1844

JANUARY

1 January 1844. I remained up in Burlington today for the purpose of having the opportunity of starting earlier for the country this afternoon, than if I had gone to the City and come up in the 2 o'clock train. I was at home until about 3 p.m. with exception of about one hour in the morning when I was out skating on a small pond on Kinsey's Lane. It was the first time I was out this season. Left about 1/4 of 4 p.m. with Jim Sterling for Springfield to attend a Party given by the Misses Earl.

We arrived there about 1/4 past 5, and were introduced into

the parlor, where there was a roomful of young ladies, the gentlemen not having arrived. It being dark, it was impossible to judge of the beauty or homeliness of the company collected. In a short time the lamp was lit, which brought to my view among the ladies two of the prettiest girls I have come across for a long while. They were Misses Elizabeth and Kate Earl, no relation I believe, to the family at whose house we were in.

Had a delightful supper and I never enjoyed myself more in my life during the evening by dancing, &c. for Burlington about 1/4 past 12. Messrs. Hays and Hall started at the same time. They took the lead, and we permitted this till we got to the other side of Slatetown, where we passed. We kept ahead for some time trotting our horse all the while, but they being anxious to pass again, set their horse off in full run and passed again. Finding that they were not going to beat us by fair means, we put our horse on full run while their horse was on the same gait. We passed them like the wind, beating them considerably into Burlington, though it was not very pleasant to run our horse. But we were not to be beaten.

Got into Burlington about 10 m. of 2 a.m.

2 January 1844. In the evening attended Mr. Whale's 3rd cotillion(1) party, and as on the two preceding parties, enjoyed myself exceedingly. I made several new acquaintances among the ladies, which added materially to the pleasures of the evening. The party was very large, and the ladies all looked remarkably pretty. The number of cotillions danced was eleven, and I had the pleasure of participating in all of them.

5 January 1844. In the evening around at Jim Strling's until about 8 o'clock, when we went out to take a walk, but in a few minutes concluded to go and find some skating as the night was magnificent. However was disappointed as the ice would not bear.

7 January 1844. Rather cloudy through the day and evening, wind N.W. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and after noon. Mr. Germain preached in the morning, catechized the children and gave them their new year's presents. Evening at home with the exception of about 1/2 an hour when I was over at the Temperance House. The cars did not get up until 1/2 past 8, having run off the tracks.

8 January 1844. In the evening about half past 7, accompanied Ma down to Bishop Doane's to attend the annual party given by him for the young ladies of St. Mary's Hall. I was very much embarrassed upon entering the room as there was about seventy young ladies there, with not one of whom I was acquainted. In a short time this embarrassment wore off when I was introduced to several young ladies. Among them were Miss A. Lippincott, The Misses Brown & Miss Thompson. With each of these ladies I had some conversation, which passed the evening away pleasantly until the doors of the dining room were thrown open which exposed to our view a table well stocked with the good things of the season and to which the young ladies turned an anxious eye. Upon the ring of the bell they all entered, and after the Bishop's asking a blessing, ample justice was done to the ice cream, cakes, &c. After leaving the refreshment room the young ladies assembled in another room where the Bishop finished the evening's entertainment by prayer. The company was dismissed by shaking Mrs. Doane and her husband by the hand as they passed out. The ladies of the Hall, generally speaking looked well, and with some exceptions, pretty. Left about half past 9.

11 January 1844. In the evening went up to Mdme. Hazard's party, the third of the season. Enjoyed myself very much this evening, having danced nearly every cotillion. About the middle of the evening had two fancy dances danced by three of Mdme.'s pupils. Left about half past 11 and went to my lodgings.

12 January 1844. Commenced raining and sleeting about 2 p.m. and continued up to the hour of writing, 8 p.m. The pavements were very slippery and many persons cut queer figures, and measured their length on them. At the office all day and left for Burlington at 5 p.m. as usual. Encountered considerable ice in crossing [the river]. There has been a great deal made within the last few days. It floats up and down the river impeding the navigation considerably.

Did not get further than the outskirts of Camden this evening before one of the wheels of the freight car broke, which obliged us, for some reason or other, to go backwards and forwards a number of times and finally back to the depot to get another car. Did not leave Camden until 6 and arrived at Burlington at 7 p.m.

17 January 1844. In the evening attended Mr. Whale's 4 th cotillion party. The music was not nearly so good, or the party so large as the preceding ones, but all appeared to enjoy themselves very much.

18 January 1844. At the office all day, and left about 1/4 of 6 p.m. when I went down to Hanley's, took tea, dressed, &c. for the purpose of accompanying the Misses Hanley to a Party given by Mrs. Moss. Entered the room about 1/4 past 8, and in a short time dancing was introduced. It lasted until the breaking up of the party. There were several very pretty young ladies there, which of course made the company much more agreeable.

In one of the pound cakes there were two rings, one of which I had the luck to find in my piece. It belonged to one of the young ladies in the room to whom I returned it, and of course had an introduction. Found her to be pretty, agreeable and pleasant in her manners, and had the pleasure of dancing once with her. All parties appeared to enjoy themselves, and the company dispersed about 1/4 of 2 a.m.

19 January 1844. It was my intention to remain in and go to bed early this evening on account of being up so late on the two previous nights, but being invited into Dr. Ellis', did away with my intention and accordingly went in. Spent a delightful evening in dancing &c. Met there the two Miss Biles', being the first time I was introduced. Found them very agreeable ladies.

23 January 1844. Was confined to the house all day (with the exception of about 15 minutes occupied in going to the post office to put a letter in for Cristiani) on account of having a cold and sore throat.

24 January 1844. Was in the house all day, not feeling well enough to go down this morning, having a sore throat and a headache. Towards evening felt much better. Around at Mr. Burne's in the evening, we all having had an invitation. Met there the Misses Biles', the Misses Mackison's, Dr. and Mrs. Sterling, Mr. and Mrs. and Miss Wetherill. Spent the evening pleasantly in dancing, &c.

25 January 1844. There is great deal of floating ice in the river, and has been for the past week.

26 January 1844. Clear and exceedingly cold all day, the coldest we have had this season. Wind N.W. Thermometer at 8 a.m. 10 degrees; at 2 p.m. 20 degrees. Went around to see the Misses Leeds, found them pleasant and agreeable as usual, and looking pretty. Spent a very pleasant evening chatting about matters and things, and was favored with some fine singing and playing from Miss Anathusa.

27 January 1844. The river, both opposite the City and to Burlington, was entirely frozen and persons were skating upon it, though not below Race Street at the City. Left Messrs. Elliott and Robinson's(2) office today for the purpose of going into business for myself in the course of a few days.

28 January 1844. Went down on the River which is entirely closed. In the morning walked 1/2 way over, and in the after noon went all the way to Bristol.

29 January 1844. Left Burlington this morning as usual and proceeded safely until we got just beyond Pensauken Creek, when our attention was arrested by the sudden stoppage of the cars. Upon getting out found two of the baggage cars were thrown off the track, apparently very much broken, while the wheels were strewed along the track for some distance, and the earth torn up considerably. It appears that in severely cold weather frost gets into the cast iron wheels which makes them very brittle. This morning one or two of them broke, which brought the car to the ground, and of course displaced and broke the one following. Theodore Mitchell, Pa, myself, and some others, got on the back of the freight car, which was before the broken cars and attached to the locomotive, and went down to Camden upon it.

Arrived in the City about 10 o'clock while the rest of the passengers (except those that walked) had to get to the City when best they could. Upon our arrival at the City, Pa and I went in search of a desk for the office but were unsuccessful. Then went up to Pa's office(3) but I suppose I must now call it my office, as today I commence business there on my own account. I expect to continue, and hope by a close attention to it, prosper, and merit patronage.

31 January 1844. The navigation of the river continues to be entirely obstructed by ice, which is now very thick and heavy. Opposite the City the continuing passage of the steam ferry boats keeps the channel open between this and Camden. That enables us to cross in the morning and evening without much difficulty. Above and below the City, however, the ice is fast and the bay has much floating in it. A number of vessels are now lying at the wharves, loaded and ready for sea, but it is not thought prudent to move them, even with the aid of steam. It was expected that the United States steamship Princeton would go down tomorrow, on her way to Washington. The City Ice Boat was employed to cut away the ice around, and make a passage for her, but after proceeding as far as the Point, the ice boat returned, and the Princeton is still at the Navy Yard, where she no doubt will remain some days.

At the office through the day until 5 p.m., when I took a stroll down in Chestnut Street, but it was so cold very few were on the promenade. In the evening at Mr. Whale 's 5th cotillion Party, accompanied Miss Mary Wood, Emma Erwin, and Lydia. The Party was very large, and a number of pretty faces were to be found among the ladies. Left after dancing 9 sets, when Miss Wood and Lydia were tired, and my leg paining me very much from having hurt it yesterday. Emma did not dance. Accompanied Miss Wood home where Lydia remained for the night. Then went home with Emma, being invited by Mr. Ellis and cousin Sarah to spend the night. Accepted their hospitality, thinking a nice bed, and no walk, was preferable to going from Montgomery Street to 8th and Arch, and then sleeping on the sofa.

FEBRUARY

1 February 1844. In the evening went around with Frank Woolman to the Lyceum to attend a concert given by the Virginia Minstrels. They are fine Negro singers and very amusing.

3 February 1844. Remained at home throughout the day and evening, on account of my leg being very sore having hurt it on Tuesday last.

8 February 1844. I was astonished on waking this morning to find the ground covered to the depth of several inches with snow, which was still falling very fast. It continued to come down very rapidly until about 1 p.m. There was pretty good sleighing early in the morning but it was pretty soon used up, as there was no foundation to it. In the evening attended Mdme. Hazard's 5th cotillion Party. It was a very fine affair, the company was both large and select. I enjoyed myself more than at any of the others. There were eight sets danced, 5 of which I participated in.

12 February 1844. We went over to the Misses Nesbit's, having made an engagement with them in the morning to cross the river on the ice. All started, that is Mrs. Nesbit, the Misses Louisa, Helen, Clara, Elizabeth, Amelia and Alice Nesbit, and my sister Lydia. Upon arriving at the wharf there was parleying whether we should go, as it was considered by some that it was not entirely safe. But we soon concluded to start, leaving Mrs. Nesbit on the wharf. After walking about 200 yards from the shore Lydia and Miss Louisa Nesbit became frightened, and went back. The rest of the party continued their walk to Bristol. Took a stroll through the place and returned to Burlington safely.

In the evening at home, Ma had a small company. The Company appeared to enjoy themselves laughing, talking, dancing, &c., and left about 11 p.m. I accompanied Miss Helen Nesbit home, who this evening, and as usual, looked remarkably pretty. She is a lady that suits my taste precisely. She is handsome, pleasant in her manners, intelligent, and well calculated to win the favor and admiration of gentlemen.

14 February 1844. At the office through the day and until 1/4 of 8 p.m., when I left and went up to Mr. Edward Roberts. I had an engagement to accompany Miss Elizabeth to a Party given by Mr. and Mrs. Levy(4) in Spruce Street, 2 nd House below 8 th . The Party came off in a most elegant style. The supper table was elegant in the extreme. The house was furnished in the most magnificent style, and must have cost a good deal of money. I enjoyed myself much more than I expected having been introduced to three very handsome young ladies, viz., Miss Layne and the two Misses Lehman. I have been wishing an acquaintance with the Miss L's for the last two years, and am now glad I have received it. Found them to be very agreeable and pleasant in their manners and ladies that pleased me to be acquainted with.

15 February 1844. Towards evening there was a slight fall of snow. However, it soon turned to rain, which fell heavily at night, literally flooded the streets with water and rendered them in some places quite impassable because the gutters filled with ice. Wind N.E.

At the office all day and left about 20 m. past 7 for the purpose of going up to Mr. Roberts to wait upon Anna and Elizabeth to a party given by Mrs. King. I went up there early to see what arrangements were to be made, as the evening was too bad to walk. Found that Miss Anna had engaged a Mr. Leary of South Carolina to wait upon her, who promised to come about half past 8. I, as well as the ladies, were kept in a state of suspense until near 9 o'clock, not knowing whether Mr. L. would come, or whether to get a cab myself. As good luck would have it he came and all got safe to the party.

There were a great number there, and upon our introduction into the room, soon engaged in dancing. The party was in very pretty style, and the company very large, making the rooms almost too crowded. Dancing was the order of the evening, with four musicians hired for the occasion. The supper table was beautifully arranged and well filled. The ladies, generally speaking, were pretty.

20 February 1844. At the office through the greater part of the day, though I was out on business through some portions of it. Having occasion to be in Chestnut Street, found a great number of ladies promenading there.

In the evening called down to see Mrs. and Miss Oliver in Pearl Street, to settle a little matter between them and myself. It appears that someone had written them a very insulting letter and had affixed my name to it. They, of course, thought it was me, and I therefore had to call to inform them of their mistake and at once put a stop to the mean and contemptible trick that had been played upon me which, if I had not contradicted it, would have been a base calumny on my character. I succeeded with ease in convincing them that I had nothing or knew nothing about the letter, and we parted friends, after having conversed of matters and things in general.

22 February 1844. Today being the 112th anniversary of the birth of the immortal Washington, it was celebrated in this City and vicinity in a manner that has not been surpassed, if equaled, in a long series of years, excepting only the centennial celebration.(5) The weather was as mild and pleasant as a May day. All the principal Streets presented the appearance of a holiday. The sidewalks were crowded with pedestrians, and the carriage way thronged with vehicles. Companies and battalions of the military looked remarkably well, and were accompanied by superb bands of music. Flags were streaming from the shipping and public places. All the public offices were closed before noon, and many faces wore the appearance of rejoicing. In the morning the Whig Festival at the Musical Fund Hall(6) was largely attended. The speakers were warmly greeted as they progressed, and the performances of the splendid band added much to the proceedings.

The Whig Ball at the Chestnut Street Theater(7) closed the festivities of the day. It was got up in grand style, and on true temperance principles. Everything passed off pleasantly.

25 February 1844. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon; Bishop Doane preached both times. In the evening accompanied Grandma to a Baptist meeting where I heard a very good sermon.

27 February 1844. At the office all day and left for Burlington at 5 p.m. Arrived there about 1/4 past 6. Upon going into the house found it all in confusion, having commenced moving to the house at the N.E. corner of Broad and Wood Street.(8) I was engaged through the evening in carrying different things down to the other house, and by 10 o'clock was pretty well tired. This is the second time we have moved within the year, although it was not our lot to move in the 20 years previous. I hope when we get settled in our new house we may not want to move for 20 years to come, for it is one of the most troublesome things that can occur to a family.

28 February 1844. Was engaged until about 12 N. in taking down some bedsteads &c. when I took dinner, and at 1/4 of 2 left for the city. In the evening at Mr. Whale's 7th Cotillion Party, it was unusually large. I suppose there must have been 500 persons in the room. Was introduced to 7 ladies this evening.

MARCH

1 March 1844. Today is the first day of Spring, and really, if it is to be a sample of our spring weather, I am very glad. It is one of the most delightful days we have had for a long while. The atmosphere is mild and pleasant, which brings the ladies out in great numbers in our thoroughfares. It was almost too warm to walk in the sun today.

4 March 1844. Did not leave Burlington this morning until 9 o'clock. The cars had been detained by their running off the road previous to their arrival at Burlington. The boat was expected down this morning but did not come, for what reason it is not known. It is thought by all, that she should have been down two weeks ago as the river has been clear of ice for more than that time.

7 March 1844. Clear, warm and delightful all day and evening, being real spring weather, which brought the ladies out in great numbers on the promenade. The steamer Trenton commenced her regular trips today, which is what she ought to have done long ago as the river has been clear of ice for some time.

At the office throughout the greater part of the day, and until about 1/2 past 7, when I went up to the Assembly Buildings to attend Mdme. Hazard's 7th Cotillion Party. I think I may say that I enjoy myself more at her parties than I do at Mr. Whale's. The company appears to be more select, the room is not nearly so crowded, and they have, according to my taste, better music.

9 March 1844. Left Burlington this morning in the Boat for the City at 10 m. past 8, but did not arrive until 1/4 past 11, as we encountered a very heavy fog, and were afraid to run fast. They had to use the lead(9) nearly all the way down. The Trenton presents a very neat and pretty appearance, having had a thorough repairing and cleansing through the past winter. The boat had been painted throughout, and the cabins newly carpeted & cleansed which give them a fine appearance. Waited upon Miss Morris this morning. As usual she looked pretty, and was very pleasant and loquacious.

10 March 1844. At Quaker meeting in the morning, and in the afternoon at St. Mary's Church where Bishop Doane preached.

11 March 1844. Clear and delightful all day. The ladies came out in great numbers and appeared to enjoy themselves in the promenade. Spring is now becoming visible by the workings of nature. The trees are coming out in various places, and I hope before long we can have some flowers out to gladden our senses after the winter that has just passed. In Burlington, or at home (I suppose I must now say), everything is beginning to look beautiful. Some birds are heard in the morning uttering their sweet notes while perched in some of the neighboring trees, and everything wears a clean and a fresh aspect.

At the office through the day, and until 7 p.m. when I left and went down to Bill Hanley 's. But upon going in unexpectedly met Misses Virginia and Caroline Day, and Miss Stigarinne. Concluded to spend the evening there which I did very pleasantly having several dances, some music, plays, and plenty of chatting. Combined, these made the evening pass off delightfully. I have not met the Misses Day for some eighteen months or two years, and the meeting was very unexpected to me this evening. Virginia has considerably improved and is now quite pretty and they are both lively and pleasing in their manners.

13 March 1844. For the last two days we have had rainy weather and people looked rather drooping. Some part of today there were signs of clear weather, but, like many other good symptoms, they were soon dissipated. Our hopes of sunshine and a speedy enjoyment of the usual bright display of pretty faces along our promenades were lost in the returning mists of a gloomy day. However, late in the evening it cleared off.

Went up to the Assembly Rooms to attend Mr. Whale's last cotillion party of the season. The evening passed very pleasantly with the exception of a little difficulty I had with a gentleman in regard to a cotillion dance I was to dance with Miss Bustard. However we settled it amicably. Made several new acquaintances.

14 March 1844. At the office all day, or until 1/2 past 4 p.m., when I left for the cars to start for home. I arrived safely at the usual time, though not without encountering some danger in crossing Rancocas bridge. One of the beams of the draw [bridge] had been broken by the mammoth engine weighing 21 1/2 tons passing over it and rendering it rather dangerous. In the evening, accompanied Ma and Lydia to church. The Bishop gave us a fine discourse which ended by 1/2 past 8. The rest of the evening was spent at home employed in putting up our new blinds in the parlors. We received them today from Mr. Hedges(10) in 2nd below Dock Street.

17 March 1844. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon. Bishop Doane preached both times. In the morning he gave us a very long sermon upon "Confirmation," entirely too long to sit well with comfort, being about one hour and a half delivering it.

19 March 1844. I paid a visit to Mrs. Cristiani to inform her of her son's health having received a letter from him today.

20 March 1844. Went up to the office and remained there until 7 p.m. when I left, got my supper and attended a sale at the exchange of Real Estate.

21 March 1844. About 1/2 past 7 went up to the Assembly Buildings to attend Mdme. Hazard's 8th and last cotillion Party of the season. The company was very large and many of the ladies pretty. The dancing was kept up until half past 12.

24 March 1844. In the evening the rite of confirmation was celebrated by Bishop Doane in a very impressive and solemn manner for 3 men and 18 women, among whom were a number of young ladies from the school.

25 March 1844. At the office from the time I arrived in the City until about 7 p.m. when, looking over the papers, noticed that Mr. Booth(11) was to play Macbeth this evening. As I had never witnessed this tragedy, concluded to go.

Scarcely had I entered the theater than I regretted that I had gone, as the low state of morals witnessed at these places of amusement is hardly to be credited, unless seen. I, however, sat the play out, which was performed well, and left almost with a resolve not to visit a theater again.

28 March 1844. In the evening accompanied Miss Virginia Mitchell and Miss Weston down to the rehearsal at St. Mary's Hall. The entertainment was very good, and the young ladies of the school performed their various pieces with great credit. Many of them looked remarkably pretty. Miss Patterson played and sang exceedingly well, both with the piano and guitar accompaniments. Miss Whitney of New York appears to be quite accomplished, judging from her singing, playing and drawing. The entertainment was concluded about 1/4 past 10 with singing a hymn and a prayer.

29 March 1844. Evening at St. Mary's Church. Bishop Doane gave us a very fine discourse.

30 March 1844. Arrived in the City by 1/4 of 10. On the way, we ran against a canal boat and broke her railing off.

We were visited about 3 o'clock by two pretty sharp flashes of lightning and a real heavy April shower with a March storm of wind, which was succeeded by a cold rain until about 8 o'clock when it commenced hailing and snowing, and continued for more than an hour.

31 March 1844. The frost of Saturday night has undoubtedly done much damage to the fruit trees, vegetables, &c., which, for the most part, were considerably advanced this season, owing to the genial weather we had through the past month, unprecedented by several years past. The greater part of the truck gardens in the vicinity of the City are already made up, and if the frost of Saturday night shall have affected them seriously, it will be a matter of no little regret to all.

APRIL

1 April 1844. We had a fine cold day for the first of April, clear, and a fine sharp wind with plenty of ice, though the shrubberies are getting ready for a spring business. The Horse Chestnut presents its buds quite expanded almost in half. The Willow is feathered up with its half-yellow leaves, and the Lilac bush is putting on its greenness; its upper buds are swelling open, and here and there the flowerstick is putting out its immature buds. Apricot trees, favorably situated, are opening their buds, and with a few more warm days would be in blossom. Perhaps it is a little too soon, all this. The sober Walnut and Oak look as gray as in mid-winter, having no desire to venture out before their time. The incautious smile of childhood is often the cause of ruin - it comes too soon. They who never smile look grave and rebuke. Perhaps it is better sometimes to incur the risk of too early exhibition than to keep our powers and faculties hidden until fear and suspicion surmount love and display. Then we stand flowerless, scentless, fruitless and profitless unless cut down.

But to change the subject, and speak of the day itself which every one knows is called "all fool's day," when endeavors are made by many persons to make fools of others, who, in turn, were in like manner operated on by their fellows. In some instances these efforts were successful, but many a wide-awake chap, when "tried on," put his thumb to his nose, and with his fingers moving to and fro, significantly said "no you don't," and walked off with a strut, indicative of a most signal triumph. Some, indeed, were fooled by letters to them, others by parcels, packages and old pocket wallets, placed in positions where they would attract notice and be picked up. This afforded no little sport to those who laid out the dice, and contributed no less in chagrin and mortification to those who swallowed the baits. One fool, it is said, makes many, and fools in one way may sometimes be made fools another way. The fear of being taken in no doubt interfered with the business relations of life and the intercourse of citizens to some extent during the whole of yesterday. Many, no doubt, who were honestly directed in the course of business, or informed on some matter of reality, doubted the truth, and hesitated or failed entirely to give credence thereto, and acted differently from what they otherwise would have done.

Went up to the Exchange, went into the Sheriff's Sale for a few minutes.

4 April 1844. So warm that fire was not needed and I noticed some persons in the Streets with summer clothes and hats on. Evening at the National Theater to see Rookwood & Columbia's Sons.

8 April 1844. After supper waited upon Anna Roberts and my sister down to the Bishop's, having had an invitation to a small party given for the young ladies who have remained through the vacation at St. Mary's Hall.

9 April 1844. Afternoon and in the evening until 1/2 past 9 at my office writing, when I left and went down to Mr. Sloan's tailor and ordered a pair of light Kessimer(12) pants.

10 April 1844. The warm weather of the few last days has exercised a very sensible effect upon vegetation. The trees throughout the city begin to bud and blossom, and from the number which have been planted along the sidewalks, we have every prospect of enjoying a green and shady summer, and of having the monotony of long lines of brick and mortar relieved by refreshing intervals of foliage. The doomed Lindens of State House Row have undergone a complete shave, a large number of the worm-eaten limbs have been sawed off, but I fear that no pruning or trimming can save them.

11 April 1844. Went out sailing with Mr. Antram, but the breeze soon died away and we came in. After supper took a seat on the steps with Mr. Grubb and brother and smoked a cigar.

12 April 1844. At about 1/2 past 7 went down to the Chinese museum(13) salon to witness the performance of a most astonishing man, who styled himself the "Fakir of Ava." Some of his performances, or tricks, were wonderful in the extreme, the particulars of one I will here record.

It was the passing of a shawl belonging to one of the ladies in the audience to the fire proof [safe or vault] of the United States Gazette office. The "Fakir" passed a number of blank cards through the company, stating at the same time that he wished the persons taking them to place their name and also the name of the place they desired the shawl to be conveyed. He then collected the cards in a small bag, and offered it to a lady to take one out. She did, and wrote on it the name of a person (Viskey, I believe), and that it should be sent to the fire-proof of the U.S. Gazette office. A Committee of 5 was then chosen to get in a cab and drive as fast as possible down to the office. I forgot to mention that during all the time, and for five minutes after, the shawl remained in full view of the audience where the "Fakir" had laid it, having carried it there at full arms length to show it was not changed. Some five minutes after the Committee left, he folded it up (in full view of the audience) in a peculiar style, tied around with black tape, placed it in a small tankard, put the lid on, took it off and it was gone. Some ten minutes afterward the Committee returned (making a great noise) with the shawl in their possession done up in the same style as when passed away by the "Fakir," they having found it in the fireproof of the U.S. Gazette office, after having some difficulty in opening it. A clerk belonging to the office of the U.S. Gazette came forward, and stated to the audience that he had locked the fire proof up at 7 o'clock this evening, and put the key in his pocket.

13 April 1844. Mitchell and I went down to the River and in a short time succeeded in getting a sail boat, and went over to Bristol. Upon our return to Burlington took in Mitchell's two sisters, Caroline and Virginia, and Miss Kidd. After sailing about 1/2 an hour put them ashore, when we put up the boat. In going over a raft in landing, the ladies had some difficulty and signs of fright with the raftsmen, but got off without either side being much injured.

14 April 1844. Took a walk around on the banks early in the morning, they are now beginning to assume a delightful appearance as the grass is now becoming green, and the trees are all putting out.

15 April 1844. Afternoon at the office until about 1/2 past 5 when Harvey Stewart and myself took a stroll down in Chestnut Street, but finding it very dusty and few ladies out, soon returned to my office.

16 April 1844. After supper went down to the river and got a sail boat for the purpose of taking a sail, but upon getting out into the river found there was not sufficient wind to carry the boat along and had to take to the oars and fuel my sail. Did not remain out more than 15 or 20 minutes.

17 April 1844. Went up to Miss H.A. Myers in 4th above Race, No. 249, for Lydia having been invited there by Miss Myers through Louisa Wood. Met there several young gentlemen and ladies. I had not had the pleasure of Miss Myers' acquaintance until this evening, she is rather pretty and very agreeable, and a lady you soon become acquainted with.

18 April 1844. So cold this evening that it is thought there will be frost, which will injure the fruit trees very much as they are now out in blossom. The country is beginning to look very beautiful. The trees are generally speaking out, and some of the early vegetables are coming forward fast. Asparagus is in the market, and has been for some days.

19 April 1844. In the evening accompanied Miss Mary Wood and Lydia to an extra concert given by the "Philharmonic Society." The audience was very large and fashionable, the principal part being ladies, and many of them quite pretty. Mrs. Baily's singing was very fine, and Norton's performance on the horn and Rudolph on the trombone was much applauded. Mr. Wallace's "Carnival of Venice" on the violin, and theme of "The Cracovienne" on the piano was beautiful in the extreme, far superior to anything I ever heard, and the applause was deafening.

20 April 1844. At 2 p.m. left for Burlington to accompany Lydia home. The number of passengers was very large, I suppose 4 or 500, the greater part Quakers as their yearly meeting broke up today.

Called over for Hugh Nesbit, and we both went down to the river accompanied by Sam Jackson of the City. Got Artram's small sail boat and went over to Bristol and back and then down the river as far as the fish huts. We were unable to get back up again as the wind was dead ahead and tide running down so we took the sail down and went up with our oars. This was the first time I ever took the helm of a sail boat to manage it myself.

21 April 1844. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Lyons preached both times. In the morning his sermon was tolerable, but in the afternoon he attempted to give an extemporaneous lecture but failed, though he succeeded in getting through. He appeared to be very much embarrassed, and introduced his references in such a ludicrous manner that he had the audience at times almost in a titter. I was really glad when it was over as well for him as for myself.

23 April 1844. Got Artram's small boat and went out sailing. Came near upset several times, as I had no ballast and the wind blew in flows. After getting Frank Garret in, we went along very well. It was the second time I ever had the management of a sail boat.

24 April 1844. In the southern part of the City and county a perfect hurricane blew. Fortunately its extent was limited, but its principal violence fell upon the Methodist Church in Wharton(14) near 4th Street. It struck the south end of the Church and, though it had been built in the finest manner, it knocked the upper part or peak as it is called, off the gable end. In an instant it ripped into splinters about one third of the roof, carrying some of the fragments a distance of 200 yards. Many persons were dreadfully alarmed by the storm, and rumors were rife of other injuries further below in the district, particularly among the rope walks and small buildings in exposed situations, and vessels on the river. I have no doubt that much and serious mischief has been produced, both on land and on the water in the path of the storm. As I before observed, it appears to have been limited, and beyond Southwark, scarcely to have been felt.

27 April 1844. Cloudy and rainy all day, making it very unpleasant. Left Burlington this morning at 8 o'clock, accompanied by Lydia for the City where we arrived at the usual hour. Went up to the office, remained until 1/2 past 1, when I left with Lydia for the boat to go to Burlington. Arrived there at usual time. Afternoon at home. In the evening all went around to Mr. Byrnes, having had an invitation to spend the evening there as the bride and groom, Mr. and Mrs. McLain (late Miss Mackison ) and several other persons were to be there. Spent the evening very pleasantly in dancing, &c., and left about 11 o'clock.

28 April 1844. In the afternoon about 2 o'clock James B[udd] Sterling, James Smith and myself started for Springfield to see the Misses Earl. Arrived there about half past 4, after passing through Slabtown, Jobstown and Wrightstown, and having a delightful ride. The Country is now looking beautiful. The trees are all in blossom, the lilacs are in bloom, and in fact vegetation appears to be several weeks in advance of the seasons of the last 4 or 5 years. Took tea and spent a very pleasant evening.

30 April 1844. Spent the evening at Dr. Ellis's where there was a small company given for the Bride and groom, Mr. and Mrs. McLain. Spent a delightful evening dancing &c. Met there two of the Misses Biles, the younger looked remarkably pretty.

MAY

1 May 1844. Clear and delightful all day and warm just such weather as is suited for the first of May, and I believe a number of private parties availed themselves of the opportunity of taking a May day frolic, vegetation is a full month in advance of the seasons of the last few years, and the bounty is now looking very beautiful, the orchards are all in bloom, and judging from the number and quantity of blossoms on the trees we may expect a plentiful supply of fruit in the coming season.

Left Burlington this morning in the early train at 1/4 past 6, and arrived in the city by 20 m. of 8, the ride down was delightful, Was away from the office the greater part of the morning attending to business.

At the office during the afternoon and evening engaged writing until 11 p.m. Up at 5 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

2 May 1844. Cloudy throughout the day, during the morning showering, and the afternoon and evening raining until about 8 o'clock when it stopped and by 9 1/2 p.m. cleared off beautifully. At the office all day, and spent the evening at Roberts' in 9th Street. Up at 5 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

3 May 1844. Clear and very pleasant through the day until about 7 p.m., when we had considerable thunder & lightning and some rain, but soon cleared off again. At the office through the morning, and in the afternoon until about 5 p.m., when I took a walk to the Recorders office on business, and afterwards a stroll in Chestnut St., found great numbers of ladies on the promenade. Evening called up for Sam Mitchell, when both of us went up to see the Miss Leeds, Spent a delightful evening there, as usual.

Up at 1/4 past 5 a.m., and to bed at 12 p.m.

4 May 1844. Clear and pleasant though warm until about 6 p.m., when we had a slight shower of rain and a considerable blow. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. left in the New Philadelphia for Burlington, had a great number of passengers on board, and a quick trip up being only one hour and 10 m. from wharf to wharf. Immediately, on arrival, Theodore Mitchell and myself went out sailing in "Antrams" boat. Had a fine breeze and went along gaily, laying over so much at times that the water would run over the gang boards. After we had been out some time, run in. Took Hugh Nesbit and Wm Wilcox out. About an hour afterwards the wind died away, and it was nearly calm, but we noticed a dark cloud rising in the Northwestern horizon when Mitchell predicted that would have wind enough in a short time, and when it did come his prediction became true to the fullest extent.

For a few minutes it blew a perfect hurricane and it was with great difficulty that we kept the boat from upsetting by sitting to the windward and luffing up a little. Stopped at Bristol twice during the time we were out, and returned to Burlington about 7 o'clock perfectly safe and without a ducking which I must say we ran a narrow chance of, had we been down opposite the fish cabins nothing would have saved us from going over.

Evening at home and went to bed quite early having so bad a headache could not remain up. Up this morning at 5 a.m.

5 May 1844. Clear warm and delightful during the day and evening. In the morning about 8 o'clock went out to take a stroll along the banks. Met Mr. Silvester and Mr. [illegible] down there, and they, wishing to go over to the fish cabins and not knowing much about rowing accompanied them over. Returned by 10 o'clock and went up to Church. Bishop Doane preached.

Afternoon took a stroll along the banks with Nesbit & Wilcox, and at about 4 o'clock got a boat and went over to Bristol. I returned in ferry boat. Spent the evening over at the Miss Nesbit's. Helen looked remarkable pretty. Up at 1/2 past 4 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

6 May 1844. Cloudy early in the morning but as the day advanced cleared off beautifully though not to last for any length of time. About 5 p.m a violent gust swept over the City, accompanied by a heavy rain. The wind blew with great force, tearing down awnings and signs, and breaking off the limbs of trees in several of the public squares and streets. The large sign of the Democratic headquarters, Chestnut St. below 6th was blown down by the violence of the wind, and falling upon a lady who was passing injured her severely. The storm and rain did not last longer than an hour when it cleared off beautifully.

Left Burlington this morning at 1/2 past 7 and arrived in the city by 1/4 of 9. Went up to the office and remained there through the day. Left for Burlington again at 5. After supper took a sail over to Bristol and back with Mr. Antram & Jim Sterling, had a very pleasant trip and returned by 8 o'clock, and then went up home where I found Miss Caroline and Virginia Mitchell who spent the evening with us, waited up them home about half past 9 o'clock. Got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

7 May 1844. Clear and warm, but windy and very dusty. It came in such clouds at times it almost blinded all poor pedestrians that were so unlucky to be in the streets.

The riots(15) between the "Irishmen" and "Native Americans"(16) that have been going on for the last few days are still progressing, and from what I hear considerable damage will be done before the matters are settled.

Left Burlington this morning about 1/4 of 8 and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9 went up to the office and remained there through the day. Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m. to accompany ma home. After supper took a sail over as far as the fish cabins and back, when it was about 8 o'clock, then went up to Mr. Sterlings where I spent the evening. Up at 10 m. of 6 a.m., and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

8 May 1844. Cloudy and blustering with considerable quantity of dust about throughout the day and evening.

Left Burlington this morning at 1/2 past 7 and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. Went up to the office and remained there through the day and evening until about 1/2 past 9 o'clock, when there was an alarm of fire, and having heard some rumors of the mob intending to set fire to St. Augustine's Church (Catholic) in 4th St. opposite New, wended my way in that direction.

About 1/2 past 9, fire was communicated to the vestibule of the Church, it is said by a boy about 14 years old. It increased with rapidity when once under way, and dense masses of smoke curled out from every window. In a few minutes the flames reached the belfry, and burst out from the upper window in broad sheets. The whole steeple was soon wrapt in the devouring element, and presented a terrific yet grand aspect. The clock struck ten while the fire was raging at its greatest fury. At 20 m. past 10, the cross which surmounted the steeple, and which remained unhurt, fell with a loud crash, amid the plaudits of a large portion of the spectators. Ten minutes afterwards the steeple, which had stood until burnt to a mere skeleton, fell throwing up a mass of cinders which fell like a shower of gold on the Building & Streets northeast of the church. The heat during the height of the fire was so intense, that persons could hardly look at the flames at the distance of a square, and the light was so brilliant as to dim even the gas lamps.

Besides "St. Augustine's," St. Michael's Church and nunnery and a number of houses were burned this afternoon, and the mob, it appears, has had virtual possession of the county of Philadelphia for the last two days and nights, and the law has been defied with impunity. Lives and property have been sacrificed in a desperate and terrible conflict, and anarchy and riots, amounting almost to civil war, have obtained a power and boldness which is without parallel in the history of our State.

Well may it be asked with regret, and apprehension, what will be the ultimate result of such a fearful state of things? Are our liberties to be surrendered to the rash and headlong domination of mobs, or are we to fly from this greater evil to the lesser one of a consolidated military police? To one or the other of these extremities we seem to be rapidly approaching, and, unless the moral atmosphere of our city be thoroughly purged, we must be content to suffer all the horrors of sanguinary tumults, reckless invasions of right and liberty, and a blind and indiscriminate destruction of property, or submit to be [dragooned] into an obedience to the law. An awful responsibility rests with those who have caused and promoted these calamities, and are yet stimulating to their continuance, and their reward must and will be the abhorrence of all good men and the anathema of every patriot.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

9 May 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day and evening, which brought numbers of the ladies of our city out on the promenade. At the office all day, and in the evening attended the Reverend Henry Giles' Lecture on Goldsmith. It was a very amusing and interesting subject & he appeared to handle it with that precision of one being well acquainted.

After the Lecture took a walk up as far as 13th and Chestnut Streets to see whether there was any mob about St. John's Church. Founded it guarded on every side by soldiers and it was impossible to approach nearer than a square. I believe all the rest of the Catholic Churches are guarded in the same way, every thing was very quiet during the time I was up, and think there will be no disturbance of any account tonight.

Up at 20 m. past 5 a.m., and to bed at 11 p.m.

10 May 1844. Clear and very pleasant through the day, but clouded over towards evening and had the appearance of rain. At the office all day and during the evening very much engaged.

Got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

11 May 1844. Cloudy and rainy in the morning and very cool, but by 3 p.m cleared off pleasantly and very warm.

At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. started for Burlington. Arrived there at the usual time, and about 5 p.m. Mr. Jos. Smith and myself got Antram's sail boat out, though there was no wind. But took with the expectation of one when the tide turned, had a little but were obliged to return as soon as the tide would carry us up. Evening out strolling with Smith and Jim Welch until about 9 o'clock then went home and in a short time after to bed.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

12 May 1844 Cloudy and rained a little in the morning but as the day advanced cleared off delightfully but windy. At home during the morning writing. Afternoon at Church, walked home with Miss Helen Nesbit. Evening at home. Cousin Lydia Roberts came up with us yesterday at 2 o'clock.

Got up at 6 a.m., bed 9 1/2 p.m.

13 May 1844. Clear and delightful through the morning and in the afternoon until about 5 p.m., when it commenced clouding over, and during the evening came the appearance of rain. Left Burlington this morning at 1/2 past 7 and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock, went up to the office and remained there during the day. Left again for Burlington at 5 p.m. where we arrived at the usual hour. After supper, Jim Smith, Jim Sterling, Jim Welch and myself took a stroll down to the river for the purpose of getting a boat and taking a sail to Bristol but unfortunately the boats were all a ground & were obliged to give up our intentions, and retraced our steps. During the remainder of the evening at home writing.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., and to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

14 May 1844. Cloudy rain damp and unpleasant during the morning but towards noon cleared off pleasantly and became rather warmer. Left Burlington this morning about 1/4 past 9. Cousin Lydia Roberts and little Addy Roberts came down with me. They have been in Burlington since Saturday last.

At the office all day, and about 1/2 past 7, went around to cousins in 9th St. Remained until 1/4 past 8, then went up to pay the Miss Leeds a visit, found them in, and as usual spent a very pleasant evening, left about 11 o'clock. Up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

15 May 1844. Clear and delightful throughout the day and evening and rather cool. At the office during the greater part of the day, and through the evening busily engaged at writing. Was out a little while on Chestnut St. in the afternoon. It was thronged with the beauty and fashion of the city, all seeming as if trying to out vie the others in the mode & variety of their dress.

Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

16 May 1844. Clear and very pleasant through the day until about 5 p.m. when it commenced clouding over, and through the evening had several showers of rain. At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington where we arrived at the usual time. Evening at home. Mrs. and Miss Helen Kinsey and son spent the evening with us.

Got up at 20 minutes past 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

17 May 1844. Cloudy and unpleasant all day with an occasional sprinkling or rain. Left Burlington this morning at about 1/4 of 8 and arrived in the city 1/4 past 9. Went up to the office and remained there through the day. About 7 p.m. took a walk down to see Bill Hanly, did not find him in, walked up as far as 6th and Market with Dr. Dickey, and then wended my way to see Miss Susan Much. Found her in, and met her sister Josephine and Mr. [illegible] there.

Up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

18 May 1844. Cloudy with the appearance of rain early in the morning but by 1 p.m. cleared off warm and pleasant. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. left for Burlington. Had over 500 passengers on board, but arrived safely about 1/2 past 3.

A few minutes after our arrival Michael Nesbit, Jim Smith and myself went out sailing. Was blowing tremendous hard and

came near capsizing several times before we got to Bristol. Upon our return from Bristol, were very near being upset twice once just off the point of the island, and again off Bishop Doanes. The latter time she was on her beam ends and the water poured in with a perfect rush over her gang boards fore and aft, wet us all completely, and shipped so much water were obliged to run into the Bishop's wharf to pump out, when Nesbit and I got out thinking it was much safer on shore, than in a small sail boat in such a blow. Smith and Mitchell however got home safe, and without upsetting.

After supper Nesbit and I got a boat and rowed over as far as the fish cabins, returned about 8 o'clock when, meeting Smith, took a stroll around town.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

19 May 1844. Clear and very pleasant through the day until about 5 p.m., when it clouded over heavily, and through the evening wore the appearance of rain. At St. Mary's Church in the morning. Bishop Doane preached. After dinner took a stroll down along the banks with Smith, upon our return met Nesbit, after some little talk concluded to take a walk out to "silver lake." The walk was delightful. Went up as far as the 5th and last lake, when we went over to see Mr. Tage. Did not find him in, and then continued on our way to Burlington again.

In the evening took a stroll down along the banks and through town with Nesbit, and finally brought up at Broad and Main just as the cars came, when both went home. Found Dr. and Mrs. Ellis, who had been spending the evening at our house.

Got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

20 May 1844. Cloudy and rained very hard during the early part of the morning, but afterwards cleared off, though it again clouded over very heavily about 4 p.m. and had several tremendous hard showers of rain. Left Burlington this morning at 1/2 past 7 and arrived in the city by 5 minutes of 9. Attended to getting some searches out and then went up to the office where I remained the rest of the day. In the evening went down to see Bill Hanly, took a stroll around with him, and about 9 o'clock went up to the office where we spent the rest of the evening.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

21 May 1844. Cloudy through the day, but towards evening cleared off quite cold. At the office all day and in the evening went up to the Assembly Buildings, to see an exhibition of the battle of Bunker Hill, Stony Point and some negro singers.

Up at 20 m. past 5 a.m. bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

22 May 1844. Clear & cool though very pleasant during the whole of the day and evening. At the office all day, and left for Burlington at 5 p.m., where we arrived at the usual time. After supper Smith and I got Antram's sail boat and went over as far as Bristol and returned being too cold to remain on the water long. After landing walked up as far as Sterling's store remained there until about 9 o'clock when Sterling, Smith and I went down to see Hall. Went in smoked a cigar, and about 10 o'clock adjourned to our respective homes. Aunt Eliza Erwin came up in the cars tonight.

Up at 5 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

23 May 1844. Clear and delightful all day, evening clear and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at 1/4 of 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 9. Ma and Aunt Erwin came down, also the Miss Biles. Waited upon Miss Kate ashore, upon arrival went up to the office where I remained through the day. Spent the evening around at Roberts' in 9th St.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

24 May 1844. Clear and delightful all day, and in the evening moonlight, warm and very pleasant. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. left for Burlington. Mr & Mrs O'Calligan and son went up.

Upon our arrival went up home, and about 1/2 past 4 took a walk down along the banks as far as the Bishop's, and around up home again. After supper Mr. Miller and I went out sailing in his boat took a stretch over to Bristol and back, and down the river a piece when the wind died away and we went in. The evening was delightful as it was both moonlight and warm. After landing (which was about 9 o'clock) and in a few minutes afterwards went over to the cars with Mr. O'Calligan to see him off.

Up at 20 m. past 5 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

25 May 1844. Clear and very pleasant during the day, and clear and moonlight in the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock went up to the office remained there until about 1 p.m., when I left attended to some little business and at 2 left for Burlington again. A very large number of passengers went up.

Upon arrival wended my way home where I remained until about 5 p.m., then took a stroll down to the river, and on returning met Jim Welch and Andrew Levering with whom I took a walk out the main Street a considerable distance but returned in time for supper, after which got a boat for the purpose of taking Miss Griffiths and Lydia out rowing, but Miss G. was prevented on account of some friends coming in. Took Lydia, Mrs. Prichett and Mr. O'Calligan. Returned by 8 o'clock. Went home and remained there the rest of the evening.

Got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

26 May 1844. Clear through the morning, afternoon showery, and the evening rained hard. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon the Bishop preached both times, evening at home. Mr. James Smith spent the evening with us. Raining hard when he left, and every appearance of continuing.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

27 May 1844. Cloudy throughout the day and evening, and in the morning from 9 1/2 until 1/2 past 10 had quite a heavy shower. Left Burlington at about 1/4 of 8 and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9, Accompanied Miss Griffiths and Lydia down, were caught in the shower and left them in a store in Walnut St. until the shower went over. Mr. and Mrs. O'Calligan went down this morning Mrs. O'C. has been staying at our house since Friday last, and Mr. O'C. since Saturday, he having returned in the 5 o'clock train.

At the office during the day and evening until 1/4 past 8, when I stopped in to see the Miss Woods. Spent about 20 minutes there, and then started up to see the Miss Leeds, but meeting them on my road up, did not go as far as the house, but retraced my steps and went down to 3rd & Walnut where I stopped in to see Bedlock & Paschall remained until about 10 o'clock when I walked up with Bedlock as far as my office and left him.

Got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

28 May 1844. Cloudy all day with sometimes the appearance of rain, early part of evening cloudy, latter part clear and moonlight.

At the office during the day and at 5 p.m., left for Burlington, where we arrived at the usual time, though not without escaping an accident which might have proved serious. On crossing the sluice bridge run off the track, might have been thrown into the sluice or down the embankment.

In the evening took a stroll down along the banks with Jim Welch and about 8 o'clock got a boat, and went over to Bristol where we remained a short time and returned to Burlington about 1/2 past 9. Up at 5 a.m., and to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

29 May 1844. Clear and delightful during the day and in the evening clear cool and moonlight. Left Burlington about 1/2 past 8 in company with Jim Welch on board the New Philadelphia for Trenton to attend a Whig convention for the confirmation of the nomination of

Henry Clay(17) for President and Theodore Frelinghuysen for Vice President. The boat was so crowded that you could with difficulty move about and at times I almost thought it unsafe to remain on board as she was almost loaded down to her guards. Upon our arrival at Bordentown had considerable difficulty in getting seats in the cars, as the party was full 1000-strong, and some ladies who had come up were unable to go on at all. After a detention of some half hour, started, and after a pleasant ride of 20 minutes or half an hour arrived at our place of destination, where we were received by our friends, the Whigs, with more enthusiastic cheers. Upon leaving the cars Welch and I took a stroll up into town. The Streets were thronged with men, each wearing the badge for the occasions, and the windows were filled with beautiful ladies, who hung from many doors and windows appropriate devices for the day.

After walking around for a while, taking some ice cream We called upon Mr. Thomas Heuling, druggist, a friend of Welches (who by the by I afterwards found to be as fine and clever a fellow as I ever met with) but did not find him in, was informed by his mother that he was down on the parade ground, where we wended our steps.

After looking around for a while found him, when I was introduced, again took a stroll around town and at abut 12 o'clock went down to the parade ground, when we bid our friend Heuling good morning and went into the ranks of the Burlington County delegation (though not without having first an invitation to dinner from him). The prize banner was taken by Salem County they having about 400 men. Burlington County turned out about 1500, and would have taken it, had they been able to rouse another hundred, as they were obliged to have four times the number of Salem, being so much nearer. About 1 p.m., the Newark and other delegations from above came in, in two trains, and such trains I never in my life witnessed before, the first one was composed of 20 eight wheeled cars and the other of 27, all filled inside and out, and I suppose they must have contained at least 3000 people. Shortly after their arrival the procession moved, headed by the national Clay banner taken by the State of Delaware at the Baltimore Convention of the early part of this month. Enthusiasm appeared to be the order of the day, throughout the whole length of the procession there was nothing but shouting and cheering, from a number of windows bouquets and wreaths were thrown to the delegations as they passed, and in return the fair donors would receive three hearty cheers. Wherever there was a Clay banner displayed, or fair faces to be seen at the windows, the cheering was unbounded, the poor fellows hardly seemed to know what they were about as I will show from an instance I will here relate in a few words. My friend Welch was so enthusiastic in cheering the ladies, waving his hat, handkerchief, &c, that he did not discover where he was going until he found himself in the middle of a large mud hole up over shoe top, which added materially to white pants, if dirt is an embellishment. After parading through a number of the streets, the procession went to the state house, and just before arriving there, Welch and I left out of the ranks, having noticed three most beautiful girls who we thought we would like to have a look at, while we could stand on the pavement in front of the house under the pretense of looking at the procession, while taking sly glances at them. Found their names to be the Miss Halsteds, daughters of an eminent lawyer, and a great Whig of Trenton. I think the number of strangers in the city of Trenton today, without exaggeration, 20,000. About 3 p.m., took dinner with Mr. Heuling, after which, went down to see Miss Fanny Brister, a very pretty looking young lady. Spent the remainder of the afternoon strolling about from one place to another. Spent about an hour in one of the upper rooms of the state house where we again had an opportunity of seeing the Miss Halsteds. In the evening took a walk down as far as the cottages, Welch with Miss Heuling, and I with Miss Brister. The walk was delightful, being moonlight, returned about 10 o'clock. Was very much amazed with a simple fellow down at the canal, at his strange and nonsensical expressions, such as "say brass horn with a pusher" (meaning trombone), "say steamboat with a fence 'round it," "say bell went ring," "say steamboat wheel, won't go 'round." Welch accompanied Miss Brister home. Got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 12 a.m.

30 May 1844. Clear and very pleasant during the early part of the morning, but about 11 o'clock came on to rain, and had sprinklings of it through the remainder of the day and in the evening. Mr. Heuling prevailed upon me to remain today for the purpose of visiting the State Prison, Calico works, &c. About 1/2 past 9 o'clock, Mr. Heuling, Mr. Welch, Miss Brister and myself, took a walk down to

the State Prison. It is a splendid building, in the Egyptian style of architecture, & composed of a kind of red stone. The interior arrangements are very fine, and we were shown in every part, not excepting the cells (in one of which a prisoner was confined), bake house, store house, kitchen, &c. Were also on top, from which is afforded a fine view of Trenton and surrounding country. After registering our names, left the prison, and visited the calico works, were shown it passing through every process of dying, stamping, &c, &c While there it came on to rain, but not so hard that we did not get home dry under a borrowed umbrella, and India rubber cloak.

In the afternoon, called on Miss Brister again with Welch, and on the Miss Quiglies with Welch and Miss Brister. After accompanying Miss B. home, Mr. Heuling took us in to see the Miss Evans, two very nice young ladies, and quite pretty. Both were lively and pleasing in their manners, spent about an hour there, and had some good playing and singing, not excepting several "coon songs(18) ." On our return to Mr. H., met a Miss Pitcher, found her agreeable and pleasant in her manners and rather pretty. Left for Burlington again at about 10 m. past 8, with Welch, and accompanied by Miss Heuling, where we arrived about 9 o'clock, and after (so far as regards myself) spending two of the most delightful days I ever had. Up at 4 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

31 May 1844. Cloudy all day, with an occasional sprinkling of rain, the sun would occasionally make an effort to shine out, but the trial was ineffectual. Evening cloudy. Left Burlington this morning about 1/4 of 8 and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. Went up to the office, and remained until about 4 p.m., busily employed writing, when I took a walk down to the Washington Square to see the Sunday school

children, who were celebrating their fourth anniversary by a floral procession. Each child carried a quantity of flowers, which were carried to the Chinese museum salon, where they were deposited, to be purchased by visitors this evening at any price they may choose to give for them to aid some of their friends. Evening at office writing.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

JUNE

1 June 1844. Clear warm and delightful during the day and evening. At the office through the morning until about 1/2 past 12 p.m., then left, attended to some little business and at 2 p.m. started for Burlington. Had a large number of passengers on board, and arrived safely about 20 m. of 4 o'clock. Went up home, remained for about 3/4 of an hour, then went around to Jim Sterling's, where I met Jim Smith and Jim Welch, concluded to take a swim over at the island. All went down to the river, got a boat and rowed over, found the water to be in delightful bathing order, on our return, broke an oar, and Sterling sculled us in.

After supper got a boat, and took a row down along the banks with the expectation of meeting Mr. Welch, Miss Heuling and some others, as I had made an appointment with Mr. W., but having supper too late, missed them. Met Lydia and little Mary Roberts (who came up this afternoon) on the banks, took them a short row, returned and put the boat up about 8 o'clock, spent the rest of the evening at home. Mr. O'Calligan came up in the mail train, and went down in the return train at 9 o'clock. Up at 1/4 of 5 a.m. and to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

2 June 1844. Clear and very pleasant, until about 7 p.m. when it clouded over heavily, and during the evening had several showers of rain, and considerable thunder and lightning. Before church in the morning took a walk down on the banks with little Mary Roberts. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, the Bishop preached in the morning and examined the Sunday school children in the afternoon. Spent the evening over at Miss Nesbit's. Helen as usual looked very beautiful, and I must say that she pleases me better than any lady I ever met with. Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

3 June 1844. Cloudy or misty throughout the day and evening, though pleasant. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock, went up to the office and remained there during the day, about 7 p.m. went out, attended to some little business, and returned to the office about 8 o'clock.

At 1/4 past 8 went up to see the Miss Leeds, found them in and as usual spent a very pleasant evening. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

4 June 1844. Cloudy all day, but cleared off in the evening. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington where we arrived at the usual hour. After supper took a walk around to Jim Sterling's, there met Jim Welch, when he and I strolled down to the river, got a boat and two pairs of oars and rowed over to the fish cabins where they were just hauling in their net. Waited about 15 minutes until they made their haul, and then rowed to Bristol, returning to Burlington about 9 o'clock, then walked around town and parted about 10 o'clock. Up at 5 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

5 June 1844. Left Burlington in the early train this morning and though it was foggy when we first started, cleared off beautifully before our arrival at Camden. The country looked magnificent, and I think those who would enjoy nature in her holiday, should now go forth from the city. It is the time when the year is most beautiful, and when every beauty, and every sweet of field, and tree, and flower, may be enjoyed by the poorest, as fully and perfectly as by the richest. No fence or wall will conceal the luscious richness of the field and meadows, nor shut off the odors that they impart to the air. And gratitude and praise may ascend from every tuneful breast, for all of delight and pleasure, which these displays can make, because everything they give,

"Beyond the rich possessor's narrowed claim,

His tuneful breast enjoys."

It was clear and delightful during the day and evening. At the office during the day, and at about 7 p.m. took a stroll down Chestnut St., it was most too late for the ladies on the promenade, however met quite a number. Spent the evening up at Miss Mary and Louisa Wood, met there Miss Jane Peterson, a very pretty and agreeable young lady, waited upon her home. Up at 5 a.m., bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

6 June 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day and through the evening. At the office until 5 p.m. when I left for Burlington, arrived there at the usual hour. After supper, Hugh Nesbit and myself took a stroll down to the river, where we met Jim Sterling, Jim Smith and Jim Welch going over to the island to swim. Joined them and went over where we remained until about 8 o'clock, and returned to Burlington, none having went in to swim except Sterling. Went home about 9 o'clock where I met Mr. & Mrs. Sterling, and two Miss Biles, Kate and waited upon the Miss B.s home about 10 o'clock. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

7 June 1844. Had a very heavy shower of rain, accompanied by thunder and lightning early in the morning but by 9 o'clock, cleared off beautifully and remained so during the rest of the day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 20 m. past 9, after attending to some little business for Pa who was too unwell to come down, went up to the office where I remained through the day.

In the evening was down at the Native American Meeting, which was the largest gathering I ever witnessed in the city, filling Chestnut St. from 6th to 4th St., and addressed by 5 different persons in as many places, was also down at Hanley's for a little while. Had a heavy shower of rain about 10 o'clock. Up at 5 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

8 June 1844. Clear and delightful all day and evening. At the office until 5 p.m. when I left for Burlington, arrived there at the usual hour. Evening out boating with Sarah Roberts (who came up this afternoon) and Lydia, returned home about 8 o'clock where I remained rest of evening. Up at 5 a.m., bed 10 p.m.

9 June 1844. Clear through the day, but clouded over about 8 o'clock when we had a shower of rain. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Bishop preached both times, in the morning gave us a sermon an hour and a quarter long. Evening at home. Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 9 3/4 p.m.

10 June 1844. Clear and delightful during the day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and arrived in the city about 7. Went up & got my breakfast, and then to the office, where I remained the greater part of the day, and in the evening busily employed writing. Got up this morning at quarter past 4, and to bed at 10 p.m.

11 June 1844. Clear and delightful weather throughout the day and evening. At the office all day, very busy, left about 1/4 past 8, took a stroll around and stopped into see Miss Susan Much for a short time. Up at 1/4 of 5 a.m., bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

12 June 1844. Clear and delightful during day and evening. At the office all day, and in the evening until after 9 o'clock, when a fire broke out in Perth St. below 8th, when thinking I wanted a little exercise after the labors of the day ran up to it. I do not remember that I have been up in that neighborhood for some 7 or 8 years, and was astonished at the Improvements made. Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed 10 3/4 p.m.

13 June 1844. Cloudy early through the morning, and at about 12 p.m. commenced raining and continued through the day and evening. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington where we arrived at 7 o'clock having been detained on the road half an hour, on account of some part of the locomotive giving way. Spent the evening at home. Miss Kate Lynd was there from Cincinnati having come up with Grandma from the city to spend a few days with us. I was very much pleased with her, as she was pretty interesting and pleasing in her manners. She favored us with some fine singing and playing on the piano. Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

14 June 1844. Cloudy with the appearance of rain early in the morning, but by noon cleared off delightfully, which weather continued through the evening.

Left Burlington this morning at a few minutes before 8 and arrived in the city by a few minutes after 9. They hurried the boat along considerably, on account of the Proprietor an opposition and fast boat followed us closely, but we gained upon her withal, and I am satisfied that she will not be able to run with the old Trenton.

At the office during the day and left for Burlington again at 5 p.m., where we arrived at the usual hour. After supper took a walk with Miss Lynd and Lydia on the banks and in the Bishop's garden returning about 8 o'clock. Mr. and Mrs. Sterling and Mrs. Pritchet spent the evening with us. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

15 June 1844. Clear and delightful all day but cool. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city about 9. Went up to the office and remained there until 2 p.m. when I left for Burlington again. After my arrival went up home, remained there a short time when Nesbit called for me. Took a stroll down to the River, got Antram's sail boat, and went out sailing. I returned about 6 o'clock. After supper took Miss Kate Lynd and Lydia out rowing, went down as far as the fish cabins and returned, landing them above the town wharf. Being low tide was very windy, was obliged to carry Kate and Lydia over the mud, the former made considerable resistance. Returned home about 8 o'clock. Dr. and Mrs. Ellis spent the evening with us. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

16 June 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day and evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning with Miss Lynd and Lydia. Afternoon at home until about 3 o'clock when Smith, Nesbit and Welch called for me, and we went out together and took a stroll out to fountain woods. Returned about 6 o'clock. After supper took a walk with Miss Lynd and Lydia down on the banks, afterwards went to Baptist meeting. Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

17 June 1844. Cloudy though pleasant all day. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9. Waited upon Miss Kate Lynd down. I am sorry she has left for I found her one of the most pleasant girls I have met with for a long time. At the office all day, and during the evening until about 9 o'clock when I took a stroll around, and returned about 10 o'clock and went to bed. Had a little sprinkling of rain in the evening. Up at 10 m. of 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

18 June 1844. Clear and exceedingly warm all day and during the evening. At the office from morning early, until 5 p.m. busy, when I left for Burlington, arrived there at the usual hour after a warm ride. Evening out on the river in boat with Jim Smith until about 1/2 past 8 when I returned home, where I remained the rest of the evening. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 9 3/4 p.m.

19 June 1844. Clear and exceedingly warm all day. Thermometer as high as 92 in the shade. Had a heavy shower of rain in the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. Went up to the office and remained there until about 8 1/4 o'clock when I went up to see the Miss Leeds and spent the evening there pleasantly. Up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

20 June 1844. Clear early in the morning and very warm, but about 11 a.m. clouded over and had several showers of rain through the day, which cooled the air considerably.

At the office the greater part of the day, left about 8 o'clock and took a stroll down Second Street. Concluded I would go down to see the Miss Coates as I have not been there since last winter. Found Susan and Lydia in and spent the evening there. Left about 1/4 of 11 and walked leisurely up to my lodgings and went to bed. Got up at 1/4 of 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m.

21 June 1844. Rainy early in the morning but afterwards cleared off, though in the evening clouded over again. At the office during the morning, and at about 1/2 past 2 p.m. went down to the Recorder's office to make an examination of the title, where I remained until about 1/4 of 5, and then left for Burlington. Arrived at the usual hour. In the evening out with Jim Welch, lasting until about 1/2 past 8, when we came in and I went home. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 9 p.m.

22 June 1844. Cloudy all day, and in the afternoon very blustering and became quite cold, evening rainy.

Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. Was at the Recorder's office the principal part of the morning, and left for Burlington again at 2 p.m. Arrived there about 1/2 past 3, after which, spent the afternoon partly at home and partly strolling about town.

In the evening over to see the Miss Nesbits, where I spent the evening. Met there Mr. Kinsey and two daughters who I accompanied home about 1/4 of 10. Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

23 June 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant all day, and evening moonlight. Took a stroll down on the banks with Jim Welch early this morning, and went to St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Between church in afternoon, Jim Welch and I again took a stroll on the banks, and when passing the young ladies' boarding school (St. Mary's Hall), our attention was called by several of the young ladies of the hall waving their handkerchiefs, kissing their hands to us, &c, &c, when of course we returned the salutations and carried them on together for about an hour. In the evening Jim Sterling, Welch and I went over to Bristol and attended the Episcopal church, had an excellent sermon and returned to Burlington about 10 o'clock. The trip over was delightful, as it was moonlight, clear, cool and pleasant. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

24 June 1844. Clear and delightful all day and during the evening, which was moonlight.

Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. After a very pleasant trip, waited upon Miss Helen Nesbit down, and after our arrival in the city, up as far as 3rd and Chestnut Sts. At the office the principal part of the day, and in the evening until 1/4 past 8, when I walked down to Mr. McIlhenny's to see Miss Kate Lynd. But found she was staying now up at the corner of Marshall and Spring Garden Sts., in which direction I wended my way. Found her in and looking as pretty and being as pleasant and agreeable as ever. Sat conversing until about 9 o'clock when a walk was proposed, the night being so clear, moonlight and beautiful. But where to go we did not know, when Miss L. proposed to go as far as the Post office, she wishing to put a letter in. I enjoyed the walk very much, occupying two hours, stopped in at Wood's and took some ice cream to refresh us. Up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

25 June 1844. Clear and very warm all day, and evening clear, warm and moonlight.

At the office all day and 5 p.m. started for Burlington on board the New Philadelphia. She commenced running up at this hour last Saturday evening, and lands her New York passengers at Bristol first and then returns to Burlington, which delays us some 3/4 of an hour, and could be avoided by about 3 minutes delay in stopping at Burlington on going up. But we will have to put up with the inconvenience, as there is no changing the company's arrangements, it being the greatest monopoly in the United States.

In the evening out rowing until 10 o'clock with Hugh Nesbit, were in to swim at the Island and also visited Bristol. Ma was taken quite sick this morning and was confined to her bed. Hope she will recover soon. Got up at 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

26 June 1844. Clear and extremely warm all day and during the evening. At the office during the day and in the evening until about 1/4 past 8, hard at work writing. Spent the evening down at Mrs. Cristiani's. Up at 5 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

27 June 1844. Clear and very warm all day and evening. At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington on board the New Philadelphia. Arrived there about 7 o'clock after landing the New York passengers at Bristol. In the evening out on the river rowing with Hugh Nesbit. Was really delightful, being moonlight, cool and pleasant. Returned home about 10 o'clock and found Mrs. Guible, she spent part of the evening at our house and left about 11 o'clock. Took a bath before going to bed. Up at 4 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

28 June 1844. Clear and very warm all day, and in the evening clear and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city 1/4 past 9. At the office all day or until 1/2 past 7 p.m., when Mr. Bird and I went down to the Arch St. Theatre to attend Mr. E. Burton's benefit, Mr. Geo. Campbell having presented me with two box tickets. The audience was large and respectable, and the pieces passed off well, though most too long being 1/2 past 12 when out. Up at 5 1/2 a.m., bed at 1 a.m.

29 June 1844. Clear and very warm during the day and in the evening clear and moonlight. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington on board the New Philadelphia and arrived there about 7 o'clock after our stoppage at Bristol. Spent the greater part of the evening talking with Miss Helen and Clara Nesbit, sitting on their steps. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

30 June 1844. Clear, warm and pleasant all day, evening clear and moonlight. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Before church, and between church time took a walk on the banks. In the evening at home on the steps smoking a cigar with James Kinsey and James Sterling. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

JULY

1 July 1844. Cloudy during the morning with the appearance of rain, but about the middle of the day cleared off delightfully.

Left Burlington this morning accompanied by Hugh Nesbit, and rowed down to Dunk's ferry for the purpose of fishing but after pulling hard against a head wind, and tiring ourselves very much, were not able to catch anything, the river having too great a swell on it.

Returned to Burlington about 1 p.m., went up home, took dinner and then a nap until about 3 o'clock, when Nesbit again called for me. Then both called for James Smith, when we got the sloop Valiant and took a delightful sail for about 5 miles up the river, then returned, going down the river as far as the sluice, when unluckily ran aground and not withstanding all our endeavors were unable to get off again, and were finally obliged to anchor the boat to let her remain until high tide.

Smith and I undressed and jumped over board and by swimming and wading to shore. I succeeded in getting a boat, then rowed out to the sloop again and took Smith and Nesbit off, when we were obliged to walk up to town, being nearly a mile. Got home again about 8 o'clock and took supper, after which Nesbit called for me, and went up to see the owner of the sloop. Were unable to see him, and we made up our minds to get up early tomorrow morning (say 1/2 past 3) when it would be high water and get her off. Nesbit to remain with me tonight. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

2 July 1844. Clear and very warm all day and in the evening. Nesbit and I got up this morning at 1/2 past 3, dressed, went down to the river, got a boat and rowed down to where we left the sloop last night. Found the tide was high enough to float her, and got out into deep water when we made sail and got up to her mooring by 5 o'clock. After which, went home and dressed myself for the day.

Left for the city at the usual hour and arrived there about 10 m. of 9 o'clock. Went up to the office and remained there until the time of leaving in the afternoon. Left for Burlington at 5 p.m. on board New Philadelphia and arrived at the usual time. Paid three visits in the evening, namely to the Miss Nesbits, Miss Biles and Miss Griffiths. Up at 1/2 past 3 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

3 July 1844 Clear and pleasant all day and the evening clear, cool and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at 1/4 of 6 o'clock and did not arrive in the city until about 1/4 of 8. Went up to the office and remained there through the day. Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m. Spent the evening strolling about town. Up at 4 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

4 July 1844. Clear and delightful all day and very cool, especially in the evening, and could not have been suited better for the glorious 4th. I must cut my remarks, &c short for today, as I have no time to write them. I will merely say how I spent the day.

After breakfast took a stroll down to the river, where I met Smith, Nesbit, Collet, brother, Hays, Mitchell and some others. About 1/2 past 8, the party started out sailing on board the sloop May Ann. I did not remain on board longer than 20 minutes, when I landed at Bristol and returned in the ferryboat. The rest of them went down to Risden's ferry to dine.

Spent the rest of the morning and afternoon until 3 o'clock strolling about town and at home, where I went down to the river and met the party again. They arrived back about 1/2 past 3, all took supper at the hotel. Evening took a walk down on the banks with Miss Helen Nesbit to see the display of fire works at the Bishop's, who gave a party for the young ladies of the Hall. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

5 July 1844. Rather cloudy all day though cool and pleasant. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived there about 10 m. past 9. Was introduced to Miss Ogleby, by Lydia coming down, she is of St. Mary's Hall, and a pretty agreeable and pleasant young lady. At the office all day and evening. Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

6 July 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office through the day, and in the evening Nesbit, Smith and I went over to swim. Upon our return, rowed down the bank, and landed about 9 o'clock, then took a stroll through town. Nesbit accompanied me home, and had a chat on the steps until about 1/2 past 10. Up at 5 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

7 July 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. In the morning, Mr. Lyons was ordained priest. After supper called over at Nesbit's for Smith and Hugh and all three went over to Bristol to church. Heard an excellent sermon and returned to Burlington by 1/2 past 10. Should have got home by 10, but came over with Bill Hays in a sailboat and was obliged to row it over. Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

8 July 1844. Clear, warm and delightful all day and evening. Left Burlington at the usual hour this morning and arrived at the city by 1/2 past 9.

Went up to the office and remained there. Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m. On board the boat going up, met Miss Israel from Pittsburgh, a younger sister of Mrs. Olden, to whom I was introduced by Miss Waterman. She is quite pretty and interesting in her manners. In the evening out rowing with Miss Clara and Helen Nesbit, their brother, James Smith and two other gentlemen. Rowed down as far as the Bishop's, then over to Bristol, but did not land, and then continued our course to the upper end of the island, returning to Burlington by the inner channel. When we arrived was near 10 o'clock. Went up with Miss Helen, went in and sat for about 1/2 an hour. Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

9 July 1844. Clear and pleasant all day, and in the evening cloudy and cool. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour. After arrival in the city went up to the office, remained there until 5 p.m. when I left for Burlington again. Spent the evening over at the Miss Nesbit's, and spent very agreeably. Left about 1/2 past 10. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

10 July 1844. Cloudy early in the morning and at about 10 o'clock had a very heavy shower of rain, after which cleared up. Did not go down to the city today, having intended to go sailing with Nesbit and Smith but the wind proving too blowy, concluded not to go. Nesbit and I, together with one of the Kinseys, got our fishing tackle with the intention of going out fishing. Went over as far as the island when we went in to swim. Afterwards practiced with pistols. Did not leave the island until the shower came on and became thoroughly soaked in going over. Went into the hotel and remained until the shower was over, when we went up to Nesbit's lot, back of the house, and commenced practicing with our pistols again. Continued until about 2 o'clock when I went home to dinner, after which took a nap.

About 3 o'clock, Kinsey, Smith and Nesbit called for me to go up to the high banks in a sailboat. It blew very hard and squally. I went about 3 miles up the river with them, when Smith ran the boat into shore and I jumped out, though not without getting a ducking. Walked down to Bristol and crossed over in the ferry. They returned safe, though not without Smith losing his hat. After my return, dressed and went over to see the Miss Nesbits to make up a party to go rowing this evening. Afterwards went down to Welch's to see Miss Brister from Trenton. In the evening the party started for rowing about 1/2 past 7, consisting of Miss Helen Nesbit, Miss Louisa Nesbit, Miss Clara Nesbit, brother Hugh, and Mr. James Smith. Remained on the river until about 9 o'clock. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

11 July 1844. Clear, warm and pleasant all day. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 1/2 past 9. At the office all day and left for Burlington again at 5 p.m. Took a walk on the banks with Lydia in the evening and on our return stopped in to see Miss Griffiths where we spent the rest of the evening pleasantly.

As yet I have not said a word about the riots that have been disgracing the city by fighting, bloodshed and death since Saturday last, on account of my not having time. But I will here record a description of the scene of action, &c, that it may not be omitted from the events of the day for which I keep this book. The streets in which the principal rioting was had, was in Front, 2nd, 3rd and Queen Sts. The church, which their endeavors most tried to destroy, was St. Phillip on the south side of Queen St. between 2nd and 3rd Sts. When the troops fired they were by 2nd and Queen Sts.

There are contradictory accounts as to the extent of provocation and resistance given them before the firing took place. From what I can gather from all accounts, it appears that a good many hard names were bestowed on the soldiers, and afterwards brickbats and bottles thrown at them, and finally an attempt was made to stab Capt. Hill with his own sword, by a person who had him down. The impression must have been strong that the troops would not venture to fire. During the riots of May last they were taunted and jeered to fire, and did not. The firing between the troops and the mob was principally up and down Queen St., between 2nd and Front. The houses, trees, posts, &c, of the square bear ample evidence of the scattering grape and canister shot. At the time when I write, attention has been called off from the church. The issue lies between the civil power and its military face and the insurgents. Third Street, between Chestnut and Walnut, gives a lively idea of military display. Mounted troops and foot soldiers line the street, and the Guard Bank building, situated there, is the headquarters of the Major General, and is also converted into a hospital for the wounded soldiery. The rioters wish to have the affair in their own hands. Death is threatened for any obnoxious soldier to show himself on their ground. One who was recognized there since the military left the place, was pursued by infuriated men and barely escaped with his life. The district is quiet, but is not the quiet of the supremacy of the law, while people take the law into their own hands.

A subordinate soldier, who is bound to obey orders emanating in the first instance from the civil authority, is hardly an object for vengeance. The duty of every citizen in this crisis is plain. He should support the laws. To be in active opposition to the military is to oppose the Commander in Chief, Gov. Porter, now here; and is treason against the entire Commonwealth. I do not stop to inquire, whether the persons opposing this supreme authority consider themselves desperately aggrieved. That has nothing to do with the question. The matter is narrowed down to this. Are the Governor of the State, and the soldiers under his command, to be defied, and the authority of the Commonwealth destroyed? The question is not whether it was an act of folly, or worse than folly, to take arms in the church; or whether persons were shot by the military. It is, whether certain persons who have no legal power, can defy, or threaten with defiance, those who have all the legal power.

Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

12 July 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day and evening though rather warm. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour. At the office all day and left for Burlington again at 5 p.m.

In the evening Hugh Nesbit and myself got a boat and after rowing around for a while, went over to Bristol. Waited until the New York cars came. Among the passengers saw Mr. M. Pope Mitchell. Invited him to go over with us in our boat. Like to have had a serious accident happen to Mr. Mitchell, caused by his missing his footing in getting into the boat and came very near falling over, when I caught hold of his coat and pulled him into the boat again, he getting off with nothing more than a wet coat tail and some little fright and bruises.

Got into Burlington again by 1/2 past 9, when I went up with Nesbit to his house & spent the rest of the evening, say until 1/4 of 11, talking with two of his sisters, Helen and Clara, and Mr. Smith. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

13 July 1844. Clear and pleasant but warm all day and during the evening. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour. Went up to the office, remained there through the morning, and at 2 p.m. started for Burlington again. Waited upon Miss Elizabeth Nesbit. After our arrival in Burlington, Smith, Nesbit, and myself went out sailing, returned safe about 7 o'clock. In the evening Mr. Smith and myself took Miss Helen, Clara and Elizabeth Nesbit out rowing. Went down as far as Bristol College wharf, and returned to Burlington about 10 o'clock. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

14 July 1844. Clear and very warm all day and evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Spent the evening over at Mr. Kinsey's. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

15 July 1844. Clear through the day and warm, towards evening clouded over and had a shower of rain. Left Burlington and arrived in the city as usual this morning. At the office during the day, and at 5 p.m. left again for Burlington.

After supper walked over with Lydia and little Clara Roberts to see Miss Parker. Left them there, and went over to the Miss Nesbits, it having been proposed to take a walk to Silver Lake this evening. But Miss Helen, having a headache, and it wearing the appearance of rain, concluded we would not go, but postpone it until some other evening. Mr. and Mrs. Sterling came over a few minutes afterwards and remained about 20 minutes when it came on to rain and we left, and went over to Mrs. S. Went in, remained a short time, and then called over for Lydia at Mr. Parker's. Went in and remained about 1/2 an hour, when we left for home. Met Miss Wilson there, the intended bride of Mr. Theodore Mitchell. After going home wrote a bond, &c. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

16 July 1844. Clear and very warm through the morning, but about 3 o'clock clouded over, and we had one of the most tremendous storms of rain I ever witnessed.

Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city by about 9 o'clock. Went up to the office, remained there during the morning and at 2 p.m. left for Burlington again.

Just as we came to at Burlington wharf the above mentioned storm came on. Capt. Kester kept his boat at the landing for about half an hour, or until after the hardest part of the shower. It was as good as a farce to see the ladies running and jumping over the water on the wharf. I got up to the hotel without being much wet and up home by about 5 o'clock after stopping at several places to avoid the rain. Evening at home. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

17 July 1844. Cloudy early in the morning, with the appearance of rain and rather cool, but as the day advanced, cleared off quite warm, evening clear and warm. Went down to the boat this morning with the intention of going to the city, but the day being so favorable for fishing, and not having anything of importance to attend to in the city, concluded I would go. Went up home changed my dress, saw Rev. Kinsey, got him to accompany me, and started for Dunk's ferry about 20 m. of 9. Rowed down there in 45 minutes, caught 4 doz. and a half and returned to Burlington by 1/4 of 2. Went up home, got dinner and took a nap until about 4 o'clock. Got up, took a bath and dressed, then over to Kinsey's. Went down in the garden with Rev., ate my fill of pears, gathered about a 1/2 peck to take home. Came out on the porch, sat and talked with Mr., Mrs. and Miss Kinsey for half an hour.

Went home, left my pears, then down to the wharf to see the New Philadelphia come in. Walked up with Pa, got supper, after which, took a seat on the steps. A few minutes afterwards Miss Virginia and Caroline Mitchell came to pay Lydia a visit, she being in the city, came in to see Ma. They remained about 15 or 20 minutes. I accompanied them home, and spent the evening until about 1/4 past 9 there and then returned home. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

18 July 1844. Clear, warm and pleasant all day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 10 m. of 9, a very quick passage. At the office during the day and

left for Burlington again at 5 p.m., where we arrived by 7 p.m.

After supper, called over for Smith at Nesbits to go out sailing with me, but found the young ladies were ready to go rowing, and he had just left to procure a boat. Concluded to walk down to the river with them, see the ladies safe in and then get my sailboat, but they insisted upon my accompanying them, and after some persuasion did so. Had a delightful row, but the ladies suffered considerably from the boat leaking, she being laden very deep in the water, having 8 on board, 4 gentlemen and 4 ladies, viz. Miss Louisa, Clara and Helen Nesbit and Miss Dobin from the city, and Mr. Smith, Mr. Boyd, Mr. Pemberton Hutchinson and myself. Returned to Burlington about 10 o'clock, waited upon the ladies home, went in, sat a while. Afterwards took a stroll around and went home about 11 o'clock. Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

19 July 1844. Clear and very warm all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. At the office during the day and left again for Burlington at 5 p.m. Met on board Mrs. Leland, her twin daughters, who are remarkably pretty, intelligent and interesting, and younger daughter. They were going to Princeton to board for the summer season. Miss Louisa Wood came up with Lydia this afternoon. Evening at home with the exception of about 20 minutes occupied in going over with Louisa Wood and Lydia to Mr. Wetherill's to see his night blooming acres. Met quite a large number of persons there.

Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at half past 10 p.m.

20 July 1844. Clear during the morning, and in the afternoon until about 3 o'clock when a very heavy shower came up and continued until about 6, when it cleared off again.

Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour this morning. Went up to the office and remained there. Left for Burlington again at 2 p.m. Spent the afternoon over at Nesbit's with Hugh smoking cigars, during the rain. In the evening over to swim at the island and rowing along the banks. Returned home about 1/2 past 9 o'clock. Found Miss Helen and Clara Nesbit there, and waited upon them home about 10 o'clock.

Got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

21 July 1844 Clear, warm and pleasant all day and evening moonlight. About 8 o'clock this morning Hugh Nesbit and myself got Miller's sailboat and went down to Bristol College wharf, to bring his friend Walter Clemens up to Burlington. Got away from the wharf about 9 o'clock, but the wind died away, and the tide running down had a difficult time to get up. However after rowing and polling succeeded in getting up as far as the Bishop's wharf by 1/4 of 11 o'clock, when I landed and went up to church. Heard the Bishop preach. Also went to church in the afternoon. In the evening Nesbit and I took Clemens down to Bristol College again, and returned to Burlington again by about 10 o'clock having a hard pull up against the tide, occupying about, but the night was clear and moonlight which made being on the water delightful. Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

22 July 1844. Cloudy during the morning, clear in the afternoon, and clear and moonlight in the evening. This morning Louisa Wood, Lydia, Rev. Kinsey and myself went down to the sluice to fish, but not meeting with much success returned home about 11 o'clock. I went over with Kinsey, and remained there until about 1/2 past 12, feasting on pears. About 1/2 past 2, Kinsey and I got a boat and went out on the bar, caught about 3 doz. fish and returned about 6. In the evening took Miss Helen and Clara Nesbit, and Louisa Wood out rowing, the evening was moonlight, clear and delightful, remained on the river until about 1/4 past 9. Waited upon the Miss N. home. Mrs. Jewell and Mr. George Campbell came up today, and spent the night at our house. The two Miss Kinseys spent the evening with us. Up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

23 July 1844. Cloudy in the morning and rained quite fast at times, cleared off about 2 p.m. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour. Went up to the office and remained there during the day. Left again at 5 p.m. for Burlington.

Mrs. Carr and two children came up this afternoon, which increased our family considerably, having Mr. Campbell, Mrs. Jewell and Louisa Wood staying with us at present. So crowded had to sleep on the sofa in the parlor. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Kinsey's. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

24 July 1844. Clear and very pleasant but warm until about 6 1/4 p.m. when a heavy shower of rain came up and continued through the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour. Met on board Miss Addie Lippincott, had some conversation with her and was introduced to her sister Mrs. Winslow. Mrs. Carr, two children and Mrs. Jewell went down this morning. At the office during the day and left again for Burlington at 5 p.m., was caught in the shower, and did not get home until 1/2 past 7.

Pa went up to Trenton this morning, and returned at noon. Ma, Lydia, Louisa Wood and Mr. Campbell went out to Brown's Mills(19) this morning, and returned by about 1/2 past 8 p.m. They spent a delightful day, until the shower of rain came on, which wet them a little. Mr. and Mrs. Burrough, Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, Mrs. May Roberts and some of the children came up to see us this afternoon and returned in the 5 o'clock boat. Evening at home. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

25 July 1844. Had several very heavy showers of rain during the day though at times it would be clear, rained hard during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city by 1/2 past 9. Miss Clara Nesbit went down this morning.

At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left again for Burlington in the midst of a tremendously hard shower of rain, which lasted all the way up. Received a ducking both on going to, and leaving the boat.

Evening at home. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 9 p.m.

26 July 1844. Raw, damp, rainy and very unpleasant all day, and in the evening wore the appearance of clearing, but very cool. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city by 1/4 of 10. Louisa Wood came down this morning. At the office during the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Evening at home.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 9 p.m.

27 July 1844. Clear, cool and delightful, evening clear, cool and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. At the office during the day, left for Burlington again at 5 p.m.

Evening out on the river with Hugh Nesbit and Rev. Kinsey. Remained out until about 1/4 past 8. After landing, walked up to Nesbits and remained on the steps until about 9, then went in. Met J. Wallace Collet there, two of the Miss Nesbits and some others. A short time after it was proposed to take a walk. Collet took Miss Louisa, and I Helen, walked as far as the Bishop's and returned. Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

28 July 1844. Clear and delightful all day and evening clear, cool and moonlight. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Ogleby preached both times. After supper made up my mind to go to the city, having some business to attend to early in the morning. Crossed to Bristol in a small boat with Hugh Nesbit and two others. Left in the New Philadelphia for the city about 9 o'clock and arrived there by 20 m. of 11. Were detained some 15 minutes at Burlington wharf, taking in about 200 colored people, who had been up to a quarterly meeting.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

29 July 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant all day and evening clear and moonlight. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Down on the banks in the early part of the evening taking a stroll with George Parker. Went over to hear the Virginia Minstrels for about an hour afterwards.

Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

30 July 1844. Clear and delightful all day, evening rather cloudy, with appearance of rain tomorrow. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour.

At the office during the greater part of the time I was in town, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. After tea Miss Virginia Mitchell stopped in to see Lydia, waited upon her home about 8 o'clock, after returning home, spent the remainder of the evening. Mr. and Mrs. Sterling passed part of the evening with us.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

31 July 1844. Cloudy and showering through the day. Evening cloudy but no rain. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour this morning. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Spent the evening over at Nesbits. Jim Smith was there; he came up today but leaves again tomorrow. Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

AUGUST

1 August 1844. Cloudy during the greater part of the day, and evening. Left Burlington this morning, and arrived in the city as usual. At the office during the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. In the evening took a stroll down to the river to see the Trenton pass with the excursion passengers from New York bay, but she not arriving until late, walked up as far as the Post Office. While there, Miss Louisa and Helen Nesbit stopped with some others to see if any letters. Walked up home with Miss Helen and spent the remainder of the evening on the steps with her conversing. The evening, being so exceedingly warm, was not pleasant to be in the house.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

2 August 1844. Cloudy during the greater part of the day and evening, but no rain in the city though they had a heavy shower in Burlington in the afternoon.

Left Burlington and arrived in the city as usual this morning. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Evening at home. Mrs. Howell and daughter Beulah came up this afternoon and stayed all night. Beulah is going down in the morning.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

3 August 1844. Rather cloudy during the day, evening clear. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour this morning. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again.

Evening over to swim with Nesbit and Welch, returned about 8 o'clock, after which took a stroll around town, and finally brought up on Nesbit's steps about 1/2 past 9. Sat conversing with Hugh and his sister Helen until about 1/2 past 10, when I left for home.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

4 August 1844 Clear and delightful all day and during the evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Ogleby preached both times. Between church took a nap and a stroll on the bank with Nesbit. Evening at home. Nesbit spent the evening at our house. Up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

5 August 1844. Clear and pleasant throughout the day and evening, and cool. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour. Arrived there by 1/2 past 9. Went up to the office and remained there during the day. In the evening at the Walnut Street Theatre to see a new pantomime entitled, "Munchausen." There is much fun and humor throughout the piece and was well performed. "The Young Scamp," a farce, was very good. Out about 20 m. of 12.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

6 August 1844. Showering through the day, evening clear. Left the city this morning about 9 o'clock in the Darby stage, to pay a visit to my friend Jas. B. Smith at his father's residence about a 1/4 of a mile beyond the "Bell Tavern."

Got out there about 1/2 past 10, spent the morning strolling about the place with Jim, and in the house. Dined about 1/2 past 1, at which time I was introduced to his sisters, and Miss Harriet Mitchell. Two of the Miss Smiths (Harriet and Elizabeth) are very pretty and remarkably fine looking young ladies, and I must say very much pleased with the former. After Dinner Smith and I went down to "Tinnicum," the residence of his three brothers, who have between them 1000 acres. Paid a visit to all of them. Went through their peach orchards, ate our fill, &c. About 6 o'clock went up to his brother Thomas's to tea. Met there two very beautiful young ladies from Baltimore, Miss Jane and Margaret Handy, the former was as beautiful a young lady as I ever saw. The other was very pretty but not the same style, which I did not admire so much. They were both very lively and pleasing in their manners. At his brother Edward's was introduced to a young lady by the name of Miss Kate Lee from Wissahickon, she was rather pretty, but did not admire her manners. Left Mr. Thomas Smith's and the young ladies (which I did not much like to do) about 1/4 of 9, and arrived at his father's residence about 1/4 of 10, distance six miles. Remained in the parlor until near 11, chatting with the young ladies who were very agreeable.

Up at 5 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

7 August 1844. Clear, cool and delightful all day and during the evening. Got up this morning about 1/4 of 6, dressed, went downstairs and took a seat on the porch & never do I remember a more delightful morning, nor the country look so beautiful. Took breakfast about 1/4 of 7, and at about 1/4 after, left for town in the omnibus, though I regretted much leaving the place, having spent my time so delightfully.

Arrived in the city by 1/2 past 8. Went to the office and remained there during the greater part of the day. Left for Burlington at 5 p.m. Waited upon Mrs. H. M. McIlvaine and Miss Clara Nesbit up. Arrived in Burlington by 20 m. of 7. Ma, Pa and Lydia also went up this afternoon.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed at 1/4 past 9 p.m.

8 August 1844. Clear and pleasant all day, and during the evening. Left Burlington and arrived in the city about the usual hour this morning. At the office through the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again.

After supper took a stroll down to the river to see the excursion boat pass. Upon going on board the New Philadelphia, met three of the Miss Nesbits, Helen, Clara, and Louisa, they had come down to see Mrs. & Mrs. McIlvaine off. Waited upon Helen and Clara home, and spent the evening there. Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

9 August 1844. Clear and warm all day and evening, very windy in the afternoon. About 8 o'clock this morning, Rev. Kinsey and I went out gunning. Got about a dozen and a half birds, when the nipple was blown out of my gun, and we returned. Afternoon out fishing with Rev., the river being very rough was unable to catch more than a dozen and a half.

After supper was out rowing for about half an hour. Miss Helen and Clara Nesbit were to have accompanied me, but some company coming up from town, with whom they had to take a walk, prevented them. Went home about 1/2 past 8, and was there the rest of the evening. Mr. & Mrs. Kinsey spent part of the evening at our house.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

10 August 1844. Cloudy, rainy and unpleasant during the greater part of the day and evening. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour this morning. At the office during the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Spent part of the evening over at the Miss Nesbits with Lydia; remained at home. Got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

11 August 1844. Clear, cool and delightful through the day and evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Odenheimer preached both times. Took a stroll with Hugh Nesbit in the morning before church on the banks as far as St Mary's Hall, where we had some sport with 5 or 6 of the young ladies of the school from the window by waving handkerchiefs, &c., &c. Also took a stroll between church and after church in the afternoon on the banks.

In the evening walked up to the creek with Nesbit, where we met Mr. Byrnes and Mr. Prichett, had a chat of about 15 minutes when all went down into town again. Nesbit and I went down to see the boat off. Went up to N.'s about 9 and remained until 1/4 past 10. Did not go in. Up at 6 1/2 a.m., to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

12 August 1844. Clear, cool and delightful during the day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again.

In the evening walked around with Lydia to Miss Woolmans, left her there, and went over to see Sterling. From there walked down to the wharf with Hall and Hays, to see the New York Bay excursion passengers go on board the boat, they having marched preceded by a band of music from the cars. Hall, while standing talking with Hays and myself, was struck by one of three rowdy fellows, when he drew off and knocked him down. It however

turned out that Hall knew who the fellow was, and they made it up without any further difficulty. Called for Lydia about 1/2 past 8, went in, sat for about 10 minutes, then went home.

Up at 5 3/4 a.m., bed at 9 3/4 p.m.

13 August 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day and evening. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour this morning. At the office during the greater part of the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. In the evening around at Jim Sterling's until about 9 o'clock, then went home and remained there the rest of the evening.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

14 August 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day, evening rather cloudy. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. At the office during the greater part of the time while in the city, until 1/4 past 4 p.m., when I called at Mr. McIlhenny's for Miss Kate Lynd, to accompany her to Burlington according to a previous engagement. Arrived at Burlington about 7 o'clock.

In the evening our family, with Miss Lynd, went up to Mr. Sterling's, having had invitation to be there, to eat fruit. About 9 o'clock had a delightful repast of different kinds of fruit, which I enjoyed very much. Left about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

15 August 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day and evening. Mr. James Hunter Sterling, Rev. Kinsey and myself went down to Dunk's ferry fishing, got down there by 1/4 of 9, and tried in several places, but could catch nothing. When we thought our luck would be poor, finally concluded to try another place, and seemed we just hit on the right spot, for scarcely had we got our lines down when we had fish on. Fished until about 1 o'clock, by which time we had 10 dozen fine perch, some weighing nearly a pound. Upon the turn of the tide, to run up the river became very rough, making it entirely unfit for fishing. Hauled up the anchor, and started for Burlington where we arrived by 1/4 past 3. Went home, got dinner, dressed, &c., and about 6 o'clock took a walk down on the banks with Miss Lynd and Lydia. In the evening at home, Miss Kate and Elizabeth Biles spent part of the evening at our house.

Up at 5 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

16 August 1844. Clear and pleasant all day but warm. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city 1/4 past 9. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Evening at home. Mr. and Mrs. Sterling, Dr. and Mrs. Ellis, Mr. Byrnes, Miss Anabella Griffiths, and Mr. James Welch spent the evening at our house, all I believe dropped in accidentally. Up at 5 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

17 August 1844. Clear and warm all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, via Camden and the cars, the New Philadelphia having broken her shaft in coming to the city this afternoon, the passengers brought down by the tow-boat Pennsylvania. Arrived in Burlington by 20 m. past 6.

After supper Hugh Nesbit, Dick Cristiani (who came up with me this afternoon) and myself went over to the island and took a bath. After our return took a stroll around, and finally halted on Nesbit's steps, where two of his sisters (Helen and Elizabeth) were sitting, chatted until about 1/2 past 10, then went home.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

18 August 1844. Clear but rather warm, evening clear and warm. At St. Mary's church in the morning, Bishop Doane preached. Afternoon over in Nesbit's garden with Cristiani and Nesbit eating pears. Evening over at Bristol to church with Jim Sterling, Jim Welch, Nesbit and Cristiani. Crossed in a small boat, and returned about 1/2 past 9 o'clock. Took a stroll on the bank, before church, between church and in the evening, when I had considerable fun with some of the young ladies of the hall at the side window.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

19 August 1844. Rather cloudy throughout the day, and very warm, about dusk clouded over very heavily, and a considerable blow, rain, thunder and lightning. Dick Cristiani and myself went down to Dunk's ferry fishing this morning, and returned by 3 o'clock, caught but one fish. I had my gun with me, went ashore and shot about a half dozen of birds. After our return home, dressed and about 1/2 past 5 took a stroll on the banks. Found a number of the young ladies from the hall walking, with whom we had some fun. Evening at home.

Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 9 p.m.

20 August 1844. Clear but very warm throughout the day and evening. Left Burlington and arrived in the city this morning as usual. Dick Cristiani came down with me. At the office during the day and left again for Burlington at 5 p.m., where we arrived by 1/4 past 6.

After supper got a boat and rowed down along the banks as far as the Bishop's, where I took Jim Welch in with me, and then rowed several times past the young ladies' boarding school. A number of those with whom we have been carrying on our flirtations were walking on the banks, had a number of signs made by them to us, and of course returned by a sly wave of the handkerchief, &c. About dusk one of them dropped a note on the bank (as we thought). I put Jim Welch ashore, when he picked up the supposed note, found it to be a newspaper, with several love passages scored, and also poetry marked and altered, to one of which Miss A. Matilda Clark's name was signed. About 1/2 past 7 the bell rang for the young ladies to go into the hall, when we left and put up our boat. Upon going up home, stopped at Mr. and Mrs. Sterling, where I remained until about 1/4 of 10 o'clock, then went home.

Got up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

21 August 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day, evening clear and moonlight. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour this morning. At the office during the day and 5 p.m. started for Burlington again. After supper Jim Welch & myself took a stroll on the banks as far as the young ladies' school. Were most too late to have our usual evening salutations and signals, as the ladies had been directed to go in, however some were on the porch, which was enough to let them know we were about.

Continued our walk below the Bishop's, where we loitered for some time, or until it was nearly dark, and then strolled up as far as the Bishop's upper gate. Stood conversing for a few minutes, when our attention was attracted by the gentle whisper and slight whistle among the deep foliage of the Bishop's garden. Upon looking more closely saw two beautiful ladies with a quiet and careful step approach the fence. When they called our names in a loud whisper, Welch immediately attended the call, I having to converse with Mr. Sepy and two other gentlemen, who, at that moment came up, and like to have discovered our meeting. The two young ladies threw Mr. Welch a small book and immediately retired. It being too dark to discover what were its contents, went up to Welch's, got a light and with eager eyes glanced over the pages. On the first was written, "Keep this, remember me to all," on the fourth, "my class" being the middle class, on the sixth, "nothing was meant by that paper last night, it was only a piece of waste paper," having reference to the paper we got on the bank last evening. Also, "I have marked the names of all who are concerned in the waving of handkerchiefs." I forgot to mention the small book was a catalog and prospectus of the school. The names of the young ladies marked were Anna E. Brown of Rye, N.Y., Agnes M. Clark, New York, Charlotte M. Cardit, Newark, N.J., Elizabeth W. Davis, Bangor, Me., May A. Peers, Louisville, Ky., Mary C. Smith, Philadelphia, Pa, Mary Mallory and Ellen A. Mallory, Germantown, Pa., and Mary Anderson, New York. If we can carry this fun out without being discovered, it will be attended with much pleasure, but if discovered will protect the ladies by all means in our power.

Miss Adaline Aldrich came up with me this evening. She intends spending the night with us and got out to Mount Holly in the morning. About 9 o'clock took a walk with her as far as the Bishop's and returned.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

22 August 1844. Cloudy throughout the day, with a shower about 12 p.m. Jim Welch, Humes, Woodman and myself, besides several others went out to Vincentown, about 1/4 miles from Burlington, in a wagon belonging to Humes, to a Whig mass meeting held in a Woods, a short distance from the town. Drove our wagon in the line

of the procession which was composed of about 70 or 80 wagons headed by a band of Music, and a schooner, clipper rigged, manned by some dozen small boys, with Vausciver as the clipper. Had a delightful time, marred a little with the shower of rain, and returned to Burlington about 8 o'clock with the procession.

Met a number on the ground that I was acquainted with, both gentlemen and ladies. Among the ladies were three of the Miss Nesbits, Mrs. McIlvaine, Mrs. Olmstead and Mrs. Poulter, a most beautiful lady, was introduced to her sister Miss Risden, a very beautiful young lady. Was also introduced to Miss Stryker of Mount Holly and Miss Guyer of Philadelphia. There were a great number on the ground, no end to ladies. The teams were well worth seeing, there were several wagons drawn by 12 horses, one by 12 mules, and another by 30 oxen.

Pa, Grandma, Lydia and Flora went around on the New York bay excursion today, and were much pleased. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

23 August 1844. Cloudy early in the morning with the appearance of rain, but as the day advanced cleared off beautifully. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. At the office during the day with the exception of about an hour occupied in going down to see Miss Kate Lynd at Mr. Mitchell's in 2nd St., to bid her good bye, previous to her departure for Cincin-nati. She leaves I believe on Monday next. While there was introduced to Miss Mitchell, a rather pretty looking young lady, and daughter of the gentleman at whose house I was in. Left Burlington again at 5 p.m., where I arrived by 1/4 past 6.

In the evening took a stroll along the banks with Welch, but saw nothing of the young ladies of the Hall, much to our disappointment. The evening was clear, cool, delightful and moonlight, well suited to take an evening stroll, and for a meeting of the young ladies, had they made their appearance.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

24 August 1844. Clear and delightful during the day and evening. I went down to the wharf this morning with the intention of going to the city, but met Jim Welch, who persuaded me to go with him to Newtown, about 1/4 mile from Bristol to attend a Whig meeting to be held at that place, he at the same time assuring me that he would procure a means of conveying us both to the place. Accordingly, about 9 o'clock started in a four horse wagon from Bristol, with seven others besides Welch and myself, and arrived at the place of our destination about 12 o'clock amid the shouts and cheers of thousands of men, the waving of handkerchiefs of hundreds of ladies, and the sound of numerous bands of music, all tending to raise the mind to the highest point of enthusiasm. And such another turn-out of women, farmers, mechanics and laboring men, I have seldom seen. As to estimating numbers, I shall not attempt it (though it was said by some there was 20,000 people present). Suffice to say that every avenue to the place was filled from early in the morning until one o'clock, and even before the "rear guard" had arrived, the town was crowded to overflowing. Such a number of vehicles of all kinds, and horses and oxen and mules, I never saw congregated together before. And all came with such joyous countenances; the women smiled, the men shouted and sang; the music, and there were several bands, pealed forth cheering notes; banners and flags waved and added interest to the scene. Judging from the numbers present, I inferred that the whole county had "shut up shop" and gathered together. I noticed one wagon of about 50 feet in length, drawn by 26 yoke of oxen, each yoke bearing the name of a state, and full of sturdy Whigs, with a sprinkling of inquiring Democrats.

Another wagon about the same length was drawn by 33 pair of horses. There were several wagons drawn by over 26 horses, and six, eight and ten horse omnibuses, and wagons of every description in great numbers drawn by one, two, and four horses. I took no note of the various banners, and the inscriptions and devices upon them, save one, which struck me as an excellent reply to one of the vile calumnies so industriously circulated by the Locofocos(20) against Mr. Clay. It was inscribed "Mr. Clay's Last Duel," and represented a spatsman as having just shot a fly-up-the-creek, which is seen tumbling headforemost into Salt River. The poor poke has been "winged" in this mortal combat, and is killed so dead that it cannot even flutter.

A stand had been erected for the officers of the meeting and the speakers, in an orchard just out of the town, whither the multitude repaired about two o'clock. The meeting was organized by the appointment of Dr. Phineas Jenks as President and a large number of Vice Presidents and Secretaries. Seats had been prepared for the ladies, in front of the rostrum, and were filled with the beauty of the county. Seats were also provided for the Philadelphia Minstrels, who discoursed eloquently to the multitude, in sweet and harmonious song. It having been found that not one half of those present could get near enough to the rostrum to hear the speakers, it was announced that another stand would be erected within the town, and that there would be persons to address the people. The speaking was continued from half past 2 until 5, the time of our leaving the ground.

We arrived at Bristol again about 1/4 of 7, and after a delay of some 3/4 of an hour on account of low tide, the ferryboat landed us safely in Burlington, after having spent a most delightful day.

Upon our landing went up home, got my tea, and then called for Jim Welch to take our usual evening stroll on the banks to see our fair young ladies of St. Mary's Hall, but as on last evening were disappointed. We at once supposed something must be wrong, and our suppositions were afterwards fully confirmed, by meeting Hugh Nesbit, who informed us the young ladies had been found out and confessed all. So all is up with us for the present.

Elizabeth Roberts, daughter of Edward Roberts, came up this afternoon and intends spending a few days at our house. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

25 August 1844. Clear through the greater part of the day, though there was a slight shower early in the morning, a heavy one in the afternoon. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Was not down on the banks, either through the day or evening for fear of bringing the young ladies into more trouble by my appearance in the vicinity of the Hall. Evening at home with the exception of about half an hour; I was over with Hugh Nesbit in his room, looking over some pieces of poetry.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 p.m. Mr. Austin, friend of Elizabeth Roberts, took tea with us.

26 August 1844. Clear and delightful all day, evening clear, cool and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning and arrived in the city at the usual hour. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived by 1/4 past 6 o'clock.

After supper took a walk on the banks with Elizabeth Roberts and Lydia. Went down as far as the Bishop's, in passing the Hall did not see any of the young ladies, suppose they are kept pretty close since the discovery of the flirtations by the teachers. Upon our return, left the girls at home, and went over to see the Miss Nesbits. Did not find Helen and Clara at home, and remained but a short time, but while there was shown a note by Amelia, addressed to her by Miss Ellen Mallory. It spoke of her (Miss Mallory) having committed a very unladylike action, in addressing a note to her (Amelia's) brother, and begged that she would ask his forgiveness for having addressed a note while unacquainted, and desired it might be destroyed or returned. The note also mentioned several other things which I did not understand; it was written, I think, merely for effect, and if unobserved they would do the same thing again.

I received through the post office this morning a prospectus from Miss Mary Anderson of New York. Several names were written in it, hers among the rest, and the following words written on the margin of a page: "If you answer this, put it in the Philadelphia post office." What she wished me to answer is impossible to tell, without it was to write her a letter, and that I feared to do, as we had all been discovered; however, if an opportunity offers she shall have a letter.

After leaving Miss Nesbits, went down to see Jim Sterling, remained there until about 9 o'clock, and then went home. Mr. George Campbell came up this afternoon, and will remain until tomorrow with us. Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

27 August 1844. Clear, cool and delightful during the day, and clear, cool and moonlight in the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. At the office through the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again.

After supper got a boat, and took a little exercise in rowing along the banks, returning by 8 o'clock. Afterwards took a walk with Elizabeth Roberts and Lydia. A short time after our return home, Miss Helen and Clara Nesbit came in and spent part of the evening. I accompanied one and Mr. Campbell the other home. Went in and remained about 15 or 20 minutes, during which time my conversation

was with Helen. She informed me they had quite a scene at St. Mary's Hall this morning, occasioned by Mr. Germain giving the young ladies a long lecture on the impropriety of their conduct towards the young gentlemen who were concerned in the flirtations of the last two months. Half the school I believe were in tears. Mr. G. I believe did not particularize any of the young ladies, which I am very glad of.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

28 August 1844. Clear, cool and delightful all day, evening clear and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. Waited upon Elizabeth Roberts down, she introduced me to a Miss Trotter, a very handsome, and as far as I could judge amiable young lady. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived by 5 minutes past 6. After supper walked as far as the river and returned home about 1/2 past 7, remained there the rest of the evening. Mr. Olmstead spent part of the evening with us; it was his first visit.

Got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

29 August 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. Mr. Campbell came down this morning. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington where we arrived at the usual hour. In the evening strolling about on the bank and town with Jim Welch until about 1/2 past 8, when I went home, found there Mrs. and Miss Kinsey and Miss Caroline Woolman. Waited upon Miss Woolman home about 9 o'clock.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

30 August 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and evening. Went out gunning this morning but met with very poor luck and returned home about 10 o'clock. In the afternoon, Mr. Prichett and myself rowed down to Bristol College to attend a celebration of the pupils of Capt. Partridge's school. There were two companies of soldiers from the city. The display was not very imposing and we left about 5 o'clock. In the evening at home. Got up this morning at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

31 August 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again via Camden and the cars, where we arrived by a few minutes after 6.

Evening at home until about 8 o'clock, when I waited upon the Miss Mitchells home. Afterwards met Hugh Nesbit, strolled about town for a while, and then went over into his yard where we remained until 1/4 past 10, eating pears, &c Then went home.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

SEPTEMBER

1 September 1844. Clear and warm all day and during the evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Bishop Doane preached in the morning and examined the Sunday school children in the afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Grubb had their baby Parker Grubb christened this afternoon. After church in the afternoon, took a walk down on the banks with George Parker, Arnold & Hugh Nesbit. Evening in company with Nesbit & Batton.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

2 September 1844. Very foggy early in the morning but cleared off warm by 9 o'clock, though at times through the day would wear the appearance of rain, and at about 7 p.m. commenced raining, which continued through the night, accompanied by sharp lightning and heavy thunder.

Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. Went up to the office and remained there through the day.

At 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, in the steamboat New Philadelphia. She commenced running again yesterday, having been off the line two weeks on account of breaking her shaft. Miss Hannah Ann Myers took tea and spent the evening with us, the rain coming on so hard she remained all night. She is much improved since I saw her last, or since her return from Pittsburgh, and is quite pretty and fine in appearance and form. Evening at home.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

3 September 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant during the day and evening. The rain of last evening has benefited the county considerably, and laid the dust. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city a few minutes after 9. At the office through the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again in the New Philadelphia.

After supper went up with Lydia, to see Miss Hannah Ann Myers from Philadelphia. She is staying in Stacy Street near Market. Remained there the greater part of the evening, returned home about 1/4 past 9 o'clock.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

4 September 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 1/4 past 9. Waited upon Miss H. A. Myers and her aunt down. Upon our arrival put them in cab, and after attending to some business, went to the office and remained there during the day.

Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m., and accompanied two of the Miss Aldriches up, Adaline and Harriet. Evening at home. Jim Welch was at our house.

Up at 20 m. of 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

5 September 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant all day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at about 20 minutes past 6 in the steamer Trenton. She was to have left at 6 precisely, this arrangement was made for today only to accommodate the "Locofocos," who were going to Trenton to attend their mass convention.

Arrived in the city about 8 o'clock. The two Miss Aldriches went down this morning, also Lydia, who intended accompanying one of them to Wilmington this afternoon, to spend a week or two.

At the office during the greater part of the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington. Mrs. Edward Roberts and little daughter Clara went up. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Nesbits, met Mr. Arnold there. Helen looked if anything more beautiful, and more fascinating than ever. Left about 1/4 past 10. Up at 1/4 of 5 a.m. (before daylight) and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

6 September 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, but did not arrive in the city until near ten o'clock, occasioned by the boat having to stop for some time, on account of the Geo. M. Dallas, a sailboat, swamping, that was in tow. Two of the men like to have lost their lives, by going into her to bail out when she was two thirds full of water, and the boat starting off run her under, the men having to cling to her mast, rope, &c, until relieved from their perilous situation.

At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Evening at home. Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

7 September 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city shortly after 9 o'clock. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again.

Evening out strolling about town with Hugh Nesbit. Edward Roberts and two sons, Edward and Lehman, came up this afternoon, and went down in the excursion train, taking with them Mrs. Roberts and daughter Clara. She came up on Thursday last. Mr. and Mrs. Sterling spent the evening at our house.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

8 September 1844 Clear, cool and delightful all day and during the evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning, Mr. Lyons preached. Afternoon over at Nesbits with Hugh until about 1/2 past 5, when we took a stroll down on the bank, returning in time for supper. Evening got a small boat and rowed over to Bristol with Hugh Nesbit. Heard an eloquent discourse delivered by the Rev. Mr. Suddards of Philadelphia, and returned to Burlington about 10 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

9 September 1844. Clear and pleasant all day, and during the evening. Did not leave Burlington this morning until 1/2 past 8, the boat not coming down until that hour on account of a dense fog on the river. Arrived in the city about 1/4 past 10, went up to the office and remained there during the day. Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m., where we arrived by 7 o'clock, after our stoppage at Bristol, it being nearly dark. Evening at home.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

10 September 1844. Clear all day and evening, but rather warm. Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 7 and arrived in the city by 20 m. past 9. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Evening at home. Mr. & Mrs. Haven spent part of the evening with us. Got up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

11 September 1844. Clear through the morning and in the afternoon until about 4 o'clock, when it commenced clouding over and through the evening wore the appearance of a storm. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived by 7 o'clock, after dark. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Nesbits with Helen. Miss Clara & some of the rest of the family came in about 1/4 of 10. Left about 1/4 past 10.

Up this morning at 6 o'clock and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

12 September 1844 Cloudy, raw & damp with an occasional shower of rain, until about 6 p.m., when the sun came out and had the appearance of clearing. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. At the office during the morning, and at 2 p.m. started for Burlington, where we arrived about 20 m. of 4, having a very heavy head wind. Remainder of the afternoon spent partly at home and partly strolling about town with Jim Welch. Evening around at Whig meeting with Jim Welch and others. Went home about 1/2 past 9.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

13 September 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. At the office through the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington. Evening out with Jim Sterling, Jim Welch and Bill Lippincott. Pa went on to New York this morning, will remain a few days.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

14 September 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived about 1/2 past 6. Found Jim Welch on the wharf waiting for me to take tea with him, as the two Miss Evans and Miss Huings of Trenton and Miss Earl of Burlington were to be there. After a number of apologies on account of dress (as the winter was entirely unexpected) and some persuasion, went with him. Took tea and spent the evening very pleasantly. Left about 10 o'clock.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

15 September 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day and during the evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning, Mr. Lyons preached a very good sermon.

In the afternoon about 2 o'clock Jim Sterling and myself started in a one-horse vehicle to see the Miss Earls at Grassdale, Springfield. Arrived there after a pleasant ride of two hours. Found but one of them at home, Miss Cornelia. The remainder of the young ladies had gone over with Misses Hays and Hall to meeting, they however returned about 5 o'clock and spent the remainder of the afternoon and evening very pleasantly, and left about 10. Had a pleasant ride in, and arrived in Burlington, put our horse up, and was home by 1/4 past 12 a.m.

Got up at half past 6 a.m. and to bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

16 September 1844. Clear and delightful all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9. Went up to the office and remained there the greater part of the time until 1/2 past 5 p.m., when I took a stroll in Chestnut St.

Found a great many ladies on the promenade, many of them beautiful. Met Dick Cristiani according to appointment about 1/2 past 6 and went home with him to tea. Samuel Milliken called in while I was there and after tea all three took a walk down town to make calls somewhere. By some mishap in stopping for a minute or so, I missed Cristiani and Milliken. When I went down to Coates', found Lydia in, and remained until about 1/2 past 9, when I left, and on going up Catherine St., saw Cristiani and Milliken in at Miss Elizabeth Mercers. Went in and spent the remainder of the evening very pleasantly. Met, besides my friends, Miss Susan and Sarah Coats, and a Mr. [line blank]. They left in a few minutes after I came in and also Samuel Milliken. Cristiani and myself remained until about 11 o'clock, when we left and walked leisurely to our homes. Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 12 a.m.

17 September 1844. Clear and delightful all day and during the evening. Lodged at the office last night. At the office during the greater part of the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again at 5

p.m. Evening out strolling about town with Jim Welch until about 1/2 past 8 then went home. Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

18 September 1844 Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 20 minutes past 9. Waited upon two of the Miss Earls from Springfield down (Lydia and Hetty) and upon our arrival as far as 4th and Arch St., when I left them, and went to the office, where I remained the greater part of the day.

Left again for Burlington at 5 p.m., arrived there by 25 m. of 7, after our stoppage at Bristol. Evening at home until about 9 o'clock, then went in to see Mr. and Mrs. Sterling. Remained there until about 10 o'clock. Pa came home from New York today, much improved, I think, in his health. He has been absent since Friday last. Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

19 September 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day, and evening moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. Waited upon Miss Helen and Elizabeth Nesbit down.

At the office during the day until about 6 o'clock, when I took a stroll in Chestnut St. with Sam Milliken. Found a great number of young ladies on the promenade. After supper walked out to Mr. Silvester's in Locust St., 4th door beyond school, 6th St. for the Miss Nesbits (Helen & Elizabeth) to accompany them to the horticultural exhibition according to an engagement made this morning. Mr. and Mrs. Silvester also accompanied us.

Upon our entrance to the lower room found it to be very much crowded with the beauty and fashion of the city, all seeming to wear a smile, as if well pleased at the beauty and display, fruits, flowers, &c, before them. The first and most prominent object that is noticed upon entering the room is a model of the monument now being erected at Edinburgh, in honor of Sir Walter Scott. It is erected in the middle of the room. The gothic style of architecture is well preserved, notwithstanding the difficulties of managing the flowers and moss of which it is composed, and it towers from floor to ceiling, an object of bold and striking beauty to challenge general admiration and regard. Further on is a large and elegant design of an English cottage, fancifully and tastefully wrought out in fresh flowers. Still further rearward is placed a model of a fountain, formed entirely of indigenous flowers. From out of a rustic basin rise twisted serpents, supporting a double basin, from the upper one of which springs a gigantic thistle, admirably represented. The silk of the thistle flower is made to represent the spreading jet of water, and slight and graceful pendant grass gives the idea of the fall of the water into the basin beneath. The idea is unique and beautifully carried out. Before the gallery, and in the centre of the flowers, rests a huge basket of flowers and laurel. The great surface of the basket is entirely covered with rare and beautiful varieties of roses. The design is entirely too large to be pretty. The display of fruits is various and very extensive, greatly exceeding that of last year. The grapes, butter pears and apples are unusually well grown & in great abundance. The vegetables merit high encomium. The exhibition was so much crowded, did not remain more than an hour. On our way to Mr. Silvester's, the Miss N.s stopped in to see their sister Mrs. McIlvaine, did not remain but a few minutes.

After taking my ladies home, went down to the exhibition again, it was then about 20 m. of 10. Went in and had a much better opportunity of seeing than before, as a great many of the visitors had left.

Up this morning at 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

20 September 1844. Clear and delightful all day, evening clear, cool and moonlight. At the office during the greater part of the day, and at about 6 o'clock p.m. took a stroll in Chestnut St., found many walking.

After supper, or say about 1/4 of 8, called up to see Miss Hannah Ann Myers, spent the evening very pleasantly, until about 1/4 past 9, when I left and called down to see Miss Susan Much. Remained there about an hour and then went up to the office where I lodged.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 12 p.m.

21 September 1844 Clear and pleasant all day, evening clear and moonlight. Left Philadelphia this morning at 8 o'clock for Wilmington and arrived there by 1/4 of 10. After calling on a few of my friends, went up to Dr. Gibbons' to see Lydia. She has been down for more than two weeks. Spent the afternoon in napping until about 4 o'clock. Took a stroll around town with Frank Gibbons and Canby Clement. Took tea at Mr. Aldrich's. About 9 o'clock took Miss Adaline Aldrich and my sister and went over to Miss Dunnot's to invite her (Caroline) to take a walk. The evening being delightful, she accompanied us in our stroll. Took some ice cream and returned about 9 o'clock to Miss A. Accompanied Miss D. home about 1/2 past 9.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

22 September 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant during the day and evening. At Quaker meeting in the morning, had four sermons, two by Juo. Brooks, and the others by a person I did not know. Accompanied and walked home with Rebecca Gibbons.

Afternoon took a walk out to the place Dr. Gibbons formerly occupied, with Canby Clement. Met there Frank and Rod Gibbons, J. Bradford, Gilpin and others. In the evening took Miss Adaline Aldrich and Miss Caroline Dunnot to church.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

23 September 1844. Clear and quite cold during the day, and cold and moonlight in the evening. Spent this morning in walking about town and at 1/4 past 1 left for Philadelphia with Lydia, where we arrived by 3 o'clock, then left Lydia and went up to the office, where I remained until the time of leaving for home. Left for Burlington at 5 p.m., in the New Philadelphia. The trip up was delightful, though very cool after dark, being moonlight added greatly to the pleasure of the trip. Miss Sarah Gibbons from Wilmington went up with us this afternoon.

Evening at home. Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

24 September 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day and clear and moonlight in the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city a few minutes after 9. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived by 7 o'clock. Evening at home.

Mrs. Kinsey spent the evening with us. Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

25 September 1844. Cloudy all day, had a shower of rain in the morning, and at about 7 p.m. commenced raining and continued very hard during the night.

Went out gunning today with Russell Batton but met with very poor luck. Were out all day and shot but 7 birds. In the evening accompanied Sarah Gibbons and Lydia to the horticultural exhibition. The display was very fine, particularly the flowers, and the decorations of the room were with great taste.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

26 September 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant during the day, and quite cold, clear and moonlight in the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. Went up to the office and remained there the greater part of the morning.

At 2 p.m. left for Burlington again on board the Trenton and arrived there by 1/2 past 3. In the evening accompanied Ma, Lydia and Sarah Gibbons down to the "Rehearsal" at St. Mary's Hall. The performances on the piano by some of the young ladies were very fine, as also on the harp and guitar. The singing except in a few instances was not much.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

27 September 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant during the day, but towards evening clouded over. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 20 minutes past 9. Went up to the office and remained there during the greater part of the day. Left again for Burlington at 5 p.m. Evening at home. Dr. and Mrs. Ellis spent the evening with us.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

28 September 1844. Cloudy early in the morning, and about 10 o'clock commenced raining which continued without interruption during the remainder of the day, and through the evening and night. Towards dark commenced blowing quite hard.

Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Had a very stormy and long passage up, having a strong head tide and wind. Occupied nearly two hours in going up to Burlington. Rained quite hard when we arrived. Evening at home.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

29 September 1844. Cold, raw, rainy with a strong N.E. wind throughout the day, about dusk the wind shifted and in the evening cleared off. At home during the morning, afternoon at St. Mary's church with Sarah Gibbons and Lydia, the Bishop preached. Spent the evening over at the Miss Nesbit's.

Up at 7 a.m., to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

30 September 1844. Clear, cool and delightful during the day, evening clear and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city a few minutes after 9. Sarah Gibbons came down. She has been up since Thursday week. At the office during the day. Took tea with Dick Cristiani, and in the evening called on Miss Lowery in 2nd below Queen with Dick and Samuel Milliken, being my first visit.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m.

OCTOBER

1 October 1844. Clear, cool and delightful during the day and evening. Was at the office until about 1/2 past 9 o'clock, when I left accompanied by Samuel Milliken and Dick Cristiani to take a stroll through the city to see the display of flags that were on every house top and hung from nearly every window in the city, in honor of the great Whig procession that came off today. Along Market and Front Streets there were thousands of flags. The procession was the largest and most brilliant affair that ever took place in this city. I suppose it must have been 4 or 5 miles long, and in the ranks some 40 or 50,000 people. Persons working at different kinds of trades were drawn in immense wagons, with from 12 to 26 horses. The whole length of the procession the Whigs were greeted and cheered by the ladies, by wreaths & bouquets thrown to them, and the waving of flags, banners, &c I joined in the procession at 4th and Market, accompanied by Cristiani, Milliken and Chambers.

The walk was rather tiresome, as it was a considerable distance up the Frankford Road, and not a great distance from Richmond, but we were fully repaid for our fatigue upon arriving on the ground. Never do I remember seeing such an immense concourse of people, suppose at least 50,000 and no end to vehicles of every description. It was impossible to hear the speaking on account of the great crowd.

In the evening attended the Arch Street Theatre, to see the new piece called "Putnam." It was well performed, and many parts of it funny. The house was well filled.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m., bed at 12 a.m.

2 October 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the greater part of the day, being very busy writing. Left for Burlington at 5 p.m. in the New Philadelphia and arrived there by 7. Evening at home.

The city still presents a very gay appearance and I suppose will wear the same until after the elections. Along Market, Front, Fourth, Fifth and many other streets nothing meets the eye but flags, flags, flags.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

3 October 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 20 m. past 9. At the office during the greater part of the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Evening at home.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

4 October 1844. Cloudy early in the morning with a slight shower of rain, but afterwards cleared off, evening clear. Left Burlington this morning about 10 m. past 8 and arrived in the city by 20 m. of 10. Went up to the office and remained there during the greater part of the day.

Left about 1/4 of 6 and took a stroll down Chestnut St., met a great many ladies on the promenade. After taking supper, met Dave Weatherly, when we took a stroll around to see the arrangement of the "Locofoco tack light procession" to come off. During the evening, after satisfying our curiosity about the state house, went down to see Mr. Delica, a friend of Dave's, where we spent the remainder of the evening, and saw the procession.

It was a lame affair, and was composed of the rakings and scrapings or the mere scum of the city and districts of Philadelphia. About one half were boys, or those not entitled to a vote, and the display of lanterns were poor, and many of the banners very vulgar. The procession occupied 45 minutes in passing. Many of the houses on the route of the procession were illuminated, and presented a very beautiful appearance.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

5 October 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and evening. At the office through the morning and in the afternoon, until about 3 o'clock, when I went out to attend to some business. Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m. Spent the evening over at the Miss Nesbit's. Miss Kennard of Eastville, Maryland was there; she is rather pretty but very quiet.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

6 October 1844. Cloudy during the day and evening and wearing the appearance of rain in the afternoon. At St. Mary's church in the morning & evening. Bishop Ives preached in the evening. Started at 1 p.m. in the Trenton and went to the city, took a walk around to several of the churches, and then called up to see Sarah Roberts in 9th St. Remained there about 1/2 an hour and 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived by 1/4 past 6. Met Samuel Haven on board.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 9 3/4 p.m.

7 October 1844. Cloudy, raw and cold during the day, but in the evening cleared off beautifully. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 10 o'clock. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington where we arrived about 7 o'clock. Evening at home.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

8 October 1844. Rarely has the morning of an election day in Pennsylvania dawned with fairer prospects than today. It was a lovely, clear day, a constant sunshine after a clear frosty night. The streets were gay with the usual display of cabs and omnibuses, decorated with party mottoes and flags. From the houses chiefly in the business part of the city, and all through the districts, the exhibition of flags was particularly imposing. I may say at a moderate estimate, that from upwards of 5000 places the national stripes and stars were floating in the breeze. Small patterns of the same were innumerable. Crowds as usual thronged the vicinity of the polls, but everyone seemed too intent on his own business of voting to interfere with his neighbor. In fact the order that prevailed is highly credible to the character of the city.

Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city about 10. At the office during the morning & part of the afternoon, about 1/2 past 6 called around for Dick Cristiani, took tea with him. After tea went out with Dick to stroll around. Met Jim Welch from Burlington, and a young fellow by the name of Brotler from Washington. Remained in company during the remainder of the evening, walking about town, and seeing considerable fun in our rambles. Left Welch about 11 o'clock, having got lost from Brotler & Cristiani some time before.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

9 October 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the greater part of the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived by about 7 o'clock.

On board this afternoon, met with a Millerite lady going to New York. She appeared to be a full believer in that faith and that the world would come to an end some time this month. She was quite young, and at one time I suppose rather pretty, but the anxiety and fasting she has gone through caused her to look very bad, and her eyes appeared to be almost starting from her head. She had not eaten anything for about 7 days. I pitied her very much, and think their leader ought to be hung for making so many persons miserable, and some even becoming raving maniacs.

Evening out strolling on the bank and through town with Jim Welch and Bill Hays.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

10 October 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day and evening. Left Burlington this morning about 25 minutes past 8 and arrived in the city by 10. At the Recorder's office during the greater part of the day searching a title. Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m. and arrived there about 7. After supper went down to the "Clay Clubroom," the Whigs are in good spirits. Left about 1/4 past 8, and went to Dr. Ellis's, met Ma and Pa there, and spent the rest of the evening.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

11 October 1844. Raw, damp and rainy during the morning and at about 2 o'clock cleared off. Left Burlington about 1/4 past 8 this morning and arrived in the city about 10. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Evening at home.

Up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

12 October 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning about 1/4 past 8 and arrived in the city by 20 m. of 10. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. On board met John Sherbun, an old school mate, he had come on board to see a friend and was accidentally carried off. He took tea and spent the evening until the time of leaving for the city again. After supper, out with Hugh Nesbit, Jim Welch, Mr. Lippincott and Sherborn.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

13 October 1844. Clear through the early part of the morning but during the remainder of the day and evening rather cloudy. At St. Mary's church in the morning, Bishop Otto preached and gave us a very fine sermon.

Afternoon took a walk out Kinsey's Lane as far as the mill, and across into the Mount Holly Road, and then home. Evening at home until about 1/4 of 9, then left to go down to the boat to start for the city. Left Burlington about 1/4 past 9 and arrived in the city by 1/2 past 10.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

14 October 1844. Cloudy and rainy during the day and evening. At the office during the day until about 6 o'clock, then went around to see Ma at Roberts' in 9th, but did not find her in. Then got supper and called for Dick Cristiani, and in a short time afterwards went down with him to see Miss Elizabeth Mercer and spent the evening there, and met Miss Kiel.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

15 October 1844. Cloudy and rainy during the morning, and greater part of the afternoon clear. About 6 o'clock commenced raining again and continued through the evening. At the office all day and at about 6 o'clock went down to Dick Cristiani's to tea. After which, not knowing where to go on account of its being a very rainy evening, concluded to go over to the Walnut St. Theatre to see the piece very highly spoken of, called Putnam. The first piece performed was The Three Wives of Madrid and certainly was a very amusing and ludicrous piece. Putnam was well performed, and many parts of it very interesting and entertaining.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

16 October 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 1/4 of 7. After supper went around to see Jim Sterling, and to the Whig Clubroom. Returned home about 1/2 past 8 and remained there the rest of the evening.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

17 October 1844. Cloudy during the day and at about 7 3/4 p.m. commenced raining and continued during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city about 1/4 of 10 o'clock. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left again for Burlington. Evening at home.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

18 October 1844. Cloudy and raining all day and during the evening, but very warm throughout; too warm to have fire. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour. Was very foggy all the way down. Did not rain when we started, but by the time of our arrival, poured.

At the office during the day until about 6 p.m., then got supper and at about 7 o'clock called down to see Miss S. Much, where I spent the evening. Left a few minutes after 10. Up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

19 October 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day, and evening moonlight. At the office in the morning until about 11 o'clock, then went out with Jim Welch for about an hour and 3/4, and returned to the office about 1/4 of 1 and remained there during the remainder of the day or until 1/4 past 4 p.m., then took a stroll in Chestnut St.

Found great numbers of ladies out on the promenade, all seeming glad to have the opportunity of taking a stroll after so many unpleasant days.

Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m., where we arrived by 1/4 past 6. In the evening out taking a walk around town with Jim Welch until about 9 o'clock. Then returned home, found Mrs. and Mr. Grubb there spending the evening.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

20 October 1844. Clear, cool and delightful all day, being the ples- antest day we have had this fall. Evening clear, cool and moonlight. Took a walk down on the bank with Jim Welch before church in the morning. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Spent the evening over at the Miss Nesbit's.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

21 October 1844. Cloudy during the day, and in the evening rained at times. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 1/4 of 10, went up to the office and remained there during the day.

In the evening went around to the exhibition of the Franklin Institute, the display of American Manufactures this year is very large and fine, and the arrangement of the exhibition is in good taste. The company this evening was very large, larger than has been since the opening, the number of beautiful ladies there was great, and many of them much more pleasing to look upon than the exhibition. Dick Cristiani accompanied me to the exhibition. Met Sam Mitchell, he was with us the greater part of the evening. Just before leaving, met Hugh Nesbit.

The excitement among this deluded people, calling themselves Millerites, increases every day. At an early hour this morning a long string of carriages, cabs, omnibuses, and furniture cars, all filled with well-dressed men and women left the city and passed through Kingsessing on their way to Delaware. They stopped a short time in the village of Kingsessing, and on being questioned as to their destination, replied that they were going to serve the Lord, and would stop wherever He directed them. Several other parties of persons believing in the Millerite doctrine left the city this morning with the design of encamping outside the city, and awaiting the great change of temporal affairs, as predicted by their leaders and expected by them. I learn others went over into Camden.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

22 October 1844. Cloudy and unpleasant all day, and with a slight sprinkling of rain in the evening (early part), in the latter part of the evening cleared off beautifully, and the moon came out in all her glory.

At the office all day, with the exception of about an hour and a half, I was out on some business. In the evening went up to see the Miss Leeds, as usual spent my time very pleasantly, and they looked as pretty as ever. Have not been up there since the 19th of June last.

This day has passed away without the final consummation of all things, Millerite prophesies to the contrary, and I hope these deluded people will now come to their right senses, and give up to foolish idea that any man can tell the precise day of the end of the world. Those that went out last night over Schuylkill and into Jersey, have in great measure returned to the city, being I suppose, fully satisfied that the end of the world will not be today, and suppose take the more wise plan of waiting in their houses.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m.

23 October 1844. Clear and pleasant all day, evening clear, cool and moonlight. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington. Ma, Pa, Grandma and Lydia all went up this evening, they having come down this morning. Never do I remember being on the river on a more delightful night. The moon was shining in all her beauty and brilliancy, and the river was as smooth as a surface of polished steel, giving the whole scene a calm and serene aspect, which far transcends the power of my pen to describe. From this day forward I intend signing my name J. Warner Erwin instead of Jos. W. Erwin as heretofore, and make this note of the circumstance to know the precise time of changing my signature to prevent any difficulty that might arise from the fact.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 9 3/4 p.m.

24 October 1844. Rather cloudy in the morning but in the afternoon cleared off beautifully, evening clear and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 1/2 past 9. Went up to the office and remained there during the day, being very busy.

About 7 o'clock Geo. Way stopped in for me, and after going to see if we could meet a person (not being able to do so) went down to see Miss Elizabeth Mercer, met there Miss Mars, Martin and Beck, and Mr. Kiehl. Left about 1/2 past 9, walked down 2nd St. a short distance and on passing Miss Martin's, saw Miss Frank Craycroft sitting at the window. Went in and remained there until about 1/2 past 10, saw two of the Miss Martins, Way and I waited upon Miss Craycroft home. Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 12 1/2 p.m.

25 October 1844. Clear and delightful all day and during the evening. At the office all day, and in the evening went down to see Cristiani at his store. Remained there the greater part of the time until about 1/4 past 10, then went home.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

26 October 1844. Clear and pleasant all day, evening clear and moonlight. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived by 20 minutes of 7. In the evening out with Jim Welch, Bill Lippincott, Hugh Nesbit & a young man by the name of Smith, strolling about town.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

27 October 1844. Cloudy all day, with an occasional sprinkling of rain. At St. Mary's church in the morning, afternoon and evening. There were five Bishops there today, Bishops Ives, Doane, Southgate, Whittington and __________. Bishop __________ preached in the morning, Whittington in the afternoon, and Southgate in the evening. The latter was ordained Bishop to Turkey yesterday, and gave us a very interesting discourse of the eastern churches. Accompanied Miss Helen Nesbit home this evening after church, went in and spent the remainder of the evening there.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

28 October 1844. Cloudy, raw, damp and rainy all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city about 1/2 past 9. Went up to the office and remained there all day, until near 8 o'clock, when feeling tired of writing, went around to see Miss Susan Much, and spent the remainder of the evening there.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. & bed at 11 p.m.

29 October 1844. Cloudy with the appearance of rain during the day and evening. At the office all day, until about 1/2 past 5 p.m., then started to go down to 2nd and Pine Sts. to see Dick Cristiani. Met him coming up 2nd St., turned about, and went home with him to tea.

Afterwards, went down to the store with him, remained there a short time, and then called down to see Miss Robinson and Hurley. Remained there until about 1/4 past 9, then went up for Dick to go with him up home again, his sister having requested us to spend the evening there, as several ladies were to spend the evening with her. Did not get up to the house until about 10 o'clock. Upon entering the room was introduced to Miss Buchanan, niece of Senator Buchanan,(21) and Miss Emma Hearns, both very pretty young ladies. Waited upon Miss B. to the hotel (Madison House) she is stopping at about 11 o'clock. Up at 7 a.m., bed at 12 p.m.

30 October 1844. Cloudy all day and very raw and cold. About the middle of the day, had a slight sprinkling of snow, being the first of the season. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the New Philadelphia. Had a very dark trip up and arrived there about 7 o'clock. In the evening went down to see Steirling, Hall and Mr. Israel, returned home about 1/2 past 9.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

31 October 1844. Clear and delightful all day and evening, and rather cold, thermometer down to 39 this morning about 7. Left Burlington this morning about 20 m. past 8 and arrived in the city by 1/4 of 10.

Just before our leaving the wharf in Burlington, saw them take from the water a drowned man, his name Reuben Mitchell, and I believe of very intemperate habits. It is supposed while intoxicated he was down on the wharf and accidentally fell over board. He is the second man that I ever saw drowned, and I do not care about seeing any more, as the sensation it occasions is very unpleasant.

At the office all day with the exception of a little while I was out on business. Left about 6 o'clock, got tea, and went down to Dick Cristiani's house, did not find him in, then down to his store. Remained there a short time, when I thought I would call on some ladies. Called at Miss Jo. Much's, E. Mercer's, and Fr. Craycroft's, did not find any of them in and returned to Dick's store. About 10 o'clock Miss M. Robinson & Miss E. Hurley stopped and we waited upon them home.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m., bed at 1/4 of 1 a.m.

NOVEMBER

1 November 1844. Today was just such a day for an election, as one would desire, clear, cool and pleasant. The polls in the city opened at 8 o'clock precisely, and voting continued steadily, quietly, peacefully. The customary parades of music, carriages, &c, were seen in the streets. I never saw so fine a turn out as the Whigs made. They had large omnibuses, with five horses richly decorated, and a band of music, that cheered and delighted whenever it was heard excepting perhaps, at the "Democratic Headquarters." The arrangements at the polls seemed good, and I understand that in the districts generally, there was an unusual quiet, a very gratifying circumstance.

At the office all day until about 1/2 past 4 p.m., when I went out to take a stroll around the election ground with Jim Welch. Was in company with Welch during the whole of the evening, and at about 10 o'clock Dick Chistiani joined us. Then took a stroll around and brought up at the Whig headquarters, where we remained until about 1/2 past 12 to hear some of the returns, then left and Welch accompanied me up to the office where we remained for the night.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 1 a.m.

2 November 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 1/2 past 3. After going up home and getting something to eat, Welch, Batton and myself got a boat and rowed down the bank. Took Lippincott in, and then crossed the river, got some persimmons, and returned to Burlington about dark. In the evening out with Batton, Lippincott and Welch until about 1/2 past 8, then went home.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 1/2 past 8 p.m.

3 November 1844. Clear and pleasant during the morning and early part of the afternoon, but towards the latter part clouded over, and at about 9 p.m. commenced raining. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Bishop McCloskey of Michigan preached both times, very excellent sermons. Spent the evening with Mr. and Mrs. Sterling.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at about 10 p.m.

4 November 1844. Cloudy, raw, damp and raining all day and during the evening, though towards night the wind changed and I think it may be clear tomorrow. Left Burlington this morning about 1/4 past 8 and arrived in the city by 1/4 of 10. At the office during the remainder of the day until about 8 o'clock, then went around to Roberts' in 9th Street and spent the evening there. I commenced boarding at Mr. Spencer's in 6th Street below Chestnut Street today and from what I can judge so far think I will like the place as the table is excellent and the company lively and agreeable.

Got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 20 m. past 10 p.m.

5 November 1844. Clear and delightful through the greater part of the day, and during the evening, though at two periods in the day it clouded over very heavily, and had a slight shower of rain both times resembling very much those of an April day. At the office all day, in the evening accompanied Dick Cristiani to a "Native American"

shilling concert. I never, with very few exceptions, saw such a crowd at a concert. I suppose there must have been between 3 and 4000 people there, the greater part ladies, and the entertainment passed off very pleasantly. There was a little kind of a skirmish, while the company was leaving the room.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m.

6 November 1844. Clear and delightful all day and during the evening. At the office all day, and in the evening went up to see the Miss Leeds, having received a note from them this morning stating that they wished to see me for something particular this evening. Met some 10 or 15 ladies and gentlemen there, quite unexpected to me, and found that it was a meeting to make some arrangement to have a sociable evening hop every other Monday evening at the different

ladies houses, the first to come off at the Misses Leeds on next Monday week. I anticipate considerable pleasure as the mode of arrangement fixed upon is well calculated to make the evening pass pleasantly. Between each dance the ladies are to perform some pieces, and sing some songs, which will add considerably to the pleasure of the entertainment.

Left Miss Leeds about 11 o'clock and walked down with Mr. Dodge (one of the club) as far as the "Clay Club reading room" to hear some of the election returns from New York, they appear to be growing more favorable for the Whigs.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 12 p.m.

7 November 1844. Clear and delightful during the day and evening. At the office the greater part of the day until about 20 m. of 5 p.m., then took a stroll on Chestnut St. Found a great number of young ladies on the promenade, many of them very beautiful. After tea called down to see Miss Martin, did not find her in, then went around to Frank Craycroft's, found her in and also Miss Sarah Martin. Spent the evening very pleasantly. Left a little before 11 o'clock and accompanied Miss Martin home, after which, stopped up at the Clay Clubroom to hear the news, but found there was none by the pilot line of this evening, though the Whigs are still sanguine of gaining the State of New York.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 12 p.m.

8 November 1844 The weather for several days past has been delightful, and today may be added to them. And well for the people that it has been so, for they have had an out of doors time of it, in awaiting the arrival of the boats from New York, to hear of the election returns. Thousands and thousands are constantly passing from corner to corner, from bulletin to bulletin, and all buzzing, looking mournful as the news is good or bad, but all looking and talking as if the balance was suspended with an equal poise, and that only a small weight was required to make one scale preponderate, and the other kick the beam.

At the office all day until about 4 p.m., then left, attended to some business and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived by about 7 o'clock. Spent the evening at home. Miss Virginia and Caroline Mitchell and Miss Anne Wilson took tea and passed the evening with us. Waited upon them home about 10 o'clock.

Up at 10 m. of 8 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

9 November 1844 Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city 1/4 of 10. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived about 1/2 past 6.

In the evening, out with Nesbit, Welch, Batton, Lippincott, and Smith strolling about town. Returned home about 1/2 past 8 or 9 o'clock.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

10 November 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. About 1/4 past 9 this morning my father and self started to ride over to see Mr. South. He resides about 5 miles below Bristol. Arrived at his house about 1/4 of 11, remained there about an hour, and returned to Burlington by 1/2 past 12 n. after having a delightful ride, the weather being just suitable.

Afternoon attended St. Mary's church, Bishop Doane preached.

After church accompanied Miss Helen Nesbit home, went in and remained about 1/2 an hour. Evening at home until about 20 m. of 9, then left and at 9 o'clock left in the New Philadelphia for the city, where we arrived by 1/4 of 11 having been detained on account of fog.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

11 November 1844. Clear and very pleasant during the day and evening, and it seems to be that we are in the full enjoyment of an old fashioned Indian summer -- a mild, subdued sunlight, a southerly wind just wafting along the gossamer web, and looking as if the work of the season was over, and the year, satisfied with itself and its produce, was pausing between its labors and the grave, gathering up its mantle, and seeking to fall with dignity.

At the office during the day until about 1/4 of 5 p.m., then left to attend to some business. After tea went out with Dr. Bun to see some ladies. We called at 5 places before finding any in, namely Miss Josephine Much's, Miss Eliz. Mercer's, Miss Craycroft's, Miss Martin's and Miss Shankland's. Found the younger sister in, and met Miss Mary Martin there, Miss Leanna Shankland came in before we left. Waited upon Miss Martin home about 1/4 of 10 o'clock. Upon our way up home stopped in for Dick Cristiani at 2nd and Pine Sts. He walked up with us and I left him at 8th & Market and Bun at 6th & Chestnut.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

12 November 1844. Cloudy and unpleasant during the day, and at about 1/2 past 5 p.m. commenced raining and continued during the greater part of the evening. At the office during the greater part of the day, and in the evening went around to the Chinese museum salon with Dr. Nelson Bun to attend a concert given for the benefit of a "Native American Association." The attendance was small in comparison with others, on account I suppose of the bad state of the weather.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

13 November 1844. Cloudy, rainy and unpleasant all day, but towards evening cleared off pleasantly, and in the evening became quite cold. At the office during the morning until about 12 n., when I went down to the Recorders office to examine a title; was engaged there during the remainder of the day, with the exception of about an hour and a half at dinner.

In the evening about 8 o'clock went up to see Miss H. A. Myers, and spent the evening there very pleasantly. Left about 10 o'clock.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

14 November 1844. Clear and delightful but rather cold during the day and evening. At the Recorder's during the greater part of the day examining a title. In the evening called up to see the Miss Leeds. Saw Sarah Elizabeth, but Arethusa was in Boston, having left with her father and mother on Friday last. Met Mr. Rafield there, we left about 1/4 past 10 and I walked down with him to the "American House," the place he is stopping at. Went in, conversed a considerable time, and afterwards took supper with him, when he accompanied me as far as 8th and Chestnut and then parted.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

15 November 1844. Clear and delightful during the day and evening, early part of the evening moonlight. At the office in the morning until about 1/2 past 10, then went down to the Recorder's office, where I remained until 1/4 of 3 searching a title. Then took dinner, after which, I went out to attend to some business of the office, which occupied my time until nearly dark so that I did not get up to the office until 5 o'clock. In the evening went down to see the Miss Martins, with Dick Cristiani and a Mr. Smith from Louisiana, boarding at our house. Spent a very pleasant evening and left about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

16 November 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived by 1/4 past 6. In the evening at Mrs. Sterling's with the rest of the family, having had an invitation to supper.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

17 November 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day, clouded over about dark and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. commenced raining. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, the Bishop preached in the morning and Mr. Lyons in the afternoon. Mr. Edward Roberts was at our house today, he came up this morning, and returned in the evening boat. His wife has been up since Monday last, as her mother Mrs. Rieford is very sick. Left for Philadelphia tonight at about 10 m. of 9 in the boat and arrived there a few minutes after 10.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

18 November 1844. Raining and unpleasant during the early part of the morning, continued cloudy until towards evening when it cleared off quite cold and in the evening moonlight. At the office during the day and in the evening went up to Miss Leeds to attend our first meeting of young ladies and gentlemen for the purpose of dancing, &c, but for some reason or other but two ladies came, though there were 6 or 8 gentlemen. Passed the evening rather pleasantly, and it was agreed we should not meet again until the first Monday in January, when perhaps it would suit the generality of ladies better.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

19 November 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day but towards evening clouded over. At the office all day, and in the evening called on Miss Ella with Dick Cristiani. It has been a very long time since I have called upon her. Remained there until about 8 o'clock, then left and went down to Miss Shankland's. While there Miss Mary Martin came in. Left about 10 o'clock and accompanied her home. After leaving her, took a stroll down around by Miss Robinson's. Noticing the door open, went in and remained about 1/2 an hour, and then wended our way home.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m.

20 November 1844. Cloudy and rainy during the day and evening. Out the greater part of the day, attending to some business, remainder at the office. In the evening went down with Mr. Smith of Louisiana to see Miss Josephine Much, but not finding her in, went down to see the Miss Martins and spent the evening. Met there Miss Conrad and Shankland.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

21 November 1844. Cloudy, rainy and unpleasant all day and during the evening. At the office all day and in the evening attended the Chestnut Street Theatre to see Mr. Jamison as Romeo and Mrs. Wilkinson as Juliet. The piece was performed exceedingly well, and with much effect, but the audience was small. Mrs. Wilkinson is the most beautiful actress I have seen on the stage for a long while, and performed her part well. The farce of "The Sleepwalker" was a funny affair and caused much mirth. Mr. Chapman as "Sanno" was excellent.

Up at 10 m. of 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

22 November 1844. Cloudy, rainy and very unpleasant all day and during the evening. At the office all day, and in the evening went to the Arch St. Theatre, being very anxious to see "King Lear." Mr. Hackett took the part of King Lear and played it with much effect. Cordelia by Miss Clarendon, and Edgar by E. S. Conner, were well performed and created much applause. The after piece, "The Nymphs of the Red Sea," was a laughable affair, and beautiful spectacle.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

23 November 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office through the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 1/2 past 6. At home during the evening with the exception of about 1/2 an hour, I was around at Jim Sterling's. Anna Roberts came up this afternoon to remain a day or so.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

24 November 1844. Clear, cold and very windy all day, much colder towards evening. A total eclipse of the moon took place this evening at the time and under the circumstances that had been previously made known. The state of the atmosphere and the apparent scarcity of clouds greatly favored the view, and numbers watched the shadow stealing over the bright surface of the luminary, dimming its beauty, and imparting to it a blood-like tinge. Shortly before 7 o'clock the obscuration was complete, and at that time the heavens were free of clouds, and the grand natural display was completely visible. In a short time, a line of light on the lower edge of the moon, indicating the passing off of the eclipse, was observable, and by degrees the dark veil passed entirely off, and the orb shone forth again with her original and beautiful effulgence.

At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, the Bishop preached both times. In the evening early part in at Mrs. Grubb's with the rest of the family viewing the eclipse, afterwards out with Welch, Nesbit, Thockmorton, Sterling & Hays until about 1/2 past 8, then returned home.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 9 p.m.

25 November 1844. Clear and cold all day; evening clear, cold and moonlight. It seems that winter has now set in, in earnest, pedestrians begin to travel with that locomotive speed, which is generally observed during the cold season of the year; cloaks and overcoats are in great demand. Ice was made to considerable extent last night, being the first of any importance this season, the gutters this morning are coated with ice, and I noticed coming down the river this morning considerable on the margin of the river. The change since Saturday last has been very great. At noon on that day the mercury in Fahrenheit was 56, on Sunday at noon, at 40, and in eight hours it sunk 12 degrees to 28. Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 1/4 of 10. The trip was very cold, and the number of passengers very large, and all being in the cabin made it difficult to move about. Mrs. May Roberts came down this morning but intends returning this evening, as Mrs. Rieford is not much better. At the office during the day and in the evening went to the Menagerie with Mr. Smith of Louisiana.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

26 November 1844. The cold weather has fairly set in upon us, and the atmosphere and sky of today looked as if a snowstorm was gathering and would soon descend. Overcoats were of course in requisition, and glistening eyes, and blue and red noses, looked as if a sudden epidemic had visited the city, so numerous were they. The preparations for the season of festivity which now approaches, begin already to be observable, especially in those articles which constitute gifts, or afford the means of passing or permanent pleasure and amusement.

At the office all day, and spent the evening at Mrs. Spencer's, the place where I am boarding at, having an invitation, as a bride and groom, Mr. and Mrs. Dallam and the two bridesmaids, Miss Dallum and Miss Hedges of New Jersey were to be there. Spent the evening very pleasantly, and was much pleased with Miss Dallam and Miss Hedges, the former being rather pretty, but the manners of the latter I liked much better. The bride sang and played very well, and had some pretensions to beauty, but her manners I cannot say I was altogether pleased with, as she appeared to be rather affected in her movements, but perhaps I may be mistaken and she would improve on acquaintance. Waited upon Miss Hedges, went in and remained for a short time.

After leaving went down to Mrs. O'Callihans for Lydia, she, and Ma and Pa having spent the evening. I had an invitation but did not go. Found they had all left before I got there, though I expected Ma and Pa would have remained.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

27 November 1844. Cloudy and cold all day and during the evening. At the office during the morning, and in the afternoon, at the Recorder's office making a copy from the records. In the evening went down to Miss Martin's with Mr. Smith and spent the evening. Met there Miss Frank Craycroft, accompanied her home shortly after 10 o'clock. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

28 November 1844. A cold, rainy, dismal, sleety, and freezing day, the consequence was slippery sidewalks and frequent falls, which rendered it good for nothing but cabs and omnibuses. At the office all day, and in the evening at my boarding house until about 8 o'clock, then left to go up to the office but stopped on the way to see Miss Susan Much.

Up at 10 m. past 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

29 November 1844. Raw, cold, damp and disagreeable all day and during the evening. At the office all day, and in the evening at my boarding house until about 1/2 past 7, then Smith and I went out to take a stroll. Called upon Miss Craycroft but did not find her in. Afterwards walked about until about 1/4 of 10, then went up to our boarding house again, where I remained until 1/2 past 10 and then went to my lodgings.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

30 November 1844. Cloudy, rainy and unpleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the morning, and in the afternoon went up to Burlington in the Trenton at 2 o'clock. Met on board Miss Burling and Miss Lydia Earl. Arrived in B. about 1/2 past 3, remained until about 4 o'clock with Miss Earl and Burling, waiting for the carriage to come in for them from Springfield. But its not arriving, went home, remained a short time, and then returned to the hotel, where I still found them. Mr. Hall started up with the ladies about 5 o'clock in a wagon he procured. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Nesbits. Helen looked beautiful, much improved since she has thrown off black, and Clara looked handsomer than I have ever seen her before.

Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

DECEMBER

1 December 1844. Cloudy, rainy and very disagreeable all day and during the evening. This day is the first of the month, the first of the week, the first of winter, and the first of the ecclesiastical year, or in other words, the first Sunday in Advent.

At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Bishop Doane preached in the morning and examined the Sunday school children in the afternoon. Evening at home. Mr. Edward Roberts ocame up last evening, and returned this evening. Mr. R.'s wife and daughter Clara dined with us today. Little Clara has been up since Wednesday last.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 9 p.m.

2 December 1844. Clear & cold but pleasant during the day and evening. The ladies were out in great numbers, all seeming glad to have the pleasure of a promenade after too many days of unpleasant weather. Left Burlington this morning at about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 1/4 of 10. When opposite the bake house, took off the

passengers of the Bolivar, she having broken some part of her machinery, which disabled her so much as only to be able to run with one wheel. Waited upon Miss Wistar down this morning, and in the city as far as 3rd and Chestnut Sts.

At the office all day, and in the evening Dick Cristiani called and persuaded me to go to see the Miss Ashleys with him, though I had partially made an engagement to go up to see Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 3/4 p.m.

3 December 1844. Cloudy all day and in the evening about 1/2 past 8 commenced raining and continued through the night. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the Steamer New Philadelphia, where we arrived at about 7 o'clock, after a dark and dreary passage. Evening at home. Miss Helen and Clara Nesbit spent the evening with us. Waited upon them home, went in and remained until about 1/4 past 10 conversing.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

4 December 1844. Cloudy, rainy and very unpleasant all day and through the evening. Left Burlington this morning about 1/4 past 8 and arrived in the city by 10. The trip was cold and unpleasant and the number of passengers few. At the office during the day, and in the evening about 7 o'clock called up for Samuel Mitchell. Went in, saw his sister Caroline, remained about 15 minutes, and then went up to see the Miss Leeds. Found Sarah Elizabeth at home, Arethusa not having returned from Boston. Spent a very pleasant evening and left about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

5 December 1844. Cloudy and unpleasant all day and during the evening. The streets for the last week have been in a deplorable situation, covered with mud and very wet, rendering them very unpleasant for the pedestrian.

At the office during the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the New Philadelphia, where we arrived at about 7 p.m., after a dark and dreary passage. Mrs. Ploughman went up this evening, to return tomorrow. Evening at home with the exception of about an hour I was out with Ma, and at Sterling's.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

6 December 1844. Cloudy, damp, rainy, drizzling, muddy, and in fact everything that was necessary to make up an unpleasant day. Left Burlington this morning at about 1/4 past 8 and arrived in the city a few minutes before 10.

At the office all day, and in the evening about 1/4 of 8, went up to Mrs. Edward Roberts', to attend a party styled a "Sociable." It

is composed of about 30 or 40 ladies and gentlemen, who meet at each other's houses every Friday evening for the purpose of spending an evening in a sociable way by dancing, waltzing, playing on the piano, singing, &c. Some of the young ladies were very pretty, and all agreeable. Was introduced to Miss Elliott, daughter of Commodore Elliott,(22) Miss Wistar, and Miss Poulson, the two first were pretty, and agreeable and I danced several times with them. Miss P. is an agreeable young lady but not so pretty as the other two. A Miss Scull, a very pretty young lady, was not introduced. The company left shortly after 12 o'clock, and if I can judge the rest by myself, spent a very pleasant evening.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

7 December 1844. Cloudy and rainy all day, evening cloudy but did not rain. In the afternoon the winds were around to the southwest, blowing quite fresh, from which circumstance think we shall have a clear day tomorrow.

Out on business during the greater part of the day and in the evening went around with Mr. Smith of Louisiana to the Walnut St. Theatre to see Mr. Forrest play Sparticus in The Gladiator. I think it is one of the most thrilling things I ever witnessed. Forrest played his part well and with much effect. The house was crowded from pit to dome.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 12 a.m.

8 December 1844. Clear and cold all day and during the evening, much colder towards evening than in the morning. At Grace church in the morning, and heard a good sermon from Mr. Suddards. After dinner or about 3 o'clock, Cristiani and myself took a walk down to see the Miss Ashleys. Remained there about an hour and then went up into Walnut St., met Dr. Turnbull(23) and took a stroll in this street to see the ladies. Went home with Dick to tea, afterwards called down to see the Miss Martins, though much in opposition to my wishes, and wanted very much to go to St. Luke's or Grace church. Left about 1/2 past 9 and came up home.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

9 December 1844. Clear and cold all day, and evening ice made in great abundance last night, and overcoats, cloaks, &c, in great demand, and a beautiful day it was for the second week of December.

After almost three weeks of incessant rain, the sun was welcomed by an unusual array of fair pedestrians. Chestnut St. looked quite metropolitan. What with the brilliant exhibition of holiday goods in the shop windows, and the gay throng on the sidewalks, we had good reason to believe that the good city of William Penn had departed irrevocably from the plain rules and habits in which he rejoiced. By the way, the fashions of no season within my memory have combined such richness of material and varied elegance of design in feminine apparel as the present. To make a slight transition - while on the subject of weather and women - the sun was eclipsed partially in the afternoon, unless the almanac makers were at fault in their cyphering. A few scattering clouds threatened about noon to run an opposition to the moon and do an eclipse on their own account. How far they succeeded we must await the report of the Philosophical Society to ascertain.

At the office all day, until about 1/2 past 4 p.m., when I took a stroll down Chestnut Street to see the beauty and fashion there congregated, and returned about 5, where I remained until after 6 and then went to tea. In the Evening called upon Miss Hannah Ann Myers. On entering the room found quite a company assembled, very unexpected to me, among whom were Miss Matthews of Cincinnati, and Mr. Clapp of Boston. Miss M. is quite a pretty young lady, and in conversation found she was acquainted with many of my friends in Cincinnati. And much to my astonishment she informed me that Miss Kate Lynd who spent last summer in Philadelphia, and was at our house two or three times, had married Mr. Snow some three or four weeks ago, a gentleman who we had joked her about considerably while here. Spent the evening very pleasantly in dancing, conversing, &c, and left about 1/4 past 10.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

10 December 1844. Clear and cold all day and during the evening. At the office all day until about 1/2 past 4, when I left for the boat to go home, Pa wishing to remain in the city. In going down Chestnut St., met Hugh Nesbit, took a short stroll to see the ladies, and then went to the boat. Arrived at Burlington about 7 o'clock. Spent the evening over at Miss Nesbits.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11p.m.

11 December 1844. Cloudy and very cold all day, with appearance of snow, ice made during the whole of the day. At the office all day from about 11 o'clock, before which time I was occupied in coming from Burlington and making some examination of title at the Recorder's office.

In the evening took a stroll down as far as the Navy Yard with Mr. Washington Smith of Louisiana. Returned to Mrs. Spencer's, remained there about half an hour, then he walked with me up to my office, and sat until about 11 o'clock, then left.

Got up this morning at 10 m. past 7 a.m. & to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

12 December 1844. Clear and cold all day but pleasant. At the office during the day until 1/2 past 4 p.m., then took a stroll down Chestnut St. Met a number of ladies on the promenade, and returned to the office about 5 o'clock, where I remained until 6 and then went to tea. After which, walked down with Smith to 5th and Spruce, then parted and I went up to see Miss Louisa Wood. Found her in and spent the evening there.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

13 December 1844. A very changeable day. We had a sprinkling of snow, early in the morning, sunshine about 12 o'clock, rain about 6, and clear weather again about 11. The atmosphere through the afternoon was quite mild but in the morning early, rain and cold.

At the office all day with the exception of about an hour and a half in the morning I was out on some business. Spent the evening at my boarding house Mrs. Spencer's, having had an invitation, as there were to be some company, viz. Mr. and Mrs. Dallam, Miss Dallam, and Mr. Kenderton Smith's two daughters. Spent the evening very pleasantly, had some good singing and playing from Mrs. Dallam, and playing from the eldest Miss Smith. Waited upon Miss D. home.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 11 3/4 p.m.

14 December 1844. Clear and cold all day and during the evening. At the office all day until about 1/2 past 4 p.m., took a stroll in Chestnut St., which was crowded with ladies, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington.

Had a quick trip up, arriving there by 1/4 past 6. After supper went over to see the Miss Kinseys, met there Miss Mary and Ellen Mallory from Germantown, and Miss Newell, three young ladies from the Hall. The two first named were among those with whom we carried on the flirtation last summer. They looked rather confused when I entered the room, but they soon gained confidence, and I found Mary to be a very pleasing, as well as handsome young lady. Waited upon her to the Hall, and found her quite loquacious, much more so than could hardly be expected from a boarding school young lady. Had very little to say to Ellen, she is very pretty. After leaving Kinsey's, went over to see Mr. Palatene at Mrs. Nesbit's, to give him a package. Upon leaving his room went in to see the Miss Nesbit, found Clara and Helen and Mrs. N. and remained about an hour or until 1/2 past.

Up at 6 3/4 a.m. and to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

15 December 1844. Clear, cold and windy all day. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Mr. Germain preached in the morning and Mr. Lyons in the afternoon. Spent the evening at Dr. Ellis' with Emma Erwin and Lydia. A Miss Mary Ellis is now staying there, found her to be a very pleasant and agreeable young lady.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

16 December 1844. Cloudy all day, and in the evening had a slight fall of snow. Very cold last night and made considerable ice in the river, some half an inch thick, being the first of any account this season. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 10 o'clock, then went up to the office, where I remained until about 2 o'clock. Then left for dinner, after which, went over to the Recorder's office, where I remained until dark examining a title.

At 5 p.m. left in the cars for Burlington, being the first trip in them this winter, the New Philadelphia having drawn off on account of the ice. Found it much pleasanter to go up in them, as we arrived at home by 1/4 past 6, an hour earlier than in the boat.

Out in the evening until 1/2 past 8 (part of the time at Mrs. Nesbit's), when I returned home. Met there Miss Mary Ellis from Freehold and Dr. and Mrs. Ellis. Waited upon Miss E. home about 10 o'clock, she is a very pretty and pleasant young lady.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. & to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

17 December 1844. Cloudy and very cold all day, ice made to considerable extent last night. Found considerable in the river in going down this morning. Do not think the boat will make more than one trip more if this weather continues, thermometer stood at 31 all day.

Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 8, the boat did not arrive until that late hour on account of the quantity of ice above. Arrived in the city about 1/2 past 10, met considerable ice, which detained us. Met Miss Emma Parker on board, with whom I was in company the greater part of the way down, and on arrival waited upon her off the boat and as far as 2nd and Chestnut.

At the office all day, and in the evening went up with Dick Cristiani and his sister to Miss Thomson in Callowhill St. below 13th. On our way up called for Miss Mary James, and Miss Caroline Fletcher, the latter lady I have not seen for the last 5 or 6 years, when she was quite a child. Since then she has grown up to be a woman, and rather pretty. Spent rather a pleasant evening and left about 11 o'clock. After waiting upon Miss Fletcher home, walked as far as 8th & Market with Dick and his sister and then went to my lodgings.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 12 1/4 a.m.

18 December 1844. Cloudy during the greater part of the day and evening, and very cold, thermometer at 5 a.m. 25, and through the day 39, being the coldest of the season. At the office all day with the exception of about three hours occupied at the Recorder's office, &c. In the evening attended Mr. Whale's 1st cotillion party of the season. It was very small and rather a lame affair, there were not more than half a dozen pretty young ladies in the room. I danced but three sets, and my partners were new acquaintances of this evening. If the first party is a specimen of the succeeding ones, they will not be worth attending, broke up about 12 o'clock.

Got up this morning at 1/4 of 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 3 a.m.

19 December 1844. Cloudy all day, and evening at times wearing the appearance of snow and quite cold. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, via Camden and the cars. Were obliged to go around the island on account of low tide, which detained us some 15 minutes, there being a considerable quantity of floating ice in the river, arrived at Burlington about 25 m. past 6. Evening at home.

Got up this morning at 7 and to bed at 10 p.m.

20 December 1844. Clear & cold but very pleasant all day, evening clear and moonlight. Did not leave Burlington until about 20 m. of 10 this morning on account of some detention of the cars and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 11. Lydia and Ma came down. After leaving them went up to the Recorder's office to make some examinations, did not get up to the office until about 1/2 past 1.

At the office during the afternoon, in the evening attended a party given by Miss Hannah Ann Myers. The company was small, but very sociable and agreeable, there were several very pretty young ladies, among whom were the youngest Miss Potter, Miss Farr, Miss Matthews and Miss Seal. The last named lady I think remarkably pretty, interesting and agreeable. Spent the evening in waltzing, dancing, promenading, &c. Left about 12 o'clock and accompanied Miss Seal home.

Got up this morning at 7 o'clock and to bed at 1/4 of 1 a.m.

21 December 1844. Clear and pleasant all day, and during the evening. At the office through the morning and at 2 p.m. left in the cars for Burlington, where we arrived about 4 o'clock. After going home, went out to "silver lake," skating with Hugh Nesbit. Found the skating very fine and returned about 1/2 past 5. In the evening accompanied Miss Clara Nesbit to a lecture, delivered at the "Lyceum" by Professor Wines.

Up this morning at 7 o'clock and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

22 December 1844. Clear and mild in the morning, but towards noon clouded over, and through the afternoon and evening had rain, the result of which will be to clear the river of the ice, which had been floating & covering it from shore to shore of the thickness of three or four inches for the last week. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Bishop Doane preached both times. Spent the evening at Mr. Sterling's with Pa.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

23 December 1844. Cloudy and rainy with an occasional sprinkling of snow through the day, and in the evening had quite a snowstorm lasting for about an hour and a half. It covered sidewalks on the south side of the way. Left Burlington this morning at about 1/2 past 8 in the cars, and after sundry detentions, arrived in the city by 1/2 past 10. At the office during the day, and in the evening after going to an Alderman's with Mr. Washington Smith, went to the circus with him, where we were entertained by a new Pantomime entitled The Wandering Jew, &c.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

24 December 1844. Clear and delightful all day and evening moonlight. At the office during the day until about half past 4, having a little business, went out to attend to it, and after which, took a stroll in Chestnut St. Found it crowded with ladies and gentlemen, all seeming glad to join in the promenade after the bad weather we have had for the last few days. In the evening out with Mr. Washington Smith of Louisiana, strolling about town, there were thousands upon thousands of people out. Chestnut St. was so crowded you could scarcely get along.

Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m.

25 December 1844. Clear, mild and pleasant, being one of the most delightful days I ever witnessed, resembling more one in spring than in midwinter, and just suitable for Christmas, when everyone wishes to turn out. My account of today I shall cut short, not having time to write a more full one. Suffice to say that it, as all the Christmases, passed off with considerable hilarity and joy.

Spent the morning strolling about town with Smith of La., until about 1 o'clock, then went up to Mr. Edward Roberts', where I dined, in company with the rest of our family. Finished dinner about 1/2 past 3, and left about 4 and took a stroll in Chestnut St. Never did I see in my life so many persons together, it was a perfect jam from one end to the other on both sides of the street, and it really seemed as if the whole city was emptied into this fashionable thoroughfare. Went up to Mr. Roberts' again about 8 o'clock, where I met with a company composed of the family and a Miss Sharp, quite a pretty and pleasant young lady, had some dancing.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

26 December 1844. Clear, warm and very pleasant during the day, overcoats or cloaks are unnecessary, being more like spring than winter weather. Clouded over in the evening and had the appearance of rain.

At the office all day and in the evening went with Mr. Smith of La. to the Walnut St. Theatre to witness the performance of the Bohemian Girl and Silver Tower or Harlequin and the Little Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe. The former piece I was not pleased with, not being able to understand it; found it to be very tedious. In the latter there was a great deal of fun, and was much pleased. The theatre was not out until 20 minutes past 12 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 1 a.m.

27 December 1844. Raining and very unpleasant during the morning, but about 12 n. commenced snowing which continued during the afternoon and evening with but little abatement. It did not lay at first, making very slushy walking, but towards night it grew colder, when it covered the streets to the depth of an inch or two, being the heaviest fall of snow we have had this season.

At the office all day and in the evening went up to Mr. Edward Roberts' to see if my sister was there, remained until about 8 o'clock, then went to the office and wrote during the remainder of the evening. Up at 7 a.m. & to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

28 December 1844. Clear and pleasant overhead, but the walking was very unpleasant, being sloppy from the snow of yesterday melting. There were a few sleighs out this morning, and quite a number in Burlington, being considerably more snow there than in the city.

At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the cars, where we arrived a few minutes after 6. At home until about 8 o'clock, then went over to Mrs. Nesbit's. Not finding any of the ladies in, went over to the lecture, was out in a few minutes, then strolled down to Jim Sterling's with Jim Welch, stayed a few minutes and returned home.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at half past 9 p.m.

29 December 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day, but the walking was miserable. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, evening at home. My friend Mr. C. Cox Harper from the Eastern Shore of Maryland came up and spent the day with me, also the night.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m. & to bed at 10 p.m.

30 December 1844. Cloudy during the greater part of the day, with the appearance of snow or rain. Cleared off about dark. The walking since the snow has been miserable.

Left Burlington this morning about 8 1/2 o'clock and arrived in the city by 10. Waited upon Miss Clara Nesbit down. Mr. Harper came down with me this morning. At the office during the day, and in the evening Cristiani, Smith and myself took a stroll down 2nd St. Upon going down, got separated from Cristiani, and Smith and I went into Miss Martin's. Found Sarah in but did not remain long, and went in search of Dick Cristiani. Found him down at the Miss Ashleys', and spent the remainder of the evening there.

Got up this morning at 1/4 past 7 and to bed at 11 3/4 p.m.

31 December 1844. The walking today was rather unpleasant, from the muddy condition of our thoroughfare, but the weather itself was as mild and beautiful as the most fastidious could desire. The principal streets were crowded to a late hour, but not to the extent they were on Christmas Eve. The "Ole Bull Caps," against which such a dead set was made by the boys on Christmas Eve, received last evening additional evidence of their unpopularity, by the appearance of some "cap."-tious individuals, with all kinds of ludicrous imitations. I am afraid the manufacturers of these articles will find it a losing speculation.

At the office all day, and in the evening took a stroll with Mr. Smith of La. until about 1/2 past 8, then left him, and went up to see Miss Susan Much. Remained there until about 10, then went home. I subscribed to "Hudson's Gymnasium" today for three months.

Up at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.


Notes:

(1) Henry Whale's dancing school, Assembly buildings, S.W. corner 10th Streets. FJD.

(2) Elliott & Robinson, Conveyancers, 81 Chestnut Street. FJD.

(3) Henry Erwin's office: 301 Arch Street below 5th.

(4) L.J. Levy, a fancy dry goods merchant in Chestnut Street, whose house was at (old number) 276 Spruce Street. FJD.

(5) Possibly the celebration of George Washington's (1732-1799) 100th, February 22, 1832.

(6) Musical Fund Hall, was renovated by William Strickland from an old church at 1806 Locust Street. "It was so nearly perfect that it was the favorite auditorium in the city." Waynewright and Wolf, Philadelphia, A 300 Year History, W.W. Norton, New York, 1982. p. 251.

(7) The Chestnut Street Theater at 6th and Chestnut Streets, built in 1822 and demolished in 1855, was the third of its name at that location. The first, from a plan of a theater in Bath, England, opened in 1794, was extensively altered by Benjamin Henry Latrobe in 1802. It was destroyed by fire in 1820. The theater of 1822 to 1855 was designed by the architect William Strickland, a student of Latrobe's.Philadelphia Theaters, pp. xiii-xiv.

The Chestnut Theater on the north side of Chestnut Street, west of 6th, was built in 1791 to 1794. It burned in 1820, but was rebuilt in 1822 after a design of William Strickland "with the splendor if gas lighting." ibid., p. 192 and 250.

(8) The red brick Federal house, now 45 West Broad Street, was built about 1833. It was purchased in the 1870's by St. Mary's Church and is used to this day as its rectory. St. Mary's Church is in the next lot west on Broad Street. Unpublished letter of Joan Lanphear, Burlington County Historical Society, 1994.

(9) Depth soundings taken with a lead weight attached to a marked line. Robert C. Degeberg.

(10) May be Mrs. Hedges. The 1846 Directory lists Eunice Hedges, Venetian blind maker, located at 111 South 2nd Street. FJD.

(11) Probably Junius Brutus Booth (1796-1852), a British actor who was on the U.S. stage from 1821. He was the father of several well known actors: Edwin Thomas Booth (1833-1893) and John Wilkes Booth (1838-1865) assassin of President Abraham Lincoln. Webester's Biographical Dictionary

(12) Probably Casmere [Cashmere (Kasmir)]: fine wool from the undercoat of the cashmere goat, also yarn of this wool. A soft fabric made originally from cashmere. Webester's Biographical Dictionary.

(13) Chinese Museum, N.E. corner of 9th and Sansom Streets, was the name given to the Philadelphia Museum building after the opening of the lower floor in 1838 of a superb collection of Chinese art objects, models and life figures of Chinese engaged in their occupations, executed in clay. It was exhibited by the collector Nathan Dunn, a rich merchant engaged in trade with China, in which country he lived. FJD.

(14) Erected 1841. Scarf and Westcott, p. 1399.

(15) "On 6 May 1844, a Protestant meeting in Kensington provoked a riot and bloodshed that lasted for three days and only terminated after the militia had been mobilized. These disorders resulted in the burning of two Catholic churches, Saint Michael's at 2nd and Jefferson Streets and Saint Augustine's at 4th and Vine Streets; the destruction of dozens of Catholic homes; and sixteen deaths.... In July the Southwark area was plagued by similar outbreaks." The Irish in Philadelphia by Dennis Clark, Temple University Press, 1973, p.21.

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(20) Locfoco: A member of a radical group of New York Democrats organized in 1835 in opposition to the regular party organization.

(21) James Buchanan (1791-1868) United States senator from Pennsylvania 1834-1845, later fifteenth president of the United States. Webster Biographical Dictionary.

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(23) Probably Lawrence Tumbull,M.D. JFD