plaster it over again in our back room. Mrs. Reynolds was up from Wilmington.

13 May 1840. It was clear all day and this evening was clear and moonlit. I began to go to the Athenaeum today.

14 May 1840. It was clear all day and warm and this evening was clear and moonlit. I was at Grace Church this evening and Bishop Onderdonk preached. There were 7 men and 19 ladies confirmed.

15 May 1840. It was clear all day and this evening was cloudy. It rained at about 1/2 past 9 p.m.

16 May 1840. It was clear all day and this evening was clear. I got a pair of shoes lined with red from Mr. Hous today.

17 May 1840. It was clear and very warm today and this evening was the same. I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I was at St. Paul's. There was a bad fire this morning at about 7 o'clock on Green St. Wharf. It was two bark houses valued at $20,000.

18 May 1840. It was clear and very warm all day and this evening was the same.

19 May 1840. It was clear in the morning and this afternoon and evening were cloudy. Our office was on fire today - 7 or 8 engines played on it.

20 May 1840. It rained all day and evening. I wrote a long deed for Mr. Campbell.

21 May 1840. It rained all day and evening. I wrote a letter to Lydia today.

22 May 1840. It was clear but there were flying clouds. This evening was clear. I went up to see the Magic Lantern at Grace Church. I also went to see the Belgian Giant at the Museum. He is 7 ft. 8 in. high and he weighs 340 pounds.

 

23 May 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I was over in Camden in the afternoon. I went into swim for the first time this season. There was flying clouds.

24 May 1840. It rained all the morning and this afternoon and evening were cloudy. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I was at Mr. Barnes' to hear Mr. Kirk. It rained hard last night.

25 May 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I was over in Camden in the morning.

26 May 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I was at Mr. Barnes' Church this evening. It did not let out until 1/2 past 10 p.m.

27 May 1840. It was clear all day until latter part of the afternoon and then got cloudy. This evening was cloudy. I got my stain for my name today.

28 May 1840. It was clear all day and evening.

29 May 1840. It was clear all day and very warm. This evening I was at the Museum with Rebecca Gibbons to see the Giant and Dr. Valentine.

30 May 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I got my black cane with a crooked white handle today. I was over in Camden to swim today for 2nd time this season.

31 May 1840. It was clear and very warm all day and evening. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I was at Trinity with Rebecca. Gibbons was here today and took dinner with us.

JUNE

1 June 1840. It was clear and very warm all day until about 1/2 past 3 p.m. then it got cloudy and rained very hard. It rained most of the evening.

2 June 1840. It was cloudy, damp, drizzling rain and very cold and unpleasant all day. This evening I was at a meeting of the Forrest Literary Association with Miss C.E.W. Parker.

3 June 1840. It was cloudy in the morning and poured rain all the afternoon and evening. It hailed on Monday night about 12 o'clock. We had strawberries for the first time this season - they have been in market for better than 3 weeks - I gave 12 1/2 cents per quart.

4 June 1840. It rained all day and evening. Ma preserved her strawberries at 16 per quart today. The rain today was extremely hard.

5 June 1840. It was clear and warm all day and very pleasant. Ma & Pa went out with a party to cousins. I was at Fountain Green to eat strawberries.

6 June 1840. It was clear until about 5 p.m. and then got cloudy. It began to rain about 1/2 past 8 and it rained all night. I was in at Murphy's swimming bath to swim this evening. It was the first time I was in his bath this season and the third time into swim.

7 June 1840. It rained all day and this evening was clear. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon and in the evening at Dr. Cuyler's. I got my flying squirrel yesterday.

8 June 1840. It was clear and rather cool all day and evening.

9 June 1840. It was clear all day and evening. It was warm through the day, and this evening was rather cool.

10 June 1840. Today was clear and this evening was cloudy. I was at the exhibition of the Artist's Association at the arcade with Miss C.E.W. Parker.

11 June 1840. It was clear all day and warm.

12 June 1840. It was clear and very warm all day and evening.

13 June 1840. It was clear until about 1/2 past 11 then clouded over for about two hours and a half. It then got clear. I was over in Camden this afternoon to swim - the fourth time I was in this season. It was very warm.

14 June 1840. We commenced taking ice yesterday. It was clear all day and evening and very warm. I was at Grace Church in the morning and evening and in the afternoon at St. Andrew's. The latter part of the evening was cloudy.

15 June 1840. It rained until about 1/2 past 10 a.m., it was cloudy the rest of the day, and this evening rather clearer. The Whigs had a great meeting in the State House yard - there were from 10,000 to 15,000 persons there.

16 June 1840. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening.

17 June 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I wrote a letter to Grandmama by Mr. Carr.

18 June 1840. It was clear very early in the morning and then got cloudy. It began to rain about 12 p.m. and it rained on and off till the afternoon. This evening was cloudy. There was a very handsome rainbow about dusk.

19 June 1840. It was clear until about 4 p.m. and then it got cloudy and rained. This evening was cloudy and rainy. I got my rosewood cane mounted with an octagon silver head this evening. I gave $2.50 for it and 25 cents for engraving. Miss Fanny Elssler made her second appearance at the Chestnut St. Theater.

20 June 1840. It was cloudy until about 4 p.m. then cleared off and this evening was clear.

21 June 1840. It was clear and very warm all day and evening. I was at Quaker Meeting in the morning and this afternoon at Grace Church. This evening I was at Mr. Bridman's.

22 June 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I went to see Madamoiselle Fanny Elssler and Monsieur Sylvain - two of the handsomest dancers ever upon the stage. They were at the Chestnut St. Theater. It was the first time I ever was at that theater.

23 June 1840. It was clear and warm all day and evening. I got my three draw pocket spy glass. I went to Camden to swim in the water. It was very warm. It was the fifth time I have been in this season.

24 June 1840. Clear and very warm all day and evening. There was a parade today to celebrate the 400th anniversary of printing.

25 June 1840. It was clear and extremely warm all day and this evening was cloudy. Mrs. Eliza Jones was here for supper this evening. Lydia got home from Bethlehem

boarding school this evening about 1/2 past 7 p.m.

26 June 1840. It rained all the morning. This afternoon was cloudy but it did not rain. This evening was cloudy and it cleared off about 1/2 past 10 p.m. I went to see Master Diamond the great Negro dancer this evening at Maran's Garden.

27 June 1840. It was changeable and warm. This afternoon I was over to swim at Cooper's Point for the 6th time this season.

28 June 1840. It was clear and exceedingly warm. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I was at Mr. Boardman's at the NE corner of 12th and Walnut St.

29 June 1840. It was cloudy early in the morning and the rest of the day clear and warm. This evening clear until about 10 and it rained very hard at about 11 o'clock. Lydia and I went to the Museum this evening to a concert. It was clear at 1/2 past 11 p.m., but I think that it will cloud again.

30 June 1840. It was clear and exceedingly warm all day until about 5 p.m. and then clouded and rained a little. This evening was clear and very warm. I got my Guiakeil hat today, but it is broke at the top.

JULY

1 July 1840. It was clear and very warm all day and this evening was clear and rather cool.

2 July 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening and rather cold. It rained a little through the day and evening.

3 July 1840. It was cloudy and cold all day and evening and it rained most of the day. A company of NY soldiers were here today. Richard Johnson, the Vice President, made a visit also - he was escorted by about 20 carriages well filled with Locofocos.(6)

4 July 1840. It was clear and warm and very pleasant all day. I started off at 8 a.m. for Havre de Grace on an excursion. We arrived at Gray's Ferry at 20 minutes of 9 a.m., the ship was going through the draw [drawbridge], passed a picnic party with a booth. We crossed Crum Crick at 1/2 past 9 a.m. and Ridley Creek at 25 minutes of 10 a.m. We arrived at Lazaretta at 20 minutes after 9 a.m. We arrived at Chester at 20 minutes of 10 a.m. - a number of passengers got out here. We left at 1/4 of 10 a.m., arrived at Marcus Hook at 10 a.m., crossed Crosby Creek at 20 minutes after 10 a.m., crossed the Brandywine at 1/2 past 10 a.m. and arrived [in Wilmington] at 25 minutes of 11 a.m. We left Wilmington at 20 minutes of 11 a.m. and arrived at Newark, Delaware at 20 minutes past 11 a.m. We arrived at Elkton at 20 minutes of 12 p.m. - it is quite a large town - and arrived at the Susquehanna at 1/2 past 12. We took the steamboat Susquehanna and went up around the Island down by the tide water canal and arrived at Havre de Grace at 1/2 past 1 p.m. The odd fellows were here from the Baltimore, the Jefferson and the Columbia Lodges - they laid a cornerstone of a Methodist Church. Started from Havre de Gras at 4 p.m. at the first watering place. There was a hard cider barrel and a log cabin with some rakes, scythes and cradles and a stick upon a pole surmounted by a flag. We arrived at Elkton at 5 minutes of 5 p.m. and then arrived at Wilmington at 1/4 of 6 p.m. I got out here and went up to Mr. Hedges and took supper. From there I went up to Dr. Gibbons'. At sundown they fired 26 minute guns from the arsenal.

5 July 1840. It was clear and very cool at Dr. Gibbons'. I went to Quaker Meeting and heard Ino Brook preach a singing kind of sermon. In the afternoon and evening I was at Dr. Gibbons'. It was clouded over in the morning.

6 July 1840. It was cloudy all day and it rained very hard all the afternoon. I was down at Christiana Creek in the morning and heard a Locofoco expressing his sentiments on politics to a Whig, a Mr. Bush. He had quite a crowd around him. I then walked up to Mr. Hedges'. From there I went to an ice cream shop and got some ice cream. I then went up to Dr. Gibbons'. It is rather cold here. In the afternoon I was out in all the rain with the boys picking mulberry leaves for silk worms. I left Wilmington at 10 minutes of 9 p.m, arrived at Gray's Ferry at 1/2 past 10 p.m, and arrived in the City at the depot at 20 minutes past 11. Mr. Campbell came here today.

7 July 1840. It was cloudy all day and it rained in the morning. This evening I was at the Museum to hear Mr. Watson sing with the Australian trumpeter. I got a handle put on my cane in Wilmington yesterday.

8 July 1840. It was cloudy all day, it rained on and off and in the evening it poured rain. I saw some peaches for the first time this season.

9 July 1840. It was cloudy all day and afternoon. At about dusk we had a shower of rain; it then cleared off and this evening was clear. I was at the Museum this evening. We had a fire today in Black House Alley.

10 July 1840. It was clear and very warm all day and this evening was clear and moonlit. I went over to swim at the Island this evening in a row boat for the 7th time this season.

11 July 1840. It was clear and very warm all day and [I went] over to Camden to swim this afternoon for the 8th time. This evening. I slept with Warner Jones at Berger & Shober's Store.

12 July 1840. It was clear and extremely warm all day. This evening was warm but cloudy. I slept again at Berger & Shober's. I was at Grace Church in the morning and evening and in the afternoon I was at Washington Square.

13 July 1840. It was cloudy and extremely warm all day and evening. It poured very hard about the middle of the day. I was at the Museum this evening to hear Mr. Watson and Mr. Davenport, and also Wells Quale.

14 July 1840. It was clear and very warm all day and evening. I went into Murphy's swimming bath this evening for the 9th time I have been into swim this season. Miss Rebecca Mitchell was married to Captain Smith.

15 July 1840. It was clear and very warm all day and evening. The thermometer at 12 p.m. in the sun was 121 degrees. I was down at the river when the Burlington boat arrived. A black man fell over board but he was saved with much exertion. Another broke a blood vessel and he died in about 10 minutes.

16 July 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I was at the Museum this evening for Mr. Watson's benefit. It was extremely warm today. I had my hair cut today.

17 July 1840. It was clear and extremely warm all day. The thermometer was at 96 degrees in the shade. I was over at the Island to swim this afternoon for the 10th time I have been into swim this season. I jumped off in 15 ft water for the first time I ever jumped over my head. I was up at 4 this morning and it was rather cloudy then.

18 July 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening and it rained all the afternoon. I was at the Museum this evening at Mr. Davenport's benefit. It was very warm today.

19 July 1840. It was changeable and very warm all day and cloudy in the evening. I took a walk over to Hamilton Village this morning with Henry Borden. I got home about 20 minutes of 11 a.m. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening at St. Paul's - I heard Mr. Bedell Jr. preach his first sermon there. Mr. Bedell Jr. was ordained this morning at St. Andrew's Church and he preached his first sermon there in the afternoon.

20 July 1840. It was clear and rather cool all day and evening. I walked with Warner Jones as far as Mr. McAdam's Garden to see the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius, but we did not go in. Ma and Lydia went out with Mrs. Eliza Jones and Warner Jones to Aunt Nancy's.

21 July 1840. It was clear and warm all day and evening. I left Philadelphia on the steamboat Clifton at 1/4 past 10 a.m. We had a very pleasant and cool trip, passing the Point House, Lazaretto and arriving in Chester at 20 minutes after 12. We were an hour and 25 minutes coming to Chester; passed the steamboat Kent of Smyrna at 12 and opposed Hooke - we exchanged bells. We arrived at Penn's Grove at 1 p.m., which is a pleasant place. I met with a young man on board, we walked up to the house and from there we took a walk out. He went up to a relation's of his and I walked back to the tavern and got my dinner. After dinner I went down on the shore and took a swim for the 11th time this season with a gentleman from Wilmington and his three sons. Afterward I went out a gunning, but did not shoot anything. I got back to the tavern about 5 p.m. The steamboat Pioneer stopped here about 3/4 past 5 p.m. and landed 7 or 8 gunners and their dogs. I went out to Mr. Patterson's where I never was before - I was invited by this young man A.M. Pedroch. We took his two horse light wagon and got out there just as they were going to eat supper. We took supper and lodged there which was a very novel thing for me to go to a stranger's house in that way.

22 July 1840. It was clear and warm all day and evening. I took breakfast at the said Mr. Patterson's and then took a walk to Old Mr. Patterson's with the young man. I left him there and went on to the Pier. I took the steamboat Clifton at 1/2 past 10 a.m. and arrived in Philadelphia at 1/2 past 1 p.m. I went out to see the explosion of Mt. Vesuvius in the evening. Charles Nailor, the Senator, was escorted in by a large procession of horsemen, carriages and bootmen; he was drawn by 6 white horses.

23 July 1840. It was cloudy all day. It began to rain about noon and it rained on and off all the afternoon and then poured rain all the evening. I got my white pants with gaiters today.

24 July 1840. It was cloudy all day. This evening was clear and cool for this season. I went out to see Mount Vesuvius again tonight.

25 July 1840. It was clear all day and evening and cool and pleasant. I went to the Museum this evening to Mr. Murdoch's benefit. I slept at Berger & Shober's. I began to take The Chronicle again today.

26 July 1840. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. I started in the morning at 5 minutes past 8 in the steamboat New Philadelphia for Bordentown with Henry M. Borden. We had a beautiful excursion up with about 600 passengers. We arrived at Burlington at about 1/2 past 9 a.m,; about 300 passengers got off here. We then went over to Bristol - a number got off here. We then proceeded up the river to the landing place of the boat. We then took the cars for Bordentown, which is about a mile. We arrived in Bordentown at 1/4 of 11 a.m. We then took a walk through the town, which is a beautiful one and contains from 1000 to 1500 inhabitants. We then went out to Joseph Bonaparte's place and walked through the different paths, which are very beautiful. After walking back to the house again, we met E.P. Borden. We then took another walk through the place and back to the tavern. We started from Bordentown at 4 p.m, stopping at Bristol, Burlington, the Bake House and several other places, arriving in Philadelphia at 7 p.m. with about 600 passengers and spending a very pleasant day.

27 July 1840. It was clear all day and evening except a little while in the morning. I was over to swim this afternoon for the 12th time this season.

28 July 1840. It was clear and warm all day. This evening was very cloudy and warm.

29 July 1840. Today was changeable and very warm all day. This evening was clear. I was out at McAdam's Gardens to see Mount Vesuvius. I did not go in the several times that I have been out.

30 July 1840. It was cloudy in the morning and the rest of the day was clear. This evening was cloudy. It was very warm all day. I got a sword mounted with brass. I got my wash stand.

31 July 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening and it rained about 10 p.m. I was out to see Mount Vesuvius. Mrs. Gibbons' sister and Adaline Hedges came here to go to the sea in the morning.

AUGUST 1840

1 August 1840. Today was changeable. It was clear in the evening and we had a little rain about 1/2 past 6 p.m. I was at Mrs. Watson's farewell benefit this evening at the Museum. I was over to swim for the 13th time this season.

2 August 1840. It was cloudy and rained a little while in the morning and this evening and afternoon were clear and very warm. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon and in the evening I was sitting in the Washington Square. Mr. Cassidy and Miss McNutt were here for supper this evening and went to church. They are from Louisville.

3 August 1840. It was clear early in the morning and the rest of the day was cloudy. It poured rain extremely hard in the middle of the day. This evening was cloudy. Mr. Hart moved out of Pa's lower house on 8th St. today.

4 August 1840. Today was changeable. It rained very hard about dark. I was at the Museum to see Master Young the Magician.

5 August 1840. It was cloudy early in the morning, rest of the day clear. I got up at 4 a.m. to go into swim for the 14th time this season. I was out to see Mt. Vesuvius with A. Thompson.

6 August 1840. It was clear all day and this evening was cloudy. Mama and Papa went to New York today. They started at 7 a.m. in the steamboat New Philadelphia. I was at the Museum tonight to see Master Young for the 2nd time. I was over to swim for the 15th time this season. Mr. Campbell was hurt very much so as he had to be brought home in a carriage.

7 August 1840. It was cloudy in the morning and in the afternoon and evening it rained very hard. I started for Wilmington at 8 a.m. with Lydia. We arrived there at 1/4 of 10 p.m. and then went up to Dr. Gibbons'. In the afternoon I went into swim for the 16th time this season.

8 August 1840. It was clear all day. I went into swim with Henry Borden in the morning and afternoon for the 17th and 18th times this season. I went in again about dusk with Dr. Gibbons' boys for the 19th time this season. The three last times I was in I went in the first dam from the mouth of the Brandywine, the first time in the Race.

9 August 1840. It was clear all day. I went to Quaker Meeting in the morning and this afternoon I took a walk up the Brandywine with Bill Chandler. I then came down the other side and stopped at Edmund Havies' to a fellow workman of his to try a small a locomotive of his which he had been making - it works well and fast.

10 August 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I came home from Wilmington today. I went to the Museum tonight to see Mr. Young the Master Magician.

11 August 1840. It was clear in the morning and in the afternoon and evening it rained very hard on and off. I was at Museum this evening to see Master Young.

12 August 1840. It was cloudy all day and very warm and it poured rain at about 10 p.m. I was at the Museum to see Master Young.

13 August 1840. It poured rain all day and evening and blew very hard. Mama and Papa got home from New York.

14 August 1840. It was clear all day. This evening it clouded over and began to rain at about 10 p.m. and it was pouring rain when I went to bed at 11 p.m. I was at the Museum to see Master Young.

15 August 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I was over to swim for the 20th time this season. This evening I was at the Museum to see Master Young.

16 August 1840. It was cloudy most all day. It rained a little in the morning. This evening was clear. I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I was at the Methodist Church on Christian St. near 7th.

17 August 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I went into swim in the Brandywine for the 21st time this season. I went up about 1/4 mile above the first toll gate with Miss BrinklZ. I had to walk home in the dark. I came down to Wilmington today - we started at 8 a.m.

18 August 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I went into swim for the 22nd time this season. I went out a gunning with William Brinkley.

19 August 1840. It was clear all day and evening. Mama came down to Wilmington this morning. I was out a fishing with Julius Bradford down at the Mills. I went into swim for the 23rd time this season. I was down in town all the morning and got three glasses of ice cream and a small tin cup.

20 August 1840. It was clear and warm all day and evening. I went into swim twice for the 24th and 25th times this season. I was out a fishing this afternoon down at the Mill with Rod and Frank Gibbons and Uncle Bradford. - I got 8. I went to town with Mama in the evening.

21 August 1840. It was clear and warm all day. I took an excursion to Havre de Grace from Wilmington. We started about 1/4 after 10 a.m., having a very pleasant trip there and stopping at Newport, Newark, Elkton and other places. When I arrived at the landing, I met the Miss Alriches and their company, which I joined in with, and had a very pleasant time. We then went aboard the steamboat Susquehanna and took an excursion three or four miles down in the bay. We then turned around and went up as far as Port Deposit, passing the Island, the Tide Water Canal, and great deal of handsome scenery. We then returned to Havre de Grace and tried fishing for a while. We had a fine picnic dinner on board, with ice cream, and we started for Wilmington at about 1/2 past 3 - passing said places and we arrived at Wilmington at 20 minutes of 6 after spending a very pleasant day. I then went home with the ladies. After that I left them after having an invitation to supper and went down to Mr. Hedges' for supper. After that I went up to Mr. Gibbons' and went to bed.

22 August 1840. It was cloudy in the morning early and the rest of the day and evening were clear and extremely warm. I was out a gunning in the morning and I was almost dead with heat. I shot about 18 birds but did not get but about 10. Went into swim for the 26th time this season.

23 August 1840. It was clear in the morning, in the afternoon it clouded over and in the evening we had a great storm. I was out on the Brandywine walking in the afternoon with Edward Harvey. I went into swim for the 27th time this season. I was at Mr. Gilbert's Church in the morning.

24 August 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I went over the creek with Randman to fish - we caught 31. I was in town tonight with Sarah Gibbons at Mr. Louring's. We did not get home till 20 minutes of 11 p.m.

25 August 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I was out a gunning and I shot 21 birds.

26 August 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I shot 26 red birds and sent them home to Mama this morning. I went into swim for the 28th time this season.

27 August 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I was down in town in the morning and in the afternoon out a gunning.

28 August 1840. It was clear and pleasant all day. I was out a gunning in the morning and I shot about a dozen. I was into swim for the 29th time this season - I swam 4 times across the dam.

29 August 1840. It was cloudy all day. I was out at the Brandywine Mills most all day. I went into swim twice there where it was about 20 ft deep for the 30th & 31st times this season.

30 August 1840. It was changeable all day, and clear in the evening. At Mr. McCullogh's Church in the morning - it was the first time they had Church in it since the enlargement. I was at Dr. Gibbons' in the afternoon and part of the evening I was in town.

31 August 1840. It was clear all day. I was down in town in the morning and this afternoon I was at Dr. Gibbons'. The National Theater opened for the first time this evening.

SEPTEMBER

1 September 1840. It was changeable all day, and rather cool. I was out a fishing in the morning. At about 6 p.m. Mrs. Gibbons, Sarah, Rebecca and myself went out to Mr. Sam Canby's which is about 4 1/2 miles. We got home about 9 p.m.

2 September 1840. It was clear all day until about dark when it clouded over and rained very hard all the evening. I was out a rowing in the Brandywine in the morning and in the afternoon I was at Dr. Gibbons'. I was into swim for the 32nd time this season.

3 September 1840. It was cloudy all day. I was at Dr. Gibbons' in the morning and this afternoon I was out a rowing on the Brandywine.

4 September 1840. It was cloudy all day and it rained in the evening. I was out a gunning all the morning. I shot 14 birds and brought them to Philadelphia with me. I came up from Wilmington today.

5 September 1840. It was cloudy and rainy all day and it cleared off a little in the evening. I got a new pair of shoes. I was not at the office. It was so cold that I had to wear an overcoat in the evening. Papa got home from New York tonight - he went on Wednesday last.

6 September 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I was at St. Andrew's.

7 September 1840. It was clear and pleasant all day and evening. I was at McAdam's Garden this evening - it was Mrs. McAdam's benefit.

8 September 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I was at the American Museum tonight at the corner of 3rd & Chestnut St.

9 September 1840. It was cloudy all day and it rained in the afternoon and evening. Mr. Gardener was here for dinner today.

10 September 1840. It was cloudy all day. It rained in the afternoon and this evening was cloudy.

11 September 1840. It was clear in the morning. This afternoon was cloudy and in the latter part it rained. The early part of the evening was cloudy and the latter part was clear.

12 September 1840. It was clear and cold all day and evening. It is my 16th birthday. I was at Burton's Theater to see Nicholas Nickelby played. It was the 12th night it had been opened.

13 September 1840. It was clear all day and evening. This morning and evening I was at Grace Church and this afternoon I was at St. Andrew's.

14 September 1840. It was clear and cool all day and evening.

15 September 1840. It was clear and cool all day and evening.

16 September 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I was in the house for my sore on my left foot for the first day.

17 September 1840. It was clear all day. It clouded over in the evening and got cold. I was in the house all day for sore foot.

18 September 1840. It rained all day and evening. I was in the house all day for my sore foot.

19 September 1840. It was clear all day and evening. This evening was rather cool. I was in the house all day.

20 September 1840. It was clear all day until about 11 p.m. and then got cloudy. It began to rain about dusk and rained until about 8 p.m. and then cleared off some time in the evening. I was in the house all day for sore foot.

21 September 1840. It was clear all day and evening; got quite cold towards evening. I was in the house all day. Papa gave me a breast pin set with 9 stones-the one in the middle rather larger than the rest.

22 September 1840. There was a heavy frost last night - it was the first this season. The thermometer was down at 45 degrees. It was clear and cold all day and evening. Tacy, Sarah and Mary Roberts were here tonight for supper. Mary R. is from the country.

23 September 1840. It was clear and cool all day and evening. William Hanly was here this evening. I was in the house all day for my foot.

24 September 1840. It was clear all day and evening. Papa went to New York today. I was in the house all day.

25 September 1840. There were light flying clouds all day, but this evening was clear. I was in the house all day for my foot.

26 September 1840. It was clear all day and evening. Papa got home form New York last night about 11 p.m. I was in the house all day.

27 September 1840. It was cloudy in the morning. This afternoon it rained and this evening was clear. I was at home in the morning and evening and this afternoon I was at Mr. Suddards' - the hours of service changed today.

28 September 1840. It was clear all day. I got out for a little while this afternoon. William Hanly was here this evening.

29 September 1840. It was rather cloudy or misty all day and evening. I took a walk up to Mr. Engle's school with William Hanly this afternoon.

30 September 1840. There were light clouds or it was rather misty all day. It rained in the evening. Papa went up to Doylestown at 4 this morning. I had my hair cut today. I was down at the office in the morning and home in the afternoon and evening for my sore foot.

OCTOBER

1 October 1840. It was cloudy and rainy in the morning and in the afternoon and evening it was clear. I was at Grace Church this evening - it was the first of the Thursday evening lectures. Papa got home form Doylestown today.

2 October 1840. It was cloudy and rainy all day and evening. I was out with William Hanly this evening.

3 October 1840. It was cloudy and poured rain part of the day. The evening was rather more clear, but rather misty. I walked out as far as the Masonic Hall where they are preparing for the exhibition of the Franklin Institute.

4 October 1840. It was clear and cold all day and evening. There was a frost last night for the 2nd time this season. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I was at St. Andrew's.

5 October 1840. It was clear and rather cold all day and evening. We had a large Whig meeting and procession here today. The Harmony Engine was brought from the makers (finished) to the Franklin Institute exhibition today - she is a handsome affair.

6 October 1840. It was clear and pleasant all day and evening. I was at the Franklin Institute exhibition this afternoon.

7 October 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I went to the office today for the first time since my sore foot.

8 October 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I was at Grace Church this evening. The Water Witch Fire Company from Wilmington was here today.

9 October 1840. It was cloudy most of the day and this evening was rainy.

10 October 1840. It was cloudy and rainy all day and evening. I was at the Franklin Institute exhibition in the evening.

11 October 1840 It rained hard in the morning and this afternoon and evening were clear. I was at the Central Church in the morning, in the afternoon I was at St. Andrew's and in the evening I was at Grace Church.

12 October 1840. It was clear all day and evening. Mrs. Van Arsdale and Mrs. Prichett were here to supper. I was at the Franklin Institute exhibition this evening.

13 October 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I was at the Franklin Institute this evening.

14 October 1840. It was clear all day and evening. I was at the Franklin Institute with William Hanly.

15 October 1840. It was cloudy early in the morning and the rest of the day and evening were clear. I was at Grace Church this evening. It was very cold for this season tonight.

16 October 1840. It was clear and cold all day and evening. I was at the American Museum with William Hanly tonight.

17 October 1840. It was cloudy and cold all day and evening. I was at the Franklin Institute this evening. I got a new hat today from Mr. Harris on Chestnut St.

18 October 1840. It rained all day and evening. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I was at the Baptist Church on George St. - his text was the 4th chapter of Proverbs and 17th verse - it was on the evils of going to the theater.

19 October 1840. It was cloudy and very damp all day and evening. I was down at William Hanly's in the evening. The Locofoco Party had a procession tonight.

20 October 1840. It rained all day and evening. Benjamin Hunter, a boy from the country, came to our office.

21 October 1840. It was cloudy and rainy all day and it poured rain in the night.

22 October 1840. It was clear and rather cold all day and evening. I was at Grace Church in the evening. I got my black spotted vest today. I got my blue Beaver cloth overcoat lined in front with velvet.

23 October 1840. It was clear and rather cold all day and evening. Papa went to New York at 5 p.m. I went up to see John Hendricks this evening.

24 October 1840. It was clear in the morning and in the afternoon it rained. In the beginning of the evening there were light clouds and the latter part was clear. I got a new pair spotted pants.

25 October 1840 It was cloudy in the morning and it rained in the afternoon. This evening was clear and very cold. I was at Grace Church in the morning and evening and this evening I was at Dr. Tyng's. Uncle was here this evening.

26 October 1840. It was cloudy on and off through the day, but very cold. I had to wear an overcoat all day. We had ice in the gutters this morning - it was the first this season. This evening clear and cold.

27 October 1840. It was clear and cold all day and this evening was cloudy and cold.

28 October 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening. The wind was south southeast. I was at a Whig meeting this morning. Papa got home form New York tonight.

29 October 1840. It poured rain all day and evening. It was rather mild. There was wind early in the morning and the rest of the day it was South Southeast. It blew extremely hard in the afternoon and evening. I was at Church this evening - Mr. Suddards'.

30 October 1840. It was cloudy the greater part of the day and evening. The wind was West Northwest. This is the day of the Presidential Election.(7) I was at the office all day. This evening I was out with Ben Springer and Mr. Swain.

31 October 1840. It was clear all day and this evening was cloudy. The wind was West Northwest. There was a bad fire this morning on Juniper St. The Harmony was in service for the first time, the Columbia and North America christened her. The Locofocos stormed Charles' house on Chestnut near 6th and the Whig headquarters about 1 this morning pelting it with mud and breaking the windows and doing considerable injury.

NOVEMBER

1 November 1840. It was clear and pleasant all day. The wind was West Northwest and North in the evening. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and at St. Luke's in the afternoon. It has not been open for more than two or three weeks. This evening I was at St. Andrew's. Lydia went out to Fountain Green yesterday to spend Sunday.

2 November 1840. It was cloudy and misty all day and this evening was clear. The wind was North Northeast. It is rather cool this evening.

3 November 1840. It was clear all day. This evening was rather misty. The wind was North Northeast. B. Franklin Hammor came to our office today. I was out with Ben Springer and Al Swain this evening.

4 November 1840. It was clear all day and evening. The wind was North. There was a bad fire yesterday morning on 5th near Walnut St. I went down with William Hanly to see Miss Snell, and bring his sister home. The new circus on Walnut St. near 8th St. was opened tonight for the first time. Raymond & Warnock's Company performed there.

5 November 1840. It was clear all day and evening with the wind from the North. I was at a Musical Fund Society Concert this evening with Sarah Roberts and her cousin Rebecca, Mama, Lydia, Papa and Tacy Roberts.

6 November 1840. It was rather cloudy all day. This evening was a beautiful moonlit night. The wind was North Northwest. I was out in the evening with William Hanly and Sam Milligan at Whig headquarters. Mr. Algernon Roberts, Tacy and Rebecca Roberts and Mrs. Cuthbert were here to tea this evening. Mama and they went to the first lecture of the Mercantile Library of the season - Dale M. Dallas addressed the meeting.

7 November 1840. It was clear all day until about 4 p.m. and then clouded over. This evening was cloudy. The wind was North Northeast. I went to a private exhibition of the Automaton Chess player this evening at the Lecture Room of the Museum. Hunter went away from our office today. With Ben Springer and Al Swain through the latter part of the evening - we were at the Whig headquarters at 5th and Chestnut, Charles' Exchange, and Chandlers & Co. to hear the election news. Old Tip(8) has a majority of 249 persons.

8 November 1840. It rained all day and evening. The wind was North Northeast. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and evening and in the afternoon I was at St. Paul's.

9 November 1840. It was cloudy and misty with the wind from the West Northwest. This evening it cleared off at about 10 with a very strong and cold wind from the Northwest.

10 November 1840. It was cloudy all the morning. This afternoon was clear and this evening was moonlit and cold with a strong wind from the Northwest. I went to the Athenaeum Lecture this evening - David Paul Brown lectured on the Ruling Passions - with two of our cousins and Mama and Lydia. After the lecture we went up to Mr. Roberts' at 11th and Spruce Streets.G ot home about 1/2 past 10 p.m.

11 November 1840. It was clear and rather cold all day and this evening was clear and moonlit. The wind was North Northwest. I was out in the evening with Al Swain. I got the offices papered.

12 November 1840. It was cloudy and rather misty all day and the evening was clear. The wind was North Northwest. I was at the office all day and this evening I was at Grace Church.

13 November 1840. Today was clear and very pleasant all day. This evening was clear and rather cold with the wind from west. I was at the office. In the evening I was out with Ben Springer, at the Athenaeum, and at the exchange on Chestnut St. Yesterday there were 1000 guns fired on the Delaware from a vessel decorated with flags and drawn up and down by the steamboat in honour of the Whig victory in Pennsylvania and elsewhere.

14 November 1840. It was clear in the morning and this afternoon was cloudy. The wind in the morning was west and in the afternoon and evening it got round to the Southeast. It began to pour rain about 10 p.m. I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home to write a Deed Poll. There were severe claps of thunder and lightning this evening. Mr. McHenry was here this evening, he said it began with a little snow. At 20 minutes of 11 p.m. it was pouring rain extremely hard. If it snowed as above mentioned, it was the first snow of the season. It also hailed very hard about eleven p.m. - first this season.

15 November 1840. It was cloudy in the morning and the afternoon and evening were clear. The wind would change alternately to Southwest, West and Northwest. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon. In the evening I was at St. Paul's with William Hanly. It cleared up, rather cold, but was very pleasant after the rain.

16 November 1840. It was cloudy and cold all day and the evening was clear. The wind was West Northwest.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home sorting jewelry. Papa gave me a breast pin, a ring and a watch key - all of them are gold.

17 November 1840. It was cloudy all day. The former part of the evening was clear and the latter part cloudy. The wind was Southwest.

Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell were here tonight. I was at the office all day and in the evening I was out with Al Swain.

18 November 1840. It began to snow about 1/2 past 5 a.m. and it snowed steady all day and evening. At 20 minutes of 11 p.m. it was snowing very hard. The wind today was North Northwest. This is the first snow I have seen this season.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. There was a bad fire this morning about 2 o'clock at 7th and Chestnut St. It was very cold all day today and yesterday. I got my breast pin all stuck in the snow where it laid at the depth of 5 1/4 inches. I saw two or three sleighs out today but it was rather poor work.

19 November 1840. It was clear early in the morning and the rest of the day was cloudy. Also, the evening. The wind was West.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at Grace Church. It was a rather cold day and evening and it was bad walking.

20 November 1840. It was clear all day and evening, but rather cold. The wind was Northwest. I was at the office all day and this evening I was out with Al Swain. I went to Cousins on 9th St. about 9.

21 November 1840. It was cloudy all day and this evening was clear. The wind was West Northwest. I was at the office all day and this evening at the store and the Athenaeum.

22 November 1840. It began to rain about 8 a.m. and it rained hard all day. This evening it poured rain and blew very hard. The wind was Northeast. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon. This evening I was at home and I wrote a letter to Grandmama.

23 November 1840. It was cloudy all day and this evening was clear. The wind in the morning was Southwest; it got round about the middle of the day to Northwest. I was at the office all day. This evening I went to see the Chess Player at the Museum.

24 November 1840. It was clear all day and evening. The wind was west.

I was at the office all day and in the evening at National Theatre to see Mr. Power the great comedian - they played 3 pieces. I did not get home until after twelve o'clock. It was very pleasant today.

25 November 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening. The wind in the morning was west; it got around to Northeast about noon. It rained hard all the afternoon and evening. I was at the office all day. I went up to see the Magic Lantern at Grace Church this evening, but it was postponed until next Wednesday on account, as I suppose, of the weather.

26 November 1840. It was clear in the morning. It got cloudy about 2 p.m. and it snowed all the evening. The wind was West Northwest.

Today was the removal of the remains of General Mercer(9) to Laurel Hill. They had a great procession of all the military of this city and some of other cities. For the particulars look at The Ledger Vol. 10 No. 53 or The Chronicle Vol. 2 No. 21.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at Grace Church. There were upwards of thirty persons here today to see the procession of Mercer.

27 November 1840. It was clear all day and evening with the wind from the Northwest. I was at the office all day and in the early part of the evening I was out with Al Swain. I went up to Mr. Elliot's for Lydia about 1/2 past 8. I got home about 11. For the particulars of the procession of yesterday see papers of today - The Ledger vol. 10 no. 53.

28 November 1840. It was clear all day and evening with the wind from the Southwest. It was rather cold all day. There was plenty of ice in the gutters this morning. I was at the office all day and this evening out with Al Swain in Chestnut St., at the Athenaeum, and at Lord & Carlisle's Auction.

29 November 1840. It was clear all day and this evening was cloudy. The wind was South Southwest. I was at Grace Church in the morning. In the afternoon I was at St. Luke's and this evening I was at Dr.Tyng's at the corner of 8th & Chestnut St. with Al Swain, Bill Hanly & Sam Milligan. Margaret Hedges was here to dinner and at our church in the morning.

30 November 1840. It was cloudy all day. The wind Southwest, but it cleared off with a strong and cold wind from the west in the evening. I was at the office all day and this evening out with Albanus Swain in Chestnut St. The Arch Street Theatre was opened tonight.

DECEMBER

1 December 1840. It was cloudy in the morning and this afternoon and evening were clear. The wind was Northwest. It was very cold all day. I was at the office all day. This evening I went down town to sell my old coat. Stopped in at Laurny Tailor's for about an hour - it is at 5th & South St.

2 December 1840. It was clear all day and this evening was moonlit. The wind early in the morning was Northwest and the rest of the day it was Southwest.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I went up to see the Magic Lantern, I was out at 1/4 of 8. After that I went up to see John Hendricks. Caroline Gibbons was here today - it was the first time that she was ever in Philadelphia in her life.

3 December 1840. It was clear and cold all day and evening. The wind early in the morning was Southwest and the rest of the day it was north.

I was at Grace Church this evening and Mr. Suddards preached. I was at the office all day. Mama had a mantua(10) maker here - it was her first time here.

4 December 1840. It was cloudy and very cold in the morning with the wind from the Southeast. It snowed a little in the afternoon. It began to snow hard about 1/2 past 4 p.m. and it snowed very hard all the evening, giving every appearance of sleighing tomorrow.

I was at the lecture of the Mercantile Library this evening - Dr. Dorr(11) lectured on the American merchant. I mashed the little finger of my left hand with a pair of dumb bells about 1/4 past 5 at Mr. Chash's office. I was at the office all day. At 1/4 after 10 p.m. it was snowing as hard as I ever saw it.

5 December 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening. The snow was 8 inches deep this morning - fine sleighing. Mama and Lydia were out with cousin Elizabeth a sleighing. The wind was south. My finger was very painful today and I was in the house all day and evening. It blew extremely hard in the night and snowed.

6 December 1840. We had a great snowstorm today - it snowed as hard as ever I saw it and made first rate sleighing. The wind was Northeast. It snowed in the evening until about 1/2 past 9 and then cleared with a westerly wind to a beautiful moonlit night.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon and this evening I was at home on account of the snowstorm.

7 December 1840. It was clear and cold all day with the wind from the Northwest. It was splendid sleighing and there was a great quantity of sleighs out. I rode up and down Chestnut St. 3 times today in an omnibus sleigh and found it very fine. I was at the museum tonight to hear a lecture on the journey of the Israelites. I slept at Berger & Shober's with Warner Jones tonight. Mr. Campbell went away to live in his new house. I was at the office all day. For account of the snow see The Chronicle vol. 2 no. 29.

8 December 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening with the wind from the Southeast. I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the house. It was cold today. There was fine sleighing and I rode 3 times up and down in the omnibus sleigh.

9 December 1840. It was damp and foggy all day. This evening was extremely foggy. The wind was Southeast. I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the first meeting of the National Literary Institute. The snow melted very much today, but a number of sleighs out.

10 December 1840. It was cloudy and it thawed very much all day. The wind was Southwest. It cleared up about dark and the wind got around to the northwest. I was at the office all day. In the evening at the Museum with Joseph Cardoza and another young man. Mr. & Mrs. Roberts were here this evening.

11 December 1840. It was clear all day and evening with the wind from the West Northwest. I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the lecture of the Mercantile Library Association. Mr. Law lectured on literary impostures. There was heavy thunder yesterday morning which cleared away the fog - it is said that it was the most dense since 1799. There were sleighs out today and yesterday.

12 December 1840. It was cloudy all day and the wind was Northeast. It commenced raining about 1/2 past 8 p.m. and it rained from that time all the evening. At 12 at night it was still raining hard.

I went to see Mr. Booth at the Arch Street Theatre play Richard the Third. Al Swain was with me at the office all day. Thursday last was the first night that I slept in the front room of the third story since Mr. Campbell went away.

13 December 1840. It was cloudy when I first got up but it was clear all day. This evening was cloudy until about 9 o'clock and it then cleared off. At 10 p.m. it was clear. The wind today was West Southwest.

I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning. In the afternoon I was at Mr. Brainard's with Al Swain and Bill Hanly and this evening I was at Mr. Suddards' with Al Swain & Bill Hanly.

14 December 1840. It was clear all day and evening. The wind in the morning early was west and the rest of the day it was South Southwest.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the Philadelphia Museum. After the Museum was out I took a walk with Bill Hanly. There is still a great deal of snow on the ground despite the rain.

15 December 1840. It was clear all day and evening, excepting a little while in the afternoon when it was cloudy. The wind was South Southwest.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was out with Al Swain & Bill Hanly until about 1/2 past 9 p.m. I then went down to Mr. King's for Sarah Roberts. I got home about 1/2 past 10.

16 December 1840. It was cloudy. It began to rain about 10 a.m. and it rained hard all the morning until about 1/2 past 1 p.m. when it commenced snowing very hard. It snowed hard all afternoon until about 6 p.m. and it then stopped and it melted as fast as it came down. It is 10 p.m. and it is quite clear now. The wind North Northwest.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at a meeting of the Union Library Association with Al Swain, El Pasy and others - we had good speaking there.

17 December 1840. Today was changeable and there were flying clouds all day. It snowed for about 10 minutes about 1/2 past 4 p.m. The wind was West Southwest.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the Musical Fund Society's 2nd concert of the season with Mama, Lydia and Sarah Roberts. Mr. Brackman & Mr. Bailey sang.

18 December 1840. It was clear and very cold today. It froze quite hard last night. The wind was West Southwest. I was at the office all day. This evening was clear and I was at a concert at the Mitchell Hall on 4th above Vine with Al Swain, El Pasy, Ben Springer et al.

19 December 1840. It was clear and very cold all day and evening with the wind from the West Southwest. It froze very hard last night.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the Museum with Sarah Roberts to hear Mr. Bailey and Mr. Norton et al.

20 December 1840. It was slightly cloudy or misty all day, but very cold. This evening was cloudy. It is now 20 minutes of 10 p.m. and it has every appearance of snow, if it is not snowing lightly now.

I was at St. Luke's Church in the morning. This afternoon I was at Grace Church and this evening I was at St. Stephen's with Bill Hanly and Al Swain.

21 December 1840. It was clear and very cold all day and evening. The ground was covered with snow this evening. The wind was West. The wind for several days back has been Southwest and early in the morning and afterward it would get around to the west and remain so all day.

I was out a skating on Parker's lower pond - it has been frozen for several days - it was the first time I was out this season. The dam is frozen, but there are no persons on it yet, and the Delaware was nearly fast on Saturday morning.

I was at the office until 1/2 past 3 p.m. then I went out skating. In the evening I was at the Museum. Mr. & Mrs. Thomas, Mr. & Mrs. Jewell, and Sarah and Lydia Roberts were here this evening.

22 December 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening. The wind in the morning was South Southwest and it got around to the west in the evening and blew very hard in the night.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was in the house to write a deed for Mr. Campbell. I was up until 12 p.m. Papa gave me a three bladed knife today with a buck handle. At 12 p.m. it was blowing very hard. Mrs. Gibbons was here for supper and slept here. It was very cold and the river was full of ice today. It snowed a little through the day. I rode in a cab for the first time in my life today - they have been in use for about 3 months.

23 December 1840. It was clear and cold all day with the wind from the Northwest. I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the house writing a deed for Mr. Campbell. The Schuylkill is now fast and there are persons skating on it. The Delaware is full of ice.

24 December 1840. It was cloudy on and off all day with the wind from the West Southwest. This evening was clear and cold. I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the Museum until about 8 p.m. with Al Swain. We then called for Ben Springer, and afterwards took a walk up and down Chestnut St. and about town. There were a tremendous number of people out walking tonight.

25 December 1840. It was clear but rather misty and very cold with the wind from the South Southwest.

I went down to the office and stayed there until Al Swain called for me at about 1/2 past 9 a.m.; we then called for Bill Hanly and went out on the dam to skate We skated up as far as the railroad bridge and returned. We then skated about a little and we then went in and got our dinners. In the afternoon I was walking up and down Chestnut St. with Al Swain, Bill Hanly and Sam Milligan. We went to the National Theatre to see the Naide Queen played, which was the most handsome thing ever played. It was clear when we went in at 1/2 past 6 p.m. but was snowing hard and the ground was covered when we came out at 1/2 past 11 p.m. I did not get to bed until after 12 p.m. Mama and Lydia and Papa were up at Mrs. Mary Roberts' this evening with all. I spent a pleasant day.

26 December 1840. It was snowing hard when I got up and the ground was covered to the depth of an inch. It commenced raining at about 10 a.m. and rained hard all the morning and afternoon and made very bad walking; it cleared up about 6 p.m. and was clear all the evening and froze hard. Wind South Southeast. At the office all day; evening at the Vaudeville at 10th and Chestnut St. on the fourth story.

27 December 1840. It was cloudy all day and evening until about 9 p.m. It snowed a little about 1/2 past 4 p.m. with the wind from the Northwest. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon. This evening I was at Mr. Tyng's with Bill Hanly and C.E., W.B & L.W.P. The text from this evening was the 4th chapter of James and the 14th verse. It was extremely cold today and this evening.

28 December 1840 It was clear and cold all day and evening. The wind in the morning was Southwest and this afternoon it was West Southwest. I was at the office all day. I was out with Al Swain, Hanly & Milligan.

29 December 1840. It was lightly cloudy all day, but the sun would shine out at different periods through the day. It cleared off cold about 7 p.m. It thawed very much today. The wind was Southeast. I was at Mr. Barclay's concert at the Museum tonight. I was at the office all day. Lydia went to the party of Louisa Woods tonight.

30 December 1840. It was cloudy all day and thawed very much. The wind was changeable - it was West, Northwest, North, and Northeast at different periods through the day.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I went to Frank Johnson's second concert of the season at the Museum. After it was out I was out to cousins at 9th St. I came home about 10 o'clock. Mrs. Reynold's was here tonight from Wilmington and she stayed here all night. It was cloudy tonight.

31 December 1840. It was cloudy all the morning. The wind was Northeast, but it got around to the Northwest about noon. It was rather clear through the afternoon, but got cloudy about dark and was so all night. There was a general thaw today which made the walking very bad. I was at the office all day. This evening I went to Grace Church to hear Mr. Suddards preach. After that was out, I came down home, and from there I went to a watch meeting at Dr. Grant's Church. I got home at quarter of 1 a.m.; I was with Bill Hanly and Sam Millagan.
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Notes:

(1) Bethlehem Female Seminary now Moravian Academy, founded 1742. See A History of the Bethlehem Female Seminary 1785-1858, William C. Reihel, Philadelphia 1858, p. 347 Catalog of Pupils 1840: "Lydia W. Erwin, b. Feb. 1827, d. of Henry Erwin, Phila., Pa. Same: 1844 Mary Catherine Erwin, d. Francis Erwin, Phila., Pa., married H.B. Jones; p.415, 1839, Eliza Roberts, b. Jan. 1826, d. of Edward Roberts, Phila., Pa., m. Lewis S. Ware; 1839, Anna F. Roberts, b. 9 Nov. 1827, d. of same, m. Edward Browning. (FJD)

(2) Stephen Higgison Tyng (1880-1885), clergyman in Philadelphia 1829-1845 (St. Paul's Protestant Episcopal Church) and New York 1845-1878. Renowned as a preacher, leader in the low church party in the Protestant Episcopal denomination. Webster's Biographical Dictionary. He was the first rector of the Church of the Epiphany, N.W. corner 15th and Chestnut Streets. For Tyng see DAB, Vol. IXX, p. 101.

(3) Charles Erwin (b1824) J.Warner Erwin's first cousin.

(4) The Athenaeum of Philadelphia, a library, was founded in 1814. It moved its collection to the present building on Sixth Street below Walnut in 1847. Until then it was housed in the hall of the American Philosophical Society on 5th Street "within the State House yard."

(5) Joseph Parrish (1779-1840), a highly respected and well known physician, an elder in the Society of Friends and an advocate of the abolition of slavery. Scharf and Westcott, p. 1262.

(6) 6. Locofoco, a radical wing of the Democratic party.

(7) Congress established Election Day to be on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November in 1845. Before that each state could set the date so long as it was 34 days before the convening of the Electoral College.

(8) President to be, William Henry Harrison, hero of Tippecanoe, an Indian village destroyed by United States troops in 1811.

(9) The remains of General Hugh Mercer, who was killed at the battle of Princeton, were moved from Christ Church on Second Street to Laurel Hill Cemetery. Sharf & Westcott, p.783-748.8 President to be, William Henry Harrison, hero of Tippecanoe, an Indian village destroyed by United States troops in 1811.

(10) Mantua: A loose fitting gown worn (mainly) in the 18th and 19th centuries. JRD

(11) Dr. Benjamin Dorr, rector of Christ Church.


1841

JANUARY

1 January 1841. It commenced snowing this morning at 25 minutes past 8 a.m. It snowed and hailed all the morning and afternoon until about 3 p.m. when it commenced raining very hard and made extremely bad walking. The wind was Northeast until about 1/2 past 4 p.m. when it got around to the Northwest. It cleared off splendidly about 8 p.m.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the Museum with Al Swain until about 9 p.m. I then went to cousin Algernon Roberts' - they had company there. I came here in their sleigh at 1/4 of 11 p.m. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 27 degrees, at 1/2 past 5 p.m. 32 degrees, and at 11 p.m. 20 degrees. It is very cold tonight. Papa gave me my black thermometer today. I got up this morning at 20 minutes of 8 and got to bed at 25 minutes past 11 p.m.

2 January 1841. It was clear and cold all day and evening. The wind was Northwest. The lower [?], that is lower than the State House [?], got around to South about 1/2 past 3 p.m.

I got up at 1/2 past 7 and got to bed at 10 o'clock p.m. There were a great number of sleighs out today (the walking is very slippery and unpleasant). The thermometer today stood at 8 a.m. 19 degrees, at 1/2 past 2 p.m. 30 degrees, at 6 p.m. 25 degrees, and at 9 p.m. 20 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was up at John Hendricks'. Mary Burr had a son on the 31st of December last.

3 January 1841. It was clear and extremely cold all day and evening. The wind was Northwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 8 degrees, at 1/2 past 8, 10 degrees, at 1/2 past 11, 12 degrees, at 1 p.m. it was 12 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 9 degrees, and at 1/4 past 10 p.m. it was 8 degrees. I was at Grace Church in the morning, Mr. Suddards preached from the 19th chapter of Daniel, the 10th verse. I was only at Mr. Suddards' towards the last part of the sermon, as I went to the Arch Street Quaker Meeting [first] and stayed until it was out and then came up to Mr. Suddards'. Afternoon at Mr. Suddards'- it was anniversary of the Sunday School. This evening I was at St. Andrew's - the text was the 24th chapter of Matthew, part of the 44th verse. I was with Al Swain, Joseph Hoopes, Ben Springer, and Bill Hanly. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 7 and got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m. I was up at Mr. Roberts' after church in the evening.

4 January 1841. It was rather cloudy all day, but generally speaking it was what you might call a clear day. The wind was from the Southwest. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. 9 1/2 degrees, at 1/2 past 8 a.m. 10 degrees, at 1/2 past 10 a.m. 19 degrees, at 2 p.m. 19 degrees, at 6 p.m. 16 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 15 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went to the Museum. This evening was clear and moonlit. There were a great number of sleighs out today and it was very fine sleighing. I got up at 1/4 after 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. I was down at the river today around 4 p.m. and there were a number of people skating upon it up by Arch and Vine. It must have frozen over last night. It was fast above and below, but not in front of the city as the ferry boats kept it open there.

5 January 1841. It was cloudy all day with the wind North Northeast. It rained or hailed all the evening, I could not tell which.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum until about 9 p.m. and from there I went up to Mr. McIntyre's for the Miss P.P. - there was a party there. The thermometer today was at 8 a.m. 16 degrees, at 1/4 after 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. was 24 degrees, at 6 p.m. was 25 degrees and 11 p.m. it was 27 degrees. I got up at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m. Mama was out a sleighing twice today.

6 January 1841. It rained very hard all day and there was heavy fog at different periods through the day - particularly at about noon and at 4 p.m. when you could not see across the street. The rain melted the snow away pretty much and made extremely bad walking. The wind was Southeast except for the middle of the day when it was Southwest for awhile. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 36 degrees, at 1/2 past 1 p.m. it was 44 degrees, at 9 p.m. it was 46 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. it was 46 degrees. I got up at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. Notwithstanding the rain, there were a number of sleighs out. Mama and Lydia were at Aunt Nancy's a sleighing yesterday. It was foggy, raining and very damp all evening, as well as mild.

7 January 1841. It rained hard all day, which made it very disagreeable for pedestrians as the walking was very bad and the atmosphere was extremely damp and unpleasant. There was a strong and warm wind from the southeast. The thermometer at 8 a.m. and 1/4 after 8 a.m. was 56 degrees, at 1/2 past 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. it was 58 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 57 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum - it was the Master Hughes' third concert. I got up this morning at 20 minutes after 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m. At 1/4 past 10 p.m., it was pouring rain as it has been all evening; it was very damp all day.

8 January 1841. Today was as mild as a spring day and was extremely pleasant. The rain of the last two days and nights has made the snow and the ice entirely disappear from the pavement and streets; the rain has also opened the river. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 and 8 a.m. was 43 degrees, at 1/2 past 1 and 2 p.m. it was 48 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 44 degrees, and at 10 p.m. and 1/2 past 10 it was 40 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum for the Master Hughes' 4th concert. The warm rain has thawed the ice and made a great freshet in the Schuylkill today. The wind today was Northwest. I got up this morning at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. It clouded over about 4 p.m. and was cloudy through the evening; at 1/2 past 10 p.m. there were high clouds from the South, but it was moonlit. The tide was so high in the Delaware that it ran over the wharves.

9 January 1841. There were high-flying clouds all day with the wind blowing from the North and Northwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 36 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 44 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 42 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 40 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went around to cousins' on 9th St and spent the evening there. I got up at 20 minutes past 7 this morning and I got to bed at 1 a.m. I was writing a deed for Papa. For the particulars of the freshet - See Chronicle (Daily) Vol. 2 No. 58. This evening was very cloudy. At 1 a.m. it is very damp and cloudy and looking like rain.

10 January 1841. Today was a damp, drizzly, rainy, and a very unpleasant day with the wind from the Northeast. This evening was damp and unpleasant. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 35 degrees, at 1/2 past 12 it was 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 38 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 37 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 47 degrees. I was at Grace Church in the morning. Mr. Suddards preached from the 35th chap-ter of Ezekiel, the 4th and 4 following verses. I was at Mr. Tyng's in the afternoon with Ben Springer, Bill Hanly, Al Swain, and Tom Gillispie. He preached from the 110th chapter of Psalms, the 10th verse. This evening I was at St. Luke's with Al Swain and Ben Springer. Mr. Spear preached from the 55th chapter of Isaiah, the 2nd verse. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes of 11 p.m. I was down at the River Delaware at about 1/2 past 2 p.m. - the water was up to the top of the wharves and the tide was running up.

11 January 1841. It was rainy, foggy, damp, and very unpleasant out today with the wind from the Northeast. This evening was the same. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 38 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 44 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 42 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 40 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at Mr. Miller's making out water rent bills for him. I got up this morning at 25 minutes of 8 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 11 p.m. For more particulars of the freshet - See Ledger Vol. 10 No. 91 & 92. Lydia was at the theatre tonight for the first time in her life.

12 January 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. The wind was West Northwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 38 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 43 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 38 degrees, and at 10 p.m. and 20 minutes of 11 it was 36 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I as down to Mr. Miller's making out water rent bills. I got up at 20 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m. There were very light clouds flying today.

13 January 1841. It was snowing hard when I got up and it stopped at about 1/2 past 8 a.m. until about 12 when it commenced raining. It rained all the afternoon and evening and made very slushy and bad walking. The wind was Northeast. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 36 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 35 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 34 degrees, and at 10 p.m. and 1/2 past 10 p.m. it was 33 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was down at Mr. Miller's making out water rent bills. I got up this morning at 10 minutes of 8 and got to bed at 11 p.m. At 20 minutes of 11 p.m. it was raining slowly.

14 January 1841. It was a raw, damp, and very unpleasant day and evening. The wind was North Northeast. The thermometer at 8 a.m. and 2 p.m. was 33 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 31 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 31 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at Mr. Miller's making out water rent bills. It was much colder during this afternoon and evening than it has been for several days past. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes of 11 p.m. I finished the w.r. bills tonight.

15 January 1841. Today was a damp, rainy and very unpleasant day with the wind from the Northeast (although it got around to the Northwest in the latter part of the afternoon). The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 32 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 35 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 34 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 34 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the Museum. Morris, the man that murdered a person on the Delaware, was hung today between 12 & 2 p.m. I received a letter from Grandmama yesterday. The banks resumed special payments today - .tc Run on U.S. banks#

there was a great run on the US banks. I got up at 25 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m.

16 January 1841. It was a damp, raw, cloudy and very unpleasant day. The wind was from the Northwest all day until about 4 p.m. when it got around to the Northeast. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 32 1/4 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 36 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 35 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 34 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum with the Robertses for the Master Hughes' last concert. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 7 and got to bed at 10 p.m. For the particulars of Morris' execution see - Ledger Vol. 2 No. 64. There was not so much of a run on the banks today.

17 January 1841. It poured rain until about 12 when it stopped and then cleared off at about 8 p.m. The wind was Southwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 47 degrees, at 1/2 past 12 it was 46 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 46 degrees, at 1/4 past 5 p.m. it was 44 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 43 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 40 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Suddards preached in the morning from the 1st chapter of Malachi, the 14th verse and in the afternoon from the 11th chapter of Hebrews, the 5th verse. This evening I was at St. Paul's and Mr. Newton preached a text from the 7th chapter of St. John, verses 37 & 38. I got up this morning at 25 minutes of 8 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

18 January 1841. Today was clear and very cold compared to what it has been for some days back and this evening was cold and clear. The wind was West Northwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 23 degrees, at 1 p.m. it was 23 1/2 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 23 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 19 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 17 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the Museum to see the magicianess and the ventriloquist. For the confession of Morris the murderer see - Daily Chronicle Vol. 2 No. 65. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 7 and got to bed at 10 minutes past 11 p.m. The streets and gutters were all frozen this morning. It will freeze hard tonight.

19 January 1841. It was cloudy and very cold all day and evening. The wind was North Northwest. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was 12 degrees, at 8 a.m. it was 13 degrees, at 1/2 past 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. it was 21 degrees, at 6 p.m. and 10 p.m. it was 19 degrees. I was at the office all day. This evening I went to hear Mr. Moriarty lecture on patriotism with Mama, Lydia, Miss Elizabeth and Lydia Roberts. When we got home Mrs. Thomas and Mrs. Carr were here to spend the evening. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m. At 1/2 past 10 p.m. there is every appearance of snow.

20 January 1841. It snowed all day - very hard in the afternoon - and it turned to rain in the evening. The wind was Northeast. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 21 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 28 degrees, at 6 p.m. and 10 p.m. it was 30 degrees.

Mama and Papa went to Miss Chrissy's wedding tonight - she married Mr. Peabody.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was in the house where I wrote a letter to Grandmama. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 12.

21 January 1841. It rained all day which made tremendously bad walking with the snow of yesterday. The wind was Northeast and it got around to Northwest sometime in the afternoon. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 31 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 36 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 34 degrees, and at 1/2 past 11 p.m. it was 34 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went to the Walnut St. Theatre to see Mazeppa played. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m. The theatre got out at 1/2 past 1 p.m.

22 January 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening. The wind was Northwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 34 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 35 degrees, and at 6 p.m. and 10 p.m. it was 30 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum to see Mrs. Wyman and her brother for the second time. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 10 p.m.

23 January 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening. The wind was North Northwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 29 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 35 degrees, and at 6 p.m. and 10 p.m. it was 33 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum to see Mrs. Wyman and her brother for the third time - I was with Lydia. Mrs. Wyman told my fortune, it was that I paid attention to 7 ladies, constant to one, and would be married in 1 year, 7 months, and 1 day.

I got up this morning at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

There was a bad fire this morning about 1 o'clock; there were four men killed at the fire; it was on Market near 3rd St. Mr. Davis was brought in guilty of murder in the first degree.

24 January 1841. It was cloudy all day and this evening was starlit. The wind was West Southwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 33 degrees, at 1 and 2 p.m. it was 43 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 39 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 36 degrees.

I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon. The text in the morning was the 3rd chapter of Ezekiel, the 26th verse and in the afternoon was the 11th chapter of Hebrews, the 5th & 6th verses. I was at the Methodist Church near Arch St. in the evening. I got there so late I did not hear the text. I got up this morning at 10 minutes of 8 a.m. and got to bed 10 p.m. It rained a little in the afternoon.

25 January 1841. Today was clear and very pleasant - it was like a spring day, though it clouded over in the latter part of the afternoon, but got clear again in the evening. The wind was West Southwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 33 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 44 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 39 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 35 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went to see Mrs. Wyman at the Museum for the fourth time. I got a pair of flying squirrels today. I got up this morning at 20 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

26 January 1841. It was clear all day until about 4 p.m. when it clouded over, but it got clear again about 9 p.m. The wind was Northwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 32 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 39 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 37 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 35 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went to the Museum to see Mrs. Wyman for the fifth time. I got up this morning at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 12. At 1/2 past 11 p.m. it was clear and rather cold.

27 January 1841. It was cloudy, wet, and damp all day with the wind from the Southwest. It cleared off about 6 p.m. and the wind got around to the West. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 43 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 41 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 38 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Athenaeum reading. I got up this morning at 10 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

28 January 1841. It was clear all day and this evening was rather cloudy or misty. The wind was North Northwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 39 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 45 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 42 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 38 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum to see Mrs. Wyman and her brother for the sixth time. There was a grand Tippecanoe Ball at the National Theatre this evening - tickets were ten dollars. I got up this morning at 25 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. Lydia was at the Museum with me tonight. At 1/2 past 10 there was every appearance of a rainy day tomorrow.

29 January 1841. It was a damp and rainy day and evening; it hailed for sometime during the morning. The wind was Northeast. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 36 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 38 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 37 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 36 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum. Mr. and Mrs. Algernon Roberts and Sarah and Tacy Roberts were here to supper this evening. I got up this morning at 20 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

30 January 1841. It was cloudy most of the day. The wind was Southwest, but got around to the West about 1/2 past 4 p.m. and cleared off. This evening was clear. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 36 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 41 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 38 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 37 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum with Lydia and Fanny and Sissy Roberts. I got up this morning at 20 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m. Elizabeth Hendricks had a son yesterday morning - his name is Albert.

31 January 1841. It was cloudy all day and it cleared off splendidly about 1/2 past 8 p.m. The wind was Southwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 32 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 40 degrees, at 6 p.m. It was 37 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 32 degrees.

I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon. The text in the morning was the 5th chapter of 2 Corinthians, the 13th verse and the afternoon in Proverbs. I was at Dr. Tyng's this evening; the text was the 47th chapter of Ezekiel, the 12th verse.

There was ice this morning - there has been none for a week or two. For particulars of the Harrison Ball see the Chronicle (Daily) Vol. 2 No. 46 & 47. I got up this morning at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

FEBRUARY

1 February 1841. It rained, snowed, and hailed today. It rained very hard all of the afternoon. The wind was Northeast. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 36 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 34 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 36 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 34 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum, but there was no performance on account of the indecency of the weather. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m. At 10 p.m. it is damp and rainy.

2 February 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening. The wind was most all parts of the compass - in the morning it was Northwest, it then got around to North then Northeast, then East, then Southeast, and then South and now at 1/4 past 10 p.m. it is Southwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 33 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 37 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 37 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 36 degrees. I was at the office all day.

I went to cousins' on 9th St. for supper. From there I went with Mama and Tacy Roberts to the Athenaeum lecture to hear Mr. Bethany lecture on Holland. I got up this morning at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes of 11 p.m. At 1/2 past 10 p.m. it is as clear as a bell and a fine moonlit night.

3 February 1841. Truly, this was a strange kind of day. In the morning, from the time that I got up, it was as clear and warm as a May morning until about 9 a.m. when it clouded over and commenced raining about 10 a.m. It rained for 1/2 an hour and then cleared up. It again got cloudy and rained. The wind being from the Southwest got around to the Northwest and by 1 p.m. it was as clear and pleasant as a spring day. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 36 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 41 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 35 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 31 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went up to the Museum to hear Mr. & Mrs. Martin and Miss Inverarity sing. After the Museum was out, I went up to Mr. Elliotts' for Lydia. I then took her home and then went for Mama and Mrs. Carr. I arrived home at 11 p.m. after a good evening's job. Papa went to New York at 3 p.m. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 12. At 10 p.m. it is damp and rainy.

4 February 1841. It was clear and much colder than it has been for two weeks back with the wind West Northwest. This evening was moonlit, but hazy, with light flying clouds. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 30 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 36 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 32 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 30 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum to see Mr. Coleman's [?] lady. Mr. and Mrs. Roberts spent the evening here. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m. At 10 p.m. it is damp and rainy. There was a report this afternoon that the U.S. Bank had broke.

5 February 1841. There were light flying clouds all day. The first part of the evening was cloudy. The wind was North Northeast. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 27 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 37 degrees, at 6 p.m. and 10 p.m. it was 32 degrees. There was a total eclipse of the moon tonight.

I was at the office all day and the evening I was at Grace Church with Bill Hanly. After church I went to the Museum and heard the two last songs. I got up this morning at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. By 1/2 past 10 p.m. the eclipse was 1/2 off. Mr. Newton preached this evening at church; his text was the 7th chapter of St. John, the 37 & 38 verses. Papa got home from New York tonight about 1/2 past 11 p.m.

6 February 1841. It was cloudy all day. The wind was changeable - it was North Northeast, North Northwest, West and Southwest. It cleared off sometime through the evening, it also rained for about a quarter of an hour in the afternoon. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 33 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 40 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 38 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 37 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum for Mr. Bailey's benefit. Mrs. Wood sang at it. She was much affected when she came out and cried and could not sing for sometime on account of the disturbance made at Chestnut Street Theatre when she played Norma. I got up this morning at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes of 11 p.m. At 20 minutes past 10 p.m. it was getting cloudy.

7 February 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening. It snowed for 4 or 5 hours through the day; it commenced when I was in church in the morning and ended while I was in church in the afternoon. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 37 degrees, at 1/2 past 12, 2 p.m, and 6 p.m. it was 35 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 34 degrees. I was at Grace Church in the morning, afternoon, and evening.

Mr. [blank] preached in the morning and afternoon; the text for this morning was a part of the 15th verse of the 17th chapter of St John, and the afternoon's was the 4th chapter of Ephesians, the 21st verse. Mr. Suddards preached in the evening; his text was the 3rd chapter of Isaiah, the first verse. I got up this morning at 20 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 10 p.m.

8 February 1841. It was clear all day and evening and rather cold. The wind was North. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 31 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 37 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 35 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 33 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the Museum to see Yanker Hill and hear Miss Reynolds sing. I got up this morning at 10 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

9 February 1841. It was cloudy today. It commenced snowing about 10 a.m. and we had a real old fashioned snowstorm all day and evening with the wind from the Northeast. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 33 degrees, at 2 p.m. and 6 p.m. it was 34 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 33 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went up to see Mr. Elliott about getting a place in his office. I got home around 8 p.m. and stayed home the rest of the evening. I got up this morning at 10 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was snowing harder than ever.

10 February 1841. It was clear until about the middle of the day when it clouded over and snowed for awhile. The wind was from the Southwest. It then cleared up, got very cold, and the wind got around to the Northwest. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was 28, at 8 a.m. it was 30 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 34 degrees, at 1/2 past 6 p.m. it was 36 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 32 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum. I got up this morning at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes of 11 p.m. This evening was clear and cold. The snow of yesterday was about 3 inches deep and there were a number of sleighs out today, but it was all spoiled by the thaw.

11 February 1841. Today was clear and very cold compared to what it has been for sometime back. It rained very hard all of the afternoon. The wind was Northwest. Thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was 17 degrees, at 8 a.m. it was 19 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 22 degrees, at 1/2 past 6 p.m. it was 17 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 14 degrees.

I was at the office all day. Then I was at the Museum with Mama, Lydia, and Mrs. E. Roberts to hear Yanker Hill. I got up this morning at 5 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes of 11 p.m. There was plenty of ice and snow on the ground today.

12 February 1841. It was clear and extremely cold all day and evening. The wind was Northwest. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was 9 degrees, at 8 a.m. it was 10 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 20 degrees, at 1/2 past 6 p.m. it was 14 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 13 degrees.

I went to see Mr. Elliott's office for the first time and stayed about an hour. I was at Mr. Mitchell's office the rest of the day. This evening I was home writing for Mr. Campbell. I got up this morning at 10 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m. There was a great deal of ice made last night.

13 February 1841. It was clear and very cold all day. The wind was West. The thermometer at 1/4 past 7 a.m. was 11 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 19 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. it was 19 degrees.

I was at the office all day except for an hour and a quarter when I was with Mr. Elliot. I was at the Museum in the evening - it was Mr. Brophy's farewell concert. I got up this morning at 5 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes past 11 p.m. I think last night was the coldest night that we had this winter - it froze in my room. I got a full circle brown cloak this evening - Papa gave it to me.

14 February 1841. It was clear and cold all day and evening. The wind was Northwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 19 degrees, at 1/4 of 1 p.m. it was 27 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 24 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 19 degrees.

I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and evening. The text in the morning was the 10th chapter of St. Luke, the 21 verse and in the evening it was on the 2nd Epistle to the Thessalonians. In the afternoon I was at Dr. Tyng's. Mr. [blank] preached the 9th verse of the 11th chapter of Corinthians II. I got up this morning at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m.

15 February 1841. Today was clear and very cold with a strong and cold wind from the Northwest. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was 16 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 25 degrees, at 7 p.m. it was 22 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 20 degrees. I was at the office all day except two hours when I was at Mr. Elliot's. This evening I was down at the Church of the Evangelist on Christian St. near 2nd St. with Aaron Thompson. Mr. Clark preached from the 14th chapter of St. Luke, the 24th verse. I got up this morning at 5 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes past 11 p.m. Left T. Mitchell & Sons conveyancing office this evening.

16 February 1841. Today was clear and warmer than it has been for some time past. The wind was Southwest and this evening was very cloudy. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was 21 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 34 degrees, and at 6 and 1/2 past 1 a.m. was 30 degrees.

This morning I was walking about town. In the afternoon I skated up to the falls with Al Swain. This evening I was at William Hanly's party - I enjoyed myself more than I ever did at any other - and I got home at 1/2 past 1 a.m. I got up this morning at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes past 2 a.m. At 2 a.m. it was very cloudy.

17 February 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening and thawed very much. The wind Northwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 32 degrees, at 1/2 past 2 p.m. it was 38 degrees, at 1/4 of 7 p.m. it was 36 degrees, and at 1/2 past 12 it was 31 degrees.

I went to Mr. Elliot's for good today. This evening I was at home and I wrote a $12 deed for Mr. Campbell. I got up this morning at 20 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 1 a.m.

18 February 1841. It was cloudy through the morning with the wind from the North. It was clear in the afternoon and evening and the wind got round to the Southeast.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was home where I wrote a $12 deed for Mr. Campbell. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 27 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 32 degrees, at 7 p.m. it was 31 degrees, and at 12 midnight it was 30 degrees. I got up this morning at 20 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 12.

19 February 1841. Today was cloudy with the wind from the Southeast. The wind got around to the Northwest in the latter part of the afternoon and cleared up cold. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 30 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 38 degrees, at 1/4 of 8 p.m. it was 36 degrees, and at 1/4 of 12 it was 32 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home until about 8, I then went up to John Hendricks'. I got up this morning at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 12.

20 February 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. The wind was West Northwest, and in the evening it was Southwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 29 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 42 degrees, at 1/4 of 7 p.m. it was 38 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 36 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum with Mrs. Roberts, Mrs. Thomas, and Miss Cuthbert. I got up this morning at 25 minutes of 8 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m. It was quite mild today.

21 February 1841. It was clear and very pleasant until about the middle of the day when it clouded over. It was cloudy for the rest of the day and evening. The wind was Southwest. The thermometer at 1/2 past 8 a.m. was 35 degrees, at 1 p.m. it was 49 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 45 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 40 degrees.

I was at St. Luke's Church in the morning. Mr. Spear preached from the 7th chapter of St. Luke, the 32nd through 34th verses. In the afternoon I was at Dr. Tyng's and he preached from the 51st chapter of Psalms, the 17th verse. In the evening I was at Mr. Bethany's and he preached - I could not hear the text. I got up this morning at 20 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

22 February 1841. Today was changeable but very warm and pleasant and this evening was clear. The wind was North Northwest. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was 37 degrees, at 1/2 past 6 p.m. it was 42 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 it was 38 degrees. I was at the office all day.

This evening I was walking about town with Al Swain and Ben Springer. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

23 February 1841. It was clear, pleasant and very warm until about the middle of the day when it clouded over and got a great deal colder. It remained so all the rest of the day and evening. The wind was Northwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 36 degrees, at 1/2 past 1 p.m. it was 56 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 50 degrees, at 1/2 past 6 p.m. it was 38 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 30 degrees. There was a fall in the temperature of 26 degrees between 1/2 past 1 p.m. and 10 p.m.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at Mr. Mitchell's office talking with Aaron Thompson. I got up this morning at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes of 12 p.m.

24 February 1841. It was cloudy and snowed until about noon; it cleared up about 1/2 past 4 p.m. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was at 24 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 26 degrees, at 1/2 past 6 p.m. it was 24 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. it was 23 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was out with Bill Hanly and Sam Milligan. I got up this morning at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

25 February 1841. Today was changeable. The wind was Southwest. This evening was very cloudy. The thermometer at 1/4 past 7 a.m. was at 18 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 32 degrees, at 1/2 past 6 p.m. it was 30 degrees, and at 1/2 past 1 a.m. it was 32 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at Miss Priscilla Swell's party on Catherine St. I got up this morning at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 2 a.m. At 2 a.m. it was very cloudy.

26 February 1841. It was clear until about the middle of the day when it clouded over and remained so during the rest of the day and evening. The wind was changeable, but was mostly Northwest. The thermometer at 1/4 past 7 a.m. was at 33 degrees, at 1/4 of 7 p.m. it was at 42 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. it was at 39 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to see Miss Chamber - a young woman that I went home with from the party last evening with Bob Pervis, Aaron Thompson, and Mr. Byerly. I got up this morning at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was damp and cloudy.

27 February 1841. It rained all the morning and was very damp and foggy. The wind was South, but it got around to the Northwest in the latter part of the afternoon and cleared off beautifully. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 42 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 44 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 44 degrees, and at 12 it was at 37 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the National Theatre with Sarah, Elizabeth, and Anna Roberts and Lydia - it was the Powers benefit. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 1 a.m.

28 February 1841. It was clear and warm and an extremely pleasant day and evening. The wind was Southwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 39 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 50 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 46 degrees, and at 1/4 of 10 p.m. it was 40 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Tyng preached in the morning, his text: the 11th chapter of Romans the 22nd verse. Mr. Suddards preached in the afternoon from the 44th chapter of Isaiah, the 4th verse. I was at Dr. Tyng's in the evening and he preached from the 47th chapter of Ezekiel, the 3rd through the 5th verses. I got up this morning at 5 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m.

MARCH

1 March 1841. It was clear and very warm all day; this evening was moonlit and very pleasant. The wind was Southwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 51 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 46 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was 42 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at Miss Stewart's with Bill Hanly. I got up this morning at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 11 p.m.

2 March 1841. It was cloudy or misty and warm, but a very pleasant day. The wind was Southwest, but it got around to the Northeast about the middle of the day. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 52 degrees, at 6 p.m. it was 48 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 43 degrees.

Mama got very sick tonight and now at 10 p.m. is very bad. I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum with Miss Cook. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was cloudy.

3 March 1841. It was clear and pleasant but rather misty all day and evening. The wind Northeast. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 1/2 past 1 p.m. was at 48 degrees, at 6 p.m. was at 48 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was at 43 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was out with Bill Hanly. Mama was sick in bed all day. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

4 March 1841. It was clear all day and evening. The wind was North Northwest. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was at 36 degrees, at 1/2 past 1 p.m. was 44 degrees, at 1/2 past 6 p.m. was 41 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 34 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was home. I got up this morning at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. Mama was much better today - she went a riding.

5 March 1841. It was cloudy all day and very cold. The wind was North Northeast. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 26 degrees, at 1/2 past 1 p.m. was 32 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 30 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 29 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was home. For the Inaugural Address of General Harrison(1) see The Chronicle Vol. 2 No. 105 and The Ledger Vol. 10 No. 137. I got up at 20 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

6 March 1841. It snowed very hard all the morning until about 1/2 past 12 when it commenced raining and poured hard the remainder of the day and evening. The snow was deep enough for sleighing. The wind was Northeast. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was 26 degrees, at 1/2 past 2 was 34 degrees, and at 6 & 9 p.m. was 38 degrees.

I was at the office all day and at home in the evening. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m. At 9 p.m. it was pouring rain.

7 March 1841. Today was clear and very warm and pleasant until about the middle of the day. The wind was Southwest. It got cloudy about 2 p.m. and the wind got around to the NE. It commenced raining from about 4 p.m. and rained during the rest of the day and evening. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was at 36 degrees, at 1/2 past 1 p.m. was 46 degrees, and at 6 p.m. was 41 degrees.

I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon; the text in the morning was the 54th chapter of Isaiah, the 10th verse and in the afternoon it was the 44th chapter of Jeremiah, the 4th verse. I spent the evening down at Miss Chalenor's. I made her a Phillippina present of a small China smelling bottle. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

8 March 1841. There were heavy flying clouds all day with a sprinklin' of snow during the early part of the morning; this evening was cloudy. The wind was West. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was at 36 degrees, at 8 a.m. was at 38 degrees, at 2 p.m. was at 43 degrees, and at 11 p.m. was at 36 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the 1st Anniversary of the National Institute. After I got home I wrote a bond warrant for Papa. I got up at 10 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 12 p.m. Sarah Hockley was here to supper this evening. At 20 minutes of 12 p.m. it was very cloudy.

9 March 1841. It was clear but rather cold until about 3 p.m. when it clouded over and remained so until about evening when it clouded off again. It got cloudy again about 10 p.m. The wind today was Northwest. The thermometer at 1/4 past 7 a.m. was at 35 degrees, at 2 p.m. was at 23 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 37 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at Bill Hanly's. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m. At 20 minutes of 11 p.m. it was very cloudy.

10 March 1841. It commenced snowing about 8 a.m. It snowed very hard all day and evening and made very slushy walking. The wind was Northeast. At 1/2 past 7 a.m. and 2 p.m. it was 36 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. it was 32 1/2 degrees.

I was at the office all day and was at home in the evening. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed 10 minutes past 11 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was snowing.

11 March 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. The wind was Northwest. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 41 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 38 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 36 degrees. The snow of yesterday has entirely disappeared.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the Museum to see Dr. Valentine. I got up at 20 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

12 March 1841. It was cloudy until about 2 p.m. when it commenced hailing, snowing, and raining and made tremendously bad walking. It poured rain all the evening. The wind was East Northeast. Thermometer at 7 a.m. was 29 degrees, at 1/2 past 1 p.m. was 36 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 32 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 33 degrees. I was at the office all day and at home in the evening. I got up at 25 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m. It hailed and blew and was very stormy tonight.

13 March 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening with a sprinklin' of snow in the morning early. The wind was Southwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 34 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 44 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 38 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 37 degrees. Mr. Cook went to Halifax today.

I was at the office all day until 1/2 past 4 p.m., when I took a walk down to Miss Chalenor's for my pencil which I left there last Sunday evening. This evening I was at the Museum to see Mr. Valentine. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes past 10 p.m.

14 March 1841. Today was changeable. It was mostly cloudy until about 5 p.m. when it commenced raining and hailing extremely hard. It then cleared up and then again clouded over and snowed very hard for awhile. It then cleared up very cold with a very strong wind from the Southwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 45 degrees, at 6 p.m. was 39 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 33 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning, the text was in Jeremiah. I was at Brainard's in the afternoon. In the evening I was at Grace Church, the text was the 14th chapter of Romans, the 5th verse. I got up at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m. There was a very bad fire about 7 p.m.

15 March 1841. It was clear and cold, but a very beautiful day with the wind from the NW until afternoon when the wind changed and got around to the Northeast and it clouded over. It commenced snowing about 1/2 past 10 p.m. and now at 12 p.m. it is snowing hard and the ground is covered to the depth of an inch. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 26 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 32 degrees, and at 1/2 past 11 p.m. was 29 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to Bill Hanly's and from there I went up to Miss Cook's and stayed there about 1/2 an hour. I then got home and wrote a deed. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 12 p.m.

16 March 1841. It snowed hard all day and with the snow of last night made very good sleighing. The wind was Northeast. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 31 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 26 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 24 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at Bill Hanly's. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m. It is now cloudy.

17 March 1841. It was cloudy, cold and very windy all day. The wind was Northeast. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 24 degrees, at 2 p.m. was at 28 degrees, at 7 p.m. was at 28 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 27 degrees.

There was fine sleighing today and Mama was out with Mrs. Elizabeth Roberts in her sleigh. I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the Museum to hear some of the songs and the overture from Norma. I got up at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m.

18 March 1841. It commenced hailing and sleeting early in the morning; it then turned to rain and poured hard all day - melting the snow of the day before yesterday and making very bad walking. The wind was North. This evening was very cloudy but it was not raining. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 29 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 26 degrees, and at 1/2 past 8 p.m. was 36 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 10 p.m.

19 March 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. The wind was Northwest. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 49 degrees, at 1/2 past 10 p.m. was 42 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I walked down to the Mercantile Lecture with Sarah and Mary (from the country) Roberts. I then went down to Bill Hanly's. I again came up to the lecture about 9 p.m. and came home with them. William R. Reed lectured on "American Loyalty" - it was the last lecture of the season. I got up at 25 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m. Mrs. Elizabeth Algernon Roberts, Sarah, Tacy, and Mary (from the country) Roberts were here to supper this evening. At 10 p.m. it was clear and warm.

20 March 1841. It was clear until about the middle of the day when it got kind of hazy. It got very cloudy by evening and it rained a little between 8 and 9 p.m. The wind was Southwest. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 40 degrees, at 6 p.m. 58 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was out with Papa and he bought me a beautiful silk umbrella - I paid $4 of the cost which was $6. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m. At 1/2 past 10 p.m. it was very warm and cloudy.

21 March 1841. It was a clear, warm, and delightful day and evening. The wind was Northwest. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 48 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 59 degrees, at 6 p.m. was 55 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 47 degrees.

I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon. The text this morning was the 25th chapter of Matthew, the 2nd verse and the text in the afternoon was the 2nd chapter of Jeremiah, the 6th verse. I was at Mr. Todd's in the evening with Aaron Thompson. He preached to the young men - it was the closing sermon of course - from the 119th chapter of Psalms, the 19th verse. I got up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes of 11 p.m.

22 March 1841. It was misty or kind of cloudy all day and this evening was very cloudy. The wind was Northeast for awhile in the morning, but soon got around to the SE and remained so.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the (2) . The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 37 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 42 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 41 degrees. I got up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m. At 1/2 past 10 p.m. it is cloudy but rather cold, but pleasant.

23 March 1841 It was cloudy and it commenced raining about 1 p.m. It poured rain all the afternoon until about 1/2 past 4 p.m. when the wind got around to the NW (it being SW all morning until then) and it cleared up beautifully. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was 52 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 55 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 52 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 43 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was down to Bill Hanly's. I got up at 10 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m. At 1/2 past 10 p.m. it was very clear.

24 March 1841. It was clear and very warm and pleasant; there were a great number of ladies out today. The wind was Southwest. The thermometer at 7 a.m. it was 41 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 56 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 52 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. was 48 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home until about 1/4 of 10 p.m. when I went for Lydia on Chestnut St. - the first house above the mint. I got home at 1/2 past 10 p.m. I got up at 25 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m.

25 March 1841. It was clear and a very beautiful day. The wind was South. It was rather cloudy through the early part of the evening. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was 44 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 63 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 57 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. was 51 degrees. I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to Miss Chalenor's with Aaron Thompson and Bob Purvis. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was clear.

26 March 1841. Today was clear, warm, and pleasant. The wind was from the South. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was 51 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 67 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 60 degrees, and at 11 p.m. was 55 degrees. This evening was rather cloudy.

I was at the office all day and in the evening was at the Museum to hear Frank Johnson and band.

27 March 1841. It was clear and very warm until about 4 p.m. when it clouded ever. The wind was South. The wind at 1/2 past 6 a.m. was 53 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 69 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 66 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. was 60 degrees. I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the Museum with Lydia. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was rather cloudy but very warm.

28 March 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening and very warm. The wind was North Northwest until about dusk when it got around to NE. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was 57 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 69 degrees, at 64 p.m. was 64 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 53 degrees.

I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon; in the morning he preached from the 3rd chapter of John, the 1st verse. A missionary from Indiana preached in the afternoon from the 16th chapter of St. Luke, the 16th verse. In the evening I was at Dr. Tyng's. His text was the 47th chapter of Ezekiel, the 3rd to 7th verse. I got up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was cloudy and windy.

29 March 1841. It was a very disagreeable, damp, rainy day. The wind was ENE. It stopped raining about 4 p.m. and the wind got around to the North. The thermometer at 1/2 past 6 a.m. was 44 degrees; at 2 p.m, 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. it was 43 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening was at home. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. At 1/2 past 10 p.m. there was every appearance of clearing.

30 March 1841. It was cloudy, rainy and cold all day with the wind from the NNW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 44 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 43 degrees, at 6 p.m. was 42 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 38 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to Miss Chalenor's with Bill Hanly. We stayed there for about a 1/2 an hour and then we went to Miss Snell's and remained there for the rest of the evening. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

31 March 1841. It was clear and cold, but very pleasant until about 4 p.m. when it clouded over and remained so during the rest of the day and evening. The wind was changeable - it was at different periods through the day NE, SW, and SE The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 31 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 46 degrees, at 7 p.m. 43 degrees, and at 11 p.m. was 39 degrees. There was ice this morning early. I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the Museum. After I left the Museum I went up home with Mrs. Elliott, daughter Elizabeth and Auntie Ruth. I got up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m.

APRIL

1 April 1841. It was cloudy, damp and rainy until about noon when it cleared up beautifully. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 43 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 56 degrees, and at 12 p.m. was 49 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home to write a deed in trust for Mr. Campbell. It was from the Reverend Walter H. Bidwell to him. I got up this morning at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 12 p.m. Mama was at Mrs. Charles Thomas' to supper this evening.

2 April 1841. It was clear and warm until the latter part of the afternoon when it clouded over and we had a tremendous storm accompanied by thunder and lightning. The wind was SSE. but during the storm it got around to the NW. The storm lasted about an hour. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 48 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 57 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 46 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was partly at Bill Hanly's and partly at home. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m. At 20 minutes of 11 p.m. it was clear and moonlit with a strong wind from the NW.

3 April 1841. Today was clear and cool but very pleasant. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 42 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 51 degrees, at 9 p.m. was 50 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. was 42 degrees.

I was at the office as usual. This evening I was at the Mineva Institute with Sarah Roberts. I got up at 10 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. At 1/2 past 10 p.m. there was every appearance of a cloudy day tomorrow.

4 April 1841. It was cloudy until about 1/2 past 12 p.m. when it commenced raining and it poured all the afternoon and evening. The wind was South. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 43 degrees, at 2 p.m., 6 p.m., and 10 p.m. it was 48 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Suddards preached in the morning from the 35th chapter of Job, the 10th verse and in the afternoon from the 133rd Psalm, the 1st verse. I was at Dr. Tyng's in the evening with Bill Hanly and Sam Milligan. It was their confirmation day. Bishop Onderdonk preached from the 20th chapter of Acts, the 19th verse: "Serving the Lord with all Humility of Mind". I got up at 5 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes of 11 p.m. At 1/2 past 10 p.m. it was dark and rainy. There was a report in town tonight that President Harrison is dead.

5 April 1841. It was clear until about the middle of the afternoon when it clouded over and commenced raining. It cleared up about 10 p.m. as I suppose. The wind was South. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 47 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 37 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 53 degrees, and at 11 p.m. was 49 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening was at a celebration of the Union Library Association. The death of General William Henry Harrison as reported last night was true. He died Saturday morning (yesterday) at about 1/2 past 12. For the particulars see - The Chronicle Vol. 2 Nos. 131,132 & 133 and The Ledger Vol. 11 Nos. 7, 8 & 9. It is a heart rending intelligence to the People of the United States of America. I got up this morning at 10 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m.

6 April 1841. It was cloudy and rainy in the early part of the morning, but it cleared up afterwards and remained so during the rest of the day and evening. The wind was Northwest. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 47 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 55 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 48 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went to the Athenaeum. Today I went to George Magnet's to get my teeth plugged - it was the first sitting. I got up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes of 11 p.m. At 1/2 past 10 p.m. it was clouding over and the wind was from the Southwest. It is rather cold this evening.

7 April 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening. The wind was changeable - it was SW, SE, & NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 46 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 52 degrees, at 1/2 past 6 p.m. 54 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was 47 degrees.

I was at the office until about 12 noon. I then went out to look at the city. It was a gloomy prospect - all the stores were closed and a number had crepe on the doors. Also, all the hotels and dwelling houses had their windows bowed. The United States Hotel, the Washington & Madison Houses, the Union Hotel, Morris House, Parkinson's and a number of hotels had their doors trimmed with crepe in honor of the death of General Harrison.

I was in the office in the afternoon until about 4 p.m. when Bill Bird and I and his cousin took a walk down to the Navy Yard but could not get in. I got up at 10 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m. I was in the house all evening. At 20 minutes past 10 p.m. it was very cloudy.

8 April 1841. It was cloudy in the early part of the day but it soon cleared off and remained so. The wind was North. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 44 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 56 degrees, at 1/2 past 7 p.m. was 51 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 46 degrees.

I was at the office through the morning. In the afternoon I was at the dentist until 1/4 of 4 p.m. I then went down to the Steam Frigate at the Navy Yard. I spent the evening at cousin Elizabeth Roberts'. I got up at 20 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was cloudy.

9 April 1841. It was cloudy except from about 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The wind was South. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 46 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 68 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 59 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at Grace Church - it was the confirmation night there. Bishop Onderdonk preached from Jeremiah. I got up at 10 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

10 April 1841. It was cloudy and cold and commenced snowing about 2 p.m. and continued so through all the afternoon - it covered the houses and the pavement. This evening was rainy and pleasant. The wind was Northeast. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was at 45 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 44 degrees, and at 7 & 9 p.m. was at 33 degrees.

I was at the office all day until about 4 p.m. I then went down to Bill Hanly's. I spent the evening at home. I got up at 10 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m. At 9 p.m. it was rainy and damp.

11 April 1841. It was clear and cold until about 4 p.m. when it clouded over and remained so. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 34 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 41 degrees, at 1/2 past 6 p.m. was 40 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 36 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning - his text was the 15th chapter of 1st Corinthians, the 20th verse. I went up to Dr. Tyng's with Tom Gillespie and Bill Hanly in the afternoon and there was no one there. We then went over to the church at the corner of Broad St. & George St. - it was so crowded that we could not get in. We then went to the Catholic Church. This evening I was at Mr. Suddards' Church. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

12 April 1841. It snowed tremendously hard all day. It was a greater snowstorm than we had all winter. It was snowing when I got up and continued so all day without ceasing until about 9 p.m. The wind was Northeast. The thermometer at 7 a.m. & 2 p.m. & 7 p.m. was 32 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. it was 21 degrees. It was very slushy walking.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the National Institute for awhile. I then went up to Miss Patton's for Mama and afterwards I went to John Hendricks'. I got up at 20 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes past 11 p.m. The snow today was about 6 or 7 inches deep - there were a few sleighs out this evening.

13 April 1841. It was clear until about 8 p.m. when it clouded over. The wind was from the Northwest until about 4 p.m. when it got around to the Southwest. The snow of yesterday mostly disappeared by the heat of the sun today. The thermometer was at 7 a.m. was at 31 degrees, at 2 p.m. was at 47 degrees, and at 1/4 past 9 was 40 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum to see Mr. Young, the Magician. I got up at 1/6 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m. At 1/4 past 10 p.m. it is very cloudy and there is every appearance of rain.

14 April 1841. It was snowing hard when I got up and continued to do so until about 8 a.m. when it turned to rain and made the worst walking that we have had all through the winter. The wind was North, but it got around to the Northwest and cleared off during the morning and remained so through the day. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 32 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 41 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 40 degrees, and at 11 p.m. was 37 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to Miss Chalenor's with Bob Parvin, but they were not in. From there we went to Miss Field's. We went in and stayed awhile but the girls were not in. >From there we went to Miss Martin's and they were not in. We then went to Miss Flannigan's and there we found Miss Field - we spent a very pleasant evening. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m. At 11 p.m. the snow of this morning, though almost an inch and a half, had almost entirely disappeared.

15 April 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and this evening was clear. The wind was Northwest. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 39 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 47 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 40 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went up to William Cansler's. I then came home and remained there. I got up at 10 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m.

16 April 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening with the wind from the SSW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 44 degrees, at 2 p.m. was at 55 degrees, and at 11 p.m. was 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at Miss Chalenor's with Bob Parvin, John Sherborn and Miss Field. The two Miss Mercers were there. I got up this morning at 1/4 past 5 a.m. to go out to see Mr. Cansler at Market St. near Juniper St. I got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m.

17 April 1841. It was very cloudy, damp, and disagreeable all day and evening. The wind was South. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 48 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 58 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 56 degrees, and at 9 p.m. was 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening was at home. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m. At 1/2 past 9 p.m. there was every appearance of rain. For particulars of Robinson's execution see The Ledger Vol. 11 No. 18 and The Chronicle Vol. 2 No. 141.

18 April 1841. It was clear and pleasant with occasional light flying clouds. The wind was changeable and very strong - it was from the SW, W, and NW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 60 degrees, at 1 p.m. was 61 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 54 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 45 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning. Mr. Suddards preached a sermon on the death of William Henry Harrison - the text was the 3rd chapter of Isaiah verses 1-3. In the afternoon I was at Mr. Suddards' Church and he preached from the 14th chapter and 14th verse of Proverbs. This evening I was at Mr. Bethany's; the text was the 20th chapter of St. John, the 28th verse. I got up at 10 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m. At 1/4 past 10 p.m. it was clear and the wind was NW.

19 April 1841. It was clear all day and evening. The wind in the morning was NW, in the afternoon was W, SW, and SSW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was 44 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 55 degrees, at 7 a.m. was 50 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at a meeting of the National Institute. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. At 1/2 past 10 p.m. it was clear with the appearance of a clear day tomorrow.

20 April 1841. It was cloudy until about 11 a.m. when it commenced raining hard and continued to do so throughout the day and evening which spoiled the effect of the Procession. The wind was SE The thermometer at 1/2 past 6 a.m. was at 44 degrees, and at 2 and 10 p.m. was 50 degrees. I was not at the office today.

I walked in the Procession with the National Literary Institute through the rain and I am really worn out tonight. After the procession and after I got my dinner (about 5 p.m.), Bill Hanly and I took a walk. About 4 p.m. we went down to Catherine St. Church, but did not stay long. We then came up to St. Stephen's to hear the same sermon preached by Bishop Onderdonk as preached by him in the morning at Christ Church on the Death of General Harrison. The

text was the 49th chapter of Psalms, the 12th verse. The words: "Man being in honour abideth not." I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m. I am very tired.

21 April 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening. The wind was NNW. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was 50 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 56 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 51 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 45 degrees. I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home writing for Papa. For the particulars of the procession see The Ledger Vol. 11 No. 21 and The Chronicle Vol. 2 No. 44. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m.

22 April 1841. It was clear early in the morning but soon clouded over and commenced raining about 1/2 past 2 p.m. and continued to do so through the rest of the day and evening. The wind was NNE. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was at 49 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 50 degrees, and at 1/2 past 9 p.m. was 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum to see Mr. Young, the Magician. I got up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m. At 1/4 of 10 p.m. it was raining very hard.

23 April 1841. It was a damp, cloudy, and very unpleasant day and evening with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 48 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 55 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 53 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 51 degrees. I was at the office all day. This evening I went to see Mr. Young, the Magician at the Museum. Mama was sick and in bed all day, with a kind of affliction of the head. I got up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

24 April 1841. It was a damp, cloudy, and unpleasant day and evening. The wind was NE although I believe that it got around to NNW in the latter part of the afternoon. The thermometer at 1/2 past 6 a.m. was at 50 degrees, at 1/2 past 1 p.m. was 56 degrees, at 1/2 past 2 p.m. was 60 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 58 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 57 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was down at Hanly's - he is sick. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

25 April 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 1/2 past 7 a.m. was at 54 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 63 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 58 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. was 54 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning; the text was the 6th chapter of 1st Kings, the 7th verse. I was at Mr. Brainard's in the afternoon; the text was the 16th chapter of 1st Corinthians, the 43rd verse. I was at Dr. Tyng's this evening; the text was the 1st chapter of Jeremiah, verses 6-9. I went home with Miss Cook from Dr. Tyng's Church. I went in their house and sat for about a 1/2 an hour. I then went for Lydia at Mr. Elliot's . I got up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was cloudy.

26 April 1841. It was cloudy until about noon and the wind was Northwest; the wind then got around to the SW and cleared up. The thermometer at 1/4 past 7 a.m. was 51 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 60 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to see Miss Field with Aaron Thompson. We afterwards went to see the Miss Singers, but they were not in. I got up at 10 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. I was elected a member of the National Institute this evening.

27 April 1841. It was raining hard when I got up this morning; it stopped at 9 a.m. and cleared up about the middle of the day. The wind was SW. until it cleared up when it got around to the NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 52 degrees, at 1 p.m. was 70 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 53 degrees, and at 11 p.m. was 47 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at Miss Chalenor's with Bob Parvin. We met Aaron Thompson there and Mr. Byerly. I got up at 20 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes of 12. This evening was moonlit.

28 April 1841. There were light clouds flying all day. The wind was NW until about noon when it got around the SW. This evening was clear and moonlit. The thermometer at 1/2 past 6 a.m. was 50 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 61 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 57 degrees, and at 1/2 past 9 p.m. was 53 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down to see Bill Hanly. Papa was taken sick yesterday afternoon and was confined to his bed most of today. Got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

29 April 1841. It commenced raining about 9 a.m. and continued to do so on and off all day and evening. The wind was changeable, it was SW, S, SE, E, and finally got around to NE. The thermometer at 1/2 past 6 a.m. was 47 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 45 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 47 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went up to see Miss Cook with Bob Parvin and Eli Harvey. I got up at 1/4 of 6 p.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

30 April 1841. It was a cloudy, damp, and very disagreeable day. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 1/2 past 6 a.m. was 47 degrees, at 2 p.m. was at 53 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. was at 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum to see Master Young. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. It rained on and off through the day. At 11 p.m. it has every appearance of being a clear day tomorrow. Papa walked as far as the store - the first he has been out since being sick.

MAY

1 May 1841. It was a cloudy, damp, cold, and very unpleasant day until about 4 p.m. when it cleared up and got rather warm. There was a very strong wind from the WNW until about the same time when it got around to the NW and abated. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was 47 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 48 degrees.

I was at the office all the morning. In the afternoon I was out at Fairmount and over on the hills on the opposite side of the river from Fairmount with Ed, Erp, and two other young men. This evening I was at home. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m. There were no flowers out today except some very common ones. There were lilacs out.

2 May 1841. It was cloudy and it rained very hard at times until about the middle of the day when it cleared up very cold. It was cold enough to wear an overcoat. The wind in the morning was SW and in the afternoon and evening was very strong from the NW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 9 a.m. was 47 degrees, at 1 p.m. was 53 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 45 degrees, and at 11 p.m. was 39 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Suddards preached in the morning from 67th Psalms, verses 1-3 and then he preached in the afternoon from Corinthians I, the 15th chap-ter, verse 5. This evening I was at Mr. Brainard's; he preached from Kings II, chapter 6, verse 16. I got up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m. Uncle was here this morning. At 11 p.m. it was clear, moonlit, and very cold and windy.

3 May 1841. It was clear and very cold all day and evening. The wind was NW. It was so cold today that I was obliged to wear an overcoat. There was ice very early in the morning. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 42 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was at 50 degrees, at 1/2 past 7 it was at 46 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. it was 50 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at a meeting of the National Institute. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was moonlit and cold.

4 May 1841. It was clear and very cold for this season of the year; there was ice again early this morning. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 44 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was at 52 degrees, at 7 p.m. it was at 51 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was at 46 degrees. I was at the office all day.

This evening I was at the Museum to see Master Young. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes of 11 p.m.

5 May 1841. It was clear until about 9 a.m. when it clouded over and about 1/2 past 1 p.m. commenced raining, which it continued to do for the rest of the day and evening. The wind during the morning was NE; it got around to the SE about 1/2 past 2 p.m. The thermometer at 1/4 past 6 a.m. was at 45 degrees, at 2 p.m. was at 53 degrees, at 7 p.m. was at 47 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. was at 45 degrees.

I was at the office during the morning until about 1/4 past 12. At 1/4 of 1 p.m. precisely, I left Dock St. Wharf in the Steamboat Ohio with Frank Johnson's band and about 600 passengers to see the Steam Frigate Mississippi launched. After passing down by the city, we laid off just below the Navy Yard. There were hundreds of clubs, and row boats pulling about the river and also a great number of steamboats, among which were the Robert Morris, Ohio, Trenton, Sun, Boliver, Hornet, William Penn, and a number of others - each containing from 500 to 800 persons. The Boliver was so crowded that they could barely move about. Exactly at 1/2 past 1 p.m. the signal for the launch of the Frigate was given and then she glided beautifully into her destined element. After she was launched, the Ohio (the boat I was on board of) went up around by her and afterwards went down the river. After going down a piece she turned and went up as far as Race St. We then turned again and came to Dock St. at 1/4 past 2 p.m.

It commenced raining very hard after the Frigate was launched and continued to do so much to the discomfort of the passengers who had not umbrellas (many - among whom I was one). I remained on board about 3/4 of an hour on account of the rain. I got back to the office about 1/2 past 3 p.m. I got up at 20 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

6 May 1841. It was clear, pleasant weather today but occasionally there were light, flying clouds. This evening was clear. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 1/2 past 6 a.m. was at 51 degrees, at 1/2 past 1 p.m. it was at 60 degrees, at 1/4 past 10 p.m. it was at 50 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was home until about 1/2 past 8 p.m. I then went for Lydia at Mr. Bura's and after I came home with her, I went down to see Bill Hanly. I got home about 10 minutes past 10 p.m. Papa went to New York today at 10 a.m. I got up this morning at 20 minutes past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. For the particulars of the launch of the Mississippi see The Ledger Vol. 9 No.34 and The Chronicle Vol. 3 No. 4.

7 May 1841. It was clear in the early part of the morning with the wind from the WNW. The wind then got around to the S. and it clouded over. It afterwards got around to the NE and commenced raining about dark and continued to do so through the evening. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 50 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was at 61 degrees, at 7 p.m. was at 53 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was at 51 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum to see Master Young. After the Museum was out I went up to Mr. and Mrs. Roberts' for Mama and Lydia. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m.

8 May 1841. It was pouring rain when I got up and it continued to do so until about 9 a.m. when it stopped raining. The wind was from the NE and then it got around to the NW about noon and in the latter part of the afternoon, it cleared off and remained so during the evening. The thermometer at 1/2 past 6 a.m. was at 46 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was at 56 degrees, and at 7 p.m. was at 53 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to see Miss Chalenor, but could not see her on account of sickness. I was with Bob Parvin. We afterwards went to see the Miss Singers. I got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m. At 10 minutes of 11 p.m. it was very clear and pleasant. Papa got home from New York about 1/4 of 12 o'clock tonight.

9 May 1841. It was clear and very pleasant until about 4 p.m. when it commenced clouding over. This evening was cloudy. The wind was changeable - in the morning it was NW, in the afternoon it was SE, and towards night it got around to the SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was 55 degrees, at 1 p.m. was 66 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 60 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. was 55 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning, Mr. Suddards preached from the 1st chapter of Job, the 6th verse. In the afternoon, I walked out with Bob Machette to Fairmount. I got back in time to go to Dr. Tyng's Church. He did not preach; Mr. [blank] preached from the 9th chapter of Matthew, the 13th & 14th verses. This evening I was at Mr. Suddards' Church and he preached from the 63rd chapter of Isaiah, the 1st verse. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m.

10 May 1841. It rained very hard during the day. The wind was SE, but got around to the S.W about noon and then in the evening it cleared up. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 52 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 61 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 62 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 60 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at a meeting of the National Institute. I got up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

11 May 1841. Today was clear and very pleasant. The wind was West. The thermometer at 1/2 past 4 a.m. was 52 degrees, at 1/2 past 1 p.m. was 66 degrees, and at 10 and 3/4 p.m. was at 57 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went up to see Miss Cook with Eliot Harwood. I got up at 4 a.m. and took a walk down to the Navy Yard with Ben Russell. I got to bed at 11 p.m.

12 May 1841. It was cloudy and showering weather with the wind from the West. The thermometer at 1/4 past 6 a.m. was 55 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 60 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. was 52 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to see Miss Chalenor with Bill Hanly. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was very clear.

13 May 1841. It was clear from about 4 p.m. with the wind from the West. The wind then got around to the NE and it commenced raining about dark and continued to do so through the evening. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 50 degrees, at 2 p.m. was at 63 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 52 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down with Lydia to see Miss Megan. She is boarding at Arch St. below 6th street. I got up at 5 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 10 p.m.

14 May 1841. Today was very changeable; at one time it would be very cloudy and then again clear. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 32 degrees, at 1 p.m. was 61 degrees, at 4 p.m. was 58 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 54 degrees. This day was a day of fasting and prayer.

I was at Grace Church in the morning; Mr. Suddards preached. The words of the text were: "Shall the trumpet sound in the city and the people be not alarmed."

In the afternoon, I was over at Schuylkill with Bill Hanly and Sam Milligan. This evening I was at church at Mr. Brainard's with Sam and Bill. The text was from the 22nd chapter of Samuel II, the 31st verse. I got up at 10 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m. Papa went to New York again today at 5 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was clear, but it had every appearance of clouding over.

15 May 1841. Today was a clear and very delightful day. The wind during the morning was NW; in the afternoon it was changeable, it was N., NE, E., SE, S, and it finally got around to the SW and remained so. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was 51 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 61 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 56 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 50 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum to see Master Young. I got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

16 May 1841. It was a clear, warm, and very delightful day. The wind during the morning was SE; in the afternoon it was changeable, it was NW, W., N., and NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was 51 degrees, at 1 p.m. was 65 degrees, at 1/4 of 2 p.m. was 60 degrees, and at 1/4 of 10 p.m. was 55 degrees.

I was at Mr. Suddards' church in the morning and afternoon. The text in the morning was the 29th chapter of Deuteronomy, verse 29. Mr. [blank] preached in the afternoon from the 13th chapter of St. Luke, part of verse 15. I was at Mr. Todd's in the evening, he preached from the 25th chapter of Isaiah, the 8th and 9th verses. I got up this morning at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 10 p.m.

17 May 1841. It was clear and very warm until about noon when it blew tremendously hard from the SW and clouded up very heavily. It then rained very hard for awhile. The wind then got around to the NW and it cleared up. It got very cold in the evening. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 55 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. was 67 degrees, and at 11 p.m. was 56 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Museum with Miss Mary White and Lydia to hear the Boston Quartette Club sing. Mr. & Mrs. Morgan and daughters, Miss Charlotte Davis, and Miss Mary White were here to supper this evening. I got up this morning at 5 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m.

18 May 1841. It was clear and very pleasant, but very warm today. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was 56 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 66 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 59 degrees. I was at the office all day.

This evening I was out with Bill Hanly. We were down at Miss Snell's and Miss Chalenor's, but neither of them were in. I got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

19 May 1841. It was a clear, warm, and very fine day until about 4 p.m. when it clouded over very heavily for two or three hours. It then cleared up again and remained so. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 1/2 past 6 a.m. was at 57 degrees, at 2 p.m. as 64 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 67 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at Mr. Russell's concert at the Musical Fund Hall with Tacy, Gainor, and Sarah Roberts.

At about 1/2 past 10 p.m. a large fire broke out in a building in back of the large factory on Cherry St. near 6th St. It burned very much; I was at it. I got up this morning at 20 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m. Papa got home from New York last night.

20 May 1841. Today was clear and very pleasant. The wind in the early part of the morning was SW, it soon got around to the NW, where it remained until about 5 p.m. when it got around to the SE The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 55 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 66 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 65 degrees, and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. was 57 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at Miss Chalenors with Bill Hanly. I got up this morning at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was clear and warm.

21 May 1841. Today was clear and pleasant but very warm - it was the warmest day we have had this season. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 5 a.m. was at 54 degrees, at 1/2 past 1 p.m. it was 78 degrees, at 7 p.m. it was 71 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was 66 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at the Museum to hear the Boston Quartette Club. Papa went down to and came up from Wilmington today. I got up this morning at 20 minutes past 4 a.m. and took a walk with the two Miss Chalenors and two other young ladies from Portland, Maine. I got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. We had a fire in our parlor grate today for the first time this season.

22 May 1841. It was clear and extremely warm until about 4 p.m. with the wind from the SW. The wind got around to the S. and it clouded over. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 66 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 84 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 77 degrees, and at 9 p.m. was 74 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I took a walk down around by the store and back home again. I got up this morning at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was very cloudy.

23 May 1841. It was rather cloudy in the early part of the morning, but soon cleared up. The wind was from the SW. It was very warm today. I was at Grace Church in the morning and the afternoon. The text in the morning was from Chronicles I, the 13th chapter, verse 16. The text in the afternoon was from the 1st book of Corinthians, chapter 6, verse 10.

This evening I was down at Miss Snell's with Bill Hanly and Frank Milligan. I put on my white summer pants today for the first time this season. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 70 degrees, at 1 p.m. was 82 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 76 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 71 degrees. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was clear and warm.

24 May 1841. It was clear and warm all day and evening. The wind was from the SW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 68 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 83 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 77 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 72 degrees. I was at the office all day. This evening I was at a meeting of the National Literary Association. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

25 May 1841. It was clear until about noon when a heavy storm came up from the S.W and at about 6 p.m. it commenced raining very hard and continued to do so until about 8 p.m. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 70 degrees, and at 9 p.m. was 66 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m. At 9 1/2 p.m. it was cloudy and very warm.

26 May 1841. It was clear in the early part of the morning, but soon clouded over. It commenced raining about 9 a.m. very hard and continued to do so through the morning until about 1 1/2 p.m. when it stopped. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 6 a.m. was at 70 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 73 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 69 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 67 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at Bill Hanly's - I spent the evening there. Lydia went out a-Maying(3) with her school today. Mama went out of town to John Crefs' funeral today - she went about 12 p.m. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. I saw strawberries in the market today; I believe they were the first this season.

27 May 1841. It was cloudy and rainy all day and evening. The wind was SE The thermometer at 6 3/4 was at 67 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 70 degrees, and at 9 1/2 was 65 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening was at the quarterly meeting of the National Literary Institute at the Phoenix Hall on Zane St. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

28 May 1841. It was cloudy in the early part of the morning but soon cleared up. It remained so until about 4 p.m. when it clouded over again and at about 5 p.m. we had a tremendous, hard shower. It however cleared up and we had a clear evening. The wind was SE and sometimes SW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 67 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 78 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 71 degrees, and at 11 1/4 p.m. was 67 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening down at the Miss Chalenor's with William Hanly and Miss Priscilla Snell. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m. At half past 11 p.m. it was clear but warm with the wind from the South West.

29 May 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening until about 10 p.m. when it clouded over very heavily. The wind was South. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 67 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 79 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. was 73 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 71 degrees.

I was at the office all day until about 1/4 of 5 p.m. when I went over to the island to swim - it was the first time I was in this season. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m. We commenced taking ice today. At 10 p.m. it was very cloudy with every appearance of a storm.

I went around to a meeting of the Mercantile Literary Company this evening.

30 May 1841. It was cloudy, raw, and cold all day until near dark when it cleared up beautifully. It was clear and moonlit during the evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 9 1/2 a.m. was at 63 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. was 67 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. was 64 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was 57 degrees.

I was at the Unitarian Church at 10th and Locust St. with Papa in the morning to hear Dr. Channing, the text was the 7th chapter of Matthew commencing at the 21st verse. I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the afternoon and he preached from the 5th chapter of Acts, verses 4 & 5. This evening I went to hear Mr. Kirk with Bill Hanly at Mr. Todd's on 10th St below Spruce. His text was the 7th chapter of Zachariah, verse 12. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

31 May 1841. It was clear and delightful but rather cool today. The wind was NNE. This evening was clear and moonlit. The thermometer at 1/4 of 6 a.m. was at 55 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 69 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. was 55 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was 56 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at a meeting of the National Literary Institute. I resigned from being a member of it this evening. Mr. Bryant lectured on the eye this evening there. I got up at 25 minutes past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. Miss Morgan, her father, and mother started for Cincinnati tonight at 12.

JUNE

1 June 1841. It was cold in the early part of the morning with the wind from the NE. It afterwards got around to the South and cleared up warm but very pleasant. The thermometer at 1/4 of 6 a.m. was at 54 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 73 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 71 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 63 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening was at the Athenaeum reading. The President's messenger came from Washington - a distance of 140 miles in 4 3/4 hours, being about 32 miles an hour. I got up at 25 minutes past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. At 20 minutes past 10 p.m. it was clouding over.

2 June 1841. It was clear and very warm. The wind was changeable - it was NE, E., SE, and finally got around to the SW about noon. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 80 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 74 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was 71 degrees. There was a very heavy shower last evening about 11 p.m.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was sitting in Washington Square with Bill Hanly and Chas. Elms. I got up at 10 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

3 June 1841. It was clear and very pleasant. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 67 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 78 degrees, at 7 1/4 p.m. was 73 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 68 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Exchange attending a sale of real estate. I got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes past 11 p.m.

4 June 1841. It was clear and warm, but very pleasant all day and evening. The wind in the morning was NW and it got around to the SW about noon and got much warmer. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 63 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. was 77 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. was 73 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 69 degrees. I was at the office all day. This evening I took a walk down around by the Post and home again. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m.

5 June 1841. It was clear and very warm until about the middle of the afternoon when it clouded up and remained so during the evening. The wind in the morning was SW and it the afternoon was W.

I was at the office in the morning. In the afternoon I was over at the island to swim - it was the second time I was in this season. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 67 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. was 67 degrees, at 1/4 of 7 p.m. was 83 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 80 degrees. Today was the warmest day that we had this season. I got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was cloudy and warm; looks like rain.

6 June 1841. It was clear and pleasant all day and evening. The wind during the morning was NE and it afterwards got around to the SE The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 69 degrees, at 1 p.m. was 81 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 74 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was 69 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon; Mr. Suddards preached. The text for both the morning and afternoon was the 6th chapter of St. Paul's 2nd letter to the Corinthians, the latter part of the 15th verse, the words "am infidel".

I was at St. Andrews's in the evening. Mr. Newton preached from the 27th chapter of St. Matthew, verse 25. Mrs. Van Arsdale was here to supper this evening. I got up at 10 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes past 11 p.m. There was a very heavy shower sometime last night.

7 June 1841. It was clear until about 4 p.m. with the wind from the SW. It then got around to the NW when a heavy storm came up and poured rain very hard for awhile. It remained cloudy during the evening. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 67 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. was 84 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. was 75 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 75 degrees.

I as at the office all day. This evening I was at a Sheriff's sale at the Exchange. I got up at 10 minutes past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was cloudy, very warm, and sultry.

8 June 1841. It was clear and very warm all day with the wind from the SW until about 5 p.m. when it got around to the NW and blew very hard and brought up a very heavy storm. This evening was cloudy and rainy. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 74 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. was 91 degrees (the highest the thermometer has been this season), and at 7 1/2 p.m. and 9 1/2 p.m. was 75 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I took a walk down to the Exchange, Athenaeum, and back. I got up at 20 minutes of 4 a.m. and went into swim out in the Schuylkill with Ben Russell; it was the third time I have been into swim this season. I got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was cloudy and very warm.

9 June 1841. It was clear and very warm all day and evening. The wind would change alternately from the SW to the W. and NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 75 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. was 91 degrees, at 7 1/4 p.m. was 83 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was 78 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was out with Bill Hanly and Paul Milligan. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes past 11 p.m.

10 June 1841. It was clear and warm all day and evening. The wind was changeable; it was NNE, N, NE, E, SE, and it finally got around to the SW. The thermometer at 4 1/2 a.m. was at 70 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. was 85 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. was 80 degrees, and at 11 p.m. was 73 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening went down to Miss Chalenor's with Bob Parvin. I got up at 10 minutes past 4 a.m. and went out to swim with Sam, Deborah, and others - it was the 4th time that I was in this season. I got to bed at 20 minutes past 11 o'clock p.m.

11 June 1841. It was clear and very warm until about 5 1/2 p.m. with the wind from the SW when it got around to the NW and blew extremely hard. It got very cloudy but soon cleared off pretty much. It again clouded up very heavily at about 9 p.m. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 80 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. was 91 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. was 80 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 78 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was out with Bill Hanly, Henry Learning, and Sam Milligan. I got up at 4 1/2 a.m. and went out to swim for the fifth time this season - I was with Russell, Deborah, Bryant, and Allen. I got to bed at 20 minutes past 10 p.m.

12 June 1841. It was clear until about 4 p.m. when it clouded over heavily and rained very hard in the night. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 73 degrees, and at 12 a.m. was 75 degrees.

I started for Wilmington in the steamboat Burlington at 10 minutes past 8 a.m. We stopped at Chester at 1/2 past 8 a.m. and arrived in Wilmington at 11 a.m. I then walked up to Mr. Hedge's. From there I went up to Dr. Gibbons' and got dinner. After dinner I walked down through town and up around to Gibbons' again stopping at Mr. McClurry's, Mr. Hadden's, and to get to glasses of ice cream. After I got back, Rodman and Frank Gibbons, Julius Bradford and I took a walk up the Brandywine. We then returned and got our supper. After supper I took a walk over to the Brandywine and down in town to get some ice cream with Henry Bradford, and Sarah E. and Rebecca Gibbons. I got up at 4 a.m. and went out to swim in the Schuylkill - it was the sixth time I have been in this season. I got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m. It got very cool during the evening.

13 June 1841. It was cloudy and cool all day. This evening was clear and cool. The wind was from the NE. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was 72 degrees, at 12 p.m. was 72 degrees, at 3 p.m. was 74 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. was 70 degrees, and at 11 1/2 p.m. was 64 degrees.

I went to the Quaker Meeting in the morning. I started for Philadelphia in the steamboat Sun at 1 1/2 p.m. and arrived at 20 minutes of 5 p.m. I went to Grace Church in the evening. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 12 o'clock a.m.

14 June 1841. It was cloudy and rained during the afternoon and evening. The wind was NE, E., and SE The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was 65 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 79 degrees, and at 8 p.m. and 10 1/2 p.m. was 68 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home to write a deed for Papa. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

15 June 1841. It was cloudy, damp, and unpleasant with the wind from the SE during the early part of the day. The wind afterwards got around to the NW and cleared up rather cool. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 67 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. was 75 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 70 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was 66 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at a sale of real estate at the Exchange. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

16 June 1841. Today was clear and rather cold. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at 1/4 of 2 p.m. was 75 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 72 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. was 66 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at Miss Snell's with Bill Hanly. I got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at eleven o'clock p.m. Mama was out at a strawberry party at Cousin Algernon's today. We had strawberries for the first time this season today; gave 12 1/2 per quart.

17 June 1841. It was clear and very pleasant today. The wind was SE The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was 67 degrees, at 1/4 of 2 p.m. was 81 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. was 73 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was 67 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the sale at the Exchange until about 9 p.m. I then came up home and afterwards went up with Anna Roberts home. I got a silver pencil with a topaz stone set in the head today. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m. This evening was cloudy.

18 June 1841. It was cloudy and rainy all day and evening, It rained very hard during some parts of the day and evening. The wind was ENE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 63 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 62 degrees, and at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. was 58 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

19 June 1841. It was a damp, cloudy day. The wind was NE. It cleared off in the evening. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was 61 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 67 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. was 65 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 63 degrees.

I was at the office during the morning and in the afternoon until about 4 p.m. when I left to go to Mrs. Eliza Ellett Bryant's funeral - it started at 5 p.m. To go to Laurel Hill, Papa, Mama, Miss Hopkins and myself rode in the same carriage. I walked with Miss Hopkins to the Chapel and the grave after we got out there. And, I rode home with her when we got to the city. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m. At 10 minutes past 10 p.m. it was clear.

20 June 1841. It was clear and very pleasant during the morning; it clouded over in the afternoon and at about 5 1/2 p.m. we had a heavy shower. It afterwards cleared off and we had a clear evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was 64 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 76 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 73 degrees, and at 10 3/4 p.m. was 68 degrees.

I went to Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Suddards preached a funeral sermon on the death of Mr. Samuel Snelling. The text was the 24th verse of Genesis, chapter 50. The text in the afternoon was in Acts, the words "A Christian". This evening I went down to hear Mr. Coleman at Trinity Church(4) with Bill Hanly and Sam Milligan, the text was the 22nd chapter of Pro-verbs, verse 6. I went home with Miss P. Snell after church and stayed there for about 1/2 an hour with Bill and Sam. I got up at 10 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

21 June 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening. The wind as SE except a little while in the morning when it was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. was 73 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. was 67 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was 65 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I went to a meeting of the National Literary Institute. I got up at 20 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes past 11 p.m. At 1/4 of 11 p.m. it was starlit but clouding over.

22 June 1841. It was a damp, cold, rainy and very unpleasant day. The wind was SE The thermometer at 10 1/4 a.m. was 67 degrees. I was at the office all day. In the evening I was home until 9 o'clock when I went up on an errand to Miss Patton's for Mama. I got up at 5 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m. At 1/2 past 10 p.m. it was clear. It cleared off in the afternoon about 1/2 past 5 p.m. or 6 o'clock. Mr. Bartolan was buried today from [?].

23 June 1841. It was cloudy during the early part of the morning but afterwards it cleared up very warm. The wind was changeable - it changed to SE, S, SW, W, NW, WSW, SSE, S, and finally got to SW again. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 2 1/4 p.m. was 83 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 77 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was 75 degrees. It clouded over again in the evening.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was home until about 10 p.m. when I went home with Elizabeth A. Gibbons who was here to supper. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

24 June 1841. It was very foggy early in the morning but cleared off about 6 1/2 a.m. and remained so during the day. It was very warm and the wind was SW. The thermometer at 4 a.m. was 73 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. was 87 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. was 81 degrees, and at 10 3/4 p.m. was 77 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down with Bob Parvin to see the Misses Chalenor, but did not succeed. We walked around to the Miss Snell's and spent the evening there. I got up at 1/4 of 4 a.m. and went out to swim with Sam, Deborah, and others - it was the 7th time that I have been in this season. I got to bed at 20 minutes past 11 p.m.

25 June 1841. It was cloudy during the morning and about noon commenced raining as hard as I ever saw it and continued so doing on and off all afternoon. The wind was NE. The thermometer was at 73 degrees all day. I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 2 minutes past 4 a.m. and went into swim in the Schuylkill for the 8th time this season. I went in with Russell, Stewart and the two Allens. I got to bed at 20 minutes of 10 p.m. Mr. Elliot went to New York today; he intends returning in the morning.

26 June 1841. It was clear during the morning but clouded over about noon and continued so during the afternoon and evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was 74 1/2 degrees, at 2 1/4 p.m. was 85 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was 77 degrees.

I was at the office during the morning. In the afternoon I started on board the steamboat Trenton at 5 minutes past 3 p.m. with Bill Hanly for Burlington. There were 400 or 500 passengers on board, mostly ladies. We arrived at Burlington at 10 minutes of 5 p.m. We met on board the boat Bill Day, Glen Worth, and another young man whose name I do not remember. After arriving in Burlington, we went down around the bank, by the school and up through a lane to the city and down to the tavern. Afterwards we took a walk up the river for about a 1/2 a mile and returned to the tavern again. At 1/2 past 6 p.m. the steamboat Bolivar stopped here and Bill and I, thinking it would be so long for the other boat, concluded to go down in the Bolivar. We started in her at 1/2 past 6 p.m. and arrived in the city at 9 p.m. after a very pleasant trip. I got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at quarter of 11 p.m.

27 June 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening. The wind was S. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was 75 degrees, at 12 p.m. was 81 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. was 77 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was 73 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and the afternoon. Mr. Suddards preached in the morning from the 13th chapter of Jeremiah, verse 23. Bishop Onderdonk preached in the afternoon from the 3rd chapter and 11th verse of 2nd Peter. This evening I was down at Trinity Church on Catherine near 2nd St. with Bill Hanly and Sam Milligan. I got up at 10 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. At 1/4 of 11 p.m. there was every appearance of a shower.

28 June 1841. It was clear and warm all day and evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 3/4 a.m. was 76 1/2 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 84 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 79 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was 75 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was out walking with Bill Hanly and Sam Milligan. I got up at 4 a.m. and went out to the Schuylkill to swim - it was the ninth time that I have been in this season. I got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m.

29 June 1841. It was a clear and warm, but delightful day and evening. The wind was mostly SW, but occasionally W and NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 75 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. was at 87 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. 81 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. was at 78 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was down to see Bill Hanly. At about half past 8 p.m, Bill, Sam Milligan and I went out to the Schuylkill to swim. Bill and I went in but Sam did not. It was the eleventh time that I have been in this season and the second time today. I got up at 20 minutes past 4 a.m. and went in to swim - it was the tenth time I have been in this season. I got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m.

30 June 1841. It was a clear and delightful day with a moonlit evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 6 a.m. was at 75 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. was 91 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. was 84 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. was 80 degrees. It was as warm today as it has been any day this season.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was with Benjamin Russell, William Rotch, Taggert, and another young man whose name I do not remember. We went out to swim in the Schuylkill - we went off a canal boat lying at Arch Street Wharf. It was the 12th time that I have been in this season. This morning Mama, Lydia, and Flora went down to Wilmington in the steamboat Burlington from Arch St. and intending to return tonight, but they have not got in yet. I got up at 5 minutes past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. At 1/2 past 10 p.m. it was moonlit and clear.

JULY

1 July 1841. It was clear all day and warm with the wind from the SW until about 4 1/2 p.m. when the wind changed to NW and clouded over very heavily and rained a little. It continued to be cloudy all the evening and it rained a little about 10 p.m. There were several very heavy peals of thunder and some very vivid strokes of lightning in the afternoon. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 81 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. was at 91 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. in the sun 97 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. 84 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 78 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was out to swim with 5 or 6 others - it was the 13th time that I have been in this season. Mama, Lydia and Flora got home from Wilmington this afternoon about 3 p.m. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m.

2 July 1841. It was cloudy and rather damp or misty, but warm all day. It cleared off about 10 p.m. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 75 degrees, at 1/4 of 2 p.m. 84 degrees, at 7 p.m. 78 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 71 degrees. I was at the office all day. This evening I went out to swim with Hal deSilver, William Rotch and others - it was the 14th time that I have been in this season. I got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

3 July 1841. It was clear but much cooler than it has been for some days back. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. 79 degrees, at 7 p.m. 74 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 67 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I went down to Bill Hanly's. I got home around 9 p.m. where I found Miss K. Walker and Miss I. Graff. I went home with Miss G. shortly afterwards and with Miss W. about 10 o'clock. I got up at half past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

4 July 1841. It was a clear, cool, and delightful day. The wind during the morning was NW but afterwards it got around to the SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 70 degrees, at 1/4 of 1 p.m. 77 degrees, and at 6 1/2 p.m. it was at 73 degrees.

I was at Mr. Suddards' Church in the morning and afternoon - he preached in both the morning and the afternoon. The text in the morning was the 9th chapter of St Luke, verse 33; in the afternoon it was from the Psalms 117, verse 8. In the evening I was down at Trinity with Bill Hanly and Sam Milligan - Bishop Onderdonk preached from the 10th chapter of St. Luke, verse 36. Mr. Coleman, of the church (Trinity), preached his last sermon this morning before leaving to take the pastoral charge of a church in New York. I got up at 10 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

5 July 1841. It was a clear, cool and delightful day. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 66 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 82 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. was at 73 degrees. I got up this morning at 1/4 past 5 a.m.

About 6 William Hanly called for me to go to Wilmington according to a previous arrangement. We both took breakfast together at home finishing at about 6 1/2 a.m. After breakfast we walked down to the Arch St. Wharf and at 10 minutes of 7 a.m. we started for Wilmington with 500 - 600 passengers on the steamboat Burlington We stopped in Chester at 20 minutes of 9 a.m. and at Marcus Hook at 5 minutes past 9 a.m. We passed the Revenue Cutter (with about 25 or 30 flags of different nations strung on her sails and masts) about 20 minutes past 9. We arrived in the Hickes' mouth at 10 a.m. and at Wilmington at 20 minutes past 10 after what is considered a long passage. We then walked up to Mr. Hedge's and from there up to Carpenter's and got some ice cream.

After eating our cream, we went up to the Brandywine as far as the Barley Mill Dam, crossed there and went up to the Head Gates. Now at 1/4 of 12 p.m. we are sitting on the same. We then retraced our steps as far as the Barley Mill Dam, crossed there and took a walk up around by Dr. Gibbons'. We remained there for about 2 hours and a half, making sure of our dinner while we were there. We then had a tea (a tete_a_tete) with the girls and at about 1/2 past 2 p.m. walked down to Carpenter's again and had two glasses of ice cream a piece. We then went around to Mathers' and each took another glass. We then went down to Mr. Hedge's and stopped there for awhile. From there we walked up to the Town Hall and visited the Cupola to take a view of the city. Afterwards, we went down to the whaling ships Lucy Ann and Ceres and looked through them both and then walked up to the depot.

It then being 5 p.m. (we met Bill Knight and John Bealy while looking at the ships), we were expecting the cars to start at 5 1/2 p.m. as we had been informed by the agent. At the appropriate time (5 1/2 p.m), we took our seats in the cars, but on the account of some detention of the Philadelphia train, we did not start until 7 minutes of 7 p.m. We stopped at Hook at 20 minutes past 7 and at Chester at 25 minutes of 8 p.m. Just after leaving Chester we came up to the train that left just before us (the said train being part of ours but divided on account of being too much for one engine), they having broken the engine. Our engine had to push their train and take our own which caused great detention.

At about 1/2 past 8 p.m. we had a tremendous storm accompanied by heavy rain, vivid flashes of lightning and very heavy thunder. We arrived at Gray's Ferry at 9 p.m. and in the city at 20 minutes past 10 p.m. - being the longest trip up I ever had in the cars. But with all we spent a delightful day. I got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

6 July 1841. It was a clear and very delightful day. The wind during the morning was SE, but it got around to the SW about the middle of the day. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 77 degrees, at 2 p.m. 83 degrees, 7 1/4 p.m. 80 degrees, and at 11 p.m. was at 77 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I walked down to Miss Field's with Aaron Thomson; we stopped there for about an hour. We then went around to Miss Chalenor's, we remained there about an hour and then went home. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m. At 11 p.m. there was every appearance of a storm coming up. There is also a fire in the neighborhood - I could hear the engines at work.

7 July 1841. Today was cloudy with the wind from the NE until about 5 p.m. when it changed to the NW and clouded over much heavier and commenced raining very hard. It continue to do so until about 9 p.m. when it stopped. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 75 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. 81 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. 69 degrees, and at 9 p.m. was at 69 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was home asleep on the sofa. I got up this morning at 5 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

8 July 1841. It was clear and very pleasant today. The wind was NNW. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 76 degrees, at 12 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 3 & 6 p.m. was at 75 degrees.

I was taken very sick last night and this morning I hardly felt able to get up and go to the office, but, I however, went down about 1/2 past 8. I was obliged to return right away and go to bed. I had one of the worst headaches that I ever had in my life accompanied by a fever and sore throat.

9 July 1841. Today was clear with light flying clouds. The wind was strong from the SW. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 81 degrees, at 12 p.m. 81 degrees, at 3 p.m. 82 degrees, and at 6 p.m. it was at 80 degrees.

I felt much better this morning but had to remain in bed until about 5 1/2 p.m. and I remained up until about 1/4 of 10 p.m. William Hanly spent the evening here with me and Mrs. and Miss Stockley were here with Mama. Mama, Papa, Lydia, Libby, Mr. & Mrs. Roberts & children, Mrs. Rieford, the cousins from 9th street, two of the Miss Whitmans and others, in all 22, started from our house to go to Wilmington but were disappointed in being too late for the boat. They however concluded to cross the river and spend the day in Camden where they enjoyed themselves exceedingly.

10 July 1841. It was clear and looked very much like rain in the morning, but cleared off about noon very pleasantly. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 74 degrees, at 12 p.m. 83 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 81 degrees, at 7 3/4 p.m. 76 degrees, and at 9 3/4 p.m. 72 degrees.

I felt pretty well again today and was able to be up all day, but remained in the house. I took a walk as far as 2nd and Chestnut St. in the evening. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

11 July 1841. It was a clear, cool and very delightful day. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 75 degrees, at 1 p.m. 77 degrees, at 6 3/4 p.m. 73 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 69 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and evening - Mr. Suddards preached both. The text in the morning was the 9th chapter and 33rd verse of St. Luke and in the evening was from St. Matthew. In the afternoon I was at Dr. Tyng's with Bill Hanly - he preached from the 6th chapter and 35th verse of St. John. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m. It clouded over this evening.

12 July 1841. Today was clear and very pleasant. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. was 79 degrees, at 7 3/4 p.m. 75 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 70 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at a meeting of the National Institute. I got up at 25 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes of 11 p.m. William Bird went to the county last Thursday.

13 July 1841. It was clear and very pleasant today. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 87 degrees, at 6 p.m. 80 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 76 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I took a walk out to the Schuylkill with William Rotch, William Bryant, Ben, Russell, and Allen - they went into swim, but I did not. I got up at 25 minutes past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

14 July 1841. It was a cloudy and extremely warm day. The wind was SW. It got around to the SE in the afternoon and rained for awhile. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 73 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 90 degrees, at 6 p.m. 83 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 79 degrees. There was incessant lightning during the evening.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I went to see Love at the Museum. I got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at quarter past 10 p.m.

15 July 1841. It was clear and very warm all day and evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 76 degrees, at 2 p.m. 86 degrees, at 6 p.m. 82 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 82 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the office writing a letter to Bill Bird. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 a.m.

16 July 1841. There was every appearance of rain early in the morning, but it soon cleared up. There was a shower of rain in the latter part of the afternoon. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 73 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 83 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 72 degrees. I was at the office all day and this evening

I was at the office writing a deed for Mr. Campbell. I was up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got up bed at 25 minutes of 11 p.m.

17 July 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 66 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 82 degrees, at 6 1/4 p.m. 76 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was at 72 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was out to swim with Bill Rotch in the Schuylkill - it was the 15th time I have been in this season. I got up at 25 minutes of 5 a.m. and got to bed at 11 o'clock p.m.

18 July 1841. It was a clear, cool and very pleasant day. The wind at 5 p.m. was SE The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 73 degrees, at 12 p.m. 82 degrees, at 6 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 70 degrees. I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Suddards preached in the morning from 14th chapter & 1st verse of Numbers. Mr.[blank] preached in the afternoon from the 3rd chapter of [blank], verses 2 & 3. In the evening I was down at Mr. Coleman's with Bill Rotch, but I had to go before the sermon commenced on the account of his being sick. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

19 July 1841. It was clear and very pleasant with the wind from the SE The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 71 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 84 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 81 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 73 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was walking about on several errands by myself. I got up this morning at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes past 1 a.m.

20 July 1841. It was clear and very pleasant and the wind was SW. The thermometer at 5 1/2 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 2 p.m. 87 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 81 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was at 73 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went into swim at Murphy's swimming bath - it was the 16th time that I have been in this season. Mama, Papa, Lydia and the Robertses, in general, went down to Wilmington, but returned today, excepting Lydia who remained there. I got up at 1/4 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minute past 11 p.m.

21 July 1841. Today was cloudy, but they were very light. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 71 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 86 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 73 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was out with Bill Rotch walking about town. I got up at 20 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m.

22 July 1841. There was every appearance of rain in the early part of the morning, but it soon cleared off. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 73 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 86 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 82 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 76 degrees. I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

23 July 1841. It was clear and very warm and the wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 76 degrees, at 1 p.m. 91 degrees, at 6 p.m. 85 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 79 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I walked down to the office to look for my pencil. From there I went down to Bill Hanly's and then home. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 11 p.m.

24 July 1841. It was clear and extremely warm all day, but it clouded over about dark and remained so all the evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 77 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 93 degrees and in the sun 132 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 87 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 82 degrees. This was decidedly the warmest day we have had this year.

I was at the office all day and this evening I went into Murphy's swimming - it was the 17th time I have been into swim this year. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 o'clock p.m.

25 July 1841. It was clear during the morning, but it clouded over in the early part of the afternoon and we had two heavy showers accompanied with thunder and lightning - one in the afternoon and the other in the evening. The wind was SW. Today has been the warmest we have had this season. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 85 degrees, at 12 p.m. 94 degrees (one degree higher than yesterday), at 6 1/2 p.m. 83 1/2 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 74 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning; Mr. Hearst preached from the 5th chapter of St. John, verses 28 & 29. This afternoon I was home until about 5 p.m. when I walked up to Grace Church and heard part of the sermon preached by Mr. Mitchelson. This evening I was down to Mr. Coleman's with Bill Hanly - he preached. It was raining quite fast when we came out of church. We stopped down at the Snell's after church for Maria, she having gone there after church. I got up this morning at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes past 11 p.m.

26 July 1841. It was a clear, cool, and very delightful day with a fine breeze from the NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 74 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 80 degrees, at 6 p.m. 77 degrees, and at 10 3/4 p.m. it was at 69 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was down at the Chalenor's with William Hanly. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes past 11 p.m.

27 July 1841. It was clear, cool and pleasant all day. The wind during the morning was NW but got around to SW in the afternoon. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 66 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 81 degrees, 6 1/2 p.m. 78 degrees, and at 9 p.m. it was at 74 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening at home. I got up this morning at 20 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

28 July 1841. It was cloudy early in the morning and the rest of the day it was cloudy on and off. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. it was at 72 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. 87 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 71 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was down at Bill Hanly's. We had corn for dinner today - first this season. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m.

29 July 1841. It was clear and cool and very pleasant until about 8 p.m. when it clouded over. The wind was in every part of the compass; it was NW in the morning and went the full rounds and got to the NW again in the afternoon. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 63 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 87 degrees, at 6 1/4 p.m. 75 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 70 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was walking about with Sam Milligan and William Hanly. I got up at 20 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

30 July 1841. It was cloudy and we had a shower of rain between 11 a.m. and 12 p.m. with the wind from the SW. It afterwards got around to the SE It rained on and off through the afternoon, but in the evening it rained very hard, especially now at 1/4 of 10 p.m. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 70 degrees, at 1 p.m. 77 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 72 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 69 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went after Miles Denny to try to get some money but did not succeed. I got home about 9 where I remained the rest of the evening. I got up at 20 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

31 July 1841. It was a cloudy, damp, rainy, and very unpleasant day. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 67 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 65 degrees, at 6 p.m. 62 degrees, and at 8 1/2 p.m. it was at 61 degrees.

I was at the office during the morning. In the afternoon I was out on some little business in preparing to go out of town on Monday. This evening I was at home, excepting about a half an hour when I was at the store. I got up at 20 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at half past 10 p.m. At 10 1/2 p.m. it is damp and raining.

AUGUST

1 August 1841. It was raining hard when I got up this morning. It stopped about 9 a.m., but remained cloudy until about 5 p.m. when it cleared off. The wind was NNE. The evening was clear and moonlit. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 61 degrees, at 12 1/2 p.m. & 6 1/2 p.m. 67 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 64 degrees.

I was at Grace Church both in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Neville preached both times; in the morning the text was the 19th chapter of St. John, verse 3 and in the afternoon it was the 3rd chapter of Genesis, verse 15. This evening I was at St. Andrew's with Bill Hanly and Sam Milligan. Mr. [blank] preached from the 3rd chapter of St. John, verses 14 & 15. I got up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at quarter past 11 p.m. At 11 p.m. it is clear.

2 August 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and the wind was SW. The thermometer at 12 p.m. was at 74 degrees.

I started this morning at 12 minutes past 10 a.m. for New York, arriving at Burlington at 10 minutes of 12 p.m. (leaving Camden at 24 minutes of 11 a.m.), at Bordentown at 25 minutes of 1 p.m., at Amboy at 25 minute past 2 p.m. We here took the steamer Independence for New York. I took dinner on board of this boat and got into New York at 20 minutes past 5 p.m. I then took a carriage which conveyed me to Mrs. Waldrons' boarding house where I put up at.

After supper, I walked up Broadway to Niblo's Garden(5) (this is the most magnificent place) and remained there during the performance. I met two persons there that I knew by sight from Philadelphia, had a short conversation with them and got back to the boarding house again about 11 p.m. I got up at 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 12 m.

3 August 1841. It was clear but warm. The wind was NNW. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 78 degrees, at 12 p.m. 79 degrees, at 3 p.m. 80 degrees, and at 6 p.m. it was at 81 1/2 degrees.

I went over to Brooklyn this morning by myself but did not remain there but a very short time. After breakfast, I went down to Wall St. to see Mr. Phelps and some other persons on business. At 10 a.m. Mr. Schumaker, a young gentleman from St. Petersburg, Russia, and myself went up to see the Great Western. We saw her, but were not able to get on board of her. In the afternoon, I took the .tc Harlem, Fordham and Tammany Hall#

cars from City Hall and went to Harlem and Fordham. Harlem is a very pretty place situated on the Harlem River about 8 miles from New York. Fordham is a very small place and is about 4 miles from Harlem. I got back to New York about 7 p.m. In the evening I was down on the Battery until about 9 1/2 p.m. It was moonlit and very cool and pleasant. I then went up to Tammany Hall and waited until about 1/4 of 11 p.m. to see Mr. Gardener, but he did not come in as they expected. I got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

4 August 1841. It was clear and very pleasant, but warm. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 81 degrees, at 12 p.m. 82 1/4 degrees, at 3 p.m. 84 degrees, and at 6 p.m. it was at 84 degrees.

I started at 7 a.m. in the steamer Troy from the foot of Barclay Street for Newburgh and Fishkill Landing. The scenery along the river is magnificent. We passed the Palisades during our trip up - they are rocks running up perpendicularly, I suppose, to the height of 50 to 80 feet. They are on the East Bank of the river and extend along the shore for a number of miles. We stopped at Caldwell's Landing, 25 miles from New York, at 10 minutes of 10 a.m. It is very handsomely situated on the West Bank of the river; it is composed of not more than 7 to 10 houses. We stopped at West Point at 10 minutes past 10 a.m. - this is 66 miles from New York. Just after leaving West Point, we passed a place called St. Anthony's Nose; as it appears from the river, it has the appearance of a man's face on the rocks. We arrived at Newburgh at exactly 11 a.m. I was immediately taken to the Ferry for Fishkill Landing where I arrived at 20 minutes past 11 a.m. I walked up to the Larr Inn, but did not find Mr. Gardener. I stopped for awhile at the inn and then got a boat and rowed up this river a piece and went in to swim.

I returned and went down to the Ferry again and crossed to Newburgh where I took the steamer Albany at 10 minutes past 2 p.m. for West Point where I arrived at 10 minutes of 3 p.m. I then walked up to the hotel, and left my coat there. I then took a walk over the place to see what could be seen in my walk. I came across the 'Spring of Rosciuzks' where I drank. At about sundown the cadets were drilled in the rear of the camp and the band played some very handsome music. I then took supper.

After supper was over, I sat on the porch talking with a gentleman and his two grandsons from Staten Island. At about 9 o'clock I walked down to the barracks where there was dance for the cadets and visitors of West Point. I remained there until after 10 when I retired to a bed made up on the floor with about 5 others (all sleeping in different beds), which was not so pleasant as it might have been.

5 August 1841. It was rather cloudy but very pleasant during the morning. It commenced raining about 3 p.m. and continued to do so during the afternoon and evening. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 77 degrees, at 12 p.m. 79 degrees, at 3 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 6 p.m. it was at 78 degrees. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and walked through the camp.

I saw the morning parade and drill. I went over to the chapel, the winter quarters of the cadets, and to several of the other buildings. I afterwards went down to the river and saw some of the cadets firing with a canon. I then walked down to the river to see the steamer Albany arrive, which was about 11 a.m. After she left I walked along the bank for about 1/2 a mile with several others and went into swim. After going into swim, I walked up to the Hotel again. I then came down to the Landing and took the steamer Troy for New York where I arrived at about 5 1/2 p.m. I found Mr. Gardener this evening at the St. George's Hotel on Broadway. I got to bed at 11 p.m.

6 August 1841. Today was clear and very pleasant. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 79 degrees, at 12 p.m. 80 degrees, at 3 p.m. 81 degrees, and at 6 p.m. it was at 81 degrees at about 10 p.m.

I started up to see the Great Western, accompanied by Miss Mary Purcell of New Brunswick. After passing through the different parts of the ship, we walked down as far as the foot of Fulton St. where we took the Ferry for Brooklyn. After arriving there we took a cab for an hour; we rode around over the heights, through the principal streets and also to the Navy Yard, getting back to the Ferry at 1/4 of 1 p.m. where we again returned to New York.

In the afternoon I took the steamboat Wave down into the Lower Bay, stopping at Staten Island, Fort Hamilton, Fort Dermond, and passing Fort Richmond and also the Quarantine Ground. We passed down into the Lower Bay at about 6 or 7 miles below the narrows, arriving at New York again about 7 p.m. I was at my boarding house most of the evening and at about 10 p.m. I went home with Miss Purcell of New Brunswick. It was on Broom St. near the Bowery. I got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

7 August 1841. It was clear and very pleasant and the wind was NW. The thermometer at 12 p.m. was at 79 degrees.

In the morning about 10 a.m., Mrs. Van Arsdale, Miss

Purcell, and myself went to Hoboken. It is a very pleasant place. We walked up to the bank past the cave as far as the Elysian Fields(6) and

returned down by another road and returned to New York about 2 p.m.

In the afternoon I went aboard the school ship North Caro-lina, Miss Purcell was to accompany me but was unexpectedly called home on account of sickness. After I returned from the ship, I took a salt water bath in the Franklin Bath near the Battery. In the evening I took an omnibus and went up to Vauxhall Garden. I got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

8 August 1841. It was clear in the morning, but cloudy in the afternoon. The wind was SSW. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 82 degrees, at 12 p.m. 83 degrees, at 3 p.m. 82 degrees, and at 6 p.m. it was at 79 degrees.

I was in the house in the morning, being very unwell. Feeling better in the afternoon, I was over in Hoboken with Mr. A.P. Crane from Florida. In the evening I was at a fire at the corner of Pearl and Maiden Lane with Mr. & Mrs. Van Arsdale.

9 August 1841. It poured rain during the morning; the afternoon was cloudy, but it did not rain. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 78 degrees, at 12 p.m. 79 degrees, 3 p.m. 82 degrees, and at 6 p.m. it was at 80 degrees.

I started this morning in the steamer New York at 1/2 past 6 for New Haven. We had a rather rough passage through the Sound and arrived in New Haven at 1/2 past 11 a.m. It is decidedly one of the handsomest places that I ever was in. I remained here during the afternoon and evening until about 1/2 past 10 p.m. when I took the steamer Bunker Hill for Hartford. While I was in this place I put up at the 'Pavilion'. In the route of the Bunker Hill, we passed along the sound until we came to the mouth of the Connecticut River, which was the river we ascended to the distance of about 60 miles before we arrived at Hartford. I was up on deck most of tonight.

10 August 1841. It was cloudy all day, but the sun would shine out occasionally. The wind was SE The thermometer at 12 p.m. was at 76 degrees.

I arrived in Hartford about 7 this morning. I took boarding at the Exchange Hotel at no. 64 State St. - it is a very good house. After I got my breakfast I took a 1 horse wagon and rode through the principal parts of the town and outskirts. I saw the old Charter Oak(7) in my ride and a number of handsome buildings. About dark I walked through the town and then back to the hotel and went to bed at about 9 p.m.

11 August 1841. It was cloudy during the day and at about 6 1/2 p.m. commenced raining very hard. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 79 degrees, at 12 p.m. 81 degrees, at 3 p.m. 80 degrees, and at 6 p.m. it was at 80 degrees.

I got up about 6 a.m., got my breakfast and then walked down to the river. I then came back to the hotel and wrote a letter to William Bird. At 1/2 past 10 a.m. I took the cars for New Haven where I arrived at about 1/4 of 1 p.m. I then took the steamer New York for New York; we started at 1/2 past 1 p.m. and arrived in New York at 1/2 past 6 p.m. There was a complete calm on the sound today. When I arrived in New York, I again took boarding with Mrs. Waldrens. This evening I was in the house.

12 August 1841. It was rather cloudy and warm and the wind was NW. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 77 degrees, at 12 p.m. 79 degrees, at 3 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 6 p.m. it was at 78 degrees.

This morning I walked around with Mr. Van Arsdale to the Christian House and went all through it - it is a splendid building. I then walked around by myself to the Exchange and looked through it. I then took an omnibus and went up into the upper part of the city and looked through the city up there. I then took the railroad at 27th St. and came down to the City Hall. I then went to my boarding house and sat there awhile and feeling unwell went up to my room at about 12 p.m. and did not wake up until about 20 minutes of 4 p.m. I then got my dinner and walked out a little distance. In the evening Mr. & Mrs. Van Arsdale, Mr. & Mrs. Hutchins from Norfolk, Virginia, Mr. Crane from Florida, and myself went up to Niblo's. We had a pleasant time. I got up at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

13 August 1841. It was cloudy all day.

I started at 6 a.m. in the steamer Independence for Amboy and arrived there at about 8 a.m. We here took the cars for Camden; we started at 1/2 past 8 a.m. and arrived at Camden at 1/4 past 12 p.m. We here took the boat from Camden where we arrived at 1/4 of 1 p.m. I took a cab and got up home at about 1/4 past 1 p.m. after a very delightful trip of about 12 days. In the afternoon I went to see Bill Hanly and to take a pattern for Mrs. Prichett and several other persons. I got up at 1/4 of 5 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

14 August 1841. It was cloudy during the morning, but it cleared off towards noon. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 2 1/4 p.m. 79 degrees, at 7 1/4 p.m. 75 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 71 degrees.

I was in the house most of the morning writing. I walked out about 11 down as far as the store and Bill Hanly's. In the afternoon, I went down to see the Steam Frigate Mississippi with William Hanly, and then got a boat and rowed over to the Island and went into swim. In the evening I was at home. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed about 25 minutes of 11 p.m.

15 August 1841. It was rather cloudy but very pleasant with the sun shimmering occasionally. The wind was ENE The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 71 degrees, at 1/4 of 1 p.m. was at 79 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. was at 73 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was at 68 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and in the afternoon. Mr. Suddards preached both times. The text in the morning was the 4th chapter and 5th verse of Isaiah and in the afternoon it was the 4th chapter and 7th verse of Corinthians I. In the evening I was down at Mr. Coleman's with William Hanly, Sam Milligan, and Barry Russell. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

16 August 1841. It was clear and pleasant and the wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 79 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. 73 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 68 degrees.

I was in the house most of the morning. In the afternoon I went up to try and find Mr. Cleadon, but could not. In the evening I was down to see the Misses Chalenors. I got up this morning at 6 and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m. Mama & Papa went to Wilmington this afternoon at 3 1/2 o'clock.

17 August 1841. It was clear and very warm all day. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 80 degrees, at 12 p.m. 81 degrees, at 3 p.m. 81 degrees, and at 6 p.m. it was at 80 degrees.

I started for Wilmington at 7 o'clock in the steamer Burlington and arrived there at about 10 a.m. I then met Papa and we went up to Mrs. Hopkins' where I took board for the remainder of the week! Papa, Mama, and Lydia went up on the boat at 1 p.m. In the afternoon I was out at the Brandywine with Rod and Frank Gibbons; we also went into swim. After supper, I walked to Dr. Gibbons' where I remained until about 1/2 past 8 when I walked into town and got some ice cream. I got up at 10 minutes past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

18 August 1841. It was clear but warm all day and the wind was SE The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 79 degrees, at 12 p.m. 80 degrees, at 3 p.m. 83 degrees, and at 6 p.m. it was at 82 degrees.

I was out a gunning in the morning with Julius Bradford; Rod & Frank Gibbons were with me part of the time. In the afternoon I was out in the Brandywine a rowing with Rod & Frank G. and J. Bradford. I was also into swim with Rod and Frank. In the evening I was down in town and stopped and talked awhile with Miss S.A. Alrich and then went over to Carpenters' and got some ice cream. I then walked over to my boarding house and went to bed. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

19 August 1841. Today was clear and very pleasant. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 80 degrees, at 12 p.m. 81 degrees, at 3 p.m. 82 degrees, and at 6 p.m. was at 81 degrees.

I was out at Dr. Gibbons' most of the morning and in the afternoon. I went down to see Edward Harvey in the evening. I walked down with Mrs. Luff to her cousin's. We then walked around to see Miss Alrich, but she not being in we down to see Mrs. Hadden's sisters where we met Miss Alrich and spent the evening. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

20 August 1841. It was clear until about 3 p.m. when it clouded over and we had a little shower. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 83 degrees, at 12 p.m. 85 degrees, at 3 p.m. 87 degrees, and at 6 p.m. it was at 86 degrees.

I was out a gunning down at the marsh this morning; I shot about 14 or 15 birds. It was exceedingly warm. This afternoon I took a walk down through town and got some ice cream. I spent the evening at Miss Alrich's and I took a walk over Brandywine with Edward Harvey in the early part of the evening. I got up at 10 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

21 August 1841. It was clear until about 4 p.m. when it clouded over very heavily, but had not much rain. It again clouded over very heavily in the evening and we had some very heavy rain and some very heavy thunder and vivid lightning.

I was at my boarding house most of the morning and in the afternoon I started at 1 p.m. for Philadelphia where I arrived at 1/2 past 3 p.m. This evening I was down at William Hanly's. The wind was SE The thermometer at 12 p.m. was at 84 degrees. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes past 11 p.m. At 11 p.m., it was pouring rain.

22 August 1841. It poured rain most of the morning but cleared up towards afternoon. It again clouded over in the evening. The wind was S. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 74 degrees, at 12 1/2 p.m. 75 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 69 degrees.

I was at Dr. McDowell's church in the morning with Papa; he preached from the 25th chapter of Matthew, verses 6 to 9.

In the afternoon Papa and I took a walk out as far as Fairmount and at 3 p.m. took the cars for Manayunk on a visit to see Mama, as she is boarding on Green Lane near there. I returned on the 6 1/2 p.m. train but Papa remained there all night. In the evening I went to Mr. Coleman's; the text was the 7th chapter of Job, verse 11. I met William Hanly, Sam Milligan and R.I. Parvin down there; after church was out we all went down to Miss Snell's and sat there awhile. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 12 p.m.

23 August 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day. The wind was NNE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 68 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. 77 degrees, at 6 3/4 p.m. 73 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 69 degrees. I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to see Bill Hanly, but did not find him. Sam Milligan came in while I was there and I took a walk through the square and up and down Chestnut St. a piece with him. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

24 August 1841. It was clear and very pleasant. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 67 degrees, at 2 p.m. 76 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 69 degrees. I was at the office all day.

This evening I was home until abut 8 p.m. when I took a letter down to Mr. Robertson's. I then walked around to Bill Hanly's and stopped there awhile and then went home. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at half past 10 p.m.

25 August 1841. It was clear and very pleasant today and the wind was NNE, though it got around to SE about dark. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 2 p.m. 76 degrees, and at 10 3/4 p.m. it was at 67 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Snell's. I went around to Miss Patterson's with Priscilla from there. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 a.m.

26 August 1841. Today was cloudy with an occasional shower. The wind was SE The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 64 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. 72 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 66 degrees.

It commenced raining about dark and continued to do so during the whole of the evening very hard. I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home. Mama and Lydia got home from the country this afternoon; they have been gone since Wednesday last. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

27 August 1841. It was cloudy and rainy all day and evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 67 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 77 degrees, and at 9 1/2 & 10 3/4 p.m. it was at 73 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening down at Bill Hanly's. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes past 11 p.m.

28 August 1841. It was raining on and off all day and sometimes very hard. The wind was NE and ENE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 72 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 75 degrees, and at 7 1/2 & 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 73 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was home asleep on the sofa most of the time. I got up this morning at 6 1/4 and got to bed at about 10 1/4 p.m.

29 August 1841. It was cloudy on and off all day and evening, but there was no rain. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 9 1/2 a.m. & 12 p.m. was at 83 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 77 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. it was at 75 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Suddards preached both times; the text in the morning was Corinthians, II chapter 3, verse 4; and, in the afternoon the text was the 34th chapter of Deuteronomy, verses 1 - 5. In the evening I was down at Mr. Coleman's with William Hanly and Sam Milligan. I got up at 10 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

30 August 1841. It was pouring rain when I got up and it had the appearance of a very rainy day. The wind was NE. At about 10 a.m. it cleared off beautifully and in the afternoon the wind got around to the SW. The evening was moonlit. There was a great storm early this morning accompanied with thunder and lightning. The thermometer at 2 p.m. was at 79 degrees, and at 6 p.m. it was at 75 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the office writing.

31 Auguat 1841. It was clear and very pleasant today. The wind was NW. It afterwards got around to the SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 74 degrees, at 1 p.m. 79 degrees, at 6 p.m. 75 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 71 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the office writing. Mrs. Alrich and her daughter Susan were here to dinner today. I got up this morning at 4 1/2 to finish a deed for Papa. I got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

SEPTEMBER

1 September 1841. It was clear and pleasant all day and this evening was moonlit. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 70 degrees, at 2 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 1/4 of 10 p.m. it was at 73 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at William Hanly's until about 8 when I walked down with him to William Day's where he stopped, having an invitation to a party there. I walked up around home. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m. Papa lost $50 yesterday afternoon.

2 September 1841. It was a clear and very pleasant day. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 70 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 83 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 73 degrees. It clouded over and there was some lightning during the evening.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went up to see Mr. Denny. I then returned as far as the National Literary Institute Room, stopped in the remainder of the evening and then I came home. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

3 September 1841. It was clear and very warm all day and evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 73 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. was at 86 degrees, at 7 p.m. 81 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 76 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down with Robert Parvin to see the Misses Chalenor, but they not being in, we went to Miss Field's and I went to Miss Snell's where I met Sam Milligan and William Hanly. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m. There was a very heavy shower of rain accompanied with heavy thunder and vivid lightning last night about 11 o'clock.

4 September 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening, except for about an hour in the afternoon when it clouded over and we had a heavy shower for awhile. The wind was fresh from the SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 76 degrees, at 2 p.m. 85 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 77 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I walked down to William Hanly's; I stayed there for a little while and came up home about 8 o'clock where I remained during the rest of the evening. I got up at 10 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

5 September 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. The wind was fresh from the NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 73 degrees, at 1/4 of 1 p.m. 79 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 76 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was at 71 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon; Mr. Suddards preached both times. The text in the morning was the 4th chapter and 5th verse of Isaiah and in the afternoon it was the 11th chapter and 6th verse of Matthew. In the evening I was at Mr. Coleman's; he preached from Thessalonians I, chapter 1, verse 1.

After church was out, I walked up with Aaron Thompson & Robert Parvin and we stopped at Thompson's sisters' for a while as we came up. Our church commenced at 10 1/2 this morning instead of 10 a.m. as heretofore. At 11 p.m. it was clear and moonlit. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes past 11 p.m.

6 September 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. The wind was NNW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 70 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 77 degrees, and at 6 1/2 p.m. it was at 75 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the Walnut Street Theatre to see the Water Queen. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 12 p.m.

7 September 1841. It was cloudy all day but cleared up about dark. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 2 p.m. was 70 degrees, at 7 p.m. was 71 degrees, and at 9 1/4 p.m. it was at 69 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening was at home reading. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

8 September 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at 1/4 of 2 p.m. 74 degrees, at 7 p.m. 72 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 65 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I walked down with William Hanly with his cousins to Miss Snell's. We left her there and then went around to the Misses Chalenor's, they not being in, we returned again to Miss Snell's. I stayed for about an hour when I came home leaving William & his cousins there. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m.

9 September 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 63 degrees, at 1/4 of 2 p.m. 75 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 72 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 66 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was home until about 9 1/2 p.m. when I went down to the National Institute Meeting and remained until it adjourned. Cousin Lydia & Sarah spent the evening here. I got up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 minutes of 11 a.m.

10 September 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at 2 p.m. 75 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was at 66 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was home writing for Papa. I got up this morning at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

11 September 1841. It was clear most the day but sometimes it would be a little cloudy. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 68 degrees, and at 7 p.m. it was at 71 degrees.

I started out on a gunning excursion this morning at about 10 o'clock with William Bryant. We crossed at Market St. bridge, walked down the bank as far as Gray's Ferry and then down to the Rope Ferry, we crossed there and then went up home by the Guard School which made us both tired. I got home about 7 p.m. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes past 10 p.m. I was at home during the evening.

12 September 1841. It was cloudy but pleasant all day and evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 2 p.m. 76 degrees, and at 8 1/2 p.m. it was at 73 degrees.

I was at Mr. Suddards' church both in the morning and the evening; he preached. The text both times was the 11th chapter of Matthew, verse 6. In the afternoon Papa and I walked to see Aunt Nancy Warner. Today is my 17th birthday. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

13 September 1841. It was cloudy and cool all day and evening with a little rain early in the morning and latter part of the afternoon. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 2 p.m. 73 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 67 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

14 September 1841. It was clear and cool all day and evening. The wind was NNW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 61 degrees, at 2 p.m. 73 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 63 degrees.

I was at the office all day until about 4 1/2 p.m. when I went up to Germantown to see John Wister on some business for Mr. Elliott. This evening I went to a party of Miss Kate Walker's. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m. Today was Mama's 41st birthday. Mr. & Mrs. Roberts, the girls from 9th St., and several others were here.

15 September 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and rather cool. The wind was NNE & NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 59 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 73 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. 67 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 63 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to William Bird's to take the key of the office. I then came to William Hanly's and stopped there until about 1/4 of 10 p.m. when I came up home. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

16 September 1841. It was cloudy and cool all day and evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 60 degrees, at 2 p.m. 73 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 63 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I walked down as far as Doolittle's Auction Store with Papa and stopped there for a while and then walked around to Hav's hat store and each of us bespoke a hat. We then walked into the store and then up home again. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 10 p.m.

17 September 1841. It was a cloudy, raw, damp, rainy and exceedingly unpleasant day. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 60 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 59 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 56 degrees, and at 9 p.m. it was at 54 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home reading. I got up at 5 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 9 1/2 p.m. At 20 minutes past 2 p.m. it was pouring rain and was rather stormy.

18 September 1841. It was cool and very pleasant all day. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 55 degrees, at 2 p.m. 70 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 67 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 63 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I walked around to Mr. Graves' with Papa and then down to Mr. Hav's on Chestnut St. and each of us got a hat. I got up at 10 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m.

19 September 1841. Today was rather misty, but sometimes pretty clear. This evening was cloudy. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 60 degrees, at 2 p.m. 68 degrees, at 6 1/4 p.m. 65 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 64 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Suddards preached both times. The text in the morning was the 9th chapter of Acts, verse 11 - the words were "for behold he prayeth" - and in the afternoon was the 11th chapter of Matthew, verse 6.

This evening I was down at Mr. Coleman's with William Hanly and Sam Milligan. The text was the 10th chapter of Matthew, verse 33. I got up at 20 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

20 September 1841. It was cloudy during the morning, but cleared up in the afternoon and this evening it was clear. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 60 degrees, at 2 p.m. 69 degrees, at 1/4 of 7 p.m. 65 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 63 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I called in on Miss Anne Chalenor at her aunt's on the corner of 7th and Chestnut St with Robert Parvin to bid her good-bye as she starts for Cincinnati tonight at 12 o'clock; she intends staying 6 months or a year. I remained there but 1/2 an hour when I went around to the Athenaeum and read until 10 p.m. when I came home. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

21 September 1841. It was cloudy all day. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 61 degrees, at 1/4 of 2 p.m. & 6 1/4 p.m. 69 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 62 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Athenaeum reading Jack Shepherd. I got up at 20 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 11 p.m.

22 September 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 63 degrees, at 2 p.m. 69 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 63 degrees.

I was at the office all day except about an hour or two in the afternoon when I was out a rowing on the Delaware with Bill Hanly. Papa went to New York this afternoon at 5 o'clock. I got up at 5 minutes of 6 a.m. and got to bed at quarter past 10 p.m.

23 September 1841. It was cloudy and it rained on and off through the day. The wind was SE The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 62 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 69 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 67 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m. Cousin Sarah and Lydia Roberts were here tonight.

24 September 1841. It was a damp, rainy and very unpleasant day. The wind was SE The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 2 p.m. 77 degrees, and at 9 p.m. it was at 70 degrees.

I was at the office all day, This evening I was at home. I got up at 10 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 10 p.m.

25 September 1841. There were some very hard showers through the morning. It would be alternately clear and cloudy during the morning with the wind from the S. - it got around to the W. about noon and cleared up delightfully. The evening was clear and moonlit. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 72 degrees, and at 9 p.m. it was at 65 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home until about 7 1/2 o'clock when I took a walk to Bill Bird's to leave the key of the office. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes past 10 p.m. Papa got home from New York this morning about 10 minutes of 1.

26 September 1841. It was a clear, delightful and cool day and evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 60 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. 72 degrees, and at 6 1/2 p.m. it was at 69 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon and Mr. Suddards preached both times. The text in the morning was the 1st chapter of Acts, verse 25 and in the afternoon was the 10th chapter of St. John, the 16th verse. I was down at Mr. Coleman's in the evening with Sam Milligan and William Hanly; the text was the 23rd chapter of St. Luke, verses 39 to 44. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

27 September 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day. The wind was NW., but it got around to the SW in the afternoon. It clouded over a little in the morning. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 60 degrees, at 2 p.m. 69 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 62 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the Athenaeum reading Jack Shepherd. I got up at 6 3/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

28 September 1841. Today was changeable - the wind was SSW and SE The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 63 degrees, at 2 p.m. & 6 1/2 p.m. 73 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 69 degrees. I was at the office all day. This evening I was in the house writing for Papa until about 1/2 past 8 when I went down to the Athenaeum. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

29 September 1841. It was cloudy on and off all day with the wind from the SW. There was a heavy shower in the early part of the morning. The wind got around to the NW in the afternoon and about dusk we had a very heavy shower of rain. This evening was cloudy. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 67 degrees, at 2 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was at 63 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the Athenaeum reading Jack Shepherd. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m.

30 September 1841. It was clear but occasionally light-flying clouds would pass over. The wind was NW and cool. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 57 degrees, at 2 p.m. 62 degrees, at 6 1/4 p.m. 69 degrees, and at 11 p.m. was at 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Athenaeum until about 1/2 past 9 when I went to Mr. Edward Roberts to bring Lydia Erwin and Sarah Roberts home. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m.

OCTOBER

1 October 1841. It was clear and very cold. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 49 degrees, at 2 p.m. 61 1/2 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 52 degrees. There was a frost this morning early - it was the first this season.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was around at the cousins on 9th St. I got up this morning at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at quarter of 11 p.m.

2 October 1841. It was clear in the early part of the day and cloudy during the rest of the day and evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 49 degrees, at 2 p.m. 59 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 63 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 61 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at the store until 1/2 past 8 when I came up home. It was cold today; mama had a fire in her room and there were a number of coats and cloaks worn this evening. I got up this morning at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 10 p.m.

3 October 1841. It poured rain incessantly all day and evening. The wind was NE and was very raw and cold. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 45 degrees, at 1/4 of 1 p.m. was at 43 degrees, and at 6 1/2 p.m. and 8 1/2 p.m. it was at 41 degrees.

I was at home during the morning and evening. I was at Grace Church in the afternoon with Bill Hanly. Mr. Suddards preached from the 3rd chapter of Colossians, the verse 15, the words were "Be ye thankful." It was so raw and cold that we both wore our cloaks - it was the first time that we have had them on this season. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 9 p.m.

4 October 1841. It was cloudy until about 5 p.m. when it cleared up; this evening was clear. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 43 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 53 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 49 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening, I was at home until about 8 when I went down to the Athenaeum. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

5 October 1841. It was clear all day and evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 44 degrees, at 2 p.m. 58 degrees, at 6 3/4 p.m. 51 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 47 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Athenaeum until about 1/2 past 8 when I went up to Mr. Watson's on Marshall Street for Sarah Roberts and Lydia. I got up at 20 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m. We stopped taking on last Sunday the 3rd.

6 October 1841. It was clear all day and evening with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 43 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 58 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 48 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was home until about 8 1/4 when I went down to Bill Hanly's and we both went for a walk around. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

7 October 1841. It was clear with the wind from the NW until the latter part of the afternoon when it cleared over and the wind got around to the SSE. and in the evening we had a shower of rain. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 45 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 59 degrees, and at 1/4 of 7 p.m. it was at 56 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the Athenaeum reading Charles O'Malley.(8) I got up at 20 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

8 October 1841. It was cloudy until the latter part of the afternoon when it cleared off a little. We had a shower of rain about 1 p.m. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 54 degrees, at 2 p.m. 59 degrees, and at 7 and 10 p.m. it was at 55 degrees. This evening was very damp.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was around at Warner Jones' until about 8 o'clock when I went down to the Athenaeum and read until 10. I got up this morning at 6 1/2 and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m.

9 October 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 53 degrees, at 2 p.m. 65 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 54 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at the store until about 9 when I came up home and went home with Anna and Elizabeth Roberts. I then went down as far as Mr. Robinson's for my 10,000 (?) a year when I came around home again. I got up at 20 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes past 11 p.m.

10 October 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 53 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 60 degrees, and at 6 p.m. was at 55 degrees. I was at Grace Church in the morning - the text was the 16th chapter of Matthew, the 26th verse. Mrs. Joseph Hedges from Wilmington and Miss MacFarland went with us. In the afternoon I was at Mr. Chambers' with Bill Hanly. In the evening I was at Grace Church with Sam Milligan and Bill Hanly. Mr. Suddards preached from the 2nd chapter of Genesis, verse 1. I got up this morning at 20 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

11 October 1841. It was clear until about 4 p.m. with the wind from the SW. It then got around to the SSE and it clouded over. This evening was cloudy. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 48 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 65 degrees, and at 6 1/2 and 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 59 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I walked to Bill Hanly's, stopped there awhile and then he and Sam Milligan and I took a walk up around by Chestnut St. I left them at Chestnut St. & 6th and went to the Athenaeum. I got up at 20 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

12 October 1841. It poured rain until about 10 p.m. when it stopped but remained cloudy during the rest of the day and evening. The wind in the morning was SSE and it afterwards got around to the NW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 59 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 63, at 6 1/2 p.m. 61, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 58 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was out with Bill Hanly and Sam Milligan - we went up around about the City Election and then we went down around about the Southwark Election. I got home at 1/2 past 10 p.m. I got up this morning at 20 minutes of 7 and got to bed at 11 p.m.

13 October 1841. It was clear with the wind from the NW until about dark when it clouded over and remained so during the evening. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 53 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 59 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 51 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the Athenaeum until about 9 1/2 p.m. when I came home. Went home with Emma Erwin. I got up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. At 10 1/2 p.m. it was cloudy and cool.

14 October 1841. It was clear all day and evening and rather cool. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 44 degrees, at 2 p.m. 57 degrees, at 7 1/2 p.m. 51 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 49 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at a meeting of the Livingston Library Institute. Edward Gibbons slept here tonight - he intends going to New York in the morning at 7 o'clock. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m. The tall butter man came for the last time this season on Tuesday last, the other one came on Wednesday last for [illegible].

15 October 1841. It was clear with the wind from the SW until the latter part of the afternoon when it clouded over and remained so during the evening. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 45 degrees, at 2 p.m. 60 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening down at the Athenaeum until about 1/4 of 10 when I walked down to Bill Hanly's where I stopped for awhile before coming home. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was cloudy. We had a fire in the grate in the parlour for the first time this season today.

16 October 1841. It was cloudy all day but cleared up in the evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 52 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. was at 56 degree, and at 6 1/2 p.m. it was at 51 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was sitting down with Sam Milligan at his house. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. At 10 1/2 p.m. it was clear and cold.

17 October 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 41 degrees, at 1/4 of 1 p.m. 52 degrees, at 6 p.m. 50 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 44 degrees.

I went to Grace Church in the morning. When Mr. Suddards was about half way through the litany, he fell back with a great noise in a fit of fainting. It caused great excitement throughout the church and there was a great deal of screaming by the ladies. After a short while Mr. Cope dismissed the congregation.

I then went up to St. Philip's Church for awhile - it has not been open more than two or three times. I was at Grace Church again in the afternoon; Mr. Newton from St. Paul's Church preached from the 5th chapter of Deuteronomy, verse 32. This evening I was down at Mr. Coleman's with Bill Hanly and Sam Milligan. Bill and I had our cloaks on. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m. There is a great fire somewhere as the State House and U.S. bells are ringing.

18 October 1841. It was clear and cold all day and evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 41 degrees, at 2 p.m. 53 degrees, at 6 p.m. 41 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 43 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Athenaeum for awhile. I then went down to Bill Hanly's for awhile and from there I went up to Mr. E. Roberts' for Lydia and then came home. I got up this morning at 6 1/2 and got to bed at 10 minutes past 11 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was clear and cool.

19 October 1841. It was clear during the morning, but it clouded over in the afternoon and remained so during the evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 40 1/2 degrees, at 1/4 of 2 p.m. 51 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 49 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 47 degrees. I was at the office all day and this evening I was out with Bill Hanly. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 20 m. past 10 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was raining a little.

20 October 1841. It was raining when I got up but it cleared up about 9 a.m. It again clouded over about the middle of the day and we had some hail and rain. Afterwards it cleared up and remained so during the evening. The wind was W. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 46 degrees, at 2 p.m. 54 degrees, at 1/4 of 7 p.m. 49 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 46 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. Cousin Gainor, Lydia & Sarah Roberts, and Mrs. Gardner were here this evening. I got up this morning at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

21 October 1841. It was cloudy most of the day, but there was no rain. The wind was W. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 47 degrees, at 1/4 of 2 p.m. 55 degrees, and at 9 3/4 p.m. it was at 48 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the Athenaeum reading. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes past 10 p.m.

22 October 1841. It was cloudy most of the day, but there was no rain. The wind was W. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 44 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 52 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 46 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home writing for Mr. Campbell. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

23 October 1841. It was changeable but there was no rain. The wind was W. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 44 degrees, at 2 p.m. 53 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 46 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was out with William and Henry Bird. I got up at 10 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes past 11 p.m.

24 October 1841. It was cloudy on and off all day. The wind was WSW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 45 degrees, at 1 p.m. 51 degrees, at 6 p.m. 46 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 41 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Hill, a missionary from Greece, preached in the morning from the 2nd chapter and 6th verse of Hosea. In the afternoon the text was the 13th chapter of St. Luke, verses 1 & 2. This evening I was down at Trinity with William Hanly and Sam Milligan. The text was the 7th chapter and the 59th verse of Acts. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 11 p.m.

25 October 1841. Today was clear and the coldest day we have had yet this year. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at ...26 1/2 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 43 degrees, at 6 p.m. 39 degrees, and at 11 1/4 p.m. 33 degrees. There was ice this morning early - it was the 1st of the season.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home writing for Mr. Brown. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m.

26 October 1841. It was clear and cold. The wind was SSW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 32 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 51 degrees, at 6 1/4 p.m. 47 degrees, and at 10 3/4 p.m. 46 degrees. There was ice in the gutters this morning. The ice of yesterday I did not see but was told by R. Pascal that there was some.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home writing for Mr. Brown. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

27 October 1841. It was clear all day. The wind was W. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 41 degrees, and at 10 3/4 p.m. was at 46 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening was at home writing for Mr. Brown. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes past 11 p.m.

28 October 1841. It was clear until the latter part of the afternoon when it clouded over and remained so during the evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 29 degrees, at 2 p.m. 51 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 48 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was at 46 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went out to see an exhibition of animal magnetism. I got up at 20 minutes past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m.

29 October 1841. It was cloudy or misty most of the day and evening. The wind was NE, but got around by degrees to the SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 48 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was at 54 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the first lecture of the course of the Mercantile; Joseph R. Ingersoll lectured on the subject of "Public Sentiment." I got up this morning at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m.

30 October 1841. It was cloudy all day and this evening was misty. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 55 degrees, at 1/4 of 2 p.m. 60 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 57 degrees, and at 9 1/4 p.m. it was at 56 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home writing for Mr. Brown. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes past 10 p.m.

31 October 1841. It was cloudy foggy and very damp all day and evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 53 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 58 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 66 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning, afternoon and evening. Bishop Watson preached there in the evening. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

NOVEMBER

1 November 1841. It was so cloudy when I woke up that I could hardly see across the street. It was cloudy and misty throughout the day and warm. The wind was S. It cleared up in the morning and it was moonlit. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 55 degrees, at 2 p.m. 70 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 61 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home writing for Mr. Brown until about 9 o'clock when I went down to Mr. King's for Sarah Roberts. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m.

2 November 1841. It was raining when I got up and it had the appearance of being a rainy day, but it cleared up about 11 a.m. and remained so during the remainder of the day and evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 59 degrees, at 2 p.m. 65 degrees, and at 6 p.m. it was at 60 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at Bill Hanly's until about 9 when I came home. I woke up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

3 November 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day. The wind was SSW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 49 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 62 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. it was at 51 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at Trinity Church with Bill Hanly. The text was the 12th chapter of Corinthians, the 1st and 2nd verses. After church we walked home with Miss M.M. and Miss S.C. and then we came up home. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

4 November 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening and we had a very heavy shower of rain about the middle of the day. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 49 degrees, at 1/4 of 2 p.m. 46 degrees, and at 6 p.m. and 1/4 of 10 p.m. it was at 43 degrees. I was at the office all day and this evening I was down at William Hanly's sitting a talking with him. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

5 November 1841. Today was clear and cool. The wind was SW, W, and NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 41 degrees, at 2 p.m. 49 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 43 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at a lecture of the Mercantile Library Co. - it was the second of the season. Henry Reed lectured on the subject of "America and England." I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes of 11 p.m.

6 November 1841. Today was clear and very pleasant. The wind was WNW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 41 degrees, at 2 p.m. 49 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 45 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 41 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was down at Mr. Doolittle's Auction until about 8; I bought the first volume of the New World. I was at the Store the rest of the evening. I got up at 10 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of eleven o'clock p.m.

7 November 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 38 1/2 degrees, at 1/4 of 2 p.m. 45 degrees, at 5 1/4 p.m. 44 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 38 degrees.

I was at St. Andrew's Church in the morning; Mr. Clark preached from the Psalms 17, verse 5. I was at Grace Church in the afternoon; Mr. Watson preached from the 1st chapter of Corinthians I, verse 13. This evening I was down at Mr. Coleman's; he preached from the 17th chapter and 12th verse of Judges. I got up at 20 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

8 November 1841. It was raining when I got up and it continued to do so for several hours when it stopped a little. It afterwards clouded over again and we had rain most of the afternoon. It cleared up about dusk and this evening was clear. The wind was SSW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 41 degrees, at 2 p.m. 44 degrees, at 6 p.m. 47 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at a concert of the Shaw's at the Assembly Building with Lydia. We met Miss Nevis there. I got up at 10 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes past eleven p.m.

9 November 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day. The wind was NNW and it got around to the E. in the afternoon and clouded over a little. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 36 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was at 43 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at Miss E. Bell's with William Hanly. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

10 November 1841. It was cloudy all day and rained through the evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 3/4 a.m. was at 38 degrees, at 2 p.m. 44 degrees, at 6 p.m. 42 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 40 degrees.

I was at the office all day. Mama had company: Mrs. Mitchell, her two daughters, and Sam, Mr. & Mrs. Cresson, Edith Prichett, Sarah and Tacy Roberts, and Mrs. Van Ardsdale. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m. It was cloudy and rainy.

11 November 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 37 degrees and at 2 p.m. 44 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. At 10 1/2 p.m. it was cloudy, damp, and cold.

12 November 1841. It rained most of the morning but cleared up about the middle of the day. We had a heavy shower in the afternoon and this evening was clear. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 47 degrees, at 1/4 of 2 p.m. 51 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 47 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at a lecture of the Mercantile Library Co. - Bishop Hughes lectured on the subject of "The Life of Louis VII." I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 10 p.m.

13 November 1841. It was clear all day and evening. The wind was WNW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 41 degrees, at 2 p.m. 49 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 43 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was down at William Hanly's with Sam Milligan. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes of 10 p.m. At 9 1/2 p.m. it was clear and cool.

14 November 1841. It was clear until about 5 p.m. when it clouded over and we had a shower of rain about 9 p.m. This evening it was cloudy. The wind was SSW until just before it clouded over when it got around to the SSE. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 41 degrees, at 12 p.m. 51 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 46 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and evening and Mr. Watson preached both times. The text in the morning was Psalms 36, verse 9, and in the evening the text was the 8th chapter and the 6th verse of Jeremiah, the words were "what have I done?" This afternoon I was at St. Philip's with William Hanly. Mr. Nevit preached from the 6th chapter and the 4th verse of Ephesians. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

15 November 1841. It was cloudy and cold. The wind was changeable - it would alternatively change from SW to W to NW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 45 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 41 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 39 degrees. I was at the office all day.

This evening I was down at the store at Doolittle's - I went with Papa to buy a shade light. I got up at 20 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

16 November 1841. It was clear and cold. The wind was WNW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. 44 degrees, at 6 1/2 p.m. 41 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 37 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home writing for Mr. Brown. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. At 10 1/2 p.m. it was clear and cold.

17 November 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. 41 degrees, at 6 p.m. 44 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home writing for Mr. Brown. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m.

18 November 1841. It was cloudy all day and evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 43 degrees, at 2 p.m. 44 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 39 degrees. This evening I was down at Miss M. Mercer's with Bill Hanly and Sam Milligan. I got up at half past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes past 11 p.m.

19 November 1841. It was a cold, raw, damp, and rainy day. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 33 degrees, at 2 p.m. 35 degrees, and at 1/4 of 12 it was at 37 degrees. When I got up this morning the house roofs and grounds were covered with snow to the depth of an inch. It was the first snow we have had this season. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 12.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the 4th lecture of Mercantile Library Co. - Fredrick Fraley lectured on the subject of "Pennsylvania." After the lecture I came home and wrote until about 1/4 of 12 for Mr. Brown.

20 November 1841. It was cloudy and damp all day. The wind was NW most of the day. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 35 degrees, at 2 p.m. 43 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 42 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home writing for Mr. Brown. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at eleven o'clock p.m. Mr. Suddards sailed for England today on Cope's Line.

21 November 1841. It was cloudy all day. The wind was WSW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 42 degrees, at 1 p.m. 44 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 42 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon; Mr. Watson preached both times. The text in the morning was the 8th chapter, the 8th and 9th verses of Genesis, and in the afternoon the text was the 13th chapter, the 13th and 14th verses of St. Matthew.

This evening I was down at Mr. Coleman's with William Hanly; he preached from the 20th chapter of St. John. We, afterwards, went around to Miss Cook's; M.M. and Lester were there. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m. I wore my black cloth cloak for the first time today.

22 November 1841. It was a cloudy, rainy, and very disagreeable day. The wind was SSE. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 43 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 49 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 59 degrees. I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home reading Charles O'Malley. I got up at 10 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

23 November 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. The wind was WNW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 49 degrees, at 2 p.m. 53 degrees, and at 12 it was at 46 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the National Theater to see the play of the London Assemblance. I got up at 20 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 12.

24 November 1841. It was clear and very pleasant all day, with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. and 12 a.m. was at 43 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the coalition party of Miss Wale's with Lydia, Miss Walker, and Miss M. and L. Wood. I got up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 12 a.m. Cousin May Roberts(9) was married to Owen Jones this morning at 8 a.m.

25 November 1841. It was a very cloudy, cold, rainy, and very disagreeable day and evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 40 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 41 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

26 November 1841. It was a damp, cloudy, and very unpleasant day. The wind was NE. There was a heavy shower in the evening. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 40 degrees, at 2 1/4 p.m. 49 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the 5th lecture of the Mercantile Library Company; John K. Kane lectured on the subject of "The Freedom of Thought." I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at quarter of 11 p.m.

27 November 1841. It was clear and cold all day and evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer was at 32 degrees most of the day.

I started this morning in the steamboat Sun for Wilmington. I met a Mr. William C. Puryear from La Grange, Georgia. On our arrival in Wilmington, we took a one hour light wagon and went about 7 or 8 miles up in the country to get some parts for the manufacturing of teeth. We got in town about 3 p.m. when we went and got some oysters and then took a walk through the town. We then went to Indian Queen Hotel where I left him and then I went to Mr. Gibbons' where I spent the evening, suppered and slept. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

28 November 1841. It was cloudy and very cold all day. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 21 degrees, at 6 p.m. was at 32 degrees, and at 1/4 of 10 p.m. it was at 29 degrees.

I went to Quaker Meeting in the morning with Sarah E. and Rebecca Gibbons. After Meeting, I walked around by Henry Gibbons' with them and then around to the Dr.'s again and got my dinner. At 1 p.m., I started on the steamboat Sun for Philadelphia where I arrived at about 1/4 of 5 p.m.

In the evening I went to St. Philip's Church with William Hanly. Mr. Neville preached from the 22nd chapter and the last verse of Revelations. At about 7 p.m. it commenced snowing and continued to do so very hard all the evening. At 10 p.m. it was snowing very hard. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 after 10 p.m.

29 November 1841. It was cloudy and it snowed most of the day. This evening was clear, cool, and moonlit. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 26 degrees, at 2 p.m. 31 degrees, at 6 p.m. 28 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 26 1/2 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home until about 8 when I went down to see Aaron Thompson; I sat there awhile and then came up home.

The snow this morning was 8 inches deep in the yard. There was good sleighing and a number of sleighs out today and evening - it was the first of the season. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes past 10 p.m.

30 November 1841. It was clear and cold all day. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 23 degrees, at 2 p.m. 32 degrees, at 6 p.m. 31 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 27 degrees. There were a great number of sleighs out today.

I was at the office all day and I spent the evening at cousins' on 9th St. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

DECEMBER

1 December 1841. It was clear and cold all day. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 25 degrees, at 2 p.m. 34 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 30 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home. Mr. & Mrs. Carpenter spent the evening here together with Sarah & Tacy Roberts. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes past 10 p.m.

2 December 1841. It was clear during the morning, but it clouded over about noon and remained so during the afternoon and evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 28 degrees, at 2 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 34 degrees.

I was at the office all day and I spent this evening at William Hanly's. I got up at 10 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

3 December 1841. It was a damp, rainy, and very unpleasant day. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 35 degrees, and at 10 p.m. was at 52 degrees. The snow almost entirely disappeared today.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the 6th lecture of the Mercantile Library Company. Mr. Albert Barnes lectured on the subject of "The Desire of a Reputation." I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes of 11 p.m.

4 December 1841. Today was cloudy and unpleasant. The wind was WNW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 50 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 50 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 47 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was around at cousins' with Mama and Lydia. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

5 December 1841. Today was cloudy and windy and the wind was from the W. The thermometer at 1/4 of 9 a.m. was at 39 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 41 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 37 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and Mr. J. Bedell preached from the 12th chapter of Romans, verse 1. In the afternoon I was at St. Philip's and Mr. Neville preached from the 3rd chapter and 25th verse of Genesis. This evening I was down at Mr. Coleman's with Bill Hanly. Mr. C. preached from St. Luke. I got up at 25 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes past 10 p.m.

6 December 1841. It was cloudy all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 35 degrees, and at 2 p.m. 41 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at the office writing for Mr. Campbell and I did not get away till quarter of 2 a.m. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 2 a.m.

7 December 1841. Today was clear and cold with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 32 degrees, at 2 p.m. 32 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 32 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home writing for Mr. Campbell. Mrs. Eliza Jones spent the evening here. I got up at 7 a.m. and I got to bed at half past eleven o'clock p.m.

8 December 1841. It was clear all day and this evening was cloudy. The wind was from the NW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 30 degrees, and at 12 a.m. it was at 29 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at a coalition party of Mr. H. Wales with Kate Walker and Lydia. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 12 a.m.

9 December 1841. It was cloudy all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 42 degrees, at 2 p.m. it was 47 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 44 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was home writing for Mr. Campbell. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

10 December 1841. It was cloudy all day and this evening was rainy. The wind was SE. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 42 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 49 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. and 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the 7th lecture of the Mercantile Library Company. Professor Charles Eames of New York lectured on the subject of "The Romance of Our Times." It was decidedly one of the most elegant lectures that I have ever heard. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

11 December 1841. Today was cloudy and unpleasant. The wind was WNW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 50 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 30 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 47 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was around at cousins' with Mama and Lydia. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

12 December 1841. It was a clear and very delightful day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 8 1/2 a.m. was at 48 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 42 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and evening; Mr. Watson preached both times. The text in the morning was the 32nd chapter of Isaiah, verse 2, and in the evening it was Psalms 56, verse .tc Wire Bridge#

2. This afternoon I walked out with Bill Hanly to see the new bridge at Callowhill Street.(10) It is not yet nearly completed; they only have three of the pillars done for the wire to be stretched over. We got in time enough to go to St. Phillip's Church. Mr. Neville preached. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

13 December 1841. It was cloudy most of the day, but pleasant. The wind was SE. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 36 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 47 degrees, at 8 p.m. 44 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 43 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down with Bill Hanly and Sam Milligan to see Miss Mercer. She not being home, we came up again and I went home and remained there during the rest of the evening. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 min. of 11 p.m.

14 December 1841. It was raining hard when I got up, but it cleared up beautifully about 10 a.m. The wind was WNW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 48 degrees, and at 12 1/4 a.m. it was at 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the office until about 12 a.m. writing for Mr. Elliot. I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 1 p.m.

15 December 1841. Today was clear and mild with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 42 degrees, at 2 p.m. 50 degrees, and at 11 1/2 p.m. it was at 47 degrees.

I was at the office all day and the evening I was at the office writing for Mr. Elliot. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 m. of 12 a.m.

16 December 1841. It was a cold, raw, damp, rainy, and very unpleasant day and evening with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 45 degrees and at 10 p.m. it was at 42 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home writing for Mr. Elliot. I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

17 December 1841. It rained, hailed, and snowed today and made very bad walking. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 36 degrees, at 2 p.m. 33 degrees, at 6 p.m. 26 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 24 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the 8th lecture of the Mercantile Library Company. Reverend I. Todd lectured on the subject of "A Historical Survey of the Gypsies." The gas all went out when he was near done his lecture. Papa went to New York yesterday. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

18 December 1841. It was cloudy until about 2 p.m. when it cleared up. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 23 degrees, at 2 p.m. & 5 1/2 p.m. 30 degrees, and at 9 p.m. it was at 24 degrees. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

19 December 1841. It was clear until about 11 a.m. when it clouded over; it again cleared off in the evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 23 degrees, at 12 p.m. 30 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 29 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Watson preached in the morning and a missionary from Africa preached in the afternoon. This evening I was at Mr. Coleman's where a missionary from Michigan preached. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

20 December 1841. It was cloudy and it snowed a little in the evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 21 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 26 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 32 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down with Bill Hanly to Miss Mercer's. She not being in, we went up and spent the evening at Miss Eliza Bell's. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

21 December 1841. It was cloudy and rainy and the pavement was covered with sleet all day and the walking was very hard. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 29 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 25 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to Miss Stewart's for her to go to a lecture with me, but she not being able to go, I spent the evening there. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. At 10 1/2 p.m., it was moonlit and clear.

22 December 1841. It was clear all day, but it clouded over in the evening. The wind was NW. Today was the coldest day that we have had this winter. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 17 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 22 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 19 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the cousins' on Chestnut St. near 8th with William Bird. I got up at 1/4 of 8 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes past 11 p.m.

23 December 1841. It was cloudy and it commenced raining about 11 a.m. and continued to do so very hard, accompanied by a strong wind during the afternoon and evening. The wind was from the E. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 23 degrees, and at 2 p.m. 35 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was down at the Lore until about 8 p.m. when Pa and I went up to see Uncle. He appears to be much better this evening. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m.

24 December 1841. It was clear all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 41 degrees, at 2 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 32 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was out with Sam Milligan and William Hanly. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 12 a.m.

25 December 1841. It was cloudy (but there was no rain) all day and evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 31 degrees, at 2 p.m. 34 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 29 degrees.

I was at cousins' on Walnut St. in the morning with Bill Hanly; he took dinner with us. In the afternoon, Bill and I were walking up and down Chestnut St. until about 5 p.m. when we went down to Sam Milligan's and got a cup of tea and some bread and butter.

Then we all went out together to Miss Garnier's where I remained until about 9 1/2 o'clock when I went up to Mr. Roberts' at 11th & Spruce St. I remained there until about 11 p.m. when I came home - there were about 10 or 15 people there. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 12 a.m.

26 December 1841. Today was clear and cold. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 25 degrees, at 1 p.m. & 6 p.m. 31 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 27 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and Mr. Watson preached. In the afternoon I was at Grace Church and Bishop Onderdonk preached from the 6th chapter and 9th verse of Micah. This evening I was at Mr. Neville's and he preached. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

27 December 1841. Today was cloudy with the wind from the NW and the SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 24 degrees, and at 2 p.m., 6 p.m. & 11 p.m. it was at 29 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was out with William Hanly at Miss Bell's for a while. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

28 December 1841. It was snowing when I got up this morning - the snow was about an inch thick. The wind was from the NE, but it afterwards got around to the SW and then it cleared up beautifully about dark. This evening was clear and moonlit. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 31 degrees, at 2 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 12 1/2 a.m. it was at 31 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at a party of William Hanly's. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1 a.m.

29 December 1841. It was clear all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 31 degrees, at 2 p.m. 39 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 35 degrees.

I was at the office all day. I spent the evening down at Miss Mercer's with William Hanly. I got up at 10 minutes past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 12 a.m. At 10 1/2 p.m. it was clouding over.

30 December 1841. It was raining most of the day and it was very unpleasant. The wind was from the NE. The thermometer at 8 1/2 a.m. was at 35 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the 9th

lecture of the Mercantile Library Company - Mr. Eames lectured. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at half past 1 a.m.

31 December 1841. The weather was changeable. The wind was from the W. The thermometer at 2 p.m. was at 29 degrees.

I was at the office until about 11 a.m. when Benjamin Warner informed me of the death of my Uncle Samuel Warner, who died this morning about 8 and a half a.m. of dropsy of the chest. I was at home during the afternoon. My uncle had been complaining for two or three months, but has not been confined to the house for more than three months. Upon an examination of him after death, the doctor found that one of his lungs had nearly wasted away and had grown to his side together with his liver. His heart was also diseased.
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Notes:

(1) Whig candidate General William Henry Harrson defeated Liberty Party James Gillespie Birney to become the 9th president of the United States on March 4, 1841. He died April 4 and was succeeded by John Tyler.

(2) Frank Johnson's Band was the most popular in Philadelphia. Its founder, Frank Johnson, was a black cornet player who toured the world and played for the Queen of England, receiving a silver cornet from her as a gift. Johnson died in 1844. (RU)

(3) "Going a Maying." It was the custom for young girls to gather flowers and make them into bouquets for people they loved, often left on doorsteps. (FJD)

(4) Trinity Church, Maylandville, West Philadelphia. John Coleman, rector. (JFD)

(5) This was one of New York City's places of recreation in the 1840s. William Niblo developed what was a private promenade into a public enclosed summer garden, which was a venue for a variety of performances. The indoor portion would later become a theater that still exists today (2002). JRD

(6) The first organized game of baseball took place here in 1846. JRD

(7) It is a famous tree. There is only one. ESEK

(8) Charles O'Malley, The Irish Dragoon, by Charles James Lever, 1841, was a popular book of the time. JRD

(9) Mary Roberts (1819-1900); Owen Jones, later Colonel of Wynnewood.

(10) The suspension bridge built to replace the one opened to the public in 1813 that was destroyed by fire in 1838, was known as the Wire Bridge, designed by Charles Ellet finished January 2, 1842. Scharf and Westcott, p. 559.


1842

JANUARY

1 January 1842. Today was clear and very pleasant. The wind was WNW.

I started this morning at 8 o'clock in the cars for Wilmington. Immediately on my arrival there (which was about 10 o'clock), I went up to see John McClung to make arrangements for the burial of my uncle. After seeing him I walked around to see several of our friends and to inform them of his death when I again went around to see Mr. McClung and we both went out together to complete the arrangements. I got through about 12 o'clock, took dinner at Mr. McClung's and returned to the boat and got home around 1/4 of 4 p.m.

I remained at home during the rest of the afternoon and evening. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

2 January 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 35 degrees, and at 4 1/2 p.m. was at 43 degrees.

My uncle was brought to our house early yesterday morning, it having been thought most expedient to bury him from there. We were all up very early this morning and started for Wilmington at 8 a.m. with the corpse of my uncle to deposit in the upper ground of that city.

After the burial we all returned to the boat and arrived home at about 4 o'clock. I got up at 5 o'clock a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

3 January 1842. Today was clear and cold with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 8 1/2 a.m. & 11 p.m. was at 25 degrees, and at 2 p.m. it was at 28 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home writing for Mr. Campbell. Mr. and Mrs. Calligan spent the evening here. I got up at 1/4 of 8 a.m. and got to bed at half past 11 p.m.

4 January 1842. Today was changeable. The wind was from the SW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 32 degrees, at 2 p.m. 39 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 35 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was down at William Hanly's until about 9 o'clock when I came home. I got up at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

5 January 1842. Today was clear with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 29 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 34 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 27 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was home writing for Mr. Campbell. I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 30 minutes past 11 p.m.

6 January 1842. It was cloudy all day. The wind was from the NE, it afterwards got around to the SE and it commenced raining about dark and continued to do so during the evening. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 25 degrees, at 2 p.m. 35 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 39 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at the store attending it. Mr. Stockley spent the evening here and took supper here. I got up at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

7 January 1842. It was raining all day until about evening when it stopped. The wind was from the SW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 39 degrees, at 2 p.m. 41 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 39 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the 10th lecture of the Mercantile Library Company. Elihu Burnett, Esquire of Massachusetts lectured on "The Success of Preserving Self-cultivation Independent of Native Genius." I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

8 January 1842. It was cloudy and commenced raining about dark and continued to do so during the evening. The wind was from the NE. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 33 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 36 degrees, and at 8 1/2 p.m. it was at 37 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home. I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m. Papa gave me a red silk net purse today as a present.

9 January 1842. Today was clear and like a day in the spring. The wind was W. The thermometer at 8 1/2 a.m. was at 38 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 47 degrees, at 6 p.m. 44 degrees, and at 9 p.m. it was at 43 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and evening. Mr. Watson preached in the evening. I was at Mr. Neville's in the afternoon; he preached.

Before church in the afternoon Bill Hanly and I walked out to see the new suspension bridge at Callowhill St. and the Schuylkill. The bridge [was put] on the cables on last Saturday week. It is not yet completed. I got up at 1/4 of 8 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

10 January 1842. We had all kinds of weather today. It rained, hailed & snowed and cleared up in the evening. The wind was from the NE. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. 36 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 34 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home except the time I accompanied... in going down to the Post Office and back.

The United States Hotel was reopened today under the charge of Mr. Reak. It has been fitted up in the most improved style. There was also a dinner given by the proprietor, I believe free.

There was a procession of several companies and citizens came down from Pottsville today in celebration of opening the railroad between that place and this city. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m.

11 January 1842. Today was cloudy. It commenced snowing about 8 1/2 a.m. and continued until about 2 p.m. and made very slushy walking. The wind was NNE. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 33 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 36 degrees, and at 1/4 of 10 p.m. it was at 34 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home writing a deed for Mr. Campbell. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 5 minutes past 10 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was cloudy.

12 January 1842. It was cloudy and clear alternately. The wind was from the SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 33 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 39 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. it was at 36 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to see Bill Hanly; he is very unwell and has been so for a week back. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 5 m. past 11 p.m.

13 January 1842. Today was clear and cold with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 31 degrees, at 2 p.m. 30 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 33 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at a lecture of the Livingston Institute. After that was out I went around to cousins' on 9th St. I got home at 10 1/2 p.m. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

14 January 1842. It was cloudy all day but there was no rain. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 28 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. 40 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 37 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the 11th lecture of the Mercantile Library Company; the lecture subject was "Naples". I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

15 January 1842. It was clear all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 35 degrees, at 2 p.m. 40 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 33 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home writing a deed for Papa. I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

16 January 1842. It was cloudy all day and evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 8 1/4 a.m. was at 31 degrees, at 1 p.m. & 6 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 36 degrees.

I was at the Unitarian Church in the morning to hear Mr. Furness deliver a eulogy on the death of Mr. John Vaughan. The text was Psalms 96, verse 14. In the afternoon I was at Grace Church; Mr. Watson preached. In the evening I was down at Mr. Campbell's until about 8 o'clock writing Griffith Evans' will when I went down to Mr. Coleman's where I met Hanly and Milligan. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

17 January 1842. Today was clear and very pleasant with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 34 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 43 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 27 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to see Miss Mercer with Sam Milligan. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and I got to bed at 5 minutes of 11 p.m.

18 January 1842. It was a clear and delightful day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 35 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 47 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 41 degrees. It was so warm and pleasant today that I had no need of a cloak or an overcoat.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the monthly meeting of the National Literary Association. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m.

19 January 1842. It was clear and very pleasant and there was no cloak required. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 49 degrees, and at 1 1/2 a.m. it was at 41 degrees. I was at the office all day. This evening I was at a party given by Mrs. Edward Roberts - there were from 60 to 70 persons there. I got home about 1 a.m. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes past 2 a.m.

20 January 1842. It was clear until about 2 p.m. when it clouded over. The wind was from the SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 39 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 57 degrees, and at 9 p.m. it was at 54 degrees. Today was more like a day in the spring than a day in January. The canary birds were all singing about at the doors and the widows as if it were summer time. It was so warm we had to have the windows up for a while at the office in the afternoon.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

21 January 1842. It was cloudy most of the day, but there was no rain. It cleared off beautifully about dark and we had a splendid moonlit evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 49 degrees, at 2 p.m. 44 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 37 degrees. It got very cold towards the evening.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the 12th lecture of the Mercantile Library Company - it was very crowded. Elihu Burnett, Esquire lectured on the subject: "Is the Patriotism of Ancient Rome Consistent with the Duties of an American Citizen?"

I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes past 11 p.m.

22 January 1842. It was clear and much colder than it has been for several days back. The wind was WSW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 35 degrees, at 2 p.m. 39 degrees, and at 9 p.m. it was at 31 degrees.

I was at the office in the morning and in the afternoon until about half past 3 when I went up to the University to see a number of persons take exhilarating (laughing) gas. This evening I was at home reading. I got up at seven o'clock a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

23 January 1842. It was clear and cold all day; there is a good deal of ice again. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 24 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 28 degrees, at 5 1/2 p.m. 26 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 23 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Watson preached in the morning and Mr. Odenheimer from St. Phillip's Church preached in the afternoon. This evening I was at St. Phillip's Church, Mr. Neville preached. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

24 January 1842. Today was clear and cold with the wind from the NW. It got around to the SE towards dark and now has the appearance of clouding over. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 18 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 25 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 23 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was out with Sam Milligan. We were at his house, Miss Mercer's, and William Hanly's. I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

25 January 1842. It was cloudy all day with a slight sprinklin' of snow about 5 p.m. The wind was SSE. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 26 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 38 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 32 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home until about 10 o'clock when I went home with Elizabeth Roberts and Lucretia Whitman; they were both here to tea. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. At half past 10 p.m. it was cloudy and the wind was SW.

26 January 1842. It was clear and mild, but very pleasant. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 30 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 42 degrees, and at 10 3/4 p.m. it was at 37 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home. Mr. Gibbons was here to dinner and supper and spent the evening here from Wilmington. I got up at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at quarter past 11 o'clock p.m.

27 January 1842. Today was clear and very windy. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. 38 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 28 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home reading. The Girard Bank was closed today, not being able to redeem their notes. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

28 January 1842. It was clear all day with the wind from the S. This evening was clear. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 32 degrees, at 2 p.m. 42 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 38 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the 13th lecture of the Mercantile Library Company. Mr. William H. Dillingham lectured on "Public Libraries and their Differences." I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

29 January 1842. It was clear during the morning, but it got cloudy and damp in the afternoon and it remained so during the evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 40 degrees, at 9 1/2 a.m. p.m. it was at 51 degrees.

I was at the office in the morning. In the afternoon I took a walk out with William Hanly to see the river suspension bridge; we walked on it - it was the first time that either he or I walked over it. After coming in from the bridge we walked up and down Chestnut St.

This evening I was at home reading The History of France. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m. At 9 p.m. it was cloudy.

30 January 1842. Today was clear and very pleasant with the wind from the WSW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 45 degrees, at 2 p.m. 52 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 44 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Coleman preached in the morning and Mr. Newton preached in the afternoon. Previous to going to church in the afternoon, I walked to cousin Elizabeth Roberts to see their new house where they now reside on 5th St. near Vine St. In the evening I went down to Mr. Coleman's Church and he preached. I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes of 11 o'clock.

31 January 1842. It was cloudy and it rained most of the day and evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 47 degrees, at 2 p.m. 50 degrees, and at 11 1/2 p.m. it was at 46 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I went to see them take exhilaration gas at the University. After it was out, which was about 9 o'clock, I came home and read until half past 11 p.m. I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 12 a.m.

FEBRUARY

1 February 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day and evening. The wind was WNW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 38 degrees, at 2 p.m. 45 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 38 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I went to see a party of Indians and their squaws perform at the Masonic Hall. I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

2 February 1842. Today was clear and very mild. The wind was S. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 34 degrees, at 2 p.m. 48 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home writing for Mr. Campbell. Mrs. Jewell spent the evening here and took tea with us. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. At 10 1/2 p.m. it was clouding over.

3 February 1842. It was cloudy and damp and very warm all day. It was so warm that we sat down at the office with the windows and doors open. The wind was S. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 54 degrees, at 2 p.m. 62 degrees, and at 11 1/4 p.m. it was at 61 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home writing for Mr. Campbell. Libby went to the Alms' House today. I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 12 a.m.

4 February 1842. It was cloudy, damp and very warm. The wind was SSW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 63 degrees, at 2 p.m. 65 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 62 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at Mr. Burr's; I was there to see John Hendricks. I was there until about 9 o'clock when I came home and read. It has been so warm for the last few days that I noticed one of the trees before the door has come out. There are now quite small leaves on it. It was so warm today that we had to have the doors and windows open. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

5 February 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. The wind was SSW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 51 degrees, and at 2 p.m. it was at 53 degrees.

I was at the office until about 12 p.m. when I went in search of John Hendricks to make arrangements to go up to his place in the country. In the afternoon, about 4 o'clock, we started to go up. We arrived up there about 6 1/2 p.m. after a very pleasant ride. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

6 February 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with a strong wind from the SW. The thermometer at 12 p.m. was at 50 degrees.

At about 10 a.m., John Hendricks and I walked over to Mr. Hollewell's. We stayed there about an hour when we came home and got dinner. After dinner we took a nap and then walked over to Mr. Conrad's and we sat there a while and then came home and got supper and went to bed at about 8 1/2 p.m. I got up at about 1/4 past 7 a.m.

7 February 1842. It commenced raining early in the morning and continued to do so all day. I remained about the store most of the morning, it being too rainy to go out.

In the afternoon, about 3 o'clock, I took the stage for Philadelphia, which was a tremendously leaky one. I was wet through to the skin by the time I got into town which was about 5 1/2 p.m. While at the Fox Chase I spent a very pleasant time, with the exception of the wet ride. I was up to Mr. Burr's in the evening. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

8 February 1842. Today was changeable and yet very cold towards night. The wind was WNW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 38 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. it was at 38 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 25 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. Sarah and Margaret Gibbons came up from Wilmington today and intend staying with us for a time. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 11 p.m.

9 February 1842. It was clear and cold all day and evening. The wind was WSW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 21 degrees, and at 2 p.m. & 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 29 degrees. The tide in the river today was lower that it has been since 1794.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home writing until 9 o'clock, when I went down to Olaf Gibbons' and spent the rest of the evening there. Pa, Ma, Lydia, and Margaret & Rebecca Gibbons were there. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

10 February 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 29 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 45 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 38 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. Mrs. Henry Gibbons took tea and spent the evening with us. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and I got to bed at 15 minutes past 11 p.m.

11 February 1842. It was clear during the day and in the evening it was cloudy. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 3 p.m. 55 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 46 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the 14th lecture of the Mercantile Library Company - Professor Bache lectured on "Switzerland." Rebecca Gibbons and Lydia went with me. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

12 February 1842. It was cloudy and damp all day, but warm. This evening was clear. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. & 11 p.m. was at 46 degrees, and at 2 1/2 p.m. it was at 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was out at Mrs. Elizabeth Roberts'. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

13 February 1842. It rained all day with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 40 degrees, at 12 p.m. 41 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 43 degrees.

I was at home during the morning reading. In the afternoon I was at St. Stephen's Church and this evening I was at Grace Church. I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

14 February 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 43 degrees, at 2 1/4 p.m. 47 degrees, and at 11 3/4 p.m. it was at 29 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was out with William Hanly; we first went down to see Miss Mercer, she not being in we came up to Miss Bell's where we found Miss Mercer. We stayed there until 8 1/2 p.m. when we went to Miss Day's where we stayed until about 11 1/2 p.m. when we came home. We spent a very pleasant evening at Miss D. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

15 February 1842. It was clear all day and cold with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 5 a.m. was at 23 degrees, at 2 p.m. 35 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 29 degrees.

I was at the office all day and I spent the evening at Mrs. Mary Roberts' - there were a number of people there. I got up at 1/4 of 5 a.m. and got to bed at 20 m. past 11 p.m.

16 February 1842. It was snowing hard when I got up this morning, but it soon turned to rain and continued to do so with the wind from the SE until the afternoon when it stopped and the wind got around to the NW. It snowed most of the evening. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 32 degrees, at 2 p.m. 45 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 30 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at one of Mr. Wales' Cotillion parties with Rebecca Gibbons and Lydia. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m. It was blowing very hard from the NW and it was cold.

17 February 1842. It was clear and very cold and windy. The wind was from the NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 20 degrees, at 2 p.m. 25 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 23 degrees.

I was at the office all day and I spent this evening around at cousins' on 9th St. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m.

18 February 1842. It was cloudy all day with the wind from the SE The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 22 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 43 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 51 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the 15th of the Mercantile Library Company lectures; John Cadwalader(1) lectured on "The Difference between Learning and Knowledge." I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 3/4 p.m. At 10 1/2 p.m. it was blowing a tremendous gale from the SE.

19 February 1842. When I got up this morning it was pouring rain and blowing a heavy gale from the SE It stopped about 8 o'clock a.m. and cleared up about 9 a.m. The rest of the day was clear and pleasant. The wind got around to NW in the afternoon. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 55 degrees, at 2 p.m. 47 degrees, and at 9 1/4 p.m. it was at 33 degrees.

I was at the office in the morning. In the afternoon I was walking up and down Chestnut St. most of the time. This evening I was at home writing. I got up at 10 m. past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

20 February 1842. It was clear and cold and this evening it was moonlit. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 26 degrees, at 2 p.m. 35 degrees, and at 1/4 of 10 p.m. it was at 28 degrees.

I was at Quaker Meeting in the morning with Rebecca Gibbons and Lydia. In the afternoon I was at St. Luke's with Margaret & Rebecca Gibbons, William Hanly, and Lydia. This evening I was at St Phillip's with Margaret Gibbons and Lydia. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 5 m. past 10 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was clear and cold.

21 February 1842. It was clear and delightful weather. The wind was from the NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 26 degrees, at 2 1/4 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 11 1/4 p.m. it was at 31 degrees. I was at the office all day.

I spent the evening down at Mrs. Edith Prichett's. Ma, Pa, Lydia, and Margaret & Rebecca Gibbons, together with several others, were there. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was clear, pleasant and moonlit.

22 February 1842. It was a clear and delightful day. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 29 degrees, at 1 p.m. 40 degrees, and at 12 a.m. it was at 33 degrees.

I was at the office most of the day. This evening I was out at Mrs. Algernon Roberts' - there were about 30 there - 6 Elliotts, 8 Robertses, 4 Erwins, 2 Gibbonses, 4 Cuthberts, Mr. & Mrs. Carr, Mr. & Mrs. Jewell, 4 Thomases and several others. I never spent a pleasanter evening. Coming home it was moonlit and we had a delightful time as there were so many of us. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

23 February 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 30 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 40 degrees, and at 11 1/2 p.m. it was at 33 degrees.

I was at the office all day. I spent the evening at Mr. Charles Gibbons'; I was there introduced to Miss Sarah Wharton, Miss Elizabeth Hollingsworth, Charles Wharton and Mrs. Howell. There were several others there. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 12 a.m.

24 February 1842. It was a clear and very pleasant day with the wind from the SW. At 6 1/2 a.m. it was 32 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 46 degrees, and at 11 1/2 p.m. it was 39 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the "Rhetorical Academy" with William Hanly, Rebecca Gibbons and Lydia. After that was out, William Hanly and I went to see two men who bet they could walk a plank 15 ft. by 3 ft. for 48 hours without sitting down a resting - one of them was at the Bath Coffee House and the other at a house on Library St. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 12 a.m.

25 February 1842. It was cloudy all day and it commenced raining a little about 7 p.m. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 36 degrees, at 2 1/4 p.m. 43 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 39 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the 16th lecture of the Mercantile Library Company. Professor Vethake lectured on "Our Country." I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

26 February 1842. It poured rain all morning. The sun came out about noon, but it soon clouded over again. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 39 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 43 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 39 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home reading Plutarch's Lives. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 3/4 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was cloudy.

27 February 1842. It was a clear and delightful day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. 48 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 43 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning; Mr. Watson preached. In the afternoon I was at Dr. Bethany's at 10th and Filbert Street; he preached. This evening I was at St. Philip's with Rebecca Gibbons and Lydia; Mr. Neville preached. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

28 February 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the W. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 39 degrees, at 2 p.m. 51 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 43 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. Mr. & Mrs. Algernon Roberts. Mr. & Mrs. Edward Roberts, Anna and Elizabeth Roberts(2) , and Rebecca Gibbons spent the evening here. The wind got around to the SE towards dark and it clouded over. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

MARCH

1 March 1842. It was cloudy early in the morning. It afterward cleared off very mild - no overcoat being required. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 5 a.m. was at 43 degrees, at 2 p.m. 55 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 50 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went to St. Andrew's Church with Barry Russell. Mr. Neville preached us an elegant and delightful sermon. After church was out, I went down to Bill Hanly's for awhile. Lydia got her new piano today from D.B. Groves. I got up at 4 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

2 March 1842. It poured rain most all day, but was clear during the evening. The wind was SE, but got around to the SW at dark. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 50 degrees, at 2 p.m. 58 degrees in the yard and 64 degrees in the street, and at 12 a.m. it was at 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at one of Wales' Cotillion parties with Rebecca Gibbons and Lydia. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 12 a.m.

3 March 1842. It was clear and delightful all day; it was so warm that we were obliged to sit with the windows and doors open all day. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 52 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. on the side of 8th St. 72 degrees and in the yard 68 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 50 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the "Rhetorical Academy" with Sarah Roberts and Lydia. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. It was so warm in the sun today that persons carried umbrellas.

4 March 1842. Today was clear and very warm, so warm that I saw boys running about the streets barefoot. We however had two showers about the middle of the day. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 56 degrees, at 2 1/4 p.m. 65 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the 17th lecture of the Mercantile Library Company. Judge Barton lectured on "The Age In Which We Live." I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

5 March 1842. Today was clear and very warm with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 61 degrees, at 2 p.m. 69 degrees, and at 8 1/2 p.m. it was at 56 degrees.

I was at the office during the morning. In the afternoon, Mr. Christian, his sister, and several other ladies and gentlemen, and myself, walked out to the new wire bridge. In the evening I was at home. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

6 March 1842. It was a damp, raw, and very unpleasant day and it rained in the evening, The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 45 degrees, at 6 p.m. 46 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 43 degrees. I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. This evening I was at Trinity with Bill Hanly. After church I was introduced to Miss Shankland by William Hanly. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. At 10 1/2 p.m. it was still raining.

7 March 1842. It rained all day with the wind from the NE. It got around towards the NW towards dark and cleared up cold. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 45 degrees, and at 10 1/2 M it was at 38 degrees.

I was at the office all day. I spent the evening down at Miss Shankland's with William Hanly for the first time. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. There was thunder and lightning very much last night.

8 March 1842. It was clear and cool all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 55 degrees, 2 p.m. 47 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 40 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the 2nd Anniversary of the National Literary Institute. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

9 March 1842. It rained most all day. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 41 degrees, at 11 p.m. it was at 50 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the gymnasium exercising. Today was the first of my going there. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and walked down to Dock St. wharf to see Boy, but I did not see him. I got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m. I was weighed today and my weight is 132 pounds.

10 March 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day and the evening was cloudy. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 52 degrees, at 2 p.m. 63 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 51 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the "Rhetorical Academy" with Mary & Louisa Wood and Lydia. The Poor Gentleman was played. It commenced raining about 11 o'clock p.m. I got up at half past 6 a.m. and got to bed at quarter past 11 o'clock.

11 March 1842. It was raining hard when I got up, with the wind from the NE. It afterwards got around to NW and it cleared up about 3 1/2 p.m. It clouded over again about 5 1/2 p.m. and we had quite a snow storm, although it did not last for more than half an hour. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 47 degrees, at 10 p.m. 37 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the 18th, and concluding, lecture of the Mercantile Library Company. Mr. Joseph Chandler lectured on "The Influence of Religion on the Character and Conduct of Women". It was a very fine lecture, delivered in an able manner. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

12 March 1842. It was clear and cold all day with the wind from the NW. There was ice again this morning - there has not been any for some time. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 29 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 8 1/2 p.m. it was at 33 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

13 March 1842. It was cloudy most of the day, but there was no rain. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 33 degrees, at 1 p.m. 46 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 41 degrees. The ground was covered with snow when I got up this morning, but it soon disappeared.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and evening. Mr. Watson preached in the morning and Mr. Tyng preached in the evening. In the afternoon I was with William Hanly; we went to St. James' and Christ Church, but we did not remain at either. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

14 March 1842. It was cloudy most of the day, but there was no rain. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 39 degrees, at 2 p.m. 46 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 41 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home. Lydia, Gainor, and Tacy & Sarah Roberts spent the evening here. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

15 March 1842. It was cloudy most of the day and rained very hard about noon with a little snow. The wind was changeable. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 1/2 of 2 p.m. 45 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 42 degrees.

This evening I was at Grace Church. Mr. Newton preached from the 1st verse and the 7th chapter of Genesis. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

16 March 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 5 1/2 a.m. was at 57 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. it was at 52 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at Mr. Wales' last cotillion party - I danced 11 sets. I got up at 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 1 a.m.

17 March 1842. It was clear all day though rather misty at times. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 43 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 57 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. it was at 54 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the "Rhetorical Academy" with Louisa Wood and Lydia. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. Cousin Tacy Roberts and Warner & Mrs. Jones were here this evening.

18 March 1842. It was clear until about the middle of the day when it clouded over and commenced raining about 9 1/2 p.m. The wind was from the SW. The thermometer at 5 1/2 a.m. was at 50 degrees, at 1/4 of 2 p.m. 60 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 52 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at William Hanly's, at an exhibitions of paintings, and at church. There was just now a vivid flash of lightning and a very hearing clap of thunder. Lid got home today. I got up at 5 a.m. and got to bed at half past 10 p.m.

19 March 1842. I was clear all day and evening with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 49 degrees, at 2 p.m. 63 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 59 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at a prayer meeting with Barry Russell. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at half past 10 p.m.

20 March 1842. It was rather misty and cloudy all day and evening and it rained very hard about 10 p.m. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at 2 p.m. 65 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 56 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning; Mr. Watson preached. In the afternoon I was at St. Philip's Church; Mr. Neville preached. This evening I was at Trinity; Mr. Dercasha preached. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

21 March 1842. It was cloudy and raining on and off all day and it poured rain all morning. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 45 degrees, and at 2 p.m. it was at 42 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the gymnasium and home. I measured myself today to see whether I gained anything from going to the gymnasium. I measured 10 inches around the upper part of the arm when doubled up and 30 and a half inches around the breast. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

22 March 1842. It was a damp, raw, and rainy day with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. 41 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 39 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at William Rotch's - there was a meeting of young men to propose arrangements to obtain or buy the 'Falcon' barge. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

23 March 1842. It was cloudy all day but there was no rain. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 35 degrees, at 2 p.m. 45 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 37 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the gymnasium, [then to] Mrs. Mary Roberts', William Hanly's, and the Roberts' on 9th St.

24 March 1842. It was cloudy all day and it rained during the evening. The wind was from the SE The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. 43 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. it was at 37 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the "Rhetorical Academy" with Miss Mary Hall. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at quarter past 11 p.m.

25 March 1842. It was a raw, rainy, and very unpleasant day with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 41 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 40 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at Grace Church with Barry Russell; Bishop Onderdonk preached and there were 32 confirmed there. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 12 a.m. At 11 1/2 p.m. there was bad fire, the bell rang SE.

26 March 1842. It was cloudy most of the day and it was clear and moonlit during the evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 43 degrees, at 2 p.m. 49 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 41 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the gymnasium. Ma and Lydia went to Wilmington this afternoon. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

27 March 1842. It was a clear and very delightful day. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 40 degrees, at 2 p.m. 57 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 49 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon; Mr. Watson preached in the morning. In the evening I was at St. Phillip's Church with Sarah Roberts; Mr. Neville preached. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 20 m. of 11 p.m.

28 March 1842. Today was clear and very windy. The wind is NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 46 degrees, at 2 p.m. 52 degrees, at 6 p.m. 46 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 39 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was home until about 8 1/2 o'clock when I went down to see William Hanly. I remained there until 10 o'clock when I came home. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 25 minutes past 11 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was moonlit.

29 March 1842. It was clear all day with the wind from the SW. It got around to the to S about dark and clouded over. The thermometer at 6 a.m. and 11 p.m. was at 36 degrees, and at 2 p.m. was at 52 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I spent down at Miss Day's with William Hanly. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

30 March 1842. It was cloudy all day with a little rain in the afternoon. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 46 degrees, at 2 p.m. 57 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 55 degrees.

In the evening I was at one of Mr. Wales' practicing parties for dancing. I got up at 5 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. At 10 1/2 p.m. there was the appearance of clearing with the wind from the NW. Papa went to Wilmington this morning.

31 March 1842. It was a windy, dusty, and unpleasant day and sometimes cloudy with a little snow in the afternoon. The wind was from the NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 49 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. was at 39 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at "Rhetorical Academy" with Lydia. Pa, Ma, and Lydia got home from Wilmington today. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

APRIL

1 April 1842. It was clear and rather cool all day. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 35 degrees, at 2 p.m. 47 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 41 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I went to see "Othello" at the Walnut St. Theatre. Ma intends staying all night at Mrs. Roberts' to sit up with the baby tonight -- it is not expected to live. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

2 April 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 42 degrees, at 2 p.m. 63 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 56 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the Athenaeum reading Cathius Indian Gallery. Mrs. May Roberts' baby died this afternoon at 1/4 past 6 p.m. after an illness of some time. I got up this morning at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

3 April 1842. It was cloudy all day and it poured rain during the evening. The wind was from the SW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 54 degrees, at 12 1/4 p.m. it was at 69 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 61 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning; Mr. Watson preached. In the afternoon I was at St. Peter's Church with William Hanly. It is the first time that I was ever there except once before when I was there for a little while before the church let out. Mr. Odenheimer preached from the 3rd chapter of St. Peter, verses 17 to 20. This evening I was at Trinity Church with William Hanly and Sam Milligan; Mr. Coleman preached. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

4 April 1842. It rained all day and the wind was from the NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 50 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 44 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 42 degrees.

I was at the office in the morning. In the afternoon I went to the funeral of Mrs. Edward Roberts' baby at Laurel Hill - it was 12 months old. In the evening I went to a "declaration by the members of the Junior Class" in the College Hall(3) on 9th St. It did not rain during the evening. I got up at 5 m. of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

5 April 1842. It was cloudy till the latter part of the afternoon when it cleared up. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 42 degrees, and at 2 p.m. it was at 49 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home copying a "Brief of Title" for Mr. A. Roberts. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 12 1/4 a.m.

6 April 1842. It was misty or rather cloudy all day and evening. The wind was SE The thermometer at 1/4 of 6 a.m. was at 43 degrees, and at 2 p.m. it was at 62 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home writing for Mr. Roberts. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 12 1/4 a.m.

7 April 1842. It was cloudy all day with a heavy shower of rain about 2 p.m. The wind was SE The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 52 degrees, at 2 p.m. 56 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 52 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the "Rhetorical Academy" with Lydia. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was drizzling rain and unpleasant.

8 April 1842. It was cloudy all day and commenced raining about dark and continued to do so very hard all the evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 49 degrees, at 2 p.m. 50 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home reading. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was pouring rain.

9 April 1842. It was a raw, cold, rainy and very unpleasant day. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 40 degrees and at 1 1/2 p.m. was at 42 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was down at William Hanly's. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 m. past 11 p.m.

10 April 1842. It was a clear and very delightful day. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 48 degrees, at 12 p.m. 57 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 53 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning; Mr. Watson preached. In the afternoon Sam Milligan, William Hanly and I went down to the River to see the brig Gypsy; the one Hanly intends going to St. John's on and to proceed to Halifax on. After looking at her we went to St. Peter's Church. This evening I was at Grace Church and Mr. Watson preached. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

11 April 1842. It was a clear and very delightful day with the wind to the NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 57 degrees, at 2 p.m. 66 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 57 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at a meeting of the National Literary Association. I stayed there a while, came home and dressed and went down to Mr. Campbell's to pick up Lydia -- there was a kind of party there. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

12 April 1842. It was clear and delightful until about the middle of the day when it clouded over and commenced raining in the latter part of the afternoon and continued to do so on and off through the evening. The wind in the morning was NW and in the afternoon NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 6 a.m. was at 52 degrees, at 2 p.m. 65 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home most of the time. There was a grand parade of the Temperance men. They turned out about 8000 or 10,000 strong. I got up at 25 minutes past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

13 April 1842. It was a damp, raw, rainy and very unpleasant day and evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 5 1/2 a.m. and at 2 p.m. was at 47 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home reading. Tacy Roberts was here all day helping Ma sew. I got up at 5 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

14 April 1842. It was raining hard when I got up, but it cleared off about noon very pleasantly. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 6 a.m. was at 42 degrees, at 2 p.m. 57 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 51 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the "Rhetorical Academy" until about 10 o'clock when I came home and then went home with Elizabeth and Anna Roberts. Joseph Thomas, Mrs. Eliza Elliott, and Ann Elliott went to Pittsburgh today; they intend staying about three weeks. I got up at 5 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

15 April 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 6 a.m. was at 48 degrees, and at 2 p.m. it was at 63 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at one of the Mr. Wales' practicing parties. I got up at 5 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

16 April 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day. The wind was W. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 48 degrees, at 2 p.m. 55 degrees, and at 11 1/2 p.m. it was at 49 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home writing a deed for Mr. Emory. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 12 o'clock.

17 April 1842. It was a raw, damp and very unpleasant day and evening with a very strong wind from the NE. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. and 12 1/2 p.m. was at 47 degrees, and at 9 p.m. it was at 43 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning. In the afternoon and evening I was at home, it being so stormy and unpleasant. I got up at 25 m. past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

18 April 1842. It rained all day. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. was at 43 degrees and at 2 p.m. it was at 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. Mr. William H. White from Fredericksburg spent the evening here. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

19 April 1842. It poured rain all day. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 9 p.m. was at 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home reading. I got up at 25 m. past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

20 April 1842. It was clear and delightful with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 48 degrees and at 10 p.m. it was at 52 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home making a draft of a deed for Mr. Emory. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

21 April 1842. It was clear and delightful all day and evening with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 5 1/4 a.m. was at 48 degrees, at 1 p.m. 62 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 53 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at a concert of the Philharmonic Society with Lydia, Mrs. Reynolds, and Caroline Gibbons from Wilmington were here today. I got up at 1/4 of 5 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

22 April 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 51 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 72 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. it was at 63 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the "Rhetorical Academy". Pa went and came back from Doylestown today. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

23 April 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 65 degrees and at 2 p.m. 71 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home writing a deed for Mr. Emory. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 12.

24 April 1842. It was cloudy all day and evening but there was no rain. The wind was SSE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 53 degrees, at 3 p.m. 69 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 68 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. This evening I was at St. Phillip's Church; Mr. Neville preached. In the afternoon I took a walk with Geo. Cook and another young man whose name I do not remember out to Walnut St., it being quite a fashionable promenade. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

25 April 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 58 degrees, at 2 p.m. 72 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 5 m. of 9 p.m. At 8 p.m. it was very warm.

26 April 1842. It was clear all day until about 4 p.m. when it clouded up very heavily and commenced raining very hard and it continued to do so all through the evening. The wind was SW. until the change when it got around to the NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 58 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 81 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home feeling unwell. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 9 p.m. We had a fire in the grate for the first time this season.

27 April 1842. It was clear and cooler than yesterday until about 4 p.m. when it clouded over very heavily and had every appearance of raining, but it did no more than sprinkle a little. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 59 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 64 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 51 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. Sarah Ellis spent the evening with us and intends sleeping here tonight. It again clouded up in the evening and at 10 p.m. was starlit. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 5 m. past 10 p.m.

28 April 1842. Today was very changeable and rather cold with the wind from the WNW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 53 degrees, 2 p.m. 56 degrees, and at 11 1/2 p.m. it was at 48 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the "Rhetorical Academy" with Lydia and Kate Walker. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 12.

29 April 1842. It was cloudy or very misty all day but pleasant. The wind was WNW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 48 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. it was at 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I went with Emma Erwin, Louisa Wood, and Lydia to a concert at the Assembly building. We then took a walk down to a debate on "the Abolition of Capital Punishment" in the room where the Chinese Museum was, and then we came back to the concert again and remained there until it was out. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m. Bill Hanly and Cook started for Halifax in the brig Gypsy last Saturday (16 April) in the evening from the Navy Yard.

30 April 1842. Today was clear and very pleasant with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 55 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 66 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. 54 degrees.

I was at the office all day until about 4 1/2 p.m. when I took a little walk. In the evening I was around at the cousins on 9th St. until about 1/2 past 9 when I came home and sat a while and then went down to Kate Walker's for Lydia - there was a little company there. I met at Miss W.'s my old friend Tom Pitman, who I have not seen for seven or eight years. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

MAY

1 May 1842. It was clear and very pleasant until about 5 p.m. when it clouded over very heavily and rained hard for a while. It again cleared up and there was a very handsome rainbow visible. The wind at 6 1/2 p.m. was NNW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 55 degrees, at 2 p.m. 73 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 57 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning; Mr. Watson preached. In the afternoon I walked out to the wire bridge and over the Schuylkill and got home about 1/2 past 4 p.m. The walk was very unpleasant as it was extremely dusty and blew tremendously hard covering a person all over with dust. In the evening I went down with Sam Milligan to Trinity Church. The text was the 8th verse of the 10th chapter of Matthew. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

2 May 1842. It was a damp, rainy, raw and very unpleasant day. The wind was NNE., but it got around to the NW. and cleared up towards evening. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 55 degrees, 2 p.m. 54 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 52 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went around to the "Rhetorical Academy" to get my ticket for May. I remained there until about 9 o'clock when I came home. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

3 May 1842. It poured rain all day and evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. and 2 p.m. was at 49 degrees, and at 9 p.m. it was at 46 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 9 1/4 p.m.

4 May 1842. It was clear, cloudy and rainy alternately all day. This evening was clear. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 1 p.m. was at 56 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. it was at 51 degrees.

I did not get up this morning until about 10 o'clock being very unwell and I remained so during the morning. I went to the office in the afternoon. I spent the evening around at Mr. Mitchell's with Ma, Pa, Lydia, and Sarah Roberts - some others were there. I got up at 10 a.m. and I got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m. I believe there was some hail around the middle of the day, during a heavy rain.

5 May 1842. It was clear and delightful all day. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 56 degrees, and at 2 p.m. 62 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the "Rhetorical Academy". I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 minutes of 11 p.m.

6 May 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the SW. At 6 a.m. it was 51 degrees, at 2 p.m. 61 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. Mr. & Mrs. Mitchell, Mrs. Mitchell's sisters Caroline and Ellen Mitchell, Sarah & Tacy Roberts, and Mr. Burrows spent the evening here.

I got a new black dress coat, satin vest, black pants and overcoat from Mr. Sloan's today. I got up at 5 1/4 a.m. and took a walk down to Washington Square and then down to the Baltimore boat and saw her start and came up home. I got to bed at 12.

7 May 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 5 1/2 a.m. was at 55 degrees and at 12 it was at 70 degrees.

Mr. Campbell, Papa, and I started at 1/2 past 6 a.m. in the Robert Morris for Wilmington. We arrived there about 9 a.m. and hired a horse, a light wagon and rode over to New Castle as Mr. Campbell wished to attend to some business at that place. We remained there until 11 a.m. when we came back to Wilmington and we all took dinner at Cleadan's.

After dinner Papa and Mr. Campbell went down to the boat and came up to Philadelphia and I went up to Dr. Gibbons'. I remained there a while and then went down to town and got some ice cream and stopped at Mr. Haddens'. I then walked out to the Brandywine and up the walk as far as Rattlesnake Run where I met a Picnic Party. It was composed of Miss Mary Ellen Bayard, Miss Elizabeth Canby, Miss Mary Milligan, Miss DuPont, Miss May Gilpin, Misses M. & R. Gibbons, and a young lady from Philadelphia whose name I do not remember and 6 or 7 gentleman. I remained with them having an introduction given by Miss Margaret Gibbons to several of them. They had a fiddle there and I danced with the rest for about two hours. We got home about 8 o'clock. I got up at 1/4 of 5 a.m. and to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

8 May 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day until about 4 p.m. when it commenced raining and continued to do so through the rest of the day and evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 12 p.m. was at 72 degrees.

I went to Quaker Meeting in the morning. In the evening I walked up to the Brandywine with Rodman and Frank Gibbons as far as the head gate and then came home. I remained in the house in the evening and went to bed about 9 1/2 p.m. I got up at 7 a.m.

9 May 1842. It was clear and cool all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 2 1/2 p.m. was at 55 degrees.

I started in the morning from Wilmington at 7 a.m. and arrived in Philadelphia at 9 1/2 a.m. After my arrival I came home and changed my dress and then went down to the office and remained there during the rest of the morning and afternoon. In the evening I was at a meeting of the National Literary Institute. I got up at 5 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

10 May 1842. It was cloudy and rather cool all day and there was no rain. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 48 degrees, at 2 p.m. 56 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 50 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. Mr. & Mrs. Edward Roberts and Anna & Elizabeth spent the evening here. I got up at 10 m. past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

11 May 1842. It was clear and warm all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 6 a.m. was at 57 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 67 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was home until about 9 p.m. when I took my Panama hat to get done up. I got up at 5 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

12 May 1842. It was clear, warm and very pleasant all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 5 a.m. was at 51 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 66 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to the "Rhetorical Academy" with Miss Riley from Wilmington, Elizabeth Roberts and Lydia. I got up this morning at 4 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 12. I was very tired.

13 May 1842. It was clear during the morning but clouded over towards noon and we had a little sprinkling of rain in the afternoon. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 58 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 74 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 60 degrees.

I was at the office all day except about an hour when I was around at the fire in back of our office and of some stables. Lydia and her school went out a maying this afternoon. They went to Wister's Woodlands near Germantown. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

14 May 1842. It was clear and cool all day. We were obliged to have a fire made up in the office. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 55 degrees, at 2 p.m. 62 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day until about 4 1/2 p.m. when I went out and took a walk. In the evening I was at home except about an hour that I took to go and get my summer hat from the persons where I left it to be done up. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m. At 9 1/2 p.m. it was clear and cool.

15 May 1842. It was cloudy, damp, and cold all day. It rained most of the afternoon, but it cleared up about dark and we had a very pleasant, moonlit evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. and at 10 1/2 p.m. was at 51 degrees, and at 3 p.m. it was at 55 degrees.

In the morning I went down to the U.S. Hotel(4) and took Miss Williams up to Grace Church -- she and her brother arrived in the City yesterday. Mr. Suddards preached his first sermon since his arrival from England. The text was the 28th chapter of Genesis, verse 21. He arrived in the City sometime in the early part of last week. In the afternoon I was at Grace Church - Mr. Watson preached his farewell sermon previous to his going to Newport RI. In the evening I was at Trinity Church with Sam Milligan. I got up at 25 m. past 5 a.m. and I got to bed at 11 p.m.

16 May 1842. It was clear and delightful all day and evening with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 52 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. it was at 61 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was home until about 10 o'clock (except about a half an hour when I was down at the National Literary Institute) when I went down to the U.S. Hotel with Miss Williams from Pittsburgh who had been spending the day with us. I went into the hotel with her and remained there about 3/4 of an hour. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

17 May 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 5 1/2 a.m. was at 57 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 78 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. it was at 62 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to hear George Mundy and I remained there for about half an hour. I then went down to the Athenaeum and remained there until about 1/2 past 9 when I went over to the U.S. Hotel and sat and talked with Miss Williams until about half past 10 when I came home. I got up at 5 a.m. and took a walk with Mr. Berghauser and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

18 May 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the SSE. The thermometer at 5 1/2 a.m. was at 58 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 75 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 65 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home until about 1/2 past 8 when I took a walk with Barry Russell down to the Mercantile Library Co. and the Post Office. We also stopped in to the Ledger Office to see them about bringing tomorrow's paper. I got up at 5 a.m. and took a walk around to see Barry Russell. Just after leaving him I saw Mr. Berghauser going up Market Street in the Harrisburg Cars. I ran and got in and rode as far as Broad and Willow with him and then walked home again. I got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

19 May 1842. It was clear until about 5 p.m. when it clouded over and rained very hard all the evening. The wind was from the SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 6 a.m. was at 61 degrees, and at 2 1/4 p.m. it was at 79 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the "Rhetorical Academy" with Miss Hall. I got up at 5 1/4 a.m. and took a walk down to the wharf and up home by Chestnut St. I got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

20 May 1842. It was a cold, damp, rainy and very unpleasant day with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 49 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 44 degrees, and at 7 p.m. it was at 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home. It was so cold today that I wore an overcoat all day. It stopped raining towards dusk. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

21 May 1842. It was cloudy most of the day but there was no rain. It cleared off towards dark and the evening was as splendid and moonlit as I ever saw one. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 45 degrees, at 2 p.m. 59 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 57 degrees.

I was at the office all day until about until about 1/2 past 4 p.m. when William Bird and I took a walk down to the Navy Yard(5) to see the frigate Raritan previous to her being launched, as it is to occur on Wednesday next. This evening I was at home except about 3/4 of an hour when I went down to hear George Mundy preach. Miss BrinkleZ took supper and spent the evening with us I went home with her about half past 9 o'clock. Louisa Wood was also here. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

22 May 1842. It was cloudy all day and it rained during the afternoon and part of the evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 51 degrees, and at 1 p.m. and at 10 p.m. it was at 59 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Suddards preached in the morning from the 2nd chapter of Jeremiah, verse 12 & 13. Mr. Thurston Bedell preached in the afternoon. In the evening I was at St. Philip's Church with Sarah Roberts and Mr. Neville preached. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

23 May 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the WNW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 60 degrees, and at 2 p.m. it was at 70 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the National Literary Institute, the Athenaeum, and the Store. This evening was moonlit. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and took a walk and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

24 May 1842. It was cloudy during the morning and it commenced raining about 2 1/2 p.m. and continued to do so through the afternoon and evening. The wind was SE. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 57 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 69 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. it was at 59 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home reading. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

25 May 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 58 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 69 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 60 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was down at the Temperance Meeting, opposite Howard Hall, with Sam Milligan. I got up at half past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

26 May 1842. It was clear during the morning and it clouded over toward noon and rained during the latter part of the evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 59 degrees, and at 2 1/2 p.m. it was at 74 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at the "Rhetorical Academy" with Anna and Elizabeth Roberts and Lydia - it was the last night of the season. We got caught and had to go home in the rain. I got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 12.

27 May 1842. It was cloudy and rainy most of the day. The wind was from the SE and it afterwards got around to the SW about dark and it cleared up. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 60 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 64 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I went down with Ma, Lydia, and Mrs. Gibbons to Chas. Gibbons' to see Mrs. Thornton and her three daughters Antonia, Betty, and Virginia. They are going to Poughkeepsie tomorrow to leave Betty and Virginia there at William Gibbons' boarding school. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

28 May 1842. It was a clear and delightful day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 62 degrees, and at 2 1/2 p.m. it was at 74 degrees.

I was at the office in the morning and for about an hour in the afternoon. The rest of the afternoon I was at the Store making out Bills of Sale, as Pa had a sale there this morning. In the evening I was out with Sam Milligan - we were down at the Temperance Meeting on German St. We broke my silver mounted cane between us tonight. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at about 11 p.m.

29 May 1842. It was clear part of the day but it rained very hard in the morning and latter part of the afternoon. This evening was cloudy but there was no rain. The wind was from the SE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 63 degrees, at 3 p.m. 78 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 69 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Suddards preached both times, in the afternoon from the 1st chapter of 2nd Thessalonians, verse 10. In the evening I was down at Trinity Church with Sam Milligan, Mr. Coleman preached. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

30 May 1842. It was clear and rainy alternately throughout the morning. There were three hard showers of rain through the morning and the afternoon was clear and pleasant. The wind was WNW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 66 degrees, at 2 p.m. 70 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 63 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at a meeting of the National Literary Institute until 9 p.m. when William Rotch's trial came on. Strangers were not allowed to remain in the room so I returned home and remained there a while and then went up to Miss Patton's for Ma. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. I put on my summer pants for the first time this season today.

31 May 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 5 1/2 a.m. was at 57 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. it was at 67 degrees.

I was at the office all day until about 4 p.m. when I was obliged to come home on account of a very bad tooth ache. This evening I was at home. Mrs. Roberts took tea here and also spent the evening. I got up at 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

JUNE

1 June 1842. It was clear and delightful all day and evening with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 6 a.m. was at 58 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 73 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 62 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was out with Sam Milligan. We went to hear George Mundy hold forth in the rear of the U.S. Bank. After listening to him for about an hour, we went around to the Sansom St. Church. We remained there for a while until it was out and then I went up for Lydia at Mrs. Edward Roberts'. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

2 June 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 6 a.m. was at 58 degrees, at 2 1/4 p.m. 72 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home. Mr. & Miss Williams, Mrs. Gibbons, Mrs. Thornton and Antonia Thornton spent the evening here. Miss Williams came from Wilmington today and Mrs. Gibbons and Mr. & Mrs. Thornton came from Poughkeepsie. Miss Williams, Mrs. Gibbons, and Mrs. & Miss Thornton took supper with us this evening. I went down to Chas Gibbons' with Mrs. Gibbons and Mrs. Thornton about 10 1/2 p.m. I got up at 5 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

3 June 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the SE. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 58 degrees, at 2 p.m. 71 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 60 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I went up to Mr. Roberts' to inquire about a whitewash man and after getting my information I went after him and found him at No. 5 Gaskill St. I then went up to the store and remained there until about 1/4 of 11 p.m. making catalogues and then came home. I got up at 5 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

4 June 1842. It was cloudy all day but there was no rain. The wind was SE until towards dark when it got around to the SW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 59 degrees, and at 2 p.m. 71 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was down at the Store most of the time. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

5 June 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. and at 10 1/2 p.m. was at 70 degrees and at 1 p.m. 80 degrees and in the sun 104 degrees.

I was at St. Luke's Church in the morning with Ma and Miss Williams. Mr. Spear preached. In the afternoon I was at St. Phillip's Church with Ma and Miss Williams; Mr. Neville preached. In the evening I was at Trinity Church with Sam Milligan; Mr. Coleman preached from the 15th chapter of St. John, the first part of the 5th verse. The words were, "I am the vine and you are the branches." I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 m. of 11 p.m.

6 June 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 6 a.m. was at 68 degrees, and at 2 p.m. 74 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at a meeting of the National Literary Institute part of the time and the rest at home. Mrs. Day opened her Day's Goods Store this morning opposite to us. I got up at 1/4 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

7 June 1842. It was clear but very cool all day with the wind from the SE. The thermometer at 5 1/2 a.m. was at 50 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 63 degrees, and at 9 p.m. 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home. I got up at 5 a.m. and took a walk with Harry Berghauser down to the wharf to see the barge Turk, a Boston packet. I got to bed at 9 p.m.

8 June 1842. It was cloudy all day with occasional showers and the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 53 degrees, at 2 p.m. 64 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 59 degrees. It was so cold today that we had a fire in the office. Ma was out at Owen Jones' today.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

9 June 1842. It was cloudy most of the day but it cleared off towards evening. The wind was SE, but finally got around to the SW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 60 degrees, at 2 p.m. 74 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. 68 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

10 June 1842. It rained early in the morning but cleared up about 10 a.m. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 66 degrees, at 2 p.m. 74 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 63 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I took a walk down to William Bird's and back up home again. I got up at 1/2 past 5 and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

11 June 1842. It was clear and cold all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 55 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 63 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 57 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home. Ma had her stove put up in her room again today and had fire; we also had a fire in the grate at the office. Miss Williams went away today. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

12 June 1842. It was clear and delightful all day and evening, but cool. The wind was S. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 55 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. 69 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. 59 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and evening; Mr. Suddards preached both times. In the afternoon I was at St. Phillip's Church and Mr. Neville preached. Mama again had a fire in her room today, it being too cold without. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 20 m. past 11 p.m.

13 June 1842. It was cloudy all day and at about dark we had a heavy shower of rain. The wind was S. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 60 degrees, at 2 p.m. 77 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 67 degrees.

I was at Mr. Briskoe's from 1/2 past 8 until 1/2 past 11 this morning and from 4 till 5 this afternoon, having my teeth plugged and pulled. I was only at the office about 2 hours today. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

14 June 1842. It was cloudy with occasional showers of rain all day. The wind as SE. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at 2 p.m. 71 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. 67 degrees.

I was at the dentist's from 1/2 past 7 until 8 in the morning and from 3 until half past 5 in the afternoon. The rest of the day I was at the office and this evening I was at home. Papa went to New York last night. The Franklin House on Chestnut St. between Third and Fourth streets was opened for the 1st time yesterday.

15 June 1842. It was raining on and off all day with the wind from the SE. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 66 degrees, at 2 p.m. 75 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 69 degrees.

I was at the dentist's office from 8 until 10 a.m. The rest of the day I was at the office and in the evening I was at home. I got up at 25 m. of 6 a.m. and got to bed at half past 10 p.m.

16 June 1842. It was cloudy and very sultry all day with the wind from the SW. It rained during most of the evening. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 2 p.m. 80 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 73 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was out with Sam Milligan - we were at Washington Square for a while and then went down to William Hanly's where we spent the rest of the evening. We came away about 10 o'clock. I got up at 20 m. of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

17 June 1842. It was cloudy all day and evening and it rained on and off. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 72 degrees, at 2 p.m. 75 degrees, and at 11 1/2 p.m. 70 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was in the company of Miss Mary Cuthbert's on Race St. above Tenth. Miss Israel was among the persons there; she is a very handsome and graceful young lady and is from Pittsburgh. It is the first time she has ever been from home; she is staying at Isaac Elliott, Esq.'s. Samuel Elliot was also there; it was the first time that I have seen him since he returned from exploring squadron. I got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 10 m. past 12.

18 June 1842. It was cloudy on and off all day with an occasional shower of rain. The wind was SE The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 70 1/2 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 80 degrees, and at 9 p.m. 73 degrees.

I was at the office until 4 1/2 p.m. when I took a walk along the wharves. In the evening I was with Papa at Mr. Doolittle's Auction Store. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

19 June 1842. It was changeable but clear part of the day. The wind was SW. It commenced raining about 6 1/2 p.m. and continued to do so through the evening and at times very hard. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. and at 10 p.m. was at 73 degrees, and at 1 p.m. 83 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon; Mr. Suddards preached both times. In the evening I was down at Trinity Church with Sam Milligan and Mr. Coleman preached from the 84th Psalms, verse 1 & 2. The words of Mr. Suddards' text this morning were: "There is no more sea." It blew very hard after the rain this evening. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

20 June 1842. It rained during the early part of the morning and cleared up towards the latter part of the afternoon. The wind was W. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 71 1/2 degrees, at 2 p.m. 75 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 70 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I took a walk up as far as 10th and Vine St. with a young gentleman by the name of David Weatherly who came to our office to commence the study of the conveyancing business. After I left him, I walked down to the room of the "National Literary Institute" and remained there about half an hour. I then went over talked with Charles Wolf for a while and went up to Miss BrincklZ's for Lydia and remained there about half an hour and came home. This evening was moonlit. I got up at 5 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

21 June 1842. It was clear and delightful all day. The wind was in all parts of the compass - it got from NW to NE and then to E. and finally around to the SW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 71 degrees, at 2 p.m. 77 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I started out to take a walk and I met Bob Parvin who told me that there was an excursion of the "Hayden Society" up to Burlington and Bristol. I went down to the boat to see them off, but when I saw the numerous ladies and gentlemen (which was about 200 ladies and 150 gentlemen) the boat (New Philadelphia) I could not resist the temptation of going up myself, for I was not at a loss for company but I did not bring any with me.

We left the wharf about 1/2 past 8 with the "Hadon Band" playing some very lively airs and every person being in high spirits. A short time after we started they commenced flying rockets and they continued to do so most of the trip. In a short time after, we commenced dancing. I was introduced by Mr. I. Ridgway to his sister and danced with her a number of cotillions. We also marched on the promenade deck accompanied by music. After passing up the river as far as Burlington, we passed over by Bristol and then up the river and turned and came down by Burlington again where the boat touched about a minute.

On passing Bristol there was a number of rockets set off - both from the shore and the boat. After leaving Burlington we had a number of fine airs played by the band and a good deal of dancing. The night was magnificent, it being a full moon and very clear, warm and pleasant. We arrived at the wharf again at about 1/2 past 12, but it was near 1 before we could make a landing, during which time the company amused themselves by singing and playing on different instruments. I do not think that I can remember that I ever spent a pleasanter evening in my life, and so very unexpectedly as I did not know 5 minutes before I started whether I would go or not, as I was afraid they would be uneasy at home. I got up at 1/4 of 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1 1/2 a.m.

22 June 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the WSW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 2 p.m. 82 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 74 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home until about 9 when I went up to Mrs. Ploughman's for Lydia and Anna & Elizabeth Roberts. Mr. & Mrs. Edward Roberts spent part of the evening here. Anna and Elizabeth went home with them. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

23 June 1842. It was raining on and off during the day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 70 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 78 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. 65 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home asleep on the sofa. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

24 June 1842. It was cloudy in the morning but cleared off towards noon and remained so. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 5 1/4 was at 64 degrees, at 2 p.m. 74 degrees, and at 11 1/4 p.m. 67 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I went down to see Miss Shankland with David Weatherly Jr., but she not being in we went to see Miss Berry. It was the first time that I ever was there. She is a very pretty girl. After returning home from there I went down to a bad fire on Walnut St. near Front St. I got up at 5 a.m. and took a walk down to the wharf and home again. I got to bed at 1/4 of 12.

25 June 1842. It was rather cloudy all day with the wind from the W. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 67 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 78 degrees. I was at the office during the morning and the afternoon at the Island with William H. Bird. We were both in to swim - it was the first time either of us had been in this season. This evening I took a walk out to Mr. Elliott's and then down to the Store where I remained a while. Then I went home and sat up till 12 o'clock assisting Pa in preparing some goods for a sale which is his intention to have on Monday next at the Store, No. 167 Chestnut St. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

26 June 1842. It was cloudy during the morning, but cleared off towards noon and remained so. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 71 degrees, at 3 p.m. 87 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 75 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Suddards preached in the morning from the 5th chapter of Ecclesiastes, verse 4 & 5. In the evening I was down at Trinity Church with Sam Milligan. The words of the text were: "The harvest is past and the summer is over and I am not saved." Mr. Spear preached at our church(6) in the afternoon. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m. At 11 p.m. it was clear and very warm.

27 June 1842. It was cloudy all day except a few hours in the middle of the day. We had two heavy showers in the afternoon and another in the evening. The wind was changeable. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 71 degrees, at 2 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 57 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 5 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

28 June 1842. It was cloudy during the morning with the wind from the NE. It afterwards got around to the SW and then cleared up. The thermometer at 1/4 of 6 a.m. was at 63 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 71 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I went down to see Miss Margaret Gibbons from Wilmington at her brother Charles' house and I remained there until about 9 o'clock when I left. I stopped at the Athenaeum on the way up. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 25 m. past 10 p.m.

29 June 1842. It was clear and delightful, but warm all day and evening with the wind from the SW, W., and NW. The thermometer at 5 1/4 a.m. was at 68 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 85 degrees, and at 11 1/2 p.m. 75 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at a company of Mr. and Mrs. Carr on 10th St. below Race. Miss Sarah Israel of Pittsburgh was among the company. I admired her still more than on my first meeting, as her manners are very pleasing and she is also very handsome and graceful. I think that she is a very fair specimen of Pittsburgh beauty, if all are to be judged from her. I got up at 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 12.

30 June 1842. It was clear and pleasant until about evening when it clouded over and remained so, with occasional lightning and a little rain during the evening. The wind was changeable - it was NE, E., SE, S., and it finally got around to the SW. The thermometer at 5 1/4 a.m. was at 71 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. in the shade 90 degrees and in the sun 120 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 87 degrees. It was the warmest day that we have had this season.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I walked up to David Weatherly to go with him to the American Institute. He not being in, I walked up there myself and remained there until the debate was closed and the meeting adjourned.

I got up this morning at 1/4 of 5 a.m. and walked to Harry Berghauser's on Julianna St. above Buttonwood St. to see him about our intended trip to Boston. I remained there for about 2 1/4 hours. I got to bed at 11 p.m.

JULY

1 July 1842. It was clear and very warm all day until about 1/2 past 4 p.m. when it commenced clouding over and in the evening from about 7 until about 1/2 past 9 o'clock. We had one of the most tremendous storms of rain, accompanied by tremendous claps of thunder and vivid flashes of lightning, that I have ever seen. Pa said it was the worse that he ever saw and I never remember ever seeing anything of the kind half so bad in my lifetime. It cleared off towards 10 o'clock. The wind was SSE. The thermometer at 5 1/2 a.m. was at 77 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 90 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 73 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home. Pa, Ma and I were invited to Mr. Jacob Thomas' this evening. There was to have been a number there, but we were prevented from going on account of the tremendous storm. I got up at 5 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

2 July 1842. It was clear and there was not a cloud to be seen until about 11 o'clock this morning. At that time it commenced clouding over and between 2 & 3 p.m. we had a very heavy shower of rain accompanied by heavy thunder and lightning. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. and at 8 p.m. was at 75 degrees, and at 1 1/2 p.m. 95 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. The lightning last night did a great deal of damage as will be seen by referring to the papers filed for this date. The rain did a great deal of damage at 4th and Market St. where it poured down in the basement stores filling them up to the ceiling with water and spoiling all the goods, even those things on the upper shelves. In one of the stores, there were a couple of girls that attended there who came near to being drowned as they fastened themselves in and could not get out. It was nearly up to their necks before they got out. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

3 July 1842. It was cloudy most of the day though the sun would shine out occasionally. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 75 degrees, at 1 p.m. 85 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 74 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and Mr. Suddards preached. In the afternoon I was home until about 1/4 of 5 when I walked up to Grace Church and got there in time to hear the sermon that Mr. Neville preached. It rained hard all this evening, accompanied by thunder and lightning and therefore I did not go out. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

4 July 1842. It was rather cloudy or misty all day but there was no rain. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 5 1/2 a.m. was at 72 degrees, at 7 p.m. 78 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 75 degrees.

In the morning about 7 o'clock I went up to David Weatherly's for him to go to Wilmington with me. We started from his house about 1/4 past 7 and went down to the Steamer Balloon which was the boat we took for Wilmington, Delaware. It started at about 8 a.m. with about 300 passengers on board and arrived in Wilmington about half past 10 a.m. On our passage down we had a race with the Steamer Rainbow, a new boat brought around from New York to beat the Balloon. She passed us before getting to Chester but did not gain more than half a mile. I do not think that she could have beaten us at all if we had had no passengers on board like her.

On our arrival to Wilmington we walked to the Brandywine where we saw the Firemen's procession, up the Brandywine Walk a piece, and then we walked over to Dr. Gibbons' and saw Mrs. Gibbons, Elizabeth, Frank, and Rod. After eating some pie and milk, which Mrs. Gibbons was kind enough to give us, and sitting and talking a while with Elizabeth, we walked down to town. In passing Dr. Henry Gibbons', I saw Margaret standing at the door and I introduced Mr. Weatherly to her and she invited us in. We remained there a while, saw Rebecca Gibbons and also Mrs. Henry Gibbons.

After leaving there, we walked down to the boat, remained there a while and then walked around to the Car office. David met there a Mr. MacAllister who he introduced me to. We then all took a walk up town and around down to the boat again which we took for Philadelphia. We started at 1/4 of 4 p.m. with about 400 passengers aboard the Mechanic Engine Co. and Penn & Hose Co. with their apertures on board. We arrived in the City about 1/4 of 7 p.m.

We then walked up and got our supper and after supper Dave called for me and we both went down to see Miss Berry, a young lady of his acquaintance. I got home at 1/4 of 11 p.m. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

5 July 1842. It was cloudy all day but there was no rain. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 74 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 83 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was up at Mrs. Algernon Roberts' with Papa, Mama & Lydia. The Elliotts, Rob-ertses, Thomases, Cuthberts, Jewells, Miss Israel, and Miss Waterman were all there. It was a family party given by Mrs. Roberts. I got home about 12 p.m. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 12 1/2 p.m.

6 July 1842. It was cloudy all day and there were two or three heavy showers of rain in the morning and afternoon. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. was at 73 degrees, and at 2 1/2 p.m. was at 74 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home. Ma was so unwell today that she was confined to her bed. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

7 July 1842. It was cloudy all day and evening but there was no rain. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 66 degrees, and at 2 p.m. 75 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was home writing agreements for Papa. I got up at half past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

8 July 1842. It was cloudy all day with a heavy shower of rain in the afternoon. The wind was S. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 68 degrees, at 2 p.m. 78 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 75 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening Warner Jones called for me and I walked around to his residence with him. We then walked out as far as 6th St. and then down to Chestnut St. and down Chestnut St. to a confectioners and got some ice cream. We then went to a fire and got separated. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

9 July 1842. It was cloudy all day with several very heavy showers of rain and the wind from the SSW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 6 a.m. was at 73 degrees, at 2 p.m. 78 degrees, and at 9 p.m. it was at 72 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home laying on the bed asleep. I got up at quarter past 6 and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

10 July 1842. It was clear during different periods in the day but would cloud over very heavily at times. There was no rain. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 68 degrees, at 2 p.m. 74 degrees, at 10 1/4 p.m. 69 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and Mr. Suddards preached. In the afternoon I was at home reading. In the evening I went down to Trinity Church with Sam Milligan; Mr. Coleman preached. Mr. David Weatherly walked up home with us. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

11 July 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 68 degrees, at 2 p.m. 77 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. it was at 69 degrees. It may be remarked as a strange circumstance that we have had cloudy and rainy weather for some time although the wind has been in a clear quarter and last night it got around to the NE and remained so during today. We had an elegant day as I have ever seen in my life.

I was at the office all day. This evening I took a walk up to Miss Patton's with Lydia. On our return home we stopped in to see Miss Mary Hall and remained there a while and then came home. Mr. Elliott spent the evening with us. I got up at quarter past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

12 July 1842. It was cloudy a little while in the morning but it cleared off delightfully in a short time and remained so. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at quarter of 11 p.m. 71 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was out with Sam Milligan down at Mr. Hanly's. He walked up home with me, and as we were walking down 8th St. our attention was attracted by a scuffle at the corner 8th & Zane St. It turned out that it was Edward Borden with a Tavern Keeper. I got up at 1/4 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

13 July 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 2 p.m. 84 degrees and on the side of Arch St. 95 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 73 degrees.

I was at the office all day. At about 1/2 past 8 in the evening, Dave Weatherly called around for me and we took a walk together down to Miss Shankland's. She not being in, we walked around to Miss Berry's where we remained the rest of the evening until about 1/2 past 10 p.m. I got up at 5 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 12 p.m.

14 July 1842. It was clear during the morning with the wind from the E. It got around to the SSW towards noon and it clouded over having every appearance of rain, but it did not. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 77 degrees, at 2 p.m. 86 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 78 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was out with Sam Milligan; we took a walk around down town and then up along Chestnut St. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 5 m. of 11 p.m.

15 July 1842. It was cloudy all day and commenced raining about 10 a.m. and continued to do so through the rest of the day and evening. The wind was NNE. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 70 degrees, at 2 p.m. 68 degrees, and at 11 p.m. 65 degrees.

I was at the office all morning until about 1/2 past 9 o'clock when I went to the Commencement of the University of Pennsylvania. I remained there until the exercises were over which was about 1 p.m. when I came home and got dinner and went down to the office. In the evening I was at home as it rained all the time. I got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

16 July 1842. It was cloudy all day and evening and it poured rain most tremendously hard all day. The wind was NNE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at 2 p.m. 67 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 67 degrees.

I was at the office all day until about half past 5 p.m. when I walked down to Mr. William H. Furness' to try and collect a bill but did not find him in. I then came home and remained there all the evening asleep on the sofa, being very tired. William Bird left the office today. I believe he intends leaving the City on Monday for his summer vacation. He expects to be gone about 2 or 3 weeks. I got up at 20 m. of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

17 July 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 1 p.m. 78 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 73 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and Mr. N. S. Harris preached. I was at Grace Church in the afternoon. In the evening I went down to Trinity Church with Sam Milligan. This evening is very clear and moonlit. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 m. of 11 p.m.

18 July 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 73 degrees and at 1 1/2 p.m. 84 degrees.

I was at the office during the morning and in the afternoon I was at home until about 1/2 past 3 p.m. when Lydia and I went up to the Wilmington Depot at 11th and Market St. and then proceeded to Wilmington by the Cars. On our arrival there, we took a carriage which conveyed us up to Dr. Gibbons'. After supper Elizabeth and Rebecca Gibbons, Lydia, and myself went over to see Miss Riley. We remained there about 3/4 of an hour and then came home and in a short time went to bed. Got up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

19 July 1842. It was clear and very warm all day with the wind from the SSW. The thermometer at 1 p.m. was at 83 degrees.

I was down in Wilmington in the morning until about 10 a.m. attending to some business. At that time I walked out to Dr. Gibbons' with Margaret Gibbons and remained there until about 4 p.m. when I again went down into Wilmington to see Mr. William H. Neff and remained there about an hour and then came up again. In the evening I walked down with Rebecca Gibbons as far as her brother Henry's. Our intention was to have walked over to G.'s with Margaret Gibbons and the Miss Milligans, but it looked so much like rain that we did not go. I got back at 8 and spent the evening at Dr. Gibbons'. Miss Riley was there. I got up at 4 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m. There was a heavy shower of rain this evening; it commenced about 9 p.m. and continued through the night accompanied by thunder and lightning.

20 July 1842. It was raining hard when I got up this morning but it stopped in a short time and then cleared off very warm. This evening was clear, cool and moonlit. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 1 p.m. was at 84 degrees.

I started from Wilmington this morning at 7 o'clock and arrived in Philadelphia about 1/4 past 9 o'clock. On my arrival, I went home and washed and changed my dress and then went to the office at about 11 o'clock. I remained there during the rest of the morning. I was at the office during the afternoon.

In the evening, at about 20 m. of 8 o'clock, I went down to Chestnut St. wharf and went on board of the steamer New Philadelphia. She left the wharf about 8 p.m. with 150 passengers on board and proceeded up as far as Noble St. where she took on board about 250 more passengers. She then proceeded up as far as Burlington, landed 300 passengers, and then over to Bristol. I went on shore at this place and took a walk up as far as the hotel with Jim Field and remained there a while and then took a walk by myself around the town and then down to the boat.

We left Bristol at 1/2 past 10 and went over to Burlington again where we remained for half an hour. I went on shore here and got some cakes. We left Burlington at 11 p.m. and arrived in the City at 1 a.m. There was a number of passengers left both at Bristol and Burlington, but I suppose they could come down in the Hudson - another which left after we did and made the same excursion. The night was a magnificent one, just suited for such an excursion, it being a full moon and not a cloud to be seen anywhere. The com-pany amused themselves by dancing, singing, promenading, etc. The music was very poor although it was done well enough to dance by. I went one round of the Straight Forward with a number of young men. The rest of the company kept it up the whole of the evening. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 2 a.m.

21 July 1842. It was clear and cool all day with the wind from the SE The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 67 degrees, at 1 p.m. 76 degrees, and at 11 p.m. it was at 68 degrees.

At 1/4 of 8 o'clock this morning Ma, Pa, and myself went around to St. Phillip's Church on Vine St. above 8th to see Miss Ellen Mitchell married. She married a Mr. Nelson Burrows and they were married at 8 o'clock by Mr. Dorr.

After the ceremony was over we all left the Church and went around to Mr. Mitchell's, according to a previous invitation, where we had the cake and wine. They started for New York at 10 1/2 a.m. with the intention of going on to Niagara Falls and to be gone 3 or 4 weeks.

After leaving the house I went down to the office and remained there the rest of the day. This evening I went down to Gray's Ferry with Warner Jones. We started from the Exchange at 8 o'clock with a fine band of music and about 150 or 200 passengers on board. We got down around 9 o'clock and amused ourselves while there with promenading around the Garden, etc. We left on the Ferry about 10 o'clock and got to the City again about 11 p.m. The music was very fine and the moon and scenery at the Ferry was magnificent. There was a number of ladies on the excursion. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

22 July 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day. The wind got around to the SW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 67 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 72 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I walked out to Mrs. Algernon Roberts' to see the boys (Sidney, Cuthbert and Percival) who are now home from boarding school. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

23 July 1842. It was cloudy early in the morning but soon cleared off very warm. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 72 degrees, at 2 p.m. 84 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 77 degrees.

I was at the office during the morning. In the afternoon I was over at the Smith's Island with Cuthbert and Percival Roberts. Percival and I went in to swim - it was the 2nd time that I have been in this season. We got over to the City again about 6 p.m. In the evening I was around at aunt Lydia Jones' with Ma for a while. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

24 July 1842. It was clear and warm through the greater part of the day, but we had a heavy shower about 2 p.m. It soon cleared off and continued so until towards evening when it again clouded over very heavily and rained all of the evening. The wind was NNW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 75 degrees, at 12 87 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. it was at 72 degrees.

I was at St. Phillip's Church in the morning (ours being closed until the 7th of August). The text was the 1st chapter of St. John, verse 17. I was at home all afternoon and in the evening I went down to Trinity Church with Sam Milligan. Mr. Coleman preached from the 12th chapter and the 24th verse of Hebrews. It was raining hard when we came out of church. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

25 July 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day and the wind was from the NW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 71 degrees, at 2 1/4 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 72 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I went down to see Miss Berry and remained there until about 10 p.m. when I came up home. It was the first evening that I have spent alone with her. I found her to be a very pleasant and pleasing girl. I got up at 25 m. of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

26 July 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 84 degrees, and at 11 p.m. 75 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I walked down with David Weatherly to Miss Flannigan's to leave a book there. We then walked up the street a piece and parted; he went over to see Miss Berry and I went to see if I could find Miss Alice Chalenor, but I could not. I walked around to a Temperance Meeting in front of the Southwark Hall and remained there for awhile and then went to Miss Berry's for Weatherly and remained there for about an hour and came up home with him. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

27 July 1842. It was clear until about 4 p.m. when it clouded over and was very warm. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 76 degrees, at 2 p.m. 87 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 80 degrees.

I was at the office all day. I spent the evening up at Mrs. Edward Roberts'. There was a dreadful murder committed this morning about 6 a.m. of a broker on 3rd above Chestnut St. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at half past 11 p.m.

28 July 1842. It was clear and warm all day with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 77 degrees, at 2 p.m. 85 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 76 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 m. of 11 p.m.

29 July 1842. It was clear and very warm until about dark when it clouded over and at about 10 p.m. commenced raining. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 75 degrees, at 2 p.m. 85 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 78 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I walked down with David Weatherly to Miss Coates as he wished to leave a book there. We remained there about 1/2 and hour when we walked up to Miss Shankland's and remained there about an hour and came up home. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

30 July 1842. It was clear and warm all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 79 degrees, and at 1 1/2 p.m. 90 degrees.

I was at the office during the morning and in the afternoon, Mr. Roberts, Cuthbert, Sidney and Percival Roberts and myself went up to Bristol in the steamer Trenton. We left the wharf about 2 p.m. and arrived in Bristol at 4. On our arrival we took a walk up through the town and then down to the Ferry boat and we went over to Burlington. We walked up as far as the Mitchell Confectionery store and got some ice cream and cakes. After eating them we walked down along the Bank as far as the girls' boarding school(7) and then up again to the boat. We went on board and started for the City about 1/2 past 6 and arrived there at 10 m. past 8. We passed the Balloon just before landing. She started for Burlington about an hour before we did. I remained in the house during the evening. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 9 3/4 p.m.

31 July 1842. It was clear and very warm until the middle of the day when it clouded over and rained for a while. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 83 degrees, at 9 a.m. 90 degrees, at 1 p.m. 85 degrees, at 3 p.m. 75 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 67 degrees, being a difference of 23 degrees since 9 a.m.

I was at St. Peter's Church in the morning and afternoon. In the evening I was down at Mr. Coleman's Church with Sam Milligan. Mr. C. preached. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

AUGUST

1 August 1842. It was clear and very cool all day and evening with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 64 degrees, at 2 p.m. 72 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 62 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home until about 1/2 past 9 when Pa and I went down to a very bad fire on Lombard St. below 7th. It was set on fire by the mob, as there had been a great riot between the blacks and whites(8) . It was occasioned by the former having a Temperance Procession. There were a number hurt very seriously and some killed on both sides. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 5 m. of 11 p.m.

2 August 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 60 degrees, at 2 p.m. 72 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 66 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I walked down with Sam Milligan through the district in which the riot occurred. They burned a colored Presbyterian Church on St. Mary St. and the Beneficial Hall on Lombard St. last night, besides destroying the property.

We then walked down to see Miss Alice Chalenor and remained there a while and then walked around to Miss Shankland's and stopped at the door and talked a while. We then went up to 5th and Lombard St. but could get no further up Lombard St. as the Sheriff had a posse of watch stationed there to prevent people from going into the riot district. He also had them stationed at several other points for the same cause. We then went up as far Washington Square where there was about a 1000 military with canons, etc. stationed to relieve the watch which were to remain on guard until it was time to go another respective round. I then walked down to the Post Office, put a paper in for Mr. Chalenor and walked up home. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

3 August 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at 2 p.m. 76 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 70 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home trying a small steam engine which Pa bought at auction today. Mr. & Mrs. Carr, Mr. & Mrs. Mitchell, and Mr. & Mrs. Roberts spent the evening at our house. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

4 August 1842. It was clear all day and it commenced raining about 9 1/2 p.m. The wind was from the NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 and 10 p.m. was at 65 degrees.

I was at the office all day. I left the office about 6 p.m. and went up for Papa and then he and I went around to Miss Sarah Stockley's where we met Ma and took tea and spent the evening very pleasantly. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 20 minutes past 10 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was cloudy and raining a little.

5 August 1842. It was raining and very unpleasant all day until about 6 p.m. when it cleared off. The wind was NE until about 11 a.m. when it got around to the SE The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 57 degrees, at 3 p.m. 66 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 63 degrees.

I was at the office all day. I spent the evening very pleasantly at Miss Berry's. I went down there by myself, but after a short time Dave Weatherly came in and remained there until about 10 o'clock when we came up home together. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

6 August 1842. It was rather misty all day with the wind from the SE The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 67 degrees, at 3 p.m. 72 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 69 degrees.

I started this morning at 1/2 past 9 a.m. for Wilmington in the streamer Balloon from the Chestnut St. wharf. I arrived in Wilmington at about 1/4 past 12 after a very pleasant passage. On my arrival I walked up to Mrs. Reynolds' and remained there awhile talking with her and Margaret Gibbons. I then walked up to Dr. Gibbons' with Margaret and got dinner and remained there until about 1/2 past 4 p.m. when I went down to the Cars and came up to Philadelphia. I arrived in the City about 6 p.m. after leaving Wilmington at 4 1/2 p.m. While I was down, I saw Lydia - she has been spending the last 3 weeks at Dr. Gibbons'. I do not think that she looks as well as she did when she went down. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

7 August 1842. It was cloudy most of the day with a heavy shower of rain about the middle. The wind was from the NE. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 67 degrees, at 4 p.m. 72 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. 69 degrees.

I was at St. Phillip's Church in the morning and Mr. Neville preached. I remained in the house in the afternoon until about 4 p.m. when Papa, Mama, and I went up to see Mrs. Jacob Thomas. I have not seen her before for a number of years. In the evening I went down to Trinity Church with Sam Milligan. Mr. Prim preached. He was formally a Presbyterian Minister, but has changed to an Episcopalian. He was ordained this morning and it was his first sermon since his change. The text was from the 2nd chapter of 2nd Thessalonians, verse 15. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

8 August 1842. It was cloudy most of the day but would be clear at times. The wind was changeable; it was SE, S, and SW, but finally got around to SE again. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 69 degrees, at 2 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 9 p.m. 70 degrees.

I was at the office until about 1/2 past 10 a.m. when I left to attend to some little business previous to my going out of town tomorrow afternoon. I was at home writing until about 5 p.m. when I went down to A.D. Cash's to try and collect a bill but did not. I then went down to the Exchange and then around up to Papa's room and then walked up home with him. In the evening I was at home writing for myself. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

9 August 1842. It was cloudy most of the day with the wind from the SE We had a shower of rain about the middle of the day.

I was not at the office today, but at the Athenaeum in the morning and at home in the afternoon until about 1/2 past 3 when I left and came down to the wharf with Papa and went on board the barge Anna Reynolds driven by Captain Doane for Boston. We left Philadelphia at 1/4 of 5 p.m. with a light wind from the SE The tide was running down. We had our mainsail, main topsail, and main topgallant sail, main royal, main foresail, fore topgallant sail, shaker, mast and jib set. We passed Fort Mifflin about 1/2 past 7 p.m. There were two other passengers besides myself: Mr. J.L. Scelrock from Reading, PA. and Mr. Benjamin T. Durrell from Lee, New Hampshire. We anchored a short distance above Marcus Hook about 11 p.m. The tide was heavy and there was a heavy head wind. I remained sitting on the afterpart of the vessel engaged in a pleasant conversation with the other passengers until about 1/4 after 10 p.m. when we turned in for the night. The bed was rather hard.

10 August 1842. I was awakened this morning by the merry "Heave-Ho" (about 1/2 past 4) of the crew at the windlass weighing anchor. Then I got dressed and went on deck. This morning was cloudy and foggy, but soon cleared off warm. We passed Wilmington at about 1/2 past 8 a.m. and New Castle at 1/2 past 9 p.m. At about 11 a.m. we dropped anchor about 4 miles below New Castle which we were obliged to do by a heavy head tide and wind. At about 3 p.m. we had a shower of rain with a heavy blow from the SE At about 5 p.m. we hove the anchor and beat down the rain. The wind was blowing very strong from the SSE. We had made down 3 or 4 miles below the Reecy Island lights by 8 1/4 p.m. at which time I turned in. The wind is now quite modest.

11 August 1842. Today was clear and delightful. We dropped anchor last night about 11 o'clock just above Duck Creek light. We

got under way again this morning about 4 a.m. with a SSW wind. We had all sails set and at 9 1/2 a.m. we sailed along finely in the middle of the bay, having a gentle but not unpleasant swell. The bay is here about 20 miles in width and I can just discern land. At about 1/4 past 10 a.m. we dropped anchor about 20 miles from the Cape, there being a dead calm and head tide. About 12, we could see a barge coming up the bay and at 2 o'clock it reached us when we again raised the anchor. The water was as smooth as glass and as far as the eye could reach previous to the barge which came from the SSE. But, as it came upon us, it caused the whole bay to become full of ripples and from there it gradually gained a gentle swell.

At 8 1/2 p.m. we were sailing along gallantly with most of the sails set in sight of Cape May and Henlope all the way. We went to sea about 11 p.m., just after getting outside the Cape; we experienced a heavy squall of wind accompanied with heavy rain and vivid flashes of lightning and also heavy claps of thunder. The wind carried away the main royal and tore the aft topsail. The pilot hailed a schooner about dark which called and he went on board of her. She was bound to Philadelphia. Found an overcoat quite comfortable both this and last evening, but more so this. I turned in about 1/4 of 10 p.m.

12 August 1842. When I awoke this morning and went up on deck, I found myself out at sea about 15 miles but in sight of Cape May. There was a gentle swell in the ocean, but not enough to make it unpleasant, nor near as much as I expected to find it. There was very little wind this morning, but what little there was was favorable so that we could lay our course. I saw the barge Turk 3 days from Boston and bound for Philadelphia. We did not travel more than 20 miles today it being entirely calm at times. What wind we had was from the SSW. We are getting rather tired of sailing so slow, but we are in hopes of catching a 10 knot breeze before long. The moon shined beautifully through the evening as though it were dancing. I remained on deck until about 8 1/2 p.m. when I went below and in a short time turned in.

13 August 1842. When I went upon deck this morning at about 1/2 past 5, there were 18 sails in sight and a fine breeze from the NNE, and a pretty heavy sea -- so much so as to cause Mr. J.L. Scelrock (one of the two passengers) to become sick. The other passenger and myself have not yet experienced that delightful sensation, nor do we expect to as we have been tried pretty well by this time. The vessel is now picking up very much, the waves are breaking over the bow and the spray flying back as far as the foremast.

At 9 a.m. we hailed the schooner Big Rush of Providence bound for Philadelphia. The wind was almost ahead all morning, and we had to take ship every hour or two and we were heading 8 points off our course. I find I will be obliged to alter my opinion in regards to the sickness of Mr. Bunell and myself - just after writing the above, we began to feel the effects of it - he much more so than myself. I remained in my berth the great part of the day feeling ill, but not so much as to cause a "heaving up" (as the sailors call it) as was the case with the other passengers. I returned quite early this evening as soon as 7 p.m. We did not sail on a straight course today over 10 miles having to tack about so much. We saw a school of porpoises this afternoon consisting of about 20.

14 August 1842. I got up this morning about daylight. It being clear, I had a view of a sunrise at sea which was a magnificent sight. We had a fine breeze from the SW. This morning it carried us about 6 knots an hour. The wind in a short time shifted to the NNW and carried us along at the rate of 7 miles per hour. I did not eat anything from yesterday morning until this evening when I took a little supper. We traveled about 80 miles today.

15 August 1842. The wind was NNE. this morning, being nearly ahead which lessens our prospects of getting into Boston as soon as we expected. We do not expect to get there now before Wednesday. The wind remained ahead today and nothing of note occurred. After supper I went up on deck and had a fine view of the sun going down - it was a splendid sight. I turned in about 8 p.m. for the night.

16 August 1842. It was cloudy, foggy, cold and very unpleasant all day - an overcoat and thick winter clothing were quite comfortable. The wind today was N. or nearly ahead, our course being in that direction. Last night it was clear and moonlit until about 10 p.m. when it commenced blowing very hard, which occasioned a very heavy sea this morning. There was also a very heavy fog last night after 11 p.m. which continued until about 7 in the morning.

At about 10 1/2 a.m. we laid to to try to catch some cod fish, but the tide ran so fast to the -- and we did not succeed. We again laid at about 4 p.m. to try our luck again, but failed. At about 5 1/2 p.m. the wind died away and it came to a calm. In the afternoon we saw a whale about 30 feet long off to the lee quarter. I turned in at about 7 1/4 p.m.

17 August 1842. It was cloudy and foggy all day. The wind was fine at first - from the W. - but soon got around to the S. which makes it fair all the way into Boston if it lasts. At 1 p.m. we were sailing along finely, striding sails set and had a 6 knot breeze.

At 1 1/2 p.m. we had in sight the table lands of Cape Cod about 12 miles in the distance. It was the first land we have seen for 4 days and we expected to get into Boston tonight. I saw this morning a large whale on the weather side -- he was about 60 feet long. I also saw a shark and a swordfish on the weather side. The whale would come up occasionally and spout with a great noise like the blowing off of steam. The ocean was almost as calm as a river throughout the day. At 11 a.m. there were 12 sails in sight; they appeared to sit at equal distances around the horizon, with our barque situated in the centre of the circle. At 2 p.m., we came into sight of the highlands of Cape Cod -- they present a very strange appearance to me -- they resemble large snowdrifts extending along the shore.

In passing, I noticed a number of buildings on the bank, among which were a church, windmill, etc. At 4 1/2 p.m., we had in sight the Cape Cod lighthouse and there are 30 or 40 sails in sight. The wind was still increasing every prospect of getting into Boston tonight.

At 6 p.m. we were in sight of Race Point lighthouse and Plymouth. I caught a cod fish and a haddock this morning before breakfast -- the cod was served up for breakfast. At 11 1/2 p.m., we passed Boston lighthouse, at 12 1/2 a.m. we passed Long Island light and at 10 minutes past 3 a.m. we hailed in the Boston dock. I turned in at quarter of 9 p.m. and was up in the night from 1/2 past 11 to 1/2 past 12 and from 1/4 of 3 to 1/4 past 3 a.m., to see them haul in.

18 August 1842. I got up this morning at about 5 1/2 a.m. and found ourselves lying in Boston Dock snug enough. After getting breakfast, the two other passengers and myself took a walk up into the town as far as the Post Office where I found a letter from Pa .tc Walking tour of Boston and the Navy Yard#

informing me that he and Ma had arrived here last Friday and were stopping at the Pavilion at No. 41 Fremont St. We then went up there where we found them, remained there a short time when all three of us took a walk as far as the Common. On our way there we saw a house(9) in which John Hancock formerly resided. We then walked down around through a number of streets, down as far as the Great Western Railroad Depot. It then came on to rain and we went up again to the hotel where we parted. I then took a short walk with Ma, but was obliged to return as a result of it coming onto rain. In a short time we were able to go out again, it having stopped, and accompanied by Pa. We went down as far as the Barge Anna Reynolds, Ma wanting to see her. On our way back we stopped in old Faneuil Hall - this building is worthy of a visit from its association with the Revolution, being the "Old Cradle of Liberty" and likewise the armories of the different military companies of the city. There was a gentleman there that we found very polite and kind in showing us a number of paintings which formed part of the decorations of the Hall the day previous in an exhibition of the schools. He also gave me the following sketch of the situation of the Patriots in the upper end of the Room. They are as follows:

[sketch of the positions of the statues]

After leaving the Hall, we walked up to the State House and then upon the top of it from which we obtained a fine view of the city and the surrounding county. We then came back to the hotel, got dinner and then went over to the Bunker Hill Monument in Charleston. Mr. Scelrock (passenger in the vessel) accompanied us, and Pa came over afterwards in a cab, but would not go to the top. Mr. S. and Ma went up and came down upon the steps, but I went up and came down by steam. After our descent from the Monument, we walked over to the Navy Yard and saw the Vermont - a vessel of war on the stocks and 4 ships of the line, the Potomac, Independence, Columbus, and Ohio. We also saw the eminent Day Dock where ships of the largest class can be repaired. This, with its steam pumps attached is magnificent indeed. As you stand in the Dock, parting the head of it, you will notice the following inscription on the left: "Commenced 10 July 1827. John Q. Adams, President of the United States. Samuel Southard, Secretary of the Navy. Authorized by the 19th Congress" and on the right: "Opened 24 June 1833. Andrew Jackson, President of the United States. Levi Woodbury, Secretary of the Navy. Loammi Baldwin, Engineer." We then left the Navy Yard and returned to Boston and got tea. After tea, Mr. S. and I went over to the Common, took a walk around there and back to the hotel. Then Ma, Pa, he and I went over to the Boston Museum to see Sig[nor] Blitz the Magician. I got to bed at 12.

19 August 1842. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and it was cloudy. After breakfast, Mr. S. and myself walked around to the new exchange and went through and upon the top of it. From there we walked down to the East Boston Ferry and crossed and went around to the steamer Britannia which had arrived this morning from England, but we were not able to get on board of her, visitors not being admitted until within three days of sailing. After looking through East Boston, we came over to the City and went around to the hotel where we found Ma and Pa. We then hired a carriage which conveyed us to Mount Auburn and Cushing's Garden - both splendid places. We got back to the hotel about 1/2 past 1.

Craigie House#

On the way, we passed over Cambridge Bridge and through the town of Cambridge. I was struck by the neatness of the town. The houses, all of frame, were built in a very handsome manner with pillars and porticoes in front. I noticed a great number of churches -- two built in the Gothic Style, one of stone near Cambridge College(10) , not yet completed, and the other of frame. I also noticed the house which was Washington's Headquarters(11) during the Revolution - it is a large yellow house with columns in front and it stands on the right hand side of the road going to Mount Auburn from Boston. I also noticed Cambridge College's ancient looking buildings, but did not go in them. After dinner we walked down to the Post Office and then went to see one of the Fire Engines and Hose Companies - they are very small but neat affairs, resembling those of New York. I then came around to the hotel and remained there for a while and afterwards took a walk with Ma down Washington Street.

In the evening I remained in the hotel except for about an hour when I took a walk through Boston Common. The evening being clear and moonlit, it was a very pretty appearance, especially the pond in the centre, as the moon shone upon the ripples which gave them the appearance of sparkling diamonds. This day was clear and very warm. I got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

20 August 1842. It was clear and delightful all day. I started out this morning and went over to Lynn on the railroad which is about 10 miles. From there I took the stage and went over to Nahaut and had .tc Train trip to Lynn and to Providence#

a delightful ride along the beach. I left there at 1/4 of 2 and came over to Lynn again expecting to get back to Boston by 1/4 past 3, but the cars did not get there until 20 m. past 3, which detained me so long as to prevent me, after getting to Boston, of finding Pa and Ma. Where they have gone I cannot tell. I have been in great pain of mind ever since I found I could not get to Boston in time. I hardly could contain myself for a while. When I found that they had left the hotel, I went to Worchester Depot, but found that the cars had started. I then went over to the Providence Depot, but found that they had started also. I did not know what to do; I never felt so bad in all my life. I knew no where to go, nor what to do. I found there was a train of cars just starting for Providence, so I concluded to go that far and remain over Sunday and then go on to New York on Monday, which I thought was the best possible thing for me to do.

I arrived in Providence about 1/2 past 6 p.m. and got a carriage on my arrival there to take me up to a boarding house where I am now. I passed a number of towns on the road from Boston to Providence, among which are Roxborough, Canton, Foxborough, Vanderfield, Attleboro, and several others whose names I do not remember. They all presented a very pretty appearance as we passed them - they are principally white frame buildings interspersed with 2 churches. I got to bed about 1/4 past 10 p.m.

21 August 1842. I got up at about 6 a.m. It was as magnificent a morning as I ever saw, or as they say has been seen here for 2 or 3 months. After breakfast, I took a walk up Westminster Street for about 1/2 a mile and then down High Street. In my walk I noticed the Arcade and several churches. The Arcade is a very handsome building - it is much superior to that in Philadelphia. It is built of granite and fronts on Westminster and High Streets and on both fronts it has 6 Corinthian columns. The interior has a very neat appearance. I went to Grace Church this morning. It is built in the Gothic style and has a very neat appearance both in- and outside. The buildings in this town are principally in brick, but there is a great number of frames among them, built in a very neat and chaste style, with columns, porticoes, etc. In the afternoon, I attended St. Stephen's Church. Mr. Waterman (the pastor) preached from the 16th chapter of St. Luke, verse 31. After church, I walked down as far as the railroad Depot to see if I could get away from this place before tomorrow night and found that I could at 10 o'clock tomorrow. In the evening I was at the Temperance lecture delivered at the Town House on College St. It was rather cloudy during the afternoon and had the appearance of rain, but cleared off elegantly towards dark and we had a splendid moonlit evening. I got to bed at 10 p.m.

22 August 1842. It was clear and delightful all day. I got up about 6 a.m. and after getting breakfast took a stroll around the town and then down to the depot of the Providence Rail Road. I then came up to the hotel and remained there until the carriage called which conveyed me to the steamer Massachusetts on board of which I took passage for New York.

I started at 1 p.m. After leaving Providence the scenery is beautiful, the country being very undulating. In going down the bay I noticed a very pretty little town called Bristol. It presents a very fine appearance from the river. We stopped at Newport about 2 p.m. A very pretty town, it appears to be situated on a hill and has three steeples visible from the river. We passed by Fort Adams on an Island bearing the same name, just after leaving Newport, it has portholes sufficient for 100 guns, besides what can be mounted on top the fort. We arrived at Stonington about 1/2 past 6 p.m. Immediately upon our arrival, I took supper (on board the boat).

After supper I walked up into town - the buildings are all frame built in the usual style of New England houses with porticoes, pillars, etc. I noticed a splendid hotel near the steamboat landing - far superior in regards to beauty or architecture than I have yet seen. I remained in this place about 2 1/4 hours when the Boston passengers arrived - there were about 350 of them, which together with the about 150 on before, made the boat very full. I was very much amused, as I lay on my cot about 6 feet from the floor, at the passengers making and fixing their beds, by getting settees, etc. and placing mattresses upon them. At times you would hear a fellow say, "Hullow stranger, what are doing in my berth?" "I am not in your berth," would be the reply. "But I can swear that is the number of my berth, and you must get up." "I be a___ if I will," would be the reply. And so they would go on until one would off to the Captain for redress & I would hear no more of it.

23 August 1842. I got up to New York this morning about 7 a.m. On my arrival here I put up at Mrs. Waldron's. (In passing Blackwell Prison on Blackwell Island, I noticed a number of Black's, both male and female, going to work.) After taking a short walk around town to see whether I could hear anything of Pa, I came back to my boarding house and wrote a letter to him. After dinner I walked down to the Battery and then went into Castle Garden and remained there until about 5 1/2 p.m. listening to fine band of music marching through the Battery grounds with a company of soldiers. From the top of the Battery, you have a fine view of the New York Bay, and also of the U.S. frigate North Carolina, the French steam frigate Gomar, and the English frigate Warspite lying therein. After supper I went up to Niblos Garden and was much pleased with the performance. I got to bed at 1/4 of 12.

24 August 1842. It was cloudy. After breakfast, I took a walk down to the Battery and from there I went on the frigate North Carolina. I met Mr. Elliott on board and also R. Baker who showed me through every part of the ship. I noticed them drilling boys, both with musket and cannon. I also saw them in school. From the quarter deck of this vessel you have a fine view of the French Steamer Frigate Gomar, and the English Frigate Warspite - both fine vessels. While on board, I went into the cabin where the Court Marshal was sitting. The officers were arranged around a table in the centre of the cabin to the number of 15 in full uniform. I left the frigate about 11 1/2 and after that went to see Mrs. Van Arsdale and remained there about 1/2 and hour and then came back to my boarding house. In the afternoon I took a walk through the city and in the evening went to Chatham Theatre to see Forrest and Mrs. Clifton play in Richelieu. I got to bed at 1 a.m.

25 August 1842. It was raining very hard when I got up, but in a short time cleared off warm. After breakfast, I went over to the Post Office, being almost sure of getting a letter either from Pa or Mr. Townsend, but was very much disappointed in not finding one. I then went down to the foot of Canal St. with the intention of going to Fort Lee about 10 miles up the river on the steamer Boston. She started on the appointed hour (10 o'clock) and instead of going up the river, she went down. On inquiring the cause, I found that she was going to take a barge in tow, then she would proceed on with her trip to Fort Lee. After making fast to the barge, she turned and went up for about a mile when she again stopped. And on asking the Captain what was the reason of the detention, he deliberately told us that he was going to leave the barge at this place and proceed again to New York, it being then too late to go up on account of his having to start again at 12 o'clock. So, about 20 other passengers, besides myself, were disappointed not having our trip, after having been kept on the river for an hour with the expectation of going up.

After I landed I went and took a saltwater bath and then returned to my boarding house. In the afternoon I went over again to the Post Office, but was again disappointed in not getting a letter. Afterwards, I took a walk around the park and then to my boarding [house] where I went up to my room and took a nap until about 5 1/2 o'clock when I went around to see Mrs. Van Arsdale, but she was out. After supper, I took a walk down to the Battery with the intention of visiting Castle Garden, but there being no performance there, I took a walk around the Battery and up to Mrs. Waldren's, when I in a short time went to bed. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 9 1/4 p.m.

26 August 1842. It was cloudy and occasionally raining through the day. I got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and went out to get breakfast at the refectory. I then went and got my valise, coat, etc. and went down to the foot of Barclay St. with the intention of going on board the steamer Albany for Albany, but when I got down there I found that there was no boat there and when making an inquiry, I found that she had not come down, having met with some accident. I thought I should have been disappointed in getting up the river, for they told me that there was no other boat, but in a short time found that there was another boat to go in her stead. From the foot of Cortland St., to which place I went and found the steamer Columbia in which I took passage.

We started at about 1/4 past 7 and had quite a quick trip to Albany, making it in about 10 hours, including stoppages, a distance of 145 miles. On our way up, we stopped at and passed a number of pretty towns among which were Peekskill, Newburgh, Hyde Park, Hudson, etc. On our arrival at Albany, I took a boat which conveyed us to Troy where I now am stopping at the "Troy House." I met with two gentlemen on board the boat, who I remained in company during the evening, and also took a walk with. Their names are Mr. Samuel Shore and Mr. J.B. Mason, both from Fall River, Massachusetts.

27 August 1842. I got up at about 6 a.m. and wrote a letter to Mr. William H. Bird of Philadelphia. After breakfast, I took a walk around town with Mr. Shore and Mr. Mason and then up in the hills back of the city, which gave us a fine view of the place and also Albany and the surrounding country. We then walked over to the part of the hill where the avalanche occurred some one or two years since, and then around to the hotel where I remained until about 1 o'clock when Mr. Shore and myself took a walk around to stoneware manufacturing. After we looked around there, we returned to the hotel, there being a heavy shower coming up from the SE In a short

time I got dinner. At about 3 p.m., I left Troy for Saratoga, had an unusual number of passengers on account of the New York Legislature having been invited by the managers of the railroad to visit Saratoga. There were 4 of them in the car that I was in and I was much amused with the jokes that they were continually telling. This railroad is inferior to any one that I have ever traveled on, both in regards to the laying of the rails and also the plan of the cars, the former being laid in loose billets of wood and the latter being nothing but common 4 wheel cars. The road is also very rough. The scenery is very beautiful. We passed over several branches of the Mohawk River and by the town of Lancingbury. We also passed through the towns of Waterford (4 miles from Troy), Vernam (12 miles from Troy), and Ballston (22 miles from Troy) - all very pretty places.

We arrived in Saratoga about 1/4 past 6 p.m. When you are about 6 miles from Saratoga, you have a fine view of the Green Mountains in Vermont. On our arrival at this place, I took board at "Congress Hall." A most magnificent house, it has a splendid piazza in front extending the whole length of the building with a covering over it supported by 17 columns, near 30 feet in height. The porch is about 225 feet long by 20 feet in width. It rained very hard during all the evening and I was not able to go out, although I was not at a loss for amusement by staying in, for I went into the parlour where there were about 20 ladies and as many more gentlemen. There was a game among some of them called "Fox and Geese," which created a great deal of amusement to those sitting around the room as well as to the participants. There was one little fellow - a Jew from New York - by the name of Solomon who kept the company in the parlour in a continual roar at his odd behavior and strange faces, as he was a little crazy. They had several other games, besides the above, which occasioned a great deal of fun, especially when Solomon was among them. There are but 3 Philadelphians at this house at present: Mr. Williams and Mr. and Miss Nevins. I got to bed at about 11 1/4 p.m.

28 August 1842. It poured rain all day until about 4 p.m. when it cleared off and the sun came out beautifully. This evening was clear and starlit. I got up this morning about 6 o'clock and after dressing, I took a walk down to the Congress Spring and took 4 glasses of water, but did not like the taste much. There were quite a number of persons down there among whom were Mr. Shore and Mr. Mason who I took a walk with as far as the circular railway. Then I went back to the hotel where I got breakfast. I remained in the house until about 11 o'clock when Mr. Mason and myself took a walk through the Union Hall, the American House, and the United States Hotel. They are all handsome hotels, especially the latter being the largest hotel I ever was in; it also had a very handsome garden connected to it.

After dinner I went down to the depot of the Albany railroad where I took passage from Albany. We started at about 1/2 past 3 p.m. and in about an hour and a half arrived in Schenectady (about 16 miles from Albany). Just after leaving this place, you ascend an inclined plane - its length being about 3/4 of a mile. You also descend another just before entering Albany. We arrived in Albany about 1/4 past 6 p.m. after a pleasant ride through a very pretty country, but it would have been much more pleasant if it had not rained. On my arrival in this place I went into the Railroad Hotel where I shall stay until morning when I will start for West Point. In the evening I attended the Universalist Church after not being able to find any other. The text was 2nd Peter, chapter 1, the last verse. I got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

29 August 1842. It was very foggy when I got up and continued so until about 9 a.m. I got up this morning about 1/2 past 5 a.m. and in a short time took breakfast. Then I got in the omnibus and went down to the steamer Troy in which I took passage for West Point. On our way down, we passed a number of towns among which were New Baltimore (west side), Kinderhook (east side), Coxsackie (west side), Hudson (east side), Catskill (west side). Just after leaving this place (Catskill), you have a fine view of the Catskill Mountains which are 3000 ft high. You also have a fine view of the Mountain House which is nearly on top of them.

Just after leaving Newburgh and upon entering the highlands, we had one of the most tremendous storms of hail and rain accompanied with thunder and lightning I ever saw. It continued until after we stopped at West Point and almost put me out of the notion of going ashore. But there were a number of ladies going, who of course made me think, if they ventured, I could. And, I am now very glad that I did, for upon landing I found that the cadets were to have their grand Annual Ball tonight and are also going to strike their tents tomorrow. And, what pleased me more than all, was to find a letter here which informed me where Pa and Ma had got to - it was the first I had heard from them since I missed them in Boston.

On my arrival at this place, after going up to the hotel, I walked around the cadet's cemetery and then around by the Professors' cottages to the Chapel and the Hall of Exercises. In the latter building I saw part of the chain that was stretched across here during the Revolution. I took a walk down around to Koskuzhos gate and then around to the seats in part of the camp to witness the evening parade.

After the parade I had supper. At about 9 p.m. I walked down to the Ball with Miss Elizabeth Sturgeon (of No. 40 Carmine St., New York), a young lady introduced to me by one of the cadets, formerly a resident of Philadelphia.

August 30 1842. I felt rather tired today on account of being up all last night at the Ball. It was a very fine affair. It kept up until 4 this morning when it was finished off with a jig dance, a waltz song, and three cheers by the male part of the company, of course, all the ladies having left. At about 1 a.m., we all went down to a supper in the refreshment room consisting of every luxury New York could afford. The decorations of the ballroom were splendid. After leaving the Ball about 4 a.m., I went up to the hotel and sat down on a chair, leaning my head on another, in which position I slept until the morning gun fired at 5 a.m. when I walked over to the camp and passed up and down with one guard until near breakfast time.

After breakfast, I walked over to the morning parade, after which I took a stroll over the Point with Miss Sturgeon and also up to Fort Putnam, from which we had a very fine view, being about 700 or 800 feet above the level of the river. After coming down from the Fort, we walked over to the encampment ground where we remained some time waiting to see them strike their tents. It was a beautiful sight for everything was done in such specified order. At about 12, the first tap of the drum was given when every man was at his post; at the second tap everything was loosened, and at the third every tent, amounting to 72, dropped as if it were by magic. In five minutes from the first tap of the drum, every camp had disappeared, no vestige of them remaining.

At about 3 p.m., I left the Point for New York. Miss S. also went down and I had the pleasure of waiting upon her down. We arrived in New York about 6 1/2 p.m. and after seeing her home, I went up to my boarding house where I got tea. After tea, I went around to Mrs. Van Arsdale's but she was out. I came back and went to bed.

31 August 1842. I got up at about 5 1/2 a.m. and was much hurried in dressing, for I wished to start for Philadelphia on the 6 o'clock boat. I however got down just in time. I left New York at about 6 a.m. and after a very pleasant trip of almost 7 hours arrived in Philadelphia. I took a cab and went up home where I found all well. I remained in the house in the afternoon and in the evening I was out with Sam Milligan for a while. I was gone just 22 days on my excursion.

SEPTEMBER

1 September 1842. It was a clear and delightful day, but rather warm. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 was at 71 degrees, at 3 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 70 degrees.

I was at the office all day. I spent the evening at Mrs. Edward Roberts' on Spruce St. I got up this morning at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

2 September 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 71 degrees, at 1/4 of 3 p.m. 81 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 73 degrees.

I was at the office all day and I spent the evening down at Miss Berry's. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

3 September 1842. It was clear and very pleasant until towards evening when it clouded over and we had several heavy showers of rain. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 72 degrees, and at 2 1/2 p.m. 82 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

4 September 1842. It was cloudy all day with the wind from the SE. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 73 degrees, at 4 p.m. 72 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 72 degrees.

I was at St. Phillip's Church both in the morning and afternoon. In the evening I went down to Trinity Church with Sam Milligan. Mr. Coleman preached from the 4th chapter of Job, verses 6 to 8. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

5 September 1842. It was cloudy all day and evening with occasional showers. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 72 degrees, at 2 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 73 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I walked down to see Miss Alice Chalenor, but found they had moved. I then walked around to see Miss Shankland, but she was out. I then walked to Mr. Hanly's new store, where I remained sitting for about half an hour talking Dr. Dickey. I started to go up home, but when I got as far as 2nd St., I met Dave Weatherly who persuaded me to go down to see Mrs. Berry with him. We remained there until about 10 p.m. when we came up home. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

6 September 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the NE until this afternoon when it got around to the NW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 71 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 73 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 68 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home. Mr. Elliott spent the evening. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

7 September 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 73 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. 72 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was down to see Sam Milligan, but he was not in. I then went around to Bill Hanly's and remained there the rest of the evening. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

8 September 1842. It was cloudy all day and evening with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 68 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 79 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. 71 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I attended a meeting of the American Institute. I got up at 20 m. of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

9 September 1842. It was cloudy all day until about 4 1/2 p.m. when it cleared off. The wind was S.W The thermometer at 6 1/4 a.m. was at 73 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 80 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. 68 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at a meeting with Dave Weatherly until 9 p.m. when we took a walk down Chestnut St. I got up at 5 3/4 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

10 September 1842. It was cloudy all day and the wind was from the NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 63 degrees.

I was at the office during the morning. In the afternoon, Dave Weatherly and myself went out agunning. We went down Broad St. and over the meadows as far as League Island and then upon it. I got home about 8 p.m. and only shot about 18 birds, not getting them all at that. I remained in the house during the rest of the evening, except about 20 minutes I took to go down after my new boots. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

11 September 1842. It was cloudy all day and the evening was clear. The wind was from the S. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at 4 p.m. 76 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 73 degrees.

I was at home all day, not being able to go out on the account of rubbing the skin off my heels so much that I could not bear my boots on. In the evening I went out to walk up to Grace Church with Ma and Lydia. Mr. Suddards preached from the 4th chapter of 1st Samuel, verse 21. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

12 September 1842. It was clear and warm all day and evening with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 74 degrees, at 2 1/4 p.m. 85 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. 79 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home. Ma and Mrs. Roberts spent the evening here, and Anna and Elizabeth spent the evening and took tea with us. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

13 September 1842. Yesterday was my 18th birthday. Today was cloudy and warm with the wind from the WSW until towards evening when it got around to the NW when it got much cooler. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 76 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 84 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 69 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home reading. Mr. Campbell spent part of the evening here. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

14 September 1842. It was cloudy and it rained most of the day. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. and 2 1/2 p.m. was at 65 degrees and at 10 p.m. 64 degrees. It poured rain all the evening.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home reading. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 25 m. past 10 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was still raining.

15 September 1842. It was cloudy all day and rainy with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. and 10 1/2 p.m. was at 63 degrees, and at 2 p.m. 70 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the Rhetorical Academy" with Louisa Wood and Lydia. They played "Rent Day and it was the first performance of the season. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. At 10 1/2 p.m. it was still cloudy.

16 September 1842. It was cloudy all day with rain in the morning. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 61 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 68 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. 63 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I attended a Whig meeting held in the room formerly occupied by the Chinese Museum at the corner of 9th and George St. The meeting was exceedingly well attended and was addressed by Messieurs Morton M. Michael, William B. Reed, Josiah Randall, Gilpin (from Wilmington, Delaware), Chas. Gibbons, Gen. Smith, Fay, and a gentleman from Ohio whose name I do not remember. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

17 September 1842. It was clear and delightful all day and the evening was moonlit. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 58 degrees, at 2 p.m. 70 degrees, and at 8 p.m. 64 degrees.

I was at the office during the morning. In the afternoon, William H. Bird and myself took a walk down to the Point House and from the Point House to League Island and from League Island up home by way of Broad St. I had my gun with me and shot 3 birds. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

18 September 1842. It was clear, cool and delightful all day. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 61 degrees, at 12 1/2 p.m. 71 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. 63 degrees.

I was at Grace Church both in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Suddards preached in the morning from the 10th chapter of Hebrews, verses 28 & 29. An African missionary preached in the afternoon. This was the second Sunday that our church has opened since the painting and repairing of it. In the evening I was down at Trinity Church with Sam Milligan and Mr. Coleman preached. I got up at 10 m. past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

19 September 1842. It was clear most of the day, but we had two light showers. This evening was moonlit. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 61 degrees, at 2 p.m. 68 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 58 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home. Lydia, Gainor, Tacy & Sarah Roberts, Aunt Lydia Jones, Mr. & Mrs. Edward Roberts and Elizabeth Roberts spent the evening here. This morning at about 2 a.m. we were awakened by ringing at the door and upon looking found that Grandma was in a carriage at the door much to our astonishment. She has been five days and a half coming on. I got up this morning at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

20 September 1842. It was a clear, cool, and delightful day. This evening was clear and moonlit. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 53 degrees, at 2 p.m. 63 degrees, and at 1/4 of 10 p.m. 57 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I went up to Mr. Berry Clark's for Grandma about half past seven. I then came home and went down to the Post Office to put a letter from Gandma to Dr. Harrison when I returned and went home with Miss Julia Gaff, who had been spending the evening here. Mr. Elliott and Mrs. Elliot also spent the evening here partly. We had a slight fall of snow yesterday about 1/2 past 12 p.m. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

21 September 1842. It was cloudy on and off all day with a short shower of rain both in the morning and afternoon. The wind was SW until towards evening when it got around to the NW and cleared off quite cool. The evening was moonlit. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 52 degrees, at 2 p.m. 68 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 65 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was out with Dave Weatherly. We were at Berry's and Shankland's, but neither were in. Then we took a rather long walk about one place or another. Old Mrs. Johnson spent the day here. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

22 September 1842. It was clear and cool all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 49 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 57 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. 49 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at a meeting of the American Institute. I had on an overcoat for the first time this season this evening and found it quite comfortable. Ma had a fire made in her room this morning, being too cold to sit without one -- it was the first that we had this season. I took a walk yesterday morning out to Fairmount, crossed on the wire bridge and down on the other side to Market St. and then in town with Dave Weatherly Jr. I got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

23 September 1842. It was clear and cold all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 43 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 58 degrees, and at 10 p.m. it was at 52 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home. Miss Mary Ann Alrich from Wilmington and Miss Buckly of 224 Race St. spent the afternoon and evening here and took tea with us. Louisa Wood was also here. I got up at 25 m. of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m. There was a very heavy frost this morning, as I was told by a countryman. Bill Hanly arrived here from Halifax today by way of Baltimore.

24 September 1842. It was clear and cool all day. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 46 degrees, at 2 p.m. 63 degrees.

I was at the office during the morning. In the afternoon, Dave Weatherly Jr. and myself walked up as far as the Falls of the Schuylkill, when I jumped on a canal boat and rode up as far as Manayunk, and he walked up. When we got there, I expected to ride home in the Cars but found the last train had started, so we had to walk in. We accomplished the walk in about 2 hours and a quarter. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at half past 10 p.m.

25 September 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 54 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 62 degrees, at 10 p.m. 56 degrees.

I was at Grace Church both in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Suddards preached in the morning from the 7th chapter of Joshua, verse 13 and in the afternoon from the 119 Psalm, verse 71. This evening I was at Trinity Church with Samuel Milligan. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 25 m. past 10 p.m. At 10 p.m. it was clear and cool.

26 September 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 52 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 65 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 58 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I walked down to the Democratic meeting with Dave Weatherly where we remained a while. When we went down to make Miss Shankland a visit, She not being in, we walked down to Miss S. Coates', and also another lady was there. On our return home, we stopped for a while at the meeting. We had a fire (in the grate) in the back office today for the first time this season. I got up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 25 m. of 11 p.m.

27 September 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day. The wind was NW but got around to the SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 53 degrees, at 2 p.m. 69 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 61 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at Miss Berry's until about 1/4 of 9 p.m. when I went around to the cousins' on 9th St. where I remained until 1/4 past 9, when I came home. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m. This evening was clear and pleasant.

28 September 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 56 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 72 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 65 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I went down to Bill Hanly's and remained there a short time and took a walk around. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m. There was ice made last Friday night as thick as window glass near Wilmington.

29 September 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day with the wind from the NE & E. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 59 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 73 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 62 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In this evening I went with Dave Weatherly to see Miss Gauman and remained there a short time and then we went around to the "American Institute" where I remained until 1/4 past 10 p.m. when I came home leaving Dave there. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

30 September 1842. It was cloudy with the wind from the SE until towards the latter part of the afternoon when it cleared off and got around to the SW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 60 degrees, at 2 p.m. 68 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 61 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I walked up as far as Broad and Chestnut St. with Dave Weatherly. We then went down to Miss Coates', where we remained the rest of the evening. There were several other gentlemen and ladies there besides ourselves. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

OCTOBER

1 October 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 65 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 70 degrees, and at 9 p.m. 63 degrees.

I was at the office during the morning. In the afternoon I took a walk down to the Navy Yard with William Bird and in the evening I took a walk down to Second St. as far as John St. with Dave Weatherly and then up home again. I got up at 10 m. of 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. At 10 1/2 p.m. it was clear and starlit.

2 October 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day and evening with the wind from the WSW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 61 degrees, and at 3 p.m. 71 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon and Mr. Suddards preached both times. In the evening I went down to Trinity Church with Sam Milligan and William Hanly. Mr. Neville preached. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

3 October 1842. It was clear until towards noon when it clouded over and rained a little in the evening. The wind was NW and SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 55 degrees, at 2 p.m. 71 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 61 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home reading. Miss Fisher and Miss Webb spent part of the evening here. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

4 October 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day and evening with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 53 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 57 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at the Athenaeum reading Blackstone.(12) Mr. Elliott spent part of the evening here. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

5 October 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 49 degrees, at 2 p.m. 63 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at a Whig meeting held on Chestnut St. opposite the State House. John M. Clayton addressed the meeting throughout. Mrs. Reiford took dinner with us today. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 25 m. past 10 p.m.

6 October 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 46 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 59 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 51 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at the Athenaeum until about 9 p.m. when I went up to Mrs. Edward Roberts' for Lydia, she having been up there to tea. I got up at 10 m. past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

7 October 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day. The wind was NE for a while but it afterwards got around to the SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 47 degrees, at 2 p.m. 62 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was down at Bill Hanly's until about 1/2 past 8 when we walked down to the other store and remained there a while. Then we went down to Miss Shankland's and she not being in, we walked down to Miss Coates' where we remained about an hour and then came up home. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 5 m. of 11 p.m.

8 October 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day and evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 52 degrees, at 2 p.m. 66 degrees, and 9 p.m. 59 degrees.

I was at the office during the morning. In the afternoon, William H. Bird and myself started at 3 o'clock and walked to Laurel Hill which occupied an hour and a half, and remained there half an hour. We started at 5 p.m. precisely, walking the 5 miles in one hour. In the evening I walked up to the Third St. tannery with Cecilia Erwin and left her there and then walked down Second St. below Queen to a Whig meeting and then up to another before the Mansion House on 3rd St. near Walnut St. I remained there a while and then went home. Mrs. Reiford took dinner with us today. I got up at 6 a.m. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

9 October 1842. It was cloudy all day, but cleared off in the evening. The wind SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 59 degrees, at 2 p.m. 67 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 60 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and Mr. Suddards preached. In the afternoon I was at St. Phillip's Church and Mr. Neville preached. In the evening I was at Grace Church with Sarah Roberts and Mr. Suddards preached. The church was very full and crowded. I got up at quarter past 6 a.m. and got to bed at half past 10 p.m.

10 October 1842. It was cloudy all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 52 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 54 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the Athenaeum reading Blackstone until 20 minutes past 9 when I walked down Chestnut St. and met Dave Weatherly and took a walk around for a few squares and then went home. I got up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

11 October 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 48 degrees, at 1 p.m. 64 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. 57 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening, Dave Weatherly called for me and we took a stroll together down to the Election Ground on Chestnut St, and then down 2nd St. to Southwark Election Ground where we remained a short time when we came up and stopped for Bill Hanly. We took a regular stroll around until after 10 p.m. when we went home. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

12 October 1842. It was clear and delightful all day and the evening was moonlit. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 8 a.m. was at 61 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 67 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 57 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was down at the Athenaeum until 9 p.m. reading Blackstone when I went down to Bill Hanly's and I remained there about 1 1/4 hours and then I came home. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

13 October 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening with the wind from the WSW. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 51 degrees, at 1 p.m. 63 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 57 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I attended a meeting of the American Institute to hear a debate on the subject of whether the Christian Minister is doing his duty when lecturing against Roman Catholic persecution. It was warmly argued on both sides and no conclusion was reached. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 20 m. of 10 p.m.

14 October 1842. It was cloudy most of the day with the wind from the S. The thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. was at 47 degrees, at 1 p.m. 67 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 60 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at the Athenaeum reading Blackstone. It commenced raining this evening at about 8 o'clock and continued throughout the evening. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

15 October 1842. It was cloudy on and off all day without rain until about 1/2 past 6 p.m. when it commenced and continued until 7 and then cleared off beautifully. The evening was clear and moonlit. The wind was WSW and the thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 53 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 61 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 51 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was out strolling about with Samuel Milligan until about 9 o'clock when I came home. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

16 October 1842. It was clear and delightful all day and evening with the wind from the SSW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 47 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 63 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 56 degrees.

I was at the Baptist Church on Sansom St. this morning with Grandma and Mr. Breck preached. In the afternoon I was at Grace Church and Mr. Suddards preached. In the evening I was at Trinity Church with Bill Hanly and Sam Milligan and Mr. Coleman preached. After church we walked down to Miss Snell's to see how Mrs. T. Snell is, as she has not been expected to live for a few days. We did not go in there, but remained at the door talking with Priscilla and then came up home.

Just after getting home from church this afternoon, Uncle Lloyd Jones stopped at the door and informed us of the death of Aunt Nancy Warner. She died this afternoon about 4 p.m. and had been sick for several weeks. I got up at 20 minutes of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 20 m. past 11 p.m.

17 October 1842. It was a clear and delightful day and this evening was moonlit. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 53 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 64 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I called down for Sam Milligan. We both went to Miss Coates' (but taking a stroll around previous to going). I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m. We had a fire in the grate in the parlour for the first time this season today.

18 October 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day and in the evening until between 9 and 10 p.m. when it clouded over and at about 10 commenced raining. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 53 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 71 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 60 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the Athenaeum reading Blackstone until about 9 p.m. when I left and took a walk down as far as Paschall & Bedlock's office where I sat talking until near 10 when I came home. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

19 October 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day and evening with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 53 degrees, at 12 p.m. 57 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 51 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I walked down to the Post Office to put a letter in for Grandma. I then walked over to the office and found Weatherly and Bird there. I went in a while and then we went down to William Hanly's and I remained the rest of the evening with him when Sam and I went home. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

20 October 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. and 10 1/2 p.m. was at 45 degrees, and at 1 1/2 p.m. 53 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at a meeting of the American Institute. The subject of the debate was the same as last week: whether the Christian Minister is doing his duty when lecturing against Roman Catholic persecution. It was warmly contested on both sides throughout the evening and was still going on when I left at 10 minutes past 10 p.m. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

21 October 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 40 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. 54 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I walked down to see Bill Hanly at 7th St. and Lombard where I remained with him until near 8 p.m. when both of us went down to Miss Shankland's. We remained there a short time and then went down to Miss Coates' where we spent the rest of the evening very pleasantly. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

22 October 1842. It was cloudy all day and at about 6 1/2 a.m. it commenced raining and continued to so throughout the morning. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 45 degrees, at 2 p.m. 58 degrees, and at 9 p.m. 53 degrees.

I was at the office all day until about 1/2 past 4 p.m. when I took a walk up and down Chestnut St. and then home. In the evening, I was at home reading Blackstone. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

23 October 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 53 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 59 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 51 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon and Mr. Suddards preached both times. After church, in the afternoon, I took a walk up and down Chestnut St. with Thomas Gillespie. In the evening I attended St. Philip's Church with Sarah Roberts and Mr. Spear preached. After church I accompanied her home, and then Lydia Roberts who took tea at our house. In the evening I went to church with Pa, Ma, Lydia, and Grandma. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

24 October 1842. It was clear and pleasant until towards the latter part of the afternoon when it clouded over and at about 9 1/2 p.m. commenced raining. The wind was SE. The wind at 7 a.m. was at 47 degrees, at 2 p.m. 68 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 61 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening, cousins Lydia, Tacy and Sarah Roberts came around here with the intention of going up to Mrs. May Roberts' with us, but it looked so much like rain that they concluded not to go. But Sarah and I went up and spent the evening there. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

25 October 1842. It rained all day. The wind was SE in the morning but towards afternoon it got around to the NW and in the evening it cleared off a little. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 61 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 58 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 52 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at the office writing for Papa until about 10 p.m. when I came up home. Dave Weatherly and Bill Bird were also there. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

26 October 1842. It was clear and pleasant but cool all day and evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 45 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 54 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 47 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at the Athenaeum reading Blackstone until 1/2 past 8 p.m. when I went down to Bill Hanly's and remained there until half past 9 and then came home. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

27 October 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 43 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 55 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 41 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the Franklin Institute exhibition at which I met Augustus Mayor and I remained in his company most of the evening and after we left I took a stroll around with him. Lydia went up to West Chester with Mr. Campbell today. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

28 October 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 41 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 54 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I walked down to the office with the intention of reading there, but after waiting half an hour found that Weatherly did not come. I walked down to Miss Coates' where I met Alfred Peterson. I remained there a short time and then all of us went around to Miss Lisle's and we remained there about an hour and then walked back to the Coates'. I got up at 6 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

29 October 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening. The wind was from the NNE. in the morning, but afterwards got around to the E.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I went down to the Athenaeum until about 1/4 of 9 p.m. reading Blackstone's Commentaries. After I walked down as far as the office with the expectation of finding Dave Weatherly there, but was disappointed and then came up home. I got up at quarter past 6 a.m. and got to bed at quarter past 10 p.m. (The thermometer stood today at 7 a.m. 43 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 56 degrees and at 9 p.m. 51 degrees.)

30 October 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day. The wind was ENE. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 47 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 54 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 47 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning. Henry Borden took dinner with us today and in the afternoon he and I took a walk down as far as the Old Swede's Church(13) which we attended. Mr. Clay preached. In the evening I was down at Trinity Church with William Hanly and Mr. Coleman preached. After church, he and I went home with Miss Shankland and Miss Coates. We went in and sat a while when we were accompanied by Dave Weatherly who we met at Miss Coates'. After I came up home. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

31 October 1842. It was cloudy and kind of hazy all day. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 46 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 53 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 44 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was down at the office reading Blackstone with Dave Weatherly until about 8 o'clock when he proposed we go to Miss Shankland's where we went. We found two of the Miss Coatses, Miss Lisle, and several gentlemen there. We spent the rest of the evening very pleasantly. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

NOVEMBER

1 November 1842. It was cloudy all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 43 degrees, at 1 p.m. 56 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 50 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the Athenaeum reading Blackstone until about 1/4 past 8 when I went up to Mrs. Suddards' for Grandma and Lydia - they had taken tea there. I found quite a number in the room upon entering and was much surprised, as I was not dressed, having on my thick overcoat and none underneath so as I could take it off. I however spent the remainder of the evening there. William H. Bird's brother John started today in the ship to sail for Liverpool and then back. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

2 November 1842. It was rather misty or cloudy all day and evening with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 47 degrees, at 1 p.m. 56 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 50 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at the office with David Weatherly and William H. Bird. Weatherly was reading Blackstone, Bird was writing a deed for himself and I was copying my notes from Blackstone. We left there at 1/2 past 8 and went up to Howell's on Cherry St. near 4th for Grandma and Lydia, they having spent the afternoon and taken tea there. I got up at quarter of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

3 November 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day with the wind from the NE. The thermometer at 6 1/2 a.m. was at 41 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 50 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 43 degrees.

I was at the office all day. I spent the evening at the girls' on 9th St. - Ma, Pa, Grandma, and Lydia were also there, Grandma having taken Ma there. Mrs. Elliott's sister Mrs. Butler was married today in Quaker Meeting. I got up at 6 a.m. and went down to the office to get a breast pin which I had dropped there last night. I got to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

4 November 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day but cool. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 50 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 44 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I walked down to the lecture of the Mercantile Library Company with Miss Mary Cuthbert and Tacy Roberts. Ma and Mrs. Jones were with Algernon Roberts. I left them there and went up to Mrs. Mary Roberts'. I remained there until quarter past 8 when I went home and then down to the lecture for Miss Cuthbert and the rest of them and then I went home. This was the first lecture of the season. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

5 November 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 6 a.m. was at 41 degrees.

I got up at quarter of 6 a.m., got breakfast, and went to the steamer Robert Morris, on board of which I took passage for Wilmington, Delaware. I arrived there after a pleasant trip at about 1/4 past 9. I met Henry Borden and took a walk up to the place where they were roasting the ox, as there is to be a great meeting of the Whigs today and this ox is roasting to from part of the dinner of which they are to partake. After looking around about the grounds for a while, I walked over to Dr. Gibbons' and remained there for a short time. I then walked down to the depot to march up with the Philadelphia Delegation, which we did until we got so dusted that we gave it up.

After leaving the procession, I walked down to Mr. Dunnot's to see his daughters and Mrs. Luff - it was very much a pleasure with both the daughters and particularly the youngest as she was both amiable and pretty. After a great deal of persuasion, they got us to remain with them to eat dinner. After dinner, I walked out to the grounds on which the meeting was held, in the company of Miss C. Dunnot, her sister, Miss Clark, and several others. We obtained seats for them in a carriage where they remained during the continuance of the meeting. John M. Clayton spoke for 4 hours which prevented many others from speaking whose intention it was to do so. I left the grounds at about 5 and accompanied the Miss D.s home and then walked to Mrs. Ringgold's, the place where Henry Borden is boarding, and took supper.

After supper, Henry went out, having a little engagement to fill, and I remained sitting a while listening to Mrs. R.'s daughter and some other young lady sing some very pretty songs. After, I walked up to see Mrs. Adrich and daughters where I remained until 9 p.m., Henry having called in the meantime. After leaving them, I went down to Mr. Dunnot's again to obtain a letter which Mrs. Luff wished me to take up to the City for her. When after accompanying Luff around to a dry-good store on Market St., I went down to Mrs. Ringgold's again where I remained until 1/2 past 10, when I walked down to the depot.

I sat down and fell asleep until 1/2 past 12 when I found the cars were near at hand. I then got a good strong cup of coffee and a piece of bread and butter and then I jumped on the cars. I fell asleep and at about 1/2 past 3 a.m., I found myself in the City again after spending a delightful day throughout in company of the ladies. I got to bed at 1/4 of 4 a.m.

6 November 1842. It was cloudy and hazy most of the day with the wind to the SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 46 degrees, at 1 p.m. 61 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 51 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and Mr. Suddards preached. In the afternoon I was at home until 1/4 of 4 p.m. when I took a letter which I brought from Wilmington for Mrs. Luff to Edward P. Borden. After leaving the letter I went up to Grace Church and heard the sermon. After Church I took a walk down Chestnut St. as far as 3rd and then I went home. In the evening, I was down at Trinity Church with William Hanly. After Church I walked home with Miss Coates. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

7 November 1842. It was cloudy all day with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 47 degrees, at 2 p.m. 60 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 55 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home until about 8 o'clock reading Blackstone part of the time, when I went up to Mr. Berry Clark's for Grandma. Mrs. Eliza Jones and her son Warner spent the evening here. It commenced raining about 1/2 past 9 p.m. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 25 m. of 11 p.m.

8 November 1842. It was cloudy and rainy until towards afternoon when it cleared off. The wind was NE, but afterwards it got around to the NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. and 10 1/2 p.m. was at 51 degrees, and at 1 1/2 p.m. it was at 53 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at the first lecture of the season of the Athenian Institute with Sarah Roberts. Dr. Ludlow delivered the first of four consecutive lectures on Palestine. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. It was moonlit the principal part of the evening.

9 November 1842. It was cloudy all day and it rained about the middle of the day. It cleared off cold in the evening and was moonlit. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 51 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 58 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. it was at 41 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I went out with William Hanly until about 8 o'clock when we parted and I went up and paid Miss Berry a visit and then came home which was about 1/2 past 9. I read Dickens' Sketches on America until half past 10 p.m. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

10 November 1842. It was cloudy in the early part of the morning but it cleared off beautifully about 10 a.m. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 59 degrees, at 2 p.m. 49 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 43 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home reading Dickens' new work on America until about 6 o'clock when Mr. & Mrs. Roberts and Elizabeth and Anna Roberts came in. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

11 November 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day and evening with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 40 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 52 degrees, and at 12 1/2 a.m. 42 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at a party given by Mrs. Edith Prichett at the corner of 8th and Spruce St. for Miss Edith Baily from Wilmington, Delaware and Mrs. Van Arsdale from New York City. I accompanied Miss Adaline Graff and Miss Sarah Roberts there. I spent a delightful evening and everything passed off with great eclat -- every person seemed to enjoy themselves and there was a subject of remark throughout the room how much Miss E. Baily contributed to the general pleasure of the guests by introducing them to each other. She is as accomplished and beautiful a young lady as I know of anywhere and does honor to her native City in regard to beauty and intellect, if she may be judged as a specimen. I got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 m. past 1 a.m.

12 November 1842. It was cloudy all day and rainy. The wind from the NE, but finally after changing several times got around to the S. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 41 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. 45 degrees, and at 8 p.m. 44 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home reading Dickens' Notes on America. I was up at 20 m. of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 9 p.m.

13 November 1842. Today was clear and pleasant, but cool. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 41 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 49 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 44 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and evening and Mr. Suddards preached both times. In the afternoon I was at St. Phillip's Church and Mr. Neville preached. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m. It was clear in the early part of the evening but afterwards got cloudy.

14 November 1842. It was cloudy all day and it rained through the middle of the day. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 39 degrees, at 2 p.m. 47 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 45 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home reading. I finished up Dickens' work on America. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m. It was clear and moonlit through the greater part of the evening.

15 November 1842. It was clear through the early part of the morning but it clouded over towards noon and it remained so through the rest of the day and evening. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 39 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. 47 degrees, and at 11 p.m. 42 degrees. The wind was NW.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at Welch's Olympic Circus on Chestnut St. below 9th on the south side with William H. Bird. Ma and Grandma took tea and spent the evening up at Mrs. Elizabeth Roberts' and Papa went up after supper. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

16 November 1842. It was cloudy, damp, and drizzling rain all day and evening. There was a slight fall of snow before daylight this morning - it was the first snow that we have had this season. The wind was NNE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 38 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. and 11 p.m. 41 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at the office writing for Mr. Elliott and also for myself. Dave Weatherly and William H. Bird were also there during the evening. I got up at 6 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m.

17 November 1842. It rained all day and evening. The wind was ENE. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 41 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. 47 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 49 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home until 7 1/2 p.m. when I went down to put a letter in the Post Office for Dr. Harrison containing the will of William Warner. Then I went to the Athenaeum and read Blackstone until 9 1/2 p.m. Kenneth Jewell came to the office for the 1st time yesterday. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

18 November 1842. It was cloudy in the early part of the morning, but it soon clouded off cold. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 49 degrees, at 2 p.m. 43 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 34 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the Athenaeum reading until 9 p.m. when I went up to Mr. Edward Roberts' for Grandma who had taken tea and spent the evening there. It is freezing in the gutters tonight - the first ice that has been made this season in the City. I had my daguerreotype likeness taken today. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 m. of 11 p.m.

19 November 1842. It was clear and very cold all day and evening; it was by far the coldest day that we have had this season - the gutters were all frozen up to a thickness of half an inch. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 29 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 1/4 of 11 p.m. 31 degrees. The wind was W.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I went up to see Mr. Chas Elliott Jr. for some business with Dave Weatherly. After leaving there we went up to see Mr. Elliott, but he not being in, we went down to the office and remained there a short time. We then went down to Miss Coates' where we met Miss Elizabeth Mercer. We remained there a short time and then went home with Miss Mercer. On the way up home a fire broke out at 3rd and Gaskill St, where we stopped until it was extinguished. We then came up home. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

20 November 1842. It was clear and cold all day and there was plenty of ice. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 27 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 10 1/4 p.m. 37 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and Mr. Suddards preached. In the afternoon we were at St. Luke's Church and Mr. Spear preached. After church, we took a walk out Walnut St. with Harry Huber. This evening I was at Trinity Church with Dave Weatherly and Bishop Onderdonk preached. After church Dave and I went home with the Misses Coates. We met Al Peterson, Al Cooper and Miss Elizabeth Mercer there. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed 10 m. of 11 p.m. This evening was moonlit.

21 November 1842. It was cloudy most of the day and the evening was clear. The wind was W. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 29 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 31 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 29 degrees. For the past three days we have had in this vicinity a real old-fashioned winter weather. Ice was made to the thickness of half an inch in some places, on Friday night. Saturday and yesterday were also cold and ice in the shade could be seen at every point. On Saturday all the cloaks and overcoats were drawn from their summer retreats and mounted upon the shoulders of the owners, and yesterday and today their use was still required. In New York and the East there has also been regular winter weather. Snow has fallen recently in Concord, NH, in several places in Ohio, Quebec, Buffalo, and at other points completing a large circle around New York. What was rain here on Thursday last was snow in the Catskill Mountains.

This evening I was at the Athenaeum reading. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 m. of 11 p.m.

22 November 1842. It was clear and cold all day and evening with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 27 degrees, at 2 p.m. 35 degrees, and at 11 p.m. 30 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at a musical and intellectual entertainment for the benefit of the Jefferson Total Abstinence Society held at the museum saloon at 9th and George St. I was in company with Harry Huber and Geo. Cope most of the evening. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

23 November 1842. It was clear and pleasant all day and it commenced raining about 12 a.m. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 27 degrees, at 2 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 12 a.m. 36 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at the office writing for Papa. Sarah and Tacy Roberts and Gainor Roberts were here to tea and spent the evening. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 1 a.m.

24 November 1842. It was clear all day and pleasant with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. 41 degrees, and at 1 1/2 a.m. 32 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at a party given by Mr. and Mrs. Burroughs It was a magnificent affair and everything passed off with great eclat. There were about 60 or 70 persons there and everyone seemed to be enjoying themselves. For my part, I was much pleased with the party and enjoyed myself much. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 2 a.m.

25 November 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 30 degrees. I was at the office all day and in the evening

I was in the office writing for Mr. Elliott until 20 m. of 12 p.m. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 12.

26 November 1842. It was clear all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 32 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 35 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at the office until about 1/2 past 8 writing, when I took a walk round with Dave Weatherly. I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

27 November 1842. It was clear, cold, and very windy all day with the exception of a short time early in the morning when it snowed very hard for a short time. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 9 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 34 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 26 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. In the evening I was at Trinity Church with Sam Milligan and William Hanly. After church I went up to Mrs. Roberts' at 11th and Spruce St. - Mama, Papa, Grandma, and Lydia were there. I got up at 9 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

28 November 1842. It was clear and cold all day and evening and the wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 22 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 31 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 25 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I went down to William Hanly's where I remained until near 8 when I walked down to Miss Elizabeth Mercer's and spent the rest of the evening there. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m. Today was the coldest of the season.

29 November 1842. It was clear and cold until near afternoon when it clouded over. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 22 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 27 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the Athenaeum lecture with Miss Elizabeth Mercer. Dr. Ludlow lectured on "The Poetry of Palestine."

I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m. Old winter has come - alack! How icy and cold is he. Early on Sunday morning the wind came out strong from the NW and though not very cold at first, it gradually grew colder until yesterday when the mercury nestled closely beside zero in some places, and from its crouching and shivering appearance was not very comfortable even there. The streets are coated with ice wherever there is waste water. The atmosphere is full of snow. All the slackwater streams are frozen over. And, the ladies noses are red, and apparently as crisp as a cherry radish. Our almanac to the contrary notwithstanding, there is abundance of evidence that "Old Hoay Head" has anticipated his usual coming and is now actually upon us, without much prospect for abatement.

30 November 1842. The winter has come. The City today presents a dreary look. The clouds are dense, the air chilly, and snow fell very fast from 10 a.m. until about 4 p.m. when it turned to rain. There were however some sleighs out. The Delaware is filled with floating ice and the boats have been compelled to stop running to Burlington and Bristol. Everything has suddenly assumed its winter appearance. From its present appearance, the Delaware will soon close, as it is badly obstructed by ice. The docks are rather bare of shipping, yet more than the usual quantity remain for this period of the year. There are larger quantities of running ice opposite the City and the ferry boats have hard work at some parts of the day. The wind throughout the day has been NE. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 25 degrees, at 2 p.m. 31 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 31 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home reading. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at quarter past 10 p.m. It has now stopped raining.

DECEMBER

1 December 1842. It was cloudy all day and very bad walking. The wind was WNW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 30 degrees, at 2 p.m. 35 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 32 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at home reading, as I was not very well.

Yesterday was a regular out and out old-fashioned winter's day. It commenced snowing at about 10 a.m. and continued throughout the day. At 3 or 4 o'clock in the afternoon, it had accumulated to the depth of 3 or 4 inches on the ground, after which it did not make very fast, being intermixed with hail. It is cold and a finer bottom for a good sleighing snow could not well be created. Two inches more of snow without rain will give the young folks fine opportunity for fun. Indeed, they had it yesterday - in every direction the windows were seen with sled cord in hand, splitting it after the vehicles as they passed, lustily crying out for a "hitch". Their laughing eyes and rosy cheeks telling how much of pleasure and health they enjoyed. We want no better evidence that a man possesses a soul, loves his wife (if he has one), and pays his debts, than his treatment to a lad who come to him for a "tow". None but the selfish, at such an appeal, can forget the happy days of his own youth, and would not wish to banish its recollection by turning his back and a deaf ear to the buoyant, laughing youth at his heels. Besides these, elder brothers were enjoying much sport in the market places and school yards, belting each other with snowballs. Towards evening, some few of the more ardent "anticipated their time" and were out on runners, behind the jingling of bells. The old folks, and those who have tested the varieties of all the patent cures for colds and consumption, were thickly crowding around in the several wonders of waterproof shoes. It was a cloudy day but, so far from being accompanied with gloom, it brightened up everything exposed to its peltings.

No little gloom was cast over our City this afternoon by the intelligence of the death of Mr. Henry Morris, the High Sheriff of the County - the particulars of which will be found in the papers of tomorrow. Mr. Morris was much esteemed and respected, and had discharged the duties of his public station with fidelity and entire satisfaction to the community. He was elected a little more than a year ago by an unusually large vote, a tribute as well to his high social qualities as to the historical and patriotic associations connected with his name. The citizens of Philadelphia, almost without distinction of party, were glad to honor the memory of Robert Morris in the person of his son. He had shown himself worthy of the honor. Everyone who heard of the sudden demise of Mr. Morris seemed to feel not merely the solemnity of the event, but deep and unfeigned sorrow for his loss. The only court in session at the time, was the ander and Terminer(14) , which was engaged in the trial of young Alexander. A suitable expression of regret and respect for the memory of the deceased was there made by the Court, the Attorney General, and the counsel for the prisoner. I got up this morning at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

2 December 1842. It was clear and very pleasant and warm all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 33 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 31 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at a lecture of the Mercantile Library Association. Levi Woodbury lectured on the subject of Some of the uncertainties of History, their evils and their cure. I went with Miss Mary Cuthbert, Sarah and Tacy Roberts, Algernon Roberts and his wife. I got up at 8 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

3 December 1842. It was clear and very pleasant all day and evening, but there was very bad walking on account of the great thaw. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 33 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 41 degrees, and at 9 p.m. 37 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I walked up with Ma to buy a pair of gloves on 10th St. above Race. From the shop, we went to cousins on 9th St. We remained there a short time and then went to Aunt Lydia Jones' and we remained there a short time and then came home. I remained in the rest of the evening. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

4 December 1842. It was cloudy, damp, unpleasant and very bad walking. It also rained a little early in the morning. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 35 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 43 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 40 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and Mr. Suddards preached. In the afternoon I was at St. Phillip's Church and Mr. Neville preached. In the evening I was down at Trinity Church with William Hanly. After Church, I went down to Miss Coates' and remained there a short time. I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

5 December 1842. It was cloudy, damp, and foggy the greater part of the day. The wind was NNE. It rained very hard during most of the evening. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 41 degrees, at 2 1/4 p.m. 44 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 42 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home reading Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at half past 10 p.m.

6 December 1842. It was clear during the morning. The wind was from the NW, but towards noon it changed to the NE and clouded over densely. In the evening, about 9 o'clock, winter again began to show his hoary head to the good citizens. Although we have not much prospect of good sleighing, as there is too poor a foundation, we have every prospect of the slushy, damp, and unpleasant walking we have had for the last few days. And the rain of last evening has just exterminated much of the joy of the pedestrians, who are obliged to keep trudging through the streets, to pursue their business and procure the necessities of life which are constantly needed in their families through this inclement season. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 34 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 37 degrees.

I was at the office all day and this evening I was at Miss Elizabeth Mercer's with Dave Weatherly. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

7 December 1842. It was cloudy and sometimes raining throughout the day and evening. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 35 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 35 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 36 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home reading Blackstone until about 9 o'clock when I went round to the cousins' on 9th St. to return some lecture tickets. I remained there a short time and then returned home and read a little again in B. and then went to bed. Miss Patton was here today making Ma's cloak. I got up at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

8 December 1842. It was cloudy, damp, and rainy all day and evening. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 33 degrees, at 2 p.m. 34 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 35 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home copying my notes from Blackstone. I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

9 December 1842. It was cloudy through the morning, but towards afternoon it cleared off. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. was at 37 degrees, at 2 p.m. 43 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening, at about 8 o'clock, Lydia and I went down to Miss Anna B. Hubb's (No. 122 Pleasant St.) for the purpose of attending a party of Miss H.'s. At about 8 1/2 p.m., we were ushered into the parlor, and our first impression was that we would not enjoy ourselves much, as there were very few there and they all appeared to be so very quiet. But shortly, the fair ladies began to make their appearance together with their galants, which began to soon enliven us from the stupor, if I may so call it, that we were fast falling into. But hark! I hear a slight noise resembling a violin. Yes it is, I hear it plainer. They come. Here they are. Two sable gentlemen make their appearance with their noisy but harmonious instruments. They seat themselves in the corner and commence their operations. The next thing we hear are the well known words of "Gentlemen take your partners". "Certainly, Miss Hubb's, I shall be pleased to dance, but I have no lady. Will you please find me one?" "Mr. Erwin. Miss Brick." "Shall I have the pleasure of dancing with you?" "Yes." We have our places, now for the music, and soon we are tapping on the light fantastic toe. Everyone's countenance is lit up with joy as they go through the various gyrations of the second cotillion. After dancing for a while, we hear the darky in the corner sing out, "Swing corners, promenade all around," and then such a flying for seats. Now you see all the gentlemen making for a certain spot in the middle of the room. Upon making examination, I found they had all gathered around the waiter to procure ice cream, etc., etc. I of course followed suit, in helping the ladies. This cleared away, now for dancing again. And so, dancing and refreshments, songs and waltzes, we kept going until near 3 a.m., when we began to disperse. All are seeming to have enjoyed themselves exceedingly and if I could judge others myself, then they must have enjoyed themselves more than any at other party they have been to for some length of time. Miss. Hubb's looked smiling and handsome and seemed to do everything in her power to make the evening pass off pleasantly. The ladies generally looked very well, especially Miss Helen Brick and Miss Green. Among the guests were Miss Caroline Brick a younger sister, Miss Field, Miss A. BrincklZ, and others whom I cannot remember. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 3 a.m.

10 December 1842. It was cloudy all day but there was no rain. The wind was NNW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 34 degrees, at 1 1/4 p.m. 38 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 33 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was down at a singing school with William Bird until about 9 p.m. when I left him and went up to William Hanly's. I remained there a while and then I came up home. I got up at 1/4 past 7 a.m., to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

11 December 1842. It was cloudy all day and evening. It snowed for an hour early in the morning. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 21 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 35 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 34 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and Mr. Suddards preached. In the afternoon, I was at St. Philip's Church and Mr. Neville preached. I sat in Mr. Mitchell's pew and walked home with Miss C. Mitchell. This evening I was at Grace Church with Lydia and Miss Mary Hehan of P. I got up 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

12 December 1842. It was cloudy all day. The wind NNW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 33 degrees, at 2 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 11 p.m. 33 degrees.

I was at the office all day with the exception of a short time in the morning when I paid a short visit to Miss Anna B. Hubb's, accompanied by Lydia. In the evening I was at Welch's Olympic Circus with Lydia. The pantomime of the red ogre of the frozen regions proved highly successful and worked like clockwork. The perfromance, it is said, surpassed their endeavors of the past night, and the piece went off with shouts of laughter and applause. The scenery was beautiful, the machinery excellent, and the tricks unsurpassed. Mr. C. Rogers, as Harlequin, dancing was capital, his attitudes beautiful, and his leaps surprising. Mrs. Howard, as Columbine, has no equal, and little Wells the clown was ludicrously funny and Parsloe, as Pantaloon, was excellent.

There was again yesterday, a slight sprinkling of snow, as I stated. The house tops and streets were whitened, but with the air being rather mild, it was soon gone. We are now crowding close on to Christmas, and thus far the most positive contradictions have been given to all the sage predictions of a severe winter, founded upon certain indications of "the goose bone", "thick coated onions", and "heavy corn husks". So far, as my recollections go (and as proved by looking over my journal), the weather of this season thus far is not materially different from that of last winter, which was more remarkable for its mildness than any one in the ten that had preceeded it. The beginning of last winter was much like the beginning of this. We had a few days of cold weather, which closed the ponds with ice and enabled a few to fill their icehouses. The same has been the case this year, and it is just as likely to be mild the rest of the season, as it was last year, the various signs to the contrary notwithstanding. I got up at 5 m. past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m.

13 December 1842. Early this morning we were again visited by a clever sprinkling of snow, which was followed by hail and a constant rain all day. The pavement was shoe-top deep in slush, and was not to be entered, even in case of emergency, except with overshoes. Though not cold, a more disagreeable day we have not encountered for some time. The Delaware River is nearly clear of ice and navigation is uninterrupted. There is but very little ice in the Schuylkill, not sufficient to interrupt navigation. The wind today was NE. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 27 degrees, at 2 p.m. 35 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 33 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was at home reading Blackstone's Commentaries. I commenced the 4th volume this evening. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 5 m. of 10 p.m.

14 December 1842. It was clear through the morning, cloudy through the afternoon, and then it cleared off again in the evening and it was moonlit. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 a.m. and 10 1/2 p.m. 33 degrees, and at 2 p.m. 35 degrees.

I was at the office all day. This evening I was down at William Hanly's until 8 p.m. when I went down to Miss Elizabeth Mercer's, where I spent the rest of the evening. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 5 m. past 11 p.m.

15 December 1842. It was clear through the greater part of the day, but it would occasionally cloud over. This evening was clear, cool, and moonlit. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 30 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 31 degrees.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home reading Blackstone until about 9 p.m. when I went around to Mrs. Suddards(15) for Grandma. I got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

16 December 1842. It was cloudy at times throughout the day and we had a sprinkling of snow about 9 p.m. - just enough to whiten the pavement and give the streets the appearance of stern old winter again. The wind was WSW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 27 degrees, at 2 1/4 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 33 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at home until about 9 p.m. when I went around to the cousins' on 9th St. for Grandma, Ma, and Lydia, who had been spending the evening there. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m.

17 December 1842. It was clear and pleasant during the morning, but it clouded over towards afternoon. It again cleared towards evening, and it was as beautiful a moonlit night as I ever saw. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 27 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 32 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 32 degrees.

I was at the office in the morning and in the afternoon until about 4 p.m. when I took a walk on Chestnut St. In the evening I was down at Bill Hanly's until about 8 p.m. when I came up home, stopping at two auction sales upon my way up. Little Lydia Stoddards was here to supper and Miss Martha and Sarah Stoddards spent the evening here. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

18 December 1842. It was clear all day and evening with exception of a short time about 2 p.m. when we had a slight sprinkling of snow, but old Aeolian came out to stay with all his force today - throwing snow and shaking the sign boards, tearing down awnings, handling the ladies dresses very rudely and in fact doing a great many ungentlemanly acts. He however got quiet towards evening and it was as fine and beautiful one as I ever witnessed.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and afternoon and Mr. Suddards preached. In the evening I was down at Trinity Church with Sam Milligan and William Hanly. Mr. Coleman preached. The wind today was from the NW and cold. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 29 degrees, at 2 p.m. 41 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 29 degrees. I got up at 5 m. of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

19 December 1842. It was clear all day and evening with the wind from the SW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 28 degrees, at 2 1/4 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 33 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the Walnut St. Theatre with William Bird. Sarah the Jewess, the first piece perfromed, was an admirable play leading the observer to believe that the Jewess was passing through all the tortures of a guilty conscience and atoning for her disobedience to her father for eloping with a young Englishman. And then, when it is thought that she is to expedite her life for her life for her errors on the block, the scene changes and we find her sleeping just as she was left in the first scene (she having had this awful dream which is represented through the piece, in all its horrors), much to the surprise and pleasure of myself and the audience in general.

The other piece, The Black Raven of the Tombs, is a splendid affair. The scenes are rich and the changes are effected with the dexterity and quickness of magic. From the gloom and melancholy of the grave yard, at a single touch, the scene is converted into a gay and brilliant ballroom, dazzling the eye by its splendor and richness. Some of the changes strike the audience with the greatest surprise and produce the most pleasing effect. The actors are perfect in their parts, and the novel peaks and tricks that some of them were made to perfrom, threw the house into convulsions of laughter. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

20 December 1842. It was clear until the latter part of the afternoon when it clouded over and remained so during the evening. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 30 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 39 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 36 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was reading Blackstone until about 7 1/2 when cousins Lydia and Sarah Roberts came in to spend the evening which prevented me from reading any further. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

21 December 1842. Today is damp, rainy, and very unpleasant - gum shoes are in great demand. Everybody hurries along to do their business, that they may again get into their houses and sit by their firesides and discuss the meeting, case or else the general topics of the day. All kinds of umbrellas are used, from the costly silk down to the common blue cotton may be seen flying along the streets, some torn to pieces and not affording much shelter to the one who carries it, others in full turn keeping the owner as dry as if he were sitting by his own fireside, although it cannot altogether be attributed to it alone, for the gum shoes and overcoats must be consulted, or else at every pull of the wind, as it blows strong from the NE, would send a sheet of water into the face of the poor pedestrian, as he trudges along the wet and muddy streets, in the act of pursuing his daily business or else perhaps running to the brokers, that he may gain some funds, that he may not be protested in the banks and thus forever have his credit blasted in his youth, when his energies are all fresh and he is elated with success of some new project which perhaps he thinks is to make his fortune. But, enough for the day, I am near the foot of the page. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 36 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 39 degrees, and at 9 1/2 p.m. 39 degrees. The wind was NE.

I was at the office all day and in the evening I was at home reading Blackstone's Commentaries. I got up at 5 m. of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 10 p.m.

22 December 1842. Today was cloudy, damp, and unpleasant. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 36 degrees, at 2 p.m. 40 degrees, at 10 p.m. 29 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the Chestnut St. Theatre to witness the perfromance of the sacred opera "The Israelites in Egypt." It is an opera of the most thrilling interest and is worthy of the high [?] bestowed upon it. It is the first Oratorio ever acted in America and its representation has been attended with the most signal success and approbation. There is no part of the scriptural history more strikingly interesting, and to the believers more thoroughly convincing as to the power of God, than his interposition through Moses and Aaron to deliver the children of Israel from the bondage of the Pharaoh. And, in no place or manner can the history be brought more effectively to view than upon the stage with dramatic impersonation. This opera possesses at least the negative recommendation of being free from objection as regards to its morals, and being [?], it attracts general attention. Its music is grand and, in the hands of very celebrated artists engaged to sustain the principal characters, aided by a large and efficient chorus.

I got up at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

23 December 1842. Today is clear and cold and bracing. Every person hastens along with a quick and elastic step, and the ladies appear to enjoy it, as there are a number of them on Chestnut St., although the tops of their nasal organs appear to suffer a little as they are almost as red as cherries. The wind was fresh and cold from the NW by W. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 23 degrees, at 2 1/4 p.m. 26 degrees, and at 11 p.m. 21 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at Bill Hanly's until about 8 p.m. when I went down to Miss Coates' and spent the rest of the evening there. Miss Elizabeth Mercer was also there. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

24 December 1842. It was clear and cold all day. The wind was W. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 19 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 26 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 25 degrees.

I was at the office in the morning. In the afternoon, I was out with William Bird and Dave Weatherly walking up and down Chestnut St. and also out in the evening with Weatherly and Hanly. Chestnut St. both in the afternoon and evening might be compared to a sea of people. It was actually so crowded, that it was with difficulty that a person could get along. Every person's countenance appears to be lit up with joy and merriment. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 11 p.m.

25 December 1842. It was clear all day, but it clouded over towards evening. The wind was SW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 26 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 33 degrees, and at 9 1/4 p.m. 31 degrees.

I was at Grace Church in the morning and Mr. Suddards preached. In the afternoon, I was at St. Luke's and Mr. Spear preached. In the evening, I was at Grace Church with Sarah Roberts and Lydia, and Mr. Suddards preached. I got up at 5 m. of 7 a.m. and got to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

26 December 1842. It was clear and delightful all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 8 a.m. was at 26 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 33 degrees.

I was out with Dave Weatherly during the whole of the day and in the evening was at the cousins' on 9th St. where I took tea. From the thousands and thousands of people that promenaded Chestnut St. today, I am almost persuaded to believe that the bad times have departed, that a heightened sun is destined to shine again upon our once happy country. Never within the recollection of the oldest inhabitants, has such a general hum been seen out in this City. And, I could not help but feel proud at my being a native of this City, when I beheld the many beauteous forms and lovely faces that I encountered during a "walk in the crowd". Really, I do not think that so many handsome women were ever before seen at any one time, in our City, as on today. So plain did this appear, that every one I spoke to, adverted at once to the fact and the strangers stopping at our hotels were enchanted by the loveliness. The Schuylkill is frozen over and numerous persons were enjoying themselves in the beautiful exercise of skating. The Delaware has a great deal of floating ice in it. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

27 December 1842. It was cloudy today and at times having the appearance of snow, but towards evening it cleared off beautifully. The wind was NW. The thermometer at 7 1/4 a.m. was at 33 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 31 degrees.

I was at the office during the day and in the evening out strolling about with William Hanly. The streets, and particularly Chestnut St., present a different aspect from what they did yesterday. The thousands that were walking yesterday, have dwindled down to as many as hundreds and the old City of Brotherly Love begins to assume that quiet which is always characteristic of her. I got up at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

28 December 1842. It was clear and rather cool, but just such a day as suits the fair ones to promenade on our fashionable thoroughfares. On Chestnut St. may be seen many beautiful ladies, all tripping it with as light hearts as if hard times were never thought of, while perhaps their husbands are toiling and working to get through with some heavy payments. Little do they know how their "good lads" have to be tossed about on the ocean, as it were, of a mercantile life. Little do they think, as they are tripping along so gaily, that perhaps when they enter the door of their grand mansions, it may be for the last time, for perchance their husbands may have been unsuccessful in meeting the payment of some one of their numerous liabilities. And, just as she thinks that she is going to sip of the cup of joy, it is dashed from her lips and in its stead, the bitter cup of anguish is placed and she may be necessitated to drink of it throughout a life. Many such events have transpired within the short space of a year.

The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 30 degrees, at 1 1/2 p.m. 37 degrees, and at 10 p.m. 29 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at Hanly's - there were several young lades spending the evening there. I left about 1/4 of 10 p.m. and accompanied them home. I got up at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

29 December 1842. It commenced snowing about 10 a.m. this morning and continued until towards noon when it turned to rain, which continued through the afternoon and evening with unremitting force, deluging the streets at times accompanied with hail and snow, which made very bad walking. The wind was NE. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 27 degrees, and at 12 a.m. 33 degrees. I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at Welch's Olympic Circus. I was much pleased with the performance, especially the last piece called Don Giovanni. The characters were well sustained, particularly that of Parsloe as Leporello, whose comic gestures, songs, acting, etc., kept the house in a continual roar of laughter. I got up at 7 a.m. and got to bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

30 December 1842. The pavement this morning was covered with sleet, but as soon as heaven's glorious luminary appeared, it melted away as if it were by magic, by its general warmth. The wind was NW and chilly. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 29 degrees, at 2 1/2 p.m. 36 degrees, and at 10 1/2 p.m. 33 degrees.

I was at the office all day. In the evening I was at the mercantile lecture. It was delivered by Rev. Alfred B. Dodd of Princeton, New Jersey upon the subject of The Ancient Egyptians. The audience was very large and fashionable. Without any attempt on his part to make his subject more pleasing to his audience, by the use of metaphor, the lecture was at all times interesting and very frequently eloquent. While he conveyed a fund of sound information through his discourse, as to the character and degree of refinement attained by this departed race, I was chiefly interested in the novelty of his argument in regard to their architecture, and its subservient effect upon the form of religion prevalent among them. The partly imitative style of modern Egyptian architecture came in for a just, but very severe, stricture. The presentation was eloquent and at its close I could not but feel that a deep and strong impression had been made. I got up at 7 1/4 a.m. and got to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

31 December 1842. It was clear and cool all day with the wind from the NW. The thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. was at 29 degrees, at 2 p.m. 32 degrees.

I was at the office all day. I spent the evening up at Mrs. Mary Roberts'. The Roberts Family was all there and we enjoyed ourselves very much throughout the evening. I got up at 7 1/2 a.m. and got to bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

With this day we close the week, the month, and the year. Whatever of good has occurred in these divisions of time, or whatever of evil we may have experienced, is now properly a subject of reflection. Of the first we may inquire how it may be made permanent and of the latter how it may be made to work out a weight of benefit, that results from afflictions well improved. Few have added much to their wealth this year, but it is a source whence a reasonable man may draw consolation amidst the loss on both sides if he has been able to retain what he has gathered, but a far greater number have been unable to do that. Those who have submitted to a portion of the operation of evil times will naturally see that the standard of wealth and the mode of living has also been lowered, hence their losses of whale, may not be so great as they seem. But from others there has been swept away the patrimony on which they leaned, and the carefully gathered heap, which industry and economy has accumulated. It has been removed without a remnant from which to devise immediate and to which future exertions may look for the means of active business. It is vain to lack the philosophy of such. It is vain to speak to a man of endurance, when his own comforts are cut off and a wife and children ask for bread and the last tear. Steeped crust is divided among them; something more than philosophy is required. Religion whispers first to those who are not thus bowed down: "Share with the wretched and to the comfortless," it says. Receive with gratitude and rely on Providence that raises up friends.

FAREWELL ADDRESS TO MY OLD BOOK

For four long years, old book, we have traveled together on the busy path of life. Many things have I recorded on your pages, now filled with many an event that has transpired within the space of those four years. Weddings, births, deaths, and travels have all been placed on thy pages - numerous events that have occurred in that short space of time, to look back upon. But to look forward is far different. Who knows what may be placed upon the leaves of the book which I am now about to commence. Ah, it is a difficult task. It may record the death of many a loved and esteemed friend, nay even the death of a father, mother, or sister, or perhaps of some dearly loved cousin or relative.

But why these gloomy reflections? Why not think of things more pleasant? Why not think of the many blessing that are constantly showered upon us? Ought not we be thankful while so many are suffering under the punishing wants of poverty and distress? Ought not we think of these things and thank God that we are so blessed? To be carried along on the busy streams of life, with all the comforts it can afford, think of these things alternatively and I am sure if we have one spark of thankfulness in our soul, we will fall down on our knees and thank God for the manyfold mercies he is constantly showering upon us.

But, a truce to such reflections. I commenced a short address, or say a farewell address to my old book, in which I have written my everyday journal. Many the cold winter nights, as also the hot summer eve, have I picked thee up old book, to open thy pages, that I may record the events of each succeeding day. On thy pages have been recorded the death of a dear uncle, who throughout his life was a kind, pleasant, and obliging friend and relative. Many the time when I was a tiny baby, scarcely large enough to walk alone, did he take me by the hand on numerous walks and to many places of amusement. Many the time have I been in his room of a morn, in my schooling days, and there would he hear and assist me in my lessons, which is a child's greatest trouble. Many the time would he console me when I thought them so difficult that I could not possibly learn them. Ah, but these childish pleasures are past and he has gone to the realm where no traveler has ever returned. No more will I ever be greeted by his dear looks on earth; no more will he teach me those lessons; no more will we take those pleasant walks together, that we used to so oft in my childish days. All those pleasures have fled, never to return again, and we ne'er shall meet again until the archangel's trumpet shall sound, when all shall awaken from their earthly resting places and commence to their final resurrection.

Farewell old book. Thy pages contain many things, which will stand when this hand is cold and laid low in the dust. Farewell and may thee rest in quietness on some shelf, or other quiet retreat, so that when thy pages are required to testify to some fact long past, that they may be brought up to remind us of scenes long past, and perhaps forgotten. Farewell old book. I feel as though I am parting with some old friend, for thy face has become familiar to me. But, we must part as the best friends must finally do, even when they are joined by the closest ties of affection. So old book, farewell, farewell, farewell and peace to thy pages.
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Notes:

(1) John Cadwalader (1804-1879), U.S. Congressman 1854-1858 and judge of the United Sates District Court for Eastern Pennsylvania 1858-1879.Scharf and Westcott, p. 1581

(2) Elizabeth Roberts, born 1826 and Anna Roberts born 1827 were at the Moravian Seminary in Bethlehem with J. Warner Erwin's sister Lydia having entered in 1839, one year ahead of her. It is likely that Mr. and Mrs. Edward Roberts recommended the school to the Erwins. (JFD)

(3) College Hall, part of the University of Pennsylvania, was located on 9th Street between Chestnut and Market Streets. The property, which was to be the site of the house of President of United States when Philadelphia was the capitol, had been purchased from the City in 1800 when Washington, D.C. became the seat of the United States government. Scharf and Westcott, p. 1938

(4) The United States Hotel, on the north side of Chestnut Street between Fourth and Fifth opposite the United States Bank, opened to guests in 1826, became the principal hotel of the city where strangers of distinction were sent and foreign travelers, such as Charles Dickens, stayed. It was sold and demolished in 1856 and became the site of the Philadelphia Bank. Scharf and Westcott, pp. 993-994.

(5) The Philadelphia Navy Yard was located on the Delaware River at Southwark on land purchased in 1880 and 1801. Edgar P. Richardson,Philadelphia, A 300 Year History. W.W. Norton, NY 1982, p. 241.

(6) Erwin family church: St. Luke's, 13th Street above Pine. Scharf and Westcott, p.1353. (JFD) "The Church of St. Luke and The Epiphany was begun in 1898 through the merging of St. Luke's Church (1840) with the Church of The Epiphany (1834)." Web site of The Church of The Epiphany, Philadelphia, PA; www.stlukeandtheepiphany.org

(7) St. Mary's Hall, a girls' boarding school founded in 1837 by the Right Reverend Bishop George Washington Doane, second Protestant Episcopal Bishop of New Jersey. Porter Sargent's Handbook of Private Schools, 1994, p. 284.

(8) "Riots in which colored people were maltreated and their property injured broke out on the 1st of August [1842], and were caused in the first place by disturbance between colored persons who were in a procession of the "Myoamensing Temperance Society" and boys and other white persons who were in the streets... A mob of white persons immediately afterwards commenced operations against dwellings inhabited by blacks in the vicinity of Lombard Street between Fifth and Eighth Streets and in various small courts and alleys adjacent...." Scharf and Westcott, pp. 660-661.

(9) The John Hancock house was on the site of the house built by Thomas Pettit in 1637/38. It was torn down in 1856. The Massachusetts State House now stands on the adjacent lot. N.P.

(10) Harvard College, later Harvard University, was locally called Cambridge College well into the 19th century. NP

(11) Craigie House, Washington's headquarters (1775-76), was occupied by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow during his teaching years at Harvard from 1837 to his death in 1882.

(12) Sir William Blackstone (1723-1780) was Professor of Common Law at Oxford University and was an authority on British Common Law. Commentaries on the Laws of England was a standard text for those studying law. (JRD)

(13) Old Swedes' Church (Gloria Dei), built between 1698 and 1700, the oldest church in Pennsylvania. Rev. Jehu Curtis Clay, rector from 1831 to 1862.

(14) A court that was used for criminal cases from 1864 to 1895. It was abolished in 1896 and absorbed by the Supreme Court. JRD

(15) 12th below Cherry Street.