1845

JANUARY

1 January 1845. The year 1844 is now numbered with the cycles of time which exist only in history, and with the rising of this morning's sun another year has opened upon us with all its hopes and cares, its events and pleasures. The year just past has left an indelible record upon the page of history; it is an epoch in the annals of our country no less than in those of the race. Its events have been great either for good or evil, and whether we view them as Christians, as philanthropists, or with a view to their political bearings, we can but recognize their importance. The growth and prosperity of this country has been great and rapid without a parallel in the history of the world. Within the compass of a single lifetime, within the memory of some who yet move among us, this nation has gained in population and wealth to an extent never realized or dreamed of by any nation in ancient or modern times. And it has risen not by wars of conquest, not by invasions of neighboring defenseless territories, not by placing the iron heel upon the necks of subdued races of men, but by the peaceful arts, by enterprise at home and abroad, by toilsome industry, by virtue, intelligence and independence. Thus, by the large-minded enterprise of the people, and by the benignity of God's providence shining upon her cloudless skies, has the vigorous youth of young America been nurtured into almost excessive greatness.

The year just past has added its quota to this miraculous growth. We have seen the manufactures of this country spring fresh again from the vortex of apparent ruin into which shortsighted public measure had hurled them. The avenues of industry have been re-opened, labor has met with encouragement, capitalists have found confidence, and our ships have traversed almost every sea laden with the products of the American soil, or of the people's labor. The political convulsions and elections of the past year have been of the greatest interest to the whole, civilized world, and have started questions, yet undecided, of considerable importance to the country.

In the Presidential election we have witnessed one of the most sublime moral spectacles ever presented to the vein of any nation under heaven. The millions of American people, scattered over the vast continent, approaching the ballot box for the choice of a national ruler, and all with a degree of order and propriety scarcely to be accounted for. The most equal popular vote ever deposited, has decided the issue, and now the attention of the people is turned to the position of parties in Congress, anxiously looking for an indication to be pursued by that body on the great political topics which agitate the country.

Without particularizing farther, however, I may roundly assert this fact, that the past year has developed great and memorable events in church and state, that the expansive character of our people has developed itself more and more, and their enterprise, boundless as the hills and valleys of the territory which they inhabit, has achieved fresh and splendid triumphs. If, with all the experience of the past, the beneficence of Divine Providence to us as a people, the triumphs of our genius and enterprise, and the results of our political doings, we have learnt wisdom and prudence, it is well. The opening year is to us, then, full of promise and bright anticipation. May its golden dreams be realized.

Never have we seen in any latitude, a more lovely "New Year's Day," than was enjoyed today in this city. I say enjoyed, because there must have been deep-seated cause for disquietude, or an unhappy temper, where such a sunshine in midwinter did not produce a correspondent smile. The joyous salutations of the young, as they wished a happy new year to their elders, and whatever might result from those wishes to themselves, the generous and cordial exchange of felicitations with the middle-aged, and the grateful recognition of the new year, and thankful return of wishes in the old, added to those charms of the weather, to make all delightful and delighted.

Did not look at the thermometer yesterday. No one thinks of measuring heat on such an occasion, by the ordinary glass. Beside, the glass itself proved treacherous to its object; the height of the mercury was as much influenced by the new warmth of feeling that was gotten up, as by the influence of the sun upon the atmosphere.

Spent the day as follows: at the office during the morning, or until 2 o'clock, then went to dinner and returned about 1/4 past 3, remained until 1/4 of 4, and then went out and took a stroll in Chestnut St. Found great numbers on the promenade, in fact the sidewalks were so much crowded it was with difficulty you could get along, though not so bad as on Christmas day. At 5 p.m. left for Burlington, for the purpose of attending a party to be given by Dr. Ellis, arrived about 1/4 past 6. Went up to the Dr.'s about 8, and spent a delightful evening. There were about 30 there, among whom were Mrs. Grubb, Miss Emma Parker, Miss Wilson, Miss Mitchells, Miss Helen Nesbit, &c. The evening was passed in dancing, &c. Left about 1/2 past 11 and accompanied Miss Emma Parker home. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

2 January 1845. Today was as mild a one as we might look for in April, and clear. The ice in the river has almost disappeared, and several vessels arrived today without having received any obstruction from that article in the navigation of our river. Overcoats and cloaks have been useless for the last few days, something astonishing for midwinter.

At the office all day and in the evening attended Miss Mallet's first "cotillion party." The company was not very large but select. The "Polka," a new dance brought up this season, was danced this evening, some parts of it I think are beautiful, others I do not like. Spent the evening very pleasantly, made several new acquaintances, namely Miss Sharp, Miss Peterson, Miss Chandler, and Miss Gillingham. The first named lady, I cannot say I became acquainted with this evening, as I met her at Mr. Edward Roberts' last Christmas evening. The hour appointed for the commencement of the party dancing was 7 o'clock, but did not commence until 1/2 past 8 or 1/4 of 9. From present appearances I think these parties will prove a very pleasant way of passing an evening, as the company is select and music good.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. & to bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

3 January 1845. Cloudy during the greater part of the day and evening, had quite a heavy shower of rain about 10 o'clock p.m. The warm weather still continues. At the office all day, and spent the evening up at Miss Myers, remained until about 10 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

4 January 1845. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 1/2 past 6, meeting with some detention on account of the mails, and having to go around the island, instead of through the canal.

In the evening accompanied Miss Mary Ellis and my sister to Professor Wine's last lecture. Miss Ellis took tea with us. Lehman Roberts came up today, and intends remaining until tomorrow night. Left Mrs. Spencer's today, not being pleased with the table. Up at 7 a.m., to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

5 January 1845. Clear during the day but towards evening clouded over and wore the appearance of rain. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon.

The Bishop preached in the morning, and examined the Sunday school children in the afternoon, and also made them their annual presents. After church in the afternoon, walked home with Miss Elizabeth and Helen Nesbit, went in and sat about half an hour. Spent the evening over at Mr. Kinsey's, until about half past 8, then left as I intended going to the city this evening. Left about 1/4 past 9 in the cars, with Lehman Roberts, and arrived in the city about 20 m. past 10.

Up at 8 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

6 January 1845. Clear early in the morning but afterwards clouded over, and at about 5 p.m. commenced snowing very hard, which continued until about 9 o'clock, when the pavements were covered, and then commenced raining which made the walking very slushy and unpleasant. At the office all day, and spent the evening in the parlor of my boardinghouse (Mrs. Parker's) conversing with Mr. Smith of La. and Mr. Varnum of Va. Left about 10 o'clock and went to my lodgings.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. & to bed at 11 p.m.

7 January 1845. Cloudy, rainy and very unpleasant all day, cleared off during the evening. At the office all day, and in the evening called up to see the Miss Leeds. Did not find them in, then went down to see Miss Susan Much, and spent the evening there.

Up at 20 m. of 8 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

8 January 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived at about 6 o'clock.

In the evening attended a small party given by Mrs. Sterling, being the second of the sociable parties. There were about 20 or 30 there, and enjoyed ourselves very much by dancing, &c.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 1 a.m.

9 January 1845. Had quite a snowstorm early in the morning, which was soon followed by rain, and made the walking very bad. Cleared off beautifully about 10 o'clock, and remained so during the rest of the day and evening.

Remained in Burlington today for the purpose of attending a party in Springfield to be given by the Miss Earls of Grassdale. Spent the morning writing and doing other matters. Left for Springfield about 1/2 past 3, and arrived there about 1/2 past 6, after a very tedious ride of three hours, the roads being in a dreadful condition.

The party was given for Mr. Charles Mickle, who lately married Miss Matilda Black, and was quite large, being between 60 and 70 there. We enjoyed ourselves very much in dancing, &c. Was introduced to several very pretty young ladies, among who were Miss Chambers of Philadelphia and the Misses Caroline and Harriet Davis. The two last named ladies were the most beautiful, chaste, and pleasing young ladies I have met with for a long time, and it seemed with difficulty that I could separate myself from their company after our introduction. Danced with them several times during the course of the evening, and generally waited upon them, and I do not think it will be long before I pay them a visit, as they please my taste exactly.

Left after having a delightful time at about 1/2 past 1 and arrived in Burlington at about 1/2 past 4, after a very rough and tedious ride, and running no little risk of having our necks, or limbs broken.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 4 1/2 p.m.

10 January 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day, and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning about 20 m. of 9, and arrived in the city about 1/2 past 10. At the office during the remainder of the day and during the evening.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 9 p.m.

11 January 1845. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 1/4 past 6. In the evening around to see Jim Sterling, also stopped in to see Miss Helen Nesbit, where I remained about an hour. Returned home by 9 o'clock. Up at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

12 January 1845. Clear and much colder than it has been for the last 2 or three weeks, evening clear, cold and moonlight. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, the Bishop preached both times. After church in the afternoon, took a walk with Mr. Wm. Hays. Evening at home, Jim Sterling spent the evening with me.

Up at 10 m. of 8 a.m. & to bed at 9 1/4 p.m.

13 January 1845. Snowed a little quite early in the morning, and through the remainder of the day remained cloudy, sometimes with the appearance of snow, and again with the appearance of rain, until towards night, when it cleared off.

Left Burlington this morning about 20 m. after 8 and arrived in the city by 1/2 past 9, went up to the office and remained there during the day. In the evening took Mr. Smith of La. up to see the Miss Leeds, but did not find them in, remained about 3/4 of an hour talking with Mr. & Mrs. Leeds and then left. While there, Mr. Vansciver came in, he left when we did. After leaving Mr. Leeds' went with Smith to see a Miss Williamson, did not remain long & then wended our way to our respective lodgings.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed 1/4 of 11 p.m.

14 January 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day, until evening when it clouded. At the office during the day, and in the evening attended Miss Mallet's 2nd cotillion party. The party was much better attended than the first one, and a number more pretty young ladies. The only thing I dislike in them is the Polka is too much danced, giving those who do not understand it an opportunity of dancing but four times. Was introduced to two young ladies this evening and danced with them, viz. Miss Kerr or Carr and Miss Wainwright. Also danced with Miss E. Gillingham & Miss Sharp, the latter lady I find improves much on acquaintance. Was in her company a considerable time during the evening. Left the room about 1/2 past 11 and went to my lodgings, having spent a delightful evening, and not regretting in the least that I have subscribed to the parties.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

15 January 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day, evening rather cloudy. At the office all day, and in the evening went down to see the Miss Martins with Mr. Smith of La. Found Mary in, and remained until about 1/2 past 9.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

16 January 1845. Cloudy all day, and in the evening rained. So warm that overcoats and cloaks were unnecessary, in fact there has been but a very few days this winter that they were necessary.

At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the cars, where we arrived about 1/4 past 6. In the evening attended a small party given by Mr. and Mrs. Kinsey, being the third of the sociable parties to be given every week. There were between 30 and 40 there, and spent a very pleasant evening in dancing, &c, though we did not keep it up so late as at Mrs. Sterling's, leaving by 1/4 past 11. I danced with Miss Emma Parker, Miss Helen Nesbit, Miss Virginia Mitchell and Miss Mary Ellis.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 11 3/4 p.m.

17 January 1845. Cloudy, rainy, damp and unpleasant day and evening. Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 8 and arrived in the city by 10. At the office during the day, and in the evening at my boarding house, until about 1/2 past 7 Dick Cristiani stopped in. In the meantime he, Smith of La. and myself went around to Dick's residence, and played whist, &c, during the remainder of the evening.

Left about 1/2 past 10. Up at 7 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

18 January 1845. Clear and pleasant all day, and evening moonlight and quite cold. At the office during the day or until about 1/2 past 4 when I left for the boat to go home. But just before I arrived at the wharf, found I had left my watch at the office, and being afraid of losing it, concluded to remain until morning and get it.

In the evening Mr. Smith and I went to the circus. The house was very full; in fact I never saw a more crowded house. The riding passed off very well, and the last piece, which was performed on the stage, entitled "Anthony Wayne," was very good, exhibiting some very bold horsemanship. Out about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

19 January 1845. Clear and cold during the morning and in the afternoon clouded over, thermometer down to 21 at 8 o'clock a.m. Left for Burlington this morning at 9 o'clock accompanied by Mr. Washington M. Smith of La., where we arrived about 1/4 past 10.

Attended church in the morning, the Bishop preached. In the afternoon took a walk around the town, to show Mr. S. In the evening remained at home. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Roberts came up yesterday afternoon, Mrs. Roberts remained, and Mr. R. went down last night. He again came up at 5 this afternoon and took Mrs. R. down this evening. Up at 7 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

20 January 1845. The ground was covered with snow when I got up, and shortly after, commenced raining. The result of this combination was anything but pleasant to those who had to move abroad.

Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 8 and arrived in the city by 10. Mr. Smith came down with me this morning. Miss Helen Nesbit also came down in the cars. At the office all day, after supper went down to the Jewish Synagogue, to get my ladies tickets for the ball to be given on Thursday. After which, returned to my boarding house, when Mr. Varnum of Va. and Mr. Smith of La. went down to see Mr. Harper of Md. at Mrs. Spencer's. Saw Rhobe & Blanchard of Maine, Betton & Cole of Florida and Harper. Remained there until after 10.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

21 January 1845. Cloudy, raw, damp, snowy, and rainy all day; in fact everything to make it disagreeable until about dark, when it cleared off beautifully and the moon came out in all her glory.

At the office all day, and in the evening took Mr. Smith of La. to see the Miss Leeds. Found them both in, and spent a very pleasant evening, left about 11 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 3/4 p.m.

22 January 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day, evening clear and moonlight. The weather of today would do credit to the latter end of April, instead of being the middle of January.

At the office all day, and in the evening attended a small "Polka" party, given by Miss Sarah Roberts. Met there the two Miss Sharpes, Miss Lex, Miss Line Jones & the Misses Elizabeth and Anna Roberts, and a number of gentlemen. Spent the evening rather pleasantly and left about 1/4 of 12. Waited upon Miss Line Jones and Miss Lex home. Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

23 January 1845. Clear and pleasant all day, and during the evening. At the office the greater part of the day, and in the evening about 1/2 past 8 called for Miss Mary Ellis of Freehold and my sister at Mr. Edward Roberts', to accompany them to the third anniversary "Hebrew Benevolent Ball."

Entered the room about 9 o'clock, the company was not very large at that time but soon increased and by 10 o'clock I suppose there must have been 8 or 900 persons present. The company was exceedingly select for one so large. Met a great number of my acquaintances and found no difficulty in obtaining partners. Among my lady acquaintances present were Mrs. Burrough and sister, Miss Mary Elliott, Mrs. Nevens, Miss Elizabeth Roberts & daughter, Mrs. Thomas, Miss M. Cuthbert, Miss Peterson and a number of others not remembered. The ladies all looked remarkably well, and many of the Jewesses were very handsome. They dressed with considerable taste, and many of their dresses were very costly. Left the ballroom with my ladies about 1/2 past 1, waited upon them home, and then returned, where I remained until about 1/2 past 3.

Up at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and to bed at 4 a.m.

24 January 1845. We had a regular southeast storm, and a general outpouring of rain today. At the office all day, and evening about 1/2 past 7 went up to see Miss Mary Ellis and my sister at Mr. Edward Roberts'. Remained until about 9 o'clock, and then went to my lodgings.

Up at 1/4 of 8 a.m. & to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

25 January 1845. A rainy, snowy, damp & disagreeable day and evening. At the office all day, or until about 1/2 past 4 p.m., when I accompanied Miss Mary Ellis and Lydia (they having stopped at my office) down to boat, and after crossing the river, in the cars to Burlington. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Nesbits playing whist, Miss Helen as my partner, and Mrs. Nesbit and her son Michael as our opponents. Beat Mrs. N. and son 5 out of 7 games, left about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 1/4 of 8 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

26 January 1845. Clear, cold and pleasant all day and evening, contrasting greatly with the weather of the last few days. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. The Bishop preached in the morning and Mr. Germain in the afternoon. In the evening attended Baptist church with grandma, heard an excellent sermon delivered by Mr. Dickerson (the pastor) to the youth.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

27 January 1845. Today was one of which, for mildness and beauty, would be worthy of being classed among the most balmy days of an Indian summer. The ladies taking advantage of it to enjoy the pleasures of a promenade, appeared in Chestnut St. and on over other fashionable promenades or thoroughfares in great numbers.

Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 8 and arrived in the city about 10. Met with an accident by running off the track, on backing on one of the turnouts to let the mail train pass. Were not detained more than 10 minutes.

At the office all day, and in the evening accompanied Sally Roberts to a large party given by Miss Matilda Barclay, daughter of A. C. Barclay.(1) The party was very large, say between 80 and 100. Was acquainted with a number of the company, dancing was the order of the evening, principally the "Polka." The supper was superb, and decorations of the table elegant. The ladies generally speaking were handsome, and all looked remarkably well. Made two new acquaintances: Miss Busby and Miss Penn-Gaskell. The ladies of my acquaintance, who were there, were two Miss Sharpes, Miss Anne & Elizabeth Roberts, Miss Paulson, & Miss Wistar. Left about 1/2 past 1.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 2 a.m.

28 January. 1845 Clear and pleasant all day, resembling spring weather more than winter. At the office all day, and in the evening attended Miss Mallet's 3rd "Polka Party." Danced four times, viz. twice with Miss Peterson, once with Miss Matilda Sharpe, and once with Miss E. Gillingham. The party was much larger than either of the others, but did not enjoy myself so much.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

29 January 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day and evening. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 3 m. before 6.

In the evening went around to Jim Sterling's, remained there a short time, then went over to Mrs. Nesbit's. Helen was out, but came in about 1/2 past 9. Met Mr. Rogers there and had several games of whist played until about 11 o'clock, then went home. Ma and Pa were not up this evening.

Up at 1/4 of 8 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

30 January 1845 Clear and pleasant all day & much colder than it has been for some days past. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 10 o'clock. At the office all day, and during the evening.

Up at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

31 January 1845. Raw, cold and very unpleasant all day, commenced snowing about 1/4 of 7 a.m., and continued to come down about as fast as I ever saw, until about 9 o'clock, when it ceased, leaving about three inches of snow on the pavements. After 9 o'clock it was alternately clear and cloudy with an occasional sprinkling of snow, until evening, when it cleared up and became very cold, the mercury falling to 20 by 10 p.m., colder than we have had it this season.

At the office all day and evening went up to see the Miss Leeds, did not find them in. Went and saw Mr. Leeds and remained about half an hour, then went down to my office, stopping in to see a friend of Dick's for a few minutes on our way down.

Up at 20 m. of 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

FEBRUARY

1 February 1845. Clear and very cold all day, and during the evening. At the office all day or until about 1/2 past 4, then took a stroll in Chestnut St. for a while and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived a few minutes before 6, having a very quick passage. Spent the evening at Dr. Ellis's playing whist. Mrs. Ellis was my partner, and Dr. and Miss Ellis played against us. Out of 4 games, Mrs. E. & I beat 3.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

2 February 1845 Clear and exceedingly cold all day, thermometer ranging at 20. Thermometer yesterday morning at 7 a.m. was 13, yesterday and today were the coldest we have had this year. The river at Burlington was fast this morning. At St. Mary's church this morning and afternoon and in the evening at Mr. Kinsey's from about 1/2 past 7 until 9. Remainder of evening at home.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

3 February 1845. Clear, cold but pleasant. Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 8 and arrived in the city by 10. At the office during the day, with the exception of about two hours, out on business.

In the evening went up to the Miss Leeds, having received a note from Arethusa stating that our sociables would commence again this evening. But as before, it failed, not more than three ladies and about 5 gentlemen being present. However, spent a pleasant evening and left with a determination of trying it again next Monday. Waited upon Miss Wainwright home, in Race S. side 3rd door below Del 7th St.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

4 February 1845. Upon waking this morning found the ground covered with snow to the depth of several inches and very good sleighing. The snow continued falling until about 9 o'clock, when it turned into a hard rain, which continued with but slight intermission until dark, when it became very cold, and commenced hailing and snowing again. Today was a severe one on pedestrians, in consequence of the snow, slush and sleet. The streets and crossings for a portion of the day were almost impassible for foot passengers. A number of individuals fell upon the pavements and were more or less injured. There were a considerable number of sleighs out this morning but the rain soon did away with sleighing.

At the office all day, and in the evening waited upon Miss Sally Roberts to Mr. & Mrs. Burroughs' party, in Chestnut St.2nd house below 13th N. side. The party was quite large, and I enjoyed myself more than at any other party this winter. Made several new acquaintances viz. Miss Julia Vogdes, Miss Clark, Miss Cochran and Miss ________. Left about 1/4 past 1 a.m. Considerable of the "Polka," as usual this winter, was danced.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 1/4 of 2 a.m

5 February 1845. Clear and very cold all day, in the evening cloudy and had another slight fall of snow. The sleighs are out in great numbers today, the sleighing being in excellent order. At the office all day, spent the evening at my boarding house in company with Smith of La. until 9 o'clock, then went to my office.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

6 February 1845. Clear and very cold all day, the thermometer at 7.

a.m. was down to 14 and ranged at 20 through the day. The sleighing continued during today, and the streets were alive with people riding and walking. The omnibuses slid on runners, and many of those who could not take a ride in a sleigh of their own, enjoyed an equal pleasure in a trip in an omnibus. There were many runaway horses and sundry sleighs were broken. The mails are greatly deranged on account of the great storm. After a long delay (from Tuesday afternoon last) the communication between this city and New York was reestablished this evening about 1/2 past 6 o'clock.

At the office all day, and in the evening attended a small party, given by Miss Noland. Spent rather a pleasant evening and left about 1/4 of 1 a.m., waited upon Miss Cristiani home.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 1 1/2 a.m.

7 February 1845. Clear and cold but rather more moderate than it has been for the last few days. At the office all day and in the evening went up to see Miss Louisa Wood, did not find her in. Then called upon Miss H. A. Myers, found her in, but was just ready to go to a party. Remained a few minutes, then went to my office, & went to work at some writing, which I wished to complete by early on tomorrow.

Up at 1/4 of 8 a.m. and to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

8 February 1845. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening, very few sleighs out, the sleighing being nearly over. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 1/2 past 6, being detained on account of the ice in the river. In the evening went over with Lydia and spent the evening at Mrs. Nesbit's playing whist. Out of 5 games, Helen Nesbit and I beat 3. Played until about 1/2 past 11.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 12 a.m.

9 February 1845. Clear and pleasant all day. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Bishop Doane preached both times.

After church in the afternoon walked with Miss Helen Nesbit and Lydia down as far as the river. It has been closed for the last few days, and the communication between Bristol and Burlington perfectly safe for pedestrians. Spent the evening at Dr. Ellis', met there Miss Elizabeth Ellis, sister of Mary who has been spending the last two months with the Dr., she arrived last evening. Left about 10 o'clock.

Up at 1/4 of 8 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

10 February 1845. Cloudy all day and evening, but no rain. About 1/2 past 8 this morning, in company with Rus. Batton, went out skating on the river; found it very good, and perfectly safe. Over to Bristol, continued skating until about 1/2 past 10, then returned home for the purpose of preparing to go down in the 11 o'clock train. It did not arrive until near 12, and consequently did not arrive in the city until 1/2 past 1.

At the office during the remainder of the day, and in the evening went up to the Miss Leeds' to wait upon them to the "Sociable," which was to meet at Miss Graves in 6th St. Met at Miss Leeds', Miss Hindman, youngest Miss Carter, and Miss Spencer, also Mr. Rafield, and the whole 7 went down together and spent a very pleasant evening. This was the first evening of my meeting Miss Spencer, and was much pleased with her; she is rather pretty, and pleasing & gay in her manner. Accompanied Miss A. Leeds home, went in had a waltz, &c, and left about 1/2 past 11.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

11 February 1845. Cloudy all day, and sometimes wearing the appearance of rain. The weather has become quite mild again, and if it continues will soon open the river.

At the office all day and in the evening attended Miss Mallet's 4th "Polka Party." The company was large and very select this evening, and more visitors than dancers. I danced three times, the polka being the order of the evening had not an opportunity of dancing more.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 1 a.m.

12 February 1845. Cloudy all day, with a shower of rain in the morning. Cleared off towards evening and was moonlight. At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 6. In the evening about 1/2 past 7 went around to see Jim Sterling, remained there until about 8, then went home, where I remained during the rest of the evening.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 9 1/4 p.m.

13 February 1845. Clear and very cold all day and evening, a great change from yesterday. Thermometer ranged at 20 during the day, colder towards night. Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 8 and arrived in the city about 10.

At the office all day, and in the evening waited upon my sister to a wedding party, given by Miss Mary and Louisa Wood. Entered the room about 1/2 past 8, and remained until about 10 when we were obliged to leave, having to attend another party given by the boarders at Mrs. Carr's in 3rd St. E. side below Spruce. The company was very large at Wood's, say over 100, and as far as could judge from my short stay would have proved very agreeable. Danced twice viz. with Miss Mary Ceil and Miss Wainwright. We entered the room at Mrs. Carr's about 1/2 past 10. The company was rather large, but not so large as I expected, enjoyed myself dancing, &c, and spent a pleasant evening. The supper was very good and table well arranged. The music for dancing was good, being two violins and violoncello. Left about 1/2 past 1 a.m. and waited upon Miss Sally Roberts, oldest Miss Mary Cuthbert, and my sister home.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 20 m. past 2 a.m.

14 February 1845. Snow commenced falling at an early hour this morning and continued to come down densely until about 1 o'clock, when it changed into a slight mixture of rain and hail. Good sleighing was produced in consequence of the downfall, and the sleighs, which had hope of rest on Thursday, were again in active use. The weather was bitterly cold during the day and evening.

At the office all day, and in the evening conversing with Smith in his room until about 1/2 past 8, then went around together to Mrs. Cooper's boarding house, to see some friends of Smith. Spent the remainder of the evening there and left about 10 1/2. Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

15 February 1845. Today opened with all the promise of a general thaw, and before noon, the mixture of half water half snow, which cumbered the streets, proved that sleighing had departed. A fog hung in misty denseness over the city, and added to the general discomfort; but at night there was a real downpour of rain, and now and then there were the unusual accompaniments of thunder and lightning. The water came down in perfect torrents for some hours, which I have no doubt will completely clear the streets of snow.

At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 1/4 past 6. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Nesbit's playing whist. Miss Louisa & Elizabeth were up. Left about 10 o'clock.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 20 m. past 10 p.m.

16 February 1845. Cloudy during the greater part of the day, evening clear and moonlight. The ice in the river as late as 6 o'clock this evening, had not started, and will bear a boat at some places between Burlington and Bristol. The snow has almost entirely disappeared with the hard rain of last night, and this morning the streets were clear of snow and cleanly.

At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Bishop Doane preached. Spent the evening at Mr. J. H. Sterling's in company with Pa and Ma. Up at 20 m. of 8 a.m., bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

17 February 1845. Clear and very pleasant, resembling a day in the middle of April more than February, evening clear and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at 1/4 past 8 and arrived in the city 1/4 of 10.

At the office all day and in the evening attended the "Sociable" at the Miss Leeds, and for the third time proved a failure. There were present, besides the two Miss Leeds, Miss Hindman, Miss Spencer, and Miss Sally Longacre. Was introduced to the latter young lady this evening, and was much pleased. She is beautiful in her face, tall, graceful, and well proportioned in her figure, very pleasant in her manners and accomplished, and according to my judgment a perfect lady. Waited upon her home, she lives on S. side of Spring Garden St., 3rd door W. of 12th St., and afterwards waited upon Miss Hindman home.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

18 February 1845. Clear and very pleasant, resembling spring weather more than winter, evening clear and moonlight. At the office during the greater part of the day, and in the evening attended a small party given by the Misses Patton in 5th St. W. side above Willow, in company with Dick Cristiani and his sister. Spent the evening pleasantly, there were several very pretty ladies there among whom were youngest Miss Brooks & Miss West and sister. Spent the evening in dancing, conversing, &c, and left about 1/4 of 1 a.m.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 1 a.m.

19 February 1845. Clear and pleasant, weather still continues spring-like, evening clear and moonlight. At the office during the greater part of the day, about 1 p.m. called upon the Miss Barclays with Sarah Roberts, it was the party call. The youngest, Matilda, is very pretty and both are very agreeable, did not remain more than 10 minutes. At 5 p.m. left in the cars for Burlington, arrived there about 6 p.m. after a very pleasant ride, as we got there before dark. In the evening around at Jim Sterling's until about 8 o'clock, then went up to Nesbits to leave a package, went and remained about 3/4 of an hour, then went home, found Helen and Mrs. N. in.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

20 February 1845. Clear and pleasant all day, evening cloudy, weather very warm. At the office all day, and in the evening called down to see the Miss Martins with Mr. Smith of La. Not finding them in went down to see the Miss Ashleys, where we spent the remainder of the evening.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

21 February 1845. Cloudy all day, but warm and pleasant. At the office during the greater part of the day, and in the evening attended a party given by the Misses Mary and Elizabeth Elliott, with my sister. The company was not very large, and generally speaking quite young. Did not enjoy myself at all, left about 1 a.m.

Up at 20 m. of 8 a.m., bed at 1 1/2 a.m.

22 February 1845. Clear and delightful during the morning but about 2 p.m. commenced raining. Notwithstanding, the brigade orders were for a parade on Monday, several volunteer companies turned out to do honor to the day. The spirit of patriotism seemed as usual to burn the brightest in the more juvenile portion of the community, as several processions of boys, with banners and flags, passed through the street.

In the evening a number of the houses had their windows illuminated. The suggestions of some of the correspondents of newspapers, who have been urging the fashion of keeping the shutters of the front windows open and the parlours lighted during the evening, was complied with in a number of instances in spite of the weather. It gave the streets quite an animated and lively appearance, compared with the gloominess of long rows of houses without a single ray of light about them to denote that they are tenanted. I hope the custom will grow in popular favor and produce an agreeable change.

At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. left for Burlington in the cars, where we arrived at about 1/2 past 4, having been detained an hour in one place on account of a freight train having run off the track, in running on the turn-out a short distance below the fish house.

After arriving in Burlington went around to see Jim Sterling, found he was in the city. Upon my return home, stopped in at Mr. Rodger's office, where I met him, George Parker and Jim Welch. Upon leaving, Jim Welch walked home with me, went in and remained a short time, I wishing to show him a note I had received. Mrs. Rieford accompanied by her daughter Mrs. Edward Roberts, Ma and Grandma went down to the city in the 11 o'clock train. Ma and Grandma returned in the 5 o'clock train, they had considerable difficulty in getting her down, on account of her having become very weak by so long a sickness.

Evening at home. Up at 7 a.m., bed at 8 1/2 p.m.

23 February 1845. A rainy, gloomy and very unpleasant day, in the morning we were visited by a very severe thunderstorm, accompanied with vivid lightning and tremendously heavy showers. One good result of the rain has been to remove the accumulation of mud from our sidewalks and crossings. During the storm of this morning two houses in Philadelphia were severely injured by the lightning, a rather strange occurrence for this season of the year. There is a considerable difference in regard to the navigation of the river Delaware between the 23rd of Feb. 1844 and the 23rd of Feb. of this year. On the 23rd of Feb. of last year the navigation of the Delaware was much obstructed by the large quantity of ice in it. While today there was scarcely an atom of ice in it and our city was visited by a severe thunderstorm, which would have better suited the month of June or July. At the St. Mary's church in the morning, the Bishop preached.

Afternoon at home, and in the evening over at Mr. Kinsey's, remained until about 1/4 of 9.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

24 February 1845. Today was like a gala day in our streets. The delightful weather drew out numbers of ladies, who looked charming in their spring dresses. The military contributed not a little to enliven the scene. The whole brigade of General Cadwalader paraded, and both officers and men appeared in fine trim. A new spirit seems to have been infused into our volunteer companies. They turn out in greater numbers, dress in handsomer uniforms, and take pride and pleasure in going through their evolutions with true military exactness.

The weather has been singularly mild for some days past, and as an evidence of its mildness, the small field flowers "the crocuses" are four or five inches high, and in bloom. This is remarkably early for the appearance of field flowers, but this is a remarkable season. We have had all kinds of weather within the last month; ice enough to fill the empty ice houses, snow deep enough for good sleighing, and thunder and lightning enough sufficient to waken all the frogs and snakes from their torpidity.

Left Burlington this morning a few minutes after 8 and arrived in the city about 20 m. of 10, having a very delightful ride. At the office during the day, and in the evening called up for the Misses Leeds to wait upon them to Miss Hindman's, as the sociable was to have met there this evening. Found it had been postponed until next Monday, on account of a large portion of the company having to attend a party this evening. However, accompanied Miss Arethusa down to Mr. Beaver's (on the E. side of 6th, few doors above Vine) to see the Miss Wilkins. Met there two Miss Conrads, the younger of whom was remarkably pretty, the eldest was also rather pretty and very agreeable. Left about 1/4 of 11 & accompanied Miss Leeds home.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 20 m. of 12 a.m.

25 February 1845. We have lately enjoyed a large share of delightful weather, and today appeared to be incapable of being surpassed, for pure air and pleasant sunshine.

At the office all day, and in the evening accompanied Sarah Roberts, Ma and Lydia to Miss Mallet's 5th "Polka Party." The company was large and respectable this evening, the number of dancers not quite so large as usual. Left shortly after 12.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 1 a.m.

26 February 1845. Clear, warm and spring-like weather during the morning, but about two p.m. clouded over and became much cooler, and for a while wore the appearance of rain, cleared off again about 5 p.m., and continued during the evening.

At the office during the morning, about 12 o'clock Dick Cristiani called for me, and both went up to pay our party visit to the Miss Pattons. Remained about 20 m., then left, and after attending to some little matters returned to the office, where I remained the rest of the day. In the evening at my boarding house until about 8 o'clock, when Smith and I took a stroll down 2nd St., and on our return stopped in to see Dick Cristiani, waited until he shut up, and walked up with him.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

27 February 1845. Cloudy during the greater part of the day, and through the evening much cooler than it has been for the last few days.

At the office during the day, with the exception of about an hour and a half at noon, during which time attended to some business, and called on Miss Rebecca Gibbons, she is staying at her brother Charles'. While there, Sarah Roberts and my sister came in, and upon leaving called upon Mrs. Carr (being the party call). Walked with Sarah and Lydia up as far as 8th and Chestnut Sts., then went to the office. Remained there during the afternoon.

In the evening waited upon Lydia to a small party given by Miss Mary Ceil, in Marshall St. E. side a few doors above Noble. Miss Seal as usual looked very pretty. Was introduced to Miss Berget, Miss Harrison and eldest Miss West, the first named lady was very pretty and agreeable. Miss West is not pretty in the face, but agreeable in her manners and graceful in her figure. Miss S. Wood & Miss H. A. Myers were there besides several gentlemen that I was acquainted with. Spent a delightful evening and left about half past 12 o'clock.

Up at 20 m. past 7 a.m., bed at 1 a.m.

28 February 1845. Clear, cool and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office all day, and in the evening about 1/2 past 7, Dick Cristiani called for me, then went up together to see the Misses Leeds. Found Arethusa in, and spent the evening there. Left about 10 o'clock.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

MARCH

1 March 1845. Clear and exceedingly warm for this season of the year, a fine commencement for the first spring month. At the office through the day, until 1/4 past 4 p.m., when I took a stroll in Chestnut St.; found large numbers of ladies on the promenade.

Left for Burlington at 5 p.m. in the cars, where we arrived about 6. In the evening went around to see Jim Sterling, where I remained until about 8 o'clock, then went up to see the Nesbits and spent the remainder of the evening there. Found Clara & Helen home.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

2 March 1845. Clear and warm during the day, and towards evening clouded over, about 9 p.m. had a shower of rain. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. The Bishop preached in the morning & examined the Sunday school children in the afternoon.

After church in the afternoon waited upon Miss Elliott, daughter of Commander Elliott of U.S.N., home from church. She is a very pretty and agreeable young lady. Between church took a walk with Jim Welch on the bank, and up around by the crick. On our return met Sammy Crosdale riding, he invited me to get in, and took a delightful ride up the river road for about two miles, and around by another road home. Afterwards rode around on the banks. Evening at home, Dr. Ellis spent it with us.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

3 March 1845. Cloudy early in the morning with a slight shower of rain, about 10 o'clock a.m. cleared off beautifully, very windy. Left Burlington this morning at 8 1/4 o'clock on board the New Philadelphia and arrived there about 10, our passage much longer than it should have been on account of a strong head wind and tide. This was the first trip the boat has made this season, it is the intention of the company to run the New Philadelphia until the Trenton is ready, when they will put her on the New York line.

At the office until about 12 n., then called around for Sally Roberts for the purpose of making my party call in company with her at Mrs. Nelson Burrough's. Found Mrs. B. in, met there Mrs. Daniel Robinson, and a Mrs. Way, the latter lady is very handsome. Remained about 15 minutes and after waiting upon Sally home returned to the office, it then being about 10 o'clock, remained there the rest of the day. In the evening called up for the Miss Leeds and waited upon them to Miss Ellen Hindman's to attend the sociable that met there this evening. Spent the evening dancing, &c, and after waiting upon the Miss Leeds home, returned to Miss Hindman's and waited upon Miss Spencer home.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., to bed at 1/4 of 12 a.m.

4 March 1845. Cloudy all day and evening, commenced raining and hailing about 2 p.m., which continued at intervals during the remainder of the day.

At the office all day, spent the evening at my boarding house in George W. Varnum's (of Petersburg Va.) room. Dick Cristiani and Smith were also there, played whist all the evening, Cristiani

as my partner, and Varnum and Smith as our opponents. Cristiani and I beat them 3 out of 5 games. Left about 1/4 of 11.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

5 March 1845. Cloudy and clear alternately during the day, with several very heavy showers of rain. Cleared off beautifully towards 5 o'clock p.m.

At the office all day, and in the evening about 8 o'clock called upon Miss Hannah Ann Myers. Not finding her in, called upon Miss Louisa Wood, but met with the same disappointment. Then called to see Sally Roberts, found her in, as well as the rest of the family and spent the evening there. Met Eliza Jones, & Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Matson there.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

6 March 1845. Clear and delightful all day and evening, the weather is like that of the latter end of April. At the office during the day, and 5 p.m. left for Burlington. Arrived there about 1/4 past 6, after a very pleasant ride. Spent the evening at Mr. Sterling's playing whist. Dr. and Mrs. Ellis and Miss Elizabeth Ellis were there, left about 11 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

7 March 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day, clouded over towards 6 p.m. and remained so during the evening. Left Burlington this morning on board the New Philadelphia at 8 o'clock for the city, where we arrived by 20 m. past 9.

At the office during the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived by about 6 o'clock. Spent the evening over at Mr. Kinsey's with Lydia playing whist.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 m. of 11 p.m.

8 March 1845. Clear, warm and pleasant during the day and towards evening clouded over. Left Burlington this morning at 8 o'clock, and arrived in the city by 20 m. past 9. Went up to the office and remained there during the day, or until about 1/2 past 4 p.m., then left and took a stroll in Chestnut St., found a large number of ladies on the promenade.

Left for Burlington at 5 p.m. Washington M. Smith of La. accompanied me up this evening, to remain until Monday. In the evening Mr. Smith, Lydia and myself went into Dr. Ellis' and spent the evening. Met there the Misses Clara, Helen, and Elizabeth Nesbit, had several games of whist, and spent the evening very pleasantly.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

9 March 1845. Rainy and disagreeable in the morning, afternoon and evening raw and cold but no rain. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, the Bishop preached. After church both in the morning and afternoon took a walk with Mr. Smith. Spent the evening at home.

Up at 1/2 past 7 a.m., bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

10 March 1845. Very disagreeable and real March weather, it rained, hailed and snowed, on and off throughout the day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at 8 o'clock on board of the boat in the midst of the snowstorm and arrived in the city about 20 m. past 9. Smith came down with me this morning.

At the office all day and in the evening at my boarding house conversing with Smith until about 9 o'clock, when both went around to Mrs. Cooper's to see Holmes and others who are boarding there, but did not find them in.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

11 March 1845. Snowed quite fast during the early part of the morning, but did not lay, cleared off about 12 o'clock, and after that had cloud & sunshine alternately. At the office all day, and in the evening attended Miss Mallet's 6th "Polka Party," the company as usual was large and select. I enjoyed myself much more than usual this evening, danced 4 times viz. with Miss Drexel,(2) Miss Harry Sharp, and Miss Kate & Lizzy Gillingham. Left about 1/2 past 12.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 m. of 1 a.m.

12 March 1845. After some days of rough, snappish weather, such as March indulges in when he puts on his vinegar-faced aspect, there is again a clear sky, and a warm sun. Not warm enough, however, to do away with the sense of cold when out of direct influence of its beams.

At the office during the day, about 5 o'clock took a stroll in Chestnut Street, where I found a great number of ladies on the promenade. In the evening according to engagement called up to see Miss Mary Drexel in Chestnut St. L. side 3rd door below Schuykill 6th St. Spent the evening very pleasantly, saw her two brothers and father. She played and sang several pieces in a very beautiful style. I expected to have met Miss Penn-Gaskell, but was disappointed, she not being in the city.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 12 p.m.

13 March 1845. Clear and pleasant during the greater part of the day, towards the latter part of the afternoon clouded over, the wind having got around to the S. E., think we shall have rain again tomorrow.

At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the cars, where we arrived about 6 o'clock. Evening at home, and had a small company. It was composed of Mrs. Nesbit, daughters Elizabeth and Helen, Mr. and Mrs. Kinsey and daughters Helen and Nancy, Dr. and Miss Elizabeth Ellis, Mr. and Mrs. James H. Sterling and Mrs. Byrnes and son. Spent the evening dancing and playing whist, they left about 11 o'clock. Waited upon Mrs. and the Miss Nesbits home, went in and remained about 5 minutes.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 3/4 p.m.

14 March 1845. Raw, damp, and raining the greater part of the day, towards night the wind got around to the N. W. and cleared off beautifully.

Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. Went up to the office and remained there the greater part of the day. Spent the evening until about 9 o'clock in Mr. Smith's room at my boarding house. Mr. Joseph J. Holmes and Mr. Robert K. Holmes of Mississippi and Mr. Moore of Alabama and Dick Cristiani were there. About 9 o'clock all went out together and took a stroll around town, went home a few minutes after 10.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

15 March 1845. Clear and much colder than it has been, and windy. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. left for Burlington in

the boat, where we arrived about 1/2 past 3. Went up home, remained about 1/2 an hour, then took a walk with Lydia. While out with Lydia, stopped in at Dr. Ellis's for half an hour. Spent the evening at Dr. Ellis's playing whist.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

16 March 1845. Cloudy and quite cold all day, ice made freely again last night. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Bishop Doane preached both times. After church in the afternoon waited upon Miss Helen Nesbit home, went in and sat for about 1/2 an hour. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Kinsey's.

Up at 1/4 past 7 a.m., bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

17 March 1845 As usual on St. Patrick's day, we were furnished with a snowstorm. It was however of short duration, and melted as it fell. In the afternoon we enjoyed a bright sunshine, until about 6 p.m., when a very black cloud from the West passed over the city, and for about 15 minutes gave us a considerable sprinkling of snow and rain. Evening clear and moonlight.

Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 1/4 of 10, being considerably later than our arrivals last week, having a head tide. At the office all day, and in the evening went to the National Circus with Mr. Smith of La. The performance was very good, and ended with the laughable Pantomime of the Wandering Jew.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

18 March 1845. Cloudy and clear alternately through the day with an occasional sprinkling of snow and quite cold, evening clear and moonlight. At the office all day, and also in the evening.

Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

19 March 1845. Clear and cloudy alternately with snow, and very cold, reminding us of winter again after the warm weather we had a few weeks since. Left Camden this morning at 8 o'clock for Woodbury, arrived there about 9 o'clock and attended to some business at Clark's office and returned in the next car, which left at half past 9, arrived in Philadelphia at 11 o'clock. This was my first visit to Woodbury, and as far as I could judge from my very short stay, think it a very pleasant place. At the office during the remainder of the day, and in the evening called up to see Miss Drexel. Found her in, and also her two brothers, spent the evening very pleasantly. Expected to have met Miss Penn-Gaskell there & some other ladies but was disappointed. Met a Mr. King, left about 1/4 past 11 o'clock.

Up at 1/2 past 5 a.m., and to bed at 12 p.m.

20 March 1845. Clear, but very blustery, cold and disagreeable, evening cloudy and cold, thermometer at 7 o'clock this morning 28.

At the office all day and in the evening, accompanied Ma and Lydia to a very large party, given by Mrs. Elizabeth Roberts. There were about 190 invitations out. The supper table was beautiful in the extreme, everything that could be thought of in the way of eatables was to be found on it. On the centre of the table was a very large bouquet some three feet high, which added materially to the beauty of the table. I was acquainted with many that were there, and enjoyed myself very much by dancing, chatting, &c. Mrs. Tyson, late Miss L. Heuling, very lately married, & the bridal party were there. Left about 1/2 past 1 a.m.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 1/4 past 2 a.m.

21 March 1845. Clear and fine weather, but very windy, and dusty. At the office all day, with the exception of about an hour from 1/2 past 4 to 1/2 past 5 p.m., Lydia and I made our party call on Miss Mary Ceil. In the evening Mr. Smith and I went down to see Miss Ellen Kirby, but did not find her in, then went down to the Miss Martin's and spent the evening. Met there Miss Frank Craycroft, left about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

22 March 1845. Clear and windy, throwing the dust about pretty freely. At the office during the greater part of the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived at about 6 o'clock. After supper went around to see Jim Sterling, did not find him, then went over to Frank Woolman's, sat a while with him, after which went home.

Up at 1/4 past 7 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

23 March 1845. Cloudy during the greater part of the day and in the evening had a shower of rain. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Evening over at Mrs. Nesbit's. Emma Erwin came up yesterday with Lydia.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

24 March 1845 Clear early in the morning, but towards 10 o'clock clouded over and remained so during the rest of the day. Left Burlington this morning at 8 o'clock, arrived in the city at the usual hour. Went up to the office, remained there until about 11 o'clock and then went to the Recorder's office, where I remained the rest of the day, busily employed making an examination of title. Spent the evening up at Miss Drexel's.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 3/4 p.m.

25 March 1845. Clear and pleasant, but quite cool. At the office the greater part of the day, very busy. In the evening attended Miss Mallet's 7th Polka Party, danced three times and left about 1/2 past 11.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 12 p.m.

26 March 1845. Clear early in the morning, but soon clouded over, and remained so during the rest of the day and evening, but no rain, and very dusty. At the office all day and evening, very busy.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 12 1/4 a.m.

27 March 1845. Clear and quite warm all day and evening, but quite dusty. At the office during the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the cars, where we arrived at about 5 minutes of 6, having a very quick passage.

In the evening attended the rehearsal at "St. Mary's Hall" with Lydia and Emma Erwin; the performance on the piano was well done by many of the young ladies, some of the singing was excellent, especially that of Miss Sally Kerr of Va. (Eastern Shore). The young ladies generally speaking looked remarkably well.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

28 March 1845. Clear and pleasant all day, and evening. Left Burlington this morning at 8 o'clock, and arrived in the city about 1/4 past 9.

At the office all day, and in the evening went down with Mr. Smith and Mr. John Castner to see Miss Ellen Kirby. Met there Miss Sarah and Dick Craycroft, Miss Craycroft and two Miss Stevensons, also a gentlemen by the name of ________. Spent a very pleasant evening and left about 1/4 of 11 o'clock, waited upon one of the Miss Stevensons home. This was my first visit to Miss Kirby.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

29 March 1845. Clear and quite warm all day and during the evening. At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the cars, where we arrived at the usual hour. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Nesbit's playing whist, left at about 10 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

30 March 1845. Clear, pleasant and warm all day and evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning, Mr. Lyons preached. In the afternoon about 1/2 past 10 o'clock, Jim Sterling and myself started to go up to the new Presbyterian church about 14 miles from Burlington. Arrived there about 1/4 past 3, heard a very good sermon delivered by Mr. Earp. Met a number of the Springfield ladies there. After church went over to Grossdale, having been invited there to take supper with the Miss Earls. Spent a very pleasant evening there and left about 10 o'clock. Arrived in Burlington by 20 m. of 12 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 1/4 past 12 a.m.

31 March 1845. Very warm and cloudy early in the morning, but cleared off soon, and was succeeded by a showery, blustery day. A pleasant month has just closed, one which but for the few days of wintry weather, from the 11th to the 23rd, might well have graced the closing instead of the opening month of spring. And the old saying that "March comes in like a lion, but goes out like a lamb" had proved but half true. For the 1st was a fine mild day, which mild weather continued until the 5th, when about noon a violent wind sprung up, and continued blowing strong the rest of the p.m. About 8 1/2 o'clock a.m. a very sudden change took place in the temperature, in the short space of half an hour the thermometer rose from 44 to 53. With the 10th commenced really "hard" weather; before daylight it commenced snowing mingled with rain, and continued till noon, at intervals snowing very hard, mingled with hail, melting as fast as it fell. On the 12th there was the first ice this month, together with a heavy frost. If it is true as the poet says, that "variety is the spice of life," we certainly then have had the very essence of it in the weather of the 17th, 18th and 19th, with the thermometer ranging from 30 to 45. Days clear in the morning and fine as a "March day" could be, and a violent snowstorm before noon, with an occasional edition of it during the rest of the day, separated by a fine clear blue sky, and the variety made up by a strong wind, with sometimes a little rain, some ice in the mornings, and finished by the cold, rainy, unpleasant, windy and exceedingly dusty day of the 20th, which was followed by others, but little more agreeable, except in temperature. A little rain in the evening of the 23rd, varied the scene some, but it was not sufficient to lay the dust which was raised, much to the discomfiture of pedestrians as well as others, in clouds by every breeze. On the 25th the weather began to assume rather more of the appearance we might look for if we expected it to be such as we have had. The 26th was a warm day, but the 27th was warmer, still continuing dusty and therefore unpleasant, and the 28th was the warmest. At noon today the thermometer rose to 73 in the shade, the day was fine and clear, wind west and southwest. The 30th and 31st were also hot and sultry days.

Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city about 20 m. past 9, after attending to some business went up to the office and remained there during the day. In the evening Smith and I took a stroll down 2nd St., stopped in to see Dick Cristiani, Miss Martins, and Miss Craycrofts, remained but a few minutes at each place.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

APRIL

1 April 1845. Today being All Fool's day, many tricks and pranks were played off upon the unsuspecting, among which was one, which afforded much amusement to the members of the bar, although it exposed many to a hearty laugh. Somebody gave out notice that a meeting of the bar was to be held in the District Council room in the morning, and Jenny Owens, the good natured and indefatigable attendant of the room, was put to work in great haste to prepare the room for the company. The notice was soon circulated through the courts, and as the meeting of the day previous was quite an interesting and animated one, a large number of the bar posted away with alacrity to attend this. Although Philadelphia lawyers, they were a little "puzzled" at not finding the "meeting" or any occasion for one, and did not discover the cause of their disappointment until some one, looking over his pocket diary of engagements, discovered that the day was the funniest of all in the calendar, the first of April.

Another was practiced on Mr. Coale in 2nd St. Letters were sent around informing persons to go and witness the performance of the "Polka" at the Exchange by a well known and excessively dignified politician (Mr. Coale) accompanied by a staid and equally well known Quaker (Townsend Sharpless) "on the organ."

I also read an account of tricks played upon some of our grave Representatives at Harrisburg. Among them was one in the shape of a pocket book nailed fast to the boardwalk, at which nearly every member made a grab as he passed, and then muttering "April fool" to himself, left the joke for his successor. Until at length one of them, unable to keep his temper under the disappointment, kicked away the trap.

Clear through the greater part of the day, though as is usual in April, had several slight showers of rain. At the office all day, and in the evening at Miss Hannah Ann Myers. Spent a pleasant evening and left about 10 o'clock.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

2 April 1845. Clear and delightful weather through the day and evening, though rather dusty. At the office all day, and in the evening Mr. W. M. Smith of La. and myself went up to see the Misses Leeds, found them in, but they were just going out to spend the evening at Miss Sally Longacre's. I being acquainted, we were pleased to go. Found Miss L. in, looking as pretty as ever, and spent a very pleasant evening. Had several songs and some playing by Miss A. C. Leeds and Miss Longacre. Met there a cousin of Miss Longacre's, name ____________.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

3 April 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day as regards weather, but very dusty. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the cars, where we arrived at the usual hour.

After supper went around to see Jim Sterling, remained there a short time, then returned home, where stayed until about 9 o'clock. Then went for Lydia, who was spending the evening at Miss Mitchell's. Upon entering the room, much to my astonishment, met quite a number of ladies, among them were Miss Brown of Philadelphia, Miss M. Lain of D. C., Miss Wilson, Miss Grant of Baltimore, and several other ladies. The last named young lady was quite pretty and interesting in her appearance.

Left about 1/2 past 10. Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

4 April 1845. Cloudy early in the morning, but soon cleared off, and might be considered almost a summer's day. It had the heat of June, and the wind of March. There has been little or no rain for a long time, and the high winds of the last week have been most actively employed in gathering all the dust in the county, and driving it about the streets of our city. There were many tearful eyes, and some that could shed no tears; the sluices of the eye, the lachrymal ducts themselves were choked up.

Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, on board the steamer Trenton, it being her second trip this season, she having made her first yesterday morning. She has been thoroughly repaired, cleansed and painted, and has had her wheels considerably enlarged, which improvement, after her machinery has been worked a little, will improve her speed considerably.

At the office all day, and evening until 8 o'clock up in Mr. Smith's room, talking with Mr. Holmes of Miss., then went down to see Miss Ellen Kirby with Mr. Smith. Met there a very pretty young lady by the name of Miss Louderback, left about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

5 April 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived at about 6 o'clock. At home during the evening, with the exception of about half an hour I was around at Jim Sterling's.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 1/2 past 9 p.m.

6 April 1845. I awoke this morning in the full enjoyment of a snowstorm, the trees and fields were completely covered. The white blossoms of the plum tree were vying with the snowflakes in purity, while the blush of an incipient bloom on the apple tree, looked to the surrounding mass of snow, like the hectic flush in the cheek of consumption. I very much fear that the weather has destroyed the early first blossoms; indeed some of the plum trees were set, and these can scarcely survive. The sun came out by 10 o'clock, and by 12 n. not a vestige of the snow remained.

At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, the Bishop preached both times, evening at home.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 1/2 past 9 p.m.

7 April 1845. Cloudy early in the morning, but cleared off towards 9 o'clock, clouded over again towards dark and in the evening about 10 o'clock had a shower of rain. Quite cold all day, and in the evening much colder.

Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock, arrived in the city at the usual hour, went up to the office and remained there during the day. In the evening Mr. Smith of La. and myself went around to the Chinese saloon for the purpose of attending a temperance celebration, but not being able to get in, on account of the great crowd, went down to see the Miss Stevensons in 5th St. East side above Lombard. Spent the evening and left about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

8 April 1845. The weather today was fearfully cold, and there was several times in the course of the day, slight snow squalls. The wind was from the northwest, and a constant mass of wild, jagged clouds was springing up, from whose sides thin yellow streaks were seen flying, like tokens of a thunder gust. I have rarely seen a more tempestuous day in April. Ice formed in the streets, and we have reason to fear that the fruit trees suffered irreparable injury.

At the office all day and in the evening attended Miss Mallet's 8th and last "Polka Party." Danced twice, did not enjoy myself much and left about 1/2 past 11 o'clock.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 12 a.m.

9 April 1845. Clear and quite cold and blustering all day and evening, much warmer towards dark. Ice made in great abundance last night, and fear all the early fruit will be killed.

At the office all day and in the evening called up to see Miss Mary Ceil. It was my first evening visit, spent it very pleasantly. Miss C. as usual looked very pretty and fascinating, left about 10 o'clock.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

10 April 1845. Cloudy early in the morning, with a slight shower of rain, but soon cleared off and became much warmer than it has been for the last few days.

At the office all day, and in the evening called down with W. M. Smith to see Miss Louderback. Did not find her in, then called upon Miss Frank Craycroft, found her out also. Then took a stroll around, and finally stopped in to see Dick Cristiani at 2nd and Pine, where we remained until 10 o'clock, and then wended our way to our respective lodgings.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

11 April 1845. Clear, cool and very dusty. At the office all day, and in the evening Mr. W. M. Smith, Mr. John Czastairs and myself went down to see Miss Ellen Kirby. Spent a very pleasant evening, met there Mr. Frank, Mr. _________, Miss Gardiner, two Miss Stevensons and Miss __________. Left about 11 o'clock. I waited upon the last named young lady home, did not fancy the walk much as it was so long, being in Market St. below School 5th.

Up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 12 a.m.

12 April 1845. Clear and pleasant all day and evening. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington on board the Steamer New Philadelphia, where we arrived by 1/4 past 6. It was my first evening trip on this boat of the season; she commenced running up at 5 p.m. last Monday. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Nesbit's with Lydia and Miss Elizabeth Ellis. Left about 1/2 past 10 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

13 April 1845. Clear during the morning and in the afternoon until about 4 o'clock, when it clouded over, very warm throughout the day and evening, which has again started the trees, making in a slight measure, regain their state of forwardness. The county now looks beautiful, the trees are all out in blossom and the fields and forest trees begin to look green. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Mr. Lyons preached both times.

Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 9 p.m.

14 April 1845. Clear throughout the day and evening, but the atmosphere was very hazy, which caused a strange appearance in the sun and moon. On last evening the sun went down red and lurid, and seemed to be quenched in a thick haze, impervious to light, rather than to sink beneath the horizon. And the moon which was half full, being in the heavens, only visible in its dull, copper colored appearance, but so bereft of every reflecting beam, as to cast no shadow, even where not a cloud intercepted its light. Here and there a "Dim love star diffused an anguish light." And, altogether, the evening presented one of those scenes at which poets aim, when describing some great convulsion, whose portents are seen in the heavens above, and are felt in the earth beneath, and the waters under the earth; worse, far worse, than the wild deformity of a storm. Such a scene seems to excite feelings of indescribable awe. And in gazing at the planets that appear to retain their places without discharging their office, we feel a wish for action, for change, for some outburst, some wild uproar of the elements, to rouse us either to preventative action, or, at least, to definite fear. Rather than such a quiet, chilling, fearful gloom, one would prefer the alternative, whose "Storms rock the sky, afflicted oceans roar, and sanguine billows dye the shadowing shore."

Left Burlington this morning at 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 1/2 past 9. Ma and Lydia came down with me this morning. At the office all day, and in the evening Mr. W. M. Smith and myself called up to see the Miss Leeds, found them in and spent a pleasant evening, left about 11 o'clock.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

15 April 1845. Clear, warm and pleasant. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived at about 1/2 past 6. Spent the evening at home, Mr. Kinsey's sister was there. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

16 April 1845. Cloudy and misty all day, and in the evening had a slight shower of rain. Left Burlington this morning at 8 o'clock, arrived in the city by 1/2 past 9, after attending to some business, went up to the office, where I remained the rest of the day.

In the evening Mr. Smith of La. and myself called up to see Miss Sally Longacre, did not find her in. Then called to see Miss Ellen Kirby, found her out also and finally stopped in to see the Miss Stevensons, where we spent the remainder of the evening. Left about 1/2 past 10, and went up with Smith to Mrs. Parke's and spent the night with him.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

17 April 1845. Cloudy, raw and unpleasant, and at times sprinkling rain. At the office all day and in the evening Mr. Smith and myself called down to see Miss Ellen Kirby. Not finding her in, called upon Miss Louderback, where we spent the evening. Met the two Miss Stevensons there.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 20 m. of 12 a.m.

18 April 1845. Cloudy and misty all day, and very unpleasant, also raw and cold. At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the steamer New Philadelphia, where we arrived at about 10 m. of 7 o'clock. In the evening at home writing a deed.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

19 April 1845. Cloudy and drizzling rain all day and through the evening. Had considerable rain during last night, which has made everything look very green, as we have been very much in want of rain. At the office all day, left for Burlington at 5 p.m., where we arrived at about 1/2 past 6, evening at home.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

20 April 1845. Cloudy all day, damp and cold. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Bishop Doane preached. Evening at the Baptist church with Lydia and Grandma.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

21 April 1845. Cloudy during the day and evening though the sun would occasionally peep from the hiding place, which he has maintained for the last week. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour 8 o'clock and arrived in the city about 1/4 past 9. After attending to some business, went up to the office, where to my great astonishment, found my uncle, Professor John P. Harrison, waiting to see me. I have not seen him since September 1837, and he looks about as well as ever. He arrived yesterday morning about 3 o'clock, and intends remaining with us about a week.

At the office all day and evening went down to see the Miss Stevensons with Mr. Smith. Met there Miss Ellen Kirby, spent a very pleasant evening and left about 11 o'clock.

Up at 10 m. of 6 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

22 April 1845 A clear, warm and delightful day, strangely con- trasting with the damp, raw, gloomy and unpleasant weather of the last week or ten days, evening clear and moonlight. At the office all day and spent the evening out at Mr. Algernon Roberts'. It was a small company, given for Dr. Harrison, composed of Roberts in 9th St., Spruce St. Roberts, Mr. Elliott and others. Left about 1/4 of 11 o'clock.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

23 April 1845. Clear, warm and very pleasant all day and evening moonlight. At the office during the morning, and at about 1/2 past 12 o'clock went out with Algernon S. Roberts. Took dinner with him and then rode out in his carriage to the sale of the "Warner Estate" about 2 miles over the bridge on the Lancaster Turnpike. They got through in one afternoon, and it brought rather over $21,000.00. Got into town again about 1/2 past 7, took tea at Mr. Roberts', and at about 9 o'clock went to my office, where I remained the rest of the night.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

24 April 1845. Clear and warm all day and evening. At the office all day, evening up at Mr. Edward Roberts. There was a small company given for Dr. Harrison, left about 11 o'clock. Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

25 April 1845. Cloudy all day and in the evening had a shower of rain. At the office all day, and in the evening with Smith of La. in his room until about 1/2 past 9, then went to my lodgings. Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

26 April 1845. Cloudy in the morning but towards noon cleared off pleasantly. At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left in the boat for Burlington, where we arrived at about 1/4 past 6. Went up home, found they had all gone to Dr. Ellis's to tea, except Grandma. Then dressed and went in myself, accompanied by Grandma. All our family and my uncle, Dr. Harrison, were there. Left about 1/2 past 9. Up at 1/2 past 5 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

27 April 1845 Cloudy during the morning, but in the afternoon cleared off. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Mr. Lyons preached both times. Evening at home, Dr. Ellis was there. Dr. Harrison has been at our house since last night and will remain until tomorrow morning.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

28 April 1845. Clear and pleasant during the morning, in the afternoon clouded over, and at about 1/2 past 5 and 7 p.m. had heavy showers of rain. Left Burlington this morning in the early train and arrived in the city by 8 o'clock. Out on business the greater part of the day. Pa, Grandma and Ma came down in the boat this morning, also Dr. Harrison who leaves for Cincinnati tomorrow morning at 6 o'clock. Spent the evening at cousins in 9th St.

Up at 5 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

29 April 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the day and in the evening down at my boarding house in Smith's room, talking with him and Holmes of [illegible] until about 1/2 past 8. Holmes left then and Smith and I took a walk as far as 5th and Library, and then both went to our lodgings.Dr. Harrison left this morning at 6 o'clock for Cincinnati.

Up at 5 a.m., bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

30 April 1845. Cloudy all day and towards evening grew very cold, rainy and unpleasant. At the office all day until 1/2 past 4 p.m., then left and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived at about 1/2 past 6. Evening at home. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

MAY

1 May 1845. The clerk of the weather is evidently a crusty old bachelor. Today, when thousands of children awoke in the hope of a May-Day frolic, he managed to hang the heavens in black and give a sort of sepulchral chill to the air, forbidding a ramble beyond the limits of brick and mortar. The omnibus drivers had tricked out their coaches in vain with lilacs and green branches. Their accustomed crowds of happy little passengers were not forthcoming.

Left Burlington this morning at 1/2 past 7 and arrived in the City about 9 o'clock. Went up to the office, remained a short time. Then went out on business which occupied my attention until nearly 4 p.m. Then returned where I remained until 11 p.m. writing, with the exception of 3/4 of an hour at supper.

3 May 1845. Hugh Nesbit called for me, and we both went down to the river, got a boat and rowed over to the fish house. Saw them draw their skein once, and then returned to Burlington. Played whist during the evening.

6 May 1845. In the morning at my office in Arch Street and at about noon moved down to my new office in 5th Street below Library, where I spent the afternoon fixing up. Ma had the carpets put down yesterday.

7 May 1845. At my office all day until about 10 m. of 5 p.m. At 5 started for Burlington, where we arrived in the midst of the rain. Evening at home. I got a young man or boy yesterday. He is to remain with me to learn the business provided he likes it. His name is James House, age about 14 years.

8 May 1845. About 7 o'clock p.m. I was taken very sick and commenced vomiting, which continued at intervals of 10 minutes to 1/2 an hour until 1/2 past 11 o'clock. My bowels also became very much disordered. I cannot imagine what caused the sickness, but am in hopes, and think I shall be well.

9 May 1845. At the office all day and in the evening took a stroll around with Smith of Louisiana. Returned to our room at about 1/2 past 9. I began boarding at Mrs. Parke's altogether yesterday, that is to say, I commenced sleeping there, heretofore I only took my meals. I felt much better when I woke up this morning and was able to get up and attend to business.

10 May 1845. At 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the Steamer New Philadelphia; had a delightful trip. Went over to see James Sterling. He soon shut up the store, and Mr. Dillard of North Carolina (lately from Princeton College) and I took a walk down as far as the river.

11 May 1845. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon. The Bishop preached in the morning, and examined the Sunday School children in the afternoon. About 1/2 past 6 p.m. Mr. William Hays and myself started up to see Miss Emily Black in Springfield. This was my first visit to see Miss Black and was much pleased.

15 May 1845. Cloudy during the morning and oppressively warm. At the office all day, and in the evening went up to see Miss Sally Longacre with Mr. Smith, and spent quite a pleasant evening.

14 May 1845. This morning, people were disagreeably surprised to see hail patterning thickly on the green leaves of the trees that drooped beneath the blows of the unwelcome visitor, and shrunk from the raw, cold breath of the morning. Fires were quite desirable and overcoats very comfortable, for the feel of everything out of doors was winterish, and the freshness of verdure and the bloom of flowers appeared as a kind of mockery of the dismal, chilly weather.

19 May 1845. At 2 p.m. left for Burlington in the Steamer Trenton, having heard that Pa was not quite so well today.

23 May 1845. In the evening went up to see my friends the Roberts in 9th Street. Remained there until about 1/4 past 9, then waited upon Sally Roberts, Mrs. Caufman and Miss Hebron to 10th and Locust Street. Then left them and went to my boarding house.

Miss Hebron had dressed herself as an Indian squaw, and went to the house to be introduced as an Indian girl by the name of Mandaline to her father, mother & others.

26 May 1845. The public squares look beautiful, with all the freshness of spring and opulence of summer in their foliage. We have not for a long time seen the streets look gayer than at present. A few persons of leisure have left town, as they find abundant enjoyment in the shady side of Chestnut Street. The fair pedestrians who are there to be seen never looked better than in the fashions of the season. In New York the weather has been quite winterish, flakes of snow fell on Sunday. The cucumber vines and early beans were destroyed by the frost of Saturday night.

30 May 1845. Clear and quite cold during the day and evening, so cold last night that ice was formed the thickness of paste board in the outskirts of the city.

Miss Jane Stevenson made me a present of a very handsome purse knit with silk and steel beads.

JUNE

1 June 1845. Clear and one of the most delightful days I ever experienced. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon. The Bishop preached in the morning and examined the Sunday school children in the afternoon.

5 June 1845. At the office all day, busy. In the evening Mr. W.M. Smith and myself went up to the Misses Leeds, found them in, and also a large company of little girls and boys, there being a party for one of the younger Leeds. Our first impulse was not to go in, but Mr. and Mrs. Leeds and the Misses Leeds' finally persuaded us, and we spent quite a pleasant evening among the children. Met there Miss Wainwright, Miss Longacre and her cousin.

8 June 1845. Clear and excessively hot all day and evening. At home during the whole day and evening. Pa being so very low I did not go out.

9 June 1845. Today was the hottest day experienced in our City for the last four years with the exception of that known as the "warm Sunday of 1842." In the reading room of the Exchange at 11 1/2 a.m. the thermometer was 99, and at 3 p.m. it ranged at 101.

10 June 1845. Clear and very warm until about 7 p.m. when we had a rain shower. At my office during the morning, but left in the 12 o'clock cars for Burlington, having heard by Mr. James H[unter] Sterling this morning my father was worse, and sent for me to come up. Arrived in Burlington about 1/2 past 1. Upon going home, went into my father's chamber. He appeared to be very uneasy from pain, and extremely weak, though he recognized me and shook hands, though it was the last, but one, he ever did.

I was in Pa's room several times during the afternoon, but did not remain long, as it pained me much to see his sufferings. About quarter past 5 p.m. I went to his bedside, took him by the hand and asked if he knew me. His reply was he did, and that was the last time my dear father ever spoke to me. At about 7 minutes past 6 p.m. he breathed his last - peace be to his soul. He died perfectly resigned, and in full belief of a happy hereafter. The last intelligible words he was heard to utter were "receive my spirit, O Lord." May the Lord receive the spirit of my dear departed father is my earnest prayer. He was a dear, kind parent to me, and who can tell the pang that now shoots through my heart, when I think that he is gone never to be seen by mortal eye again.

Oft have I thought since he has left us, of the many small kindnesses rendered me in the days of my childhood and long since forgotten. Hundreds of them have occurred to me since he has gone, that perhaps never would have been thought of. But we must be resigned, it was the will of God to remove my dear father, and we must look at it in the light of a mere veil dropped between him and us for a few short years, when we shall all meet again. May the Lord receive his soul, and peace be unto him as I now trust he is happy.

Ma, Grandma, cousin Lydia Roberts(3) and Edward P. Borden(4) were present when my dear father died.

11 June 1845. Clear and exceedingly warm all day and evening. In the house all day and evening. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Elliott, and Mr. Edward Roberts and Mr. Isaac Elliott were up, and returned to the City today. We had one of the last tributes of respect paid to my dear departed father this afternoon at 4 o'clock by having Bishop Doane to perform the funeral service at our house. The principal part of our Burlington friends were present.

12 June 1845. Clear, cool and pleasant all day, so that we were much favored for our arduous undertaking for today. This was a melancholy day for us, as it became our duty to follow to the grave the remains of my dear departed father. Ma, Grandma, Lydia and myself (also Mr. James H. Sterling, who has acted the part of friend indeed to us during our trials) left Burlington this morning in the cars for Philadelphia for the purpose of going to Wilmington, Delaware.

In the boat at 1/4 past 9 to convey the remains of my dear father to be interred in Wilmington, according to his desire. We arrived in Wilmington at about 1/2 past 11, and after paying the last tribute of respect to my dear father we returned to the boat. Bishop Lee and Mr. Weinkoop officiated at the grave.(5)

Arrived in the City by 3 and at 4 o'clock left for Burlington, where we arrived by 1/4 past 5 p.m. after a very fatiguing journey for my mother and sister, laboring under such severe affliction. I am now fatherless and an orphan, but I hope through a kind providence to prosper in business and be an honor, comfort and support to my dear mother and sister. May the Lord give us strength to bear up under our afflictions. It is a severe trial to lose a parent, but it is a trial we all have to undergo, and is brought about for some wise purpose. May the Lord be praised that this day of trials is over.

13 June 1845. Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 7. At the office all day, then to my boarding house.

17 June 1845. In the evening attended a real estate sale to buy a property for Mr. Rawl.

18 June 1845. At the office all day and in the evening up at the house at No. 301 Arch Street arranging some papers of my late dear father. My boy James House was there assisting me. Left about 10 o'clock and after attending to getting a dressmaker for Ma, went to my lodgings.

20 June 1845. Today I commence my regular trips every day to Burlington. I think it will be of service to me, as I have been so closely confined to business lately I need recreation.

24 June 1845. After supper I took a row along the banks with Jim Welch.

25 June 1845. At 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived at about 1/2 past 6. Met on board going up Miss Mary Ann Aldrich, or so I addressed her when I spoke, but was later introduced to her by the name of Mrs. Bush, she having been married today or very lately.

26 June 1845. Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 7 and arrived in the City about 9 o'clock. There were a large number of passengers on board going down to see the funeral solemnities of the late President Andrew Jackson.(6)

At the office until about 1/2 past 12, then went out to see the procession, but sun being so warm did not wait to see more than the military display, which was about 2000 strong.

Evening at home with the exception of about an hour occupied taking walk down the bank.

27 June 1845. Up at 4 a.m. to write. After supper took a walk with Dr. Ellis up the River Road.

28 June 1845. Up at 4 a.m. and wrote until breakfast time. Bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

JULY

1 July 1845. Clear and quite cool all day, a fire this morning would have been quite comfortable.

3 July 1845. The "Independent Rifle Company" went up in the boat this afternoon. They intend spending their 4th at Trenton. Evening at home. Up at 5 a.m. and took a walk before breakfast.

4 July 1845. Clear and delightful, just such a day as should be for celebrating the glorious anniversary of our Country's Independence. The people turned out in great numbers, some went to New York, others to Baltimore, and so they dispersed themselves throughout the country to enjoy the 4th. Several sailing clubs, as well as other sailing parties, came up to Burlington. For my part I enjoyed the day.

In the morning Jim Welch and myself took a stroll around town, and finally down Kinsey's Lane, where we were celebrating the 4th with a large pistol when a party passed by composed of the Misses Clara, Helen, Elizabeth, Amelia and Alice Nesbit, Miss Biddle, Miss Helen Kinsey, Miss Elizabeth Ellis, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Palitene, Mr. Lepe, Mr. John Rodgers and others, who invited us to join them. So we did, and strolled as far as the mill, where we were all weighed. My weight was 134 pounds. After leaving the mill strolled up along Silver Lakes, and after arriving at the last, took seats in the shade and rested ourselves. While resting we were joined by Mr. Clark(7) ex-mayor of New York, and Miss Lamb. We returned through the woods and had a delightful time.

Stopped in at Miss Kinsey's and went through the garden, where we had plenty of currants, raspberries, gooseberries, &c., to eat. The party left about 12 o'clock when Mr. James Kinsey, Reu Whar and myself had a grand firing with pistols, crackers, &c., until dinner time.

After dinner took a short nap. At about 2 o'clock Jim Welch called for me, and we took a stroll down on the banks. While in front of St. Mary's Hall we found some of the young ladies (and among some of the last summer party) quite as ready to carry on a flirtation game as ever. They made a number of signs from the windows with handkerchiefs, &c, which we of course returned.

While in front of the hall a club of small boys dressed as sailors, bearing flags &c., and commanded by a boy by the name of Peacock, went through a number of gyrations, keeping excellent time and good order & doing good credit to themselves.

At about 1/4 past 3 the steamer Trenton came up with a large number of passengers. I went over to Bristol in her with Mr. John Rodgers, leaving Welch as he was going out of town at 6 o'clock. Remained in Bristol for about an hour and a half, and returned to Burlington in the Steamer Sun(8) at 5 o'clock, when she left Burlington to go to the City. She must have had 5 or 600 people on board and was crowded in every part. Lydia and I spent the evening at Mr. Kinsey's. James Kinsey had a number of fireworks with which we amused ourselves during the evening, setting off many of the "reels." The "Roman Candles" were very handsome. Upon the whole I spent a very pleasant day.

5 July 1845. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the City about 9 o'clock. Ma, Grandma, Lydia and Flora all went down, and closed the house in Burlington and intend to remain until Monday or Tuesday.

12 July 1845. Mrs. Gibbons and her son Rodmond went up to remain [in Burlington] until Monday. This afternoon at 4 p.m. the thermometer stood at 98 in the shade in our garden in Burlington, and in the sun 120. After arriving home in the boat remained in the house during the afternoon and until after tea. Then Rodmond and I got a boat, took a row down along the bank, and over to the island and took a swim. It was the first time I was in the river this season.

14 July 1845. The heat of the weather today was more oppressively felt than it has been any day this season, and indeed for many years. The thermometer indicated the following excess: at 10 1/2 o'clock a.m. 98, at noon 100, at 2 o'clock 102, at 3 p.m. 101. This is the greatest heat that has been felt for years. I never remember anything like it. Every individual you meet, no matter how choleric his temper, seems to be desirous of keeping cool, and every puff of air and gentle breeze is courted with assiduity and pleasure that a lover bestows on his mistress.

Although Sunday was a hot day I think today was the hottest that I ever experienced. At 9 o'clock this morning at Bloodgood's Hotel at Walnut Street wharf the thermometer stood at 104, at the Exchange at 11 a.m. it was 100, and at 2 p.m. was up to 102. It continued nearly all the afternoon, up to the time of the shower of rain which commenced about 1/2 past 5 and continued until near 9 p.m. cooling the air considerably, and doing the country immense good. We have been wanting rain for a long time.

About 1/4 past 10 went down to the Navy Yard and from there went on board the Steamer Princeton for the purpose of seeing Lieutenant Bleeker on business. While waiting to see him went through every part of the ship.

16 July 1845. Left for Burlington at 5 p.m., in the cars again, the boat having broken her shaft. It will require some time to repair her.

17 July 1845. Took a walk up the creek, and on our return home stopped in to see Hugh Nesbit with Mr. W.M. Smith. Went into the garden and spent the rest of the afternoon there eating pears, &c. After supper Smith and I got a boat, went over to the Island and took a swim.

21 July 1845. I learned through Mrs. Hedges that Dr. William Gibbons was very ill, and not expected to live. Remained at Mrs. Hedges until about 1/4 of 8, then went in to see Mrs. Reynolds and Aunt Peggy. Did not see the former. Then went up to Dr. Gibbons. Saw all the family with the exception of the Dr. and Mrs. Gibbons.

22 July 1845. My friend Mr. Washington M. Smith left today for the south. He intends spending his time in North Carolina until about the middle of September when he will leave for his home near Pattersonville, Louisiana. I bade him farewell upon stepping into the cars at Gray's Ferry, having met the Baltimore and Wilmington train there.

26 July 1845. After going home and getting something to eat, Hugh Nesbit called for me, and we both went out fishing in a boat below Mrs. Chester's. Our luck was poor. I only caught two. Returned home about 6 o'clock.

28 July 1845. At 2 p.m. returned to Burlington with Ma and Lydia with intention of showing Mr. Wharton Lewis our house in Burlington. He has some intention of buying it. However he could not land, his wife being too much fatigued to go ashore at Burlington, and so went on to Bordentown.

Spent the afternoon taking a stroll on the river with Jim Welch, saw Lippincott, Kinsey and Gaunt come in with a sailboat from a fishing excursion. Got their boat and sailed up the river above the saw mill. Was obliged to row back, the wind and tide being up the river.

AUGUST

1 August 1845. Evening at home until about 8, then took a walk around town where I found a peddler disposing of his wares at auction. Listened to his amusing and ridiculous talk for a while.

3 August 1845. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon. The Bishop preached in the morning and examined the Sunday school children in the afternoon. After supper took a walk down on the banks, met Bill Lippincott, and saw several of the young ladies at St. Mary's Hall setting at the window. Among them were Miss Anderson and Miss Davis. They carried on pretty high with us until the bell rang for prayers when they kissed their hands to us and left. Bill and I then took a seat on the bank opposite to his house and smoked a cigar, but finding it too damp went up on his porch.

5 August 1845. Ben Kinsey, John Burns and myself went down to Dunk's Ferry fishing today. Had poor luck, only caught 5 dozen small. Returned to Burlington about 5 p.m. having taken a swim at Burlington Island before landing. After going home all went over to Kinsey's and got our fill of pears and apples.

10 August 1845. After church in the afternoon was detained for some time on account of the rain, during which time I had a fine opportunity of looking &c., &c. at the young ladies of St. Mary's Hall, several of whom I have a slight acquaintance with.

12 August 1845. Got Autram's sail boat "After You" and went over to the fair at Bristol. After looking around, returned to Burlington. After supper took a walk down on the banks with Mr. Hays. The young ladies of St. Mary's were out on the banks but left a few minutes after we got down.

17 August 1845. After dinner, Mr. W.H. Hays and I got a horse and vehicle and rode out to his father's farm about 3 miles from Burlington on the River Road. Spent the afternoon very pleasantly talking with his two sisters Amanda and Margaret. The younger, and last named, I was much pleased with. She is quite pretty. About 1/2 past 5 had supper after which Mr. Hays and myself started to take a ride up to see the Misses Davis, about 14 miles. We arrived there about 8 o'clock, found the ladies in and spent a very pleasant evening. They both looked as pretty as ever, names: Caroline and Hancel. The latter is my favorite. Met there a Mr. Jones and a Mr. Jenks from Philadelphia. I was introduced to the Misses Davis last winter at a party given by the Misses Earl, and was then much pleased and have been trying ever since to pay them a visit.

23 August 1845. Cloudy throughout the day, and at intervals there were very heavy showers of rain accompanied with thunder and lightning. One flash of lightning struck in Harmony Court, about a square from my office, and the thunder followed immediately with a terrific crash.

26 August 1845. At 5 p.m. left for Burlington. Was detained some time in taking on board soldiers at Bristol. Arrived in Burlington about 1/4 past 7.

27 August 1845. About 1/4 of 8 p.m. jumped in an omnibus and rode up as far as 10th and Spring Garden. Then went up to see the Misses Leeds in Spring Garden above 11th Street. Found them in, remained a short time when Mr. VanSciver came in. The ladies informed us they had an engagement at Miss Coates and invited us to go long. After some little persuasion, Mr. Smith and I consented to go. I accompanied Miss Sarah Elizabeth.

When nearly there met Miss Mary Carter and Mr. Rafield coming up 9th Street. They made us turn back to go with them to see a Mrs. Badger in 9th above Spruce while Messrs. Smith & VanSciver went on to Miss Carter's. Spent about an hour at Mrs. Badger's and then went to Miss Carter's. Found Messrs. Smith & VanSciver and Miss A. Leeds and Miss Harriet Carter had gone into Miss Hindman's. Remained at Miss Carter's about 3/4 of an hour, and then all went to Miss Hindman's where we spent half an hour very pleasantly. Met there two very pretty young ladies by the name of Miss Campbell. They live in 6th Street above Wood, on the west side. Left Miss Hindman about 1/4 past 11, walked with the Misses Leeds as far as 10th & Chestnut when Smith and I went to the American Hotel where we shall remain for the night.

31 August 1845. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon. Evening at a Baptist meeting. Bishop Doane preached at St. Mary's both times, and Mr. Dickinson at Baptist meeting.

SEPTEMBER

3 September 1845. In the evening went out and bought some packing boxes for Ma, as we are now about commencing to pack up our furniture to break up housekeeping. Afterwards took a stroll around with Jim Welch on the bank and then returned home.

4 September 1845. Woke up this morning with a very bad headache, but went to the City as usual. Was obliged to return at 2 o'clock. Laid on the bed during the afternoon. Felt so bad could scarcely hold my head up. Went down to tea, took a cup and at about 1/2 past 7 went to bed and took a dose of salts.

5 September 1845. Clear and pleasant all day, went down to the City this morning having to attend to some business, but being very unwell was obliged to return at 2. After getting home went to bed. In the evening took medicine again & throughout the night had a severe headache.

7 September 1845. Felt much better this morning and went to St. Mary's Church. Heard Mr. Lyons preach. After dinner took a nap. When I got up to go to church with Lydia, was taken with a chill which prevented me from going. Sent for Dr. Cole shortly afterwards and he came in about 6 o'clock. He prescribed five grains of calomel(9) for me. Went to bed about 8 1/2 o'clock with an extremely bad headache, which lasted until near daylight, at times almost setting me crazy.

9 September 1845. In bed all day. Felt much better this morning & continued so until about 1/2 past 2 p.m., when I was taken with a chill which lasted for about an hour. That was followed by a very hot fever which I was almost unable to bear. It parched my mouth and filled it with a thick slime. Towards 9 p.m. my fever went off & I felt better.

11 September 1845. Was in bed during the whole of the day and evening, thinking by that means I could avoid my chill but was unsuccessful. About 1/2 past 2 my chill came on & lasted for half an hour. It was followed by a severe fever, which lasted until about dark. Did not rest well through the night.

12 September 1845. Towards 6 p.m., had a slight chill followed by fever, which took me to bed. The fever went off about 10 & I rested pretty well through the night. Today is my 21st birthday(10) . I cannot say I spent it as pleasantly as I could desire, but as it is willed otherwise I am willing to put up with my sickness, hoping to have a speedy recovery & to be able to attend to business.

13 September 1845. In bed all day to try to avoid my chill, which was accomplished to some extent, though I had a severe fever which lasted till near 11 o'clock.

14 September 1845. Felt much better and was up nearly all day.

15 September 1845. Felt pretty well with the exception of a sick sensation at the stomach at different times through the day. About 5 1/2 p.m. vomited after which was much better.

18 September 1845. I was much better today. Was so well I wrote a long catalog of the furniture, &c., which we have concluded to sell.

20 September 1845. This was my first trip to the City since my sickness.

26 September 1845. At 2 p.m. left for Burlington. Went up home and found Ma & Grandma there. They went down to the Steamer Sun a short time afterwards, while I waited to show Captain Dixey & wife through the house before the sale. Afterward went down to the boat & saw them off. Took tea with Jim Welch who has kindly invited me to remain with him during my stay in Burlington. He and I went up to the house about 1/2 past 8 and went to bed thinking it safer that somebody should sleep there.

27 September 1845. Clear and pleasant all day and evening, a day just suited for our sale. I was engaged all day at the sale of our furniture, with the exception of about an hour at dinner.

28 September 1845. Clear and pleasant all day and evening, at Baptist meeting in the morning. Heard Mr. Dickinson preach.

29 September 1845. I was engaged the principal part of today in delivering furniture at our house. The things sold pretty well on Saturday, the sale amounting to $525 exclusive of parlor & dining room glasses & many other articles kept by Ma.

OCTOBER

1 October 1845. Did not get to my office until nearly 11 as I brought considerable freight down with me which I had to take charge of & deliver. I took up my lodgings at Mrs. Crim's(11) today, No. 108 Walnut Street. From present appearances think I shall like the house.

2 October 1845. Went up to Mrs. Edward Roberts to see Ma & Lydia who are now staying there, previous to their leaving for Cincinnati.

5 October 1845. In the house all morning, and in the afternoon went to St. Philip's Church. Heard a fine sermon from Mr. Neville. In the evening went to St. Andrew's Church heard a fine sermon from Mr. Clark.

7 October 1845. At the office all day and in the evening went up to see the "Bazaar" which is now open at the Chinese Museum saloon. The display of articles is very fine. The proceeds are to be appropriated for the rebuilding, &c., of the Artist Fund Hall which was burned down last spring. Returned to my boarding house about 9 o'clock. Sat in the parlor talking with some of the ladies until about 10.

9 October 1845. In the evening went up to the Bazaar. In addition to the other attractions there was a concert given by the blind this evening. Some of the singing was very fine. The room was exceedingly crowded and consequently warm. I visited that part of the exhibition called "The Old Curiosity Shop," in which there are many great curiosities, among which are: Washington's chair, a chair which formerly belonged to William Penn, another which was formerly used by Marie Antoinette, the ill fated Queen of Louis the 16th. There were also suits of armor, sundry other articles of great curiosity, and a number of paintings, some 300 years old.

10 October 1845. At the office all day, and in the evening up at the Bazaar. The number of persons there was quite large, more than I expected to see on so unfavorable a night. We were favored by some fine instrumental music from the "Philadelphia Brass Band" who volunteered their services.

13 October 1845. In the evening up at the ladies' grand Bazaar, the audience was large. Had some fine instrumental music to enliven the company. I was weighed this evening and much to my astonishment found that my weight was 138 pounds, 7 pounds more than I weighed before I was taken sick. Left the Bazaar about 1/4 past 9, went up to 8th below Arch, got some ice cream and then went down to my boarding house.

14 October 1845. Clear and delightful throughout the day, evening clear, cool and moonlit. I do not think the day could have been more favorable for an election day.

At the office during the greater part of the day until about 1/2 past 5 when Jim Welch called for me. We both took a stroll up Chestnut Street, after which got tea. Then he and I took a stroll around the City election ground. After that went down to the Southwark grounds. Found everything quiet. Went up to Dick Christiani's. He was not in.

I put in my first vote, today, and voted the full Whig ticket.

17 October 1845. Had a heavy frost this morning.

23 October 1845. There was some ice made last night. At the office all day & about 6 p.m. went up to Aunt Lydia Jones where Ma & Grandma had been spending part of the day and took tea with them.

23 October 1845. In the evening attended a law book sale.

26 October 1845. Went down to Mr. Edward Roberts to dine, having had an invitation to dine there with my mother and sister. It may be the last time for a long while as they leave tomorrow for Cincinnati, to stay an indefinite period.

27 October 1845. Got up this morning at 6 o'clock, dressed and went up to Mr. Edward Roberts, to see Ma, Grandma and sister and to accompany them to the cars. They left for Pittsburgh at 8 o'clock via Harrisburg & Pennsylvania Canal under care of Mr. Samuel Cuthbert of St. Louis. Immediately on their arrival in Pittsburgh they will leave for Cincinnati. God grant that they may have a safe passage and be blessed with health, and that I may in a short time be able to see them again & have them with me.

At the office all day & in the evening called up to see Miss Ceil and invited her to go to the "Franklin Institute Exhibition." She accepted my invitation. Found the saloons to be very much crowded, and at times so much it was with difficulty to get along at all. The display of articles was very fine. Went entirely through the exhibition. Met several of our friends. Found Miss Ceils to be very pleasant and agreeable in her manners, and looking remarkably pretty this evening.

NOVEMBER

1 November 1845. At the office all day and in the evening went to the Walnut Street Theater(12) with Mr. W.H. Hays of Burlington N.J. I was much pleased with the plays. The first was a new one entitled "The Fatal Dowry," a tragedy in five acts, & the last was a very amusing farce entitled "Deaf as a Post."

7 November 1845. At the office all day. Felt quite sick toward evening, and soon as tea was over went to bed and took some medicine.

9 November 1845. There was considerable sprinkling of snow, being the first of the latter commodity we have had this winter.

Left for Burlington this morning. After church walked home with Misses Helen and Clara Nesbit. They invited me to take dinner with them. I went in, but before dinner was ready, was taken with a very sick feeling and could not eat any. After that a chill came on me and I was obliged to go to bed, where I remained until about 5 p.m. When my chill and fever had gone off, got up and went downstairs into the parlor, and sat there until almost 7 when I was again obliged to go to bed, having a severe headache.

10 November 1845. Felt much better. Was at the office.

11 November 1845. Went up to see Holmes, Moore and others, but not finding them went up to the National Circus. The performance was good and house crowded to excess. The last piece, a National Drama called The Champion of Freedom or West Point in 77 and the Death of Andre was well performed & elicited much applause.

12 November 1845. In the evening went to see Mr. Murdock at the Walnut Street Theater perform as Claude Melnotte in the "Lady of Lyons." He sustained his character well and brought down great applause. "Pauline" was sustained by Miss Logan, quite a young lady, who performed her part well. The other characters were well sustained, particularly Mr. Logan as Colonel Damas. The last piece, "Mr. and Mrs. Pringle" was quite a laughable farce and passed off well.

13 November 1845. There was an eclipse of the moon this evening and as the sky was unclouded, the natural phenomenon was clearly visible to all eyes. The cloud that faintly dimmed the edge at first, gradually stole across and hid the luster of the orb, and the light that struggled through the veil upon its beauty had a blood-like hue. The obscuration was nearly total and lasted for some time, but it passed off.

14 November 1845. In the evening attended Mr. Murdock's benefit. He appeared as "Hamlet" and performed it well to a crowded house. Miss Logan as "Ophelia" performed well. After the first piece a very handsome copy of Shakespeare's works were presented to Mr. Murdock by a number of gentlemen, through the hands of Colonel Page. He delivered one of the volumes to Mr. Murdock after a short and well spoken address, which was answered by Mr. Murdock in a very beautiful and impressive manner. The after piece "A Feint Heart Never Won a Fair Lady," was very amusing and well performed.

22 November 1845. At the office during the day and also in the evening very busy writing.

25 November 1845. In the evening attended a real estate sale of Moses Thomas.

27 November 1845. Today was appointed by the Governor of the State as a day of the general thanksgiving, and was generally observed. The principal part of the stores throughout the City were closed, and the churches were all open and I believe generally well attended for such an unpleasant day. The weather was so unpleasant I did not go out but remained in my office all day.

29 November 1845. I received today very unexpectedly the melancholy intelligence of the death of my dear grandmother who, not quite four weeks ago, bade me farewell to go to Cincinnati. She was in good health, and from outward appearances seemed that she would be a long while. But God in his all wise providence has seen fit to remove her from us, and again visit our family with affliction. But grant, O Lord, that my dear mother and sister may be able to bear up under this truly great trouble, as well as her other relatives.

30 November 1845. Not feeling very well and being in very low spirits from the melancholy intelligence received yesterday I spent the day in the house and passed the time in reading the Bible &c.

DECEMBER

1 December 1845. At the office all day though very unwell, went to bed directly after tea. I had quite a fever, a bad headache and threw up twice.

10 December 1845. I left for Burlington, and had considerable difficulty in crossing as the tide was low, and we were obliged to go around the island. Met with a great deal of ice, and the boat had considerable difficulty in passing through it.

14 December 1845. The waking eye was met this morning with the house tops and streets covered with snow to the depth of about two inches. About 8 o'clock commenced raining which continued the remainder of the day and through the evening making the atmosphere very damp and unpleasant. The walking was very wet, slushy and disagreeable. Notwithstanding the unpleasantness of the weather, Mr. Welch and I rode out to see the Misses Earl at Grassdale, Springfield Township. We started this morning about 1/2 past 10 o'clock and got out there about 1/2 of 1. Jim went in and remained about 15 minutes, and then left having several other places to go. He promised to call for me tomorrow morning. Spent the rest of the day and evening in company with the young ladies conversing, &c.

15 December 1845. Left the Misses Earl at about 20 m. of 9 and after a pleasant drive, though the roads were a little muddy, arrived in Burlington and in the City by 1/2 past 12.

16 December 1845. In the evening went down to attend a sale of N. Thomas & Son of real estate at the Exchange, as the properties of my late uncle Samuel Erwin were to be offered for sale. They were offered but not sold for want of bids.

22 December 1845. The river was fast for part of the day opposite the City. Some boys crossed to the Island on the ice, a rather venturesome experiment. The ice boat soon broke it up.

23 December 1845. In the evening went up to see Mr. Edward Roberts & family, but on upon going found them just about leaving to pay an evening visit. Remained but a short time after they left. Upon going down Chestnut Street stopped in at the Circus about half an hour, saw the last act of a piece (the name I do not remember) and then left and went down to my boarding house, sat in the parlor until about 1/2 past 11 and then went to bed.

24 December 1845. The weather today was wintry, not exactly of the kind which the storekeepers or sightseers desired, for the snow came down merrily and with such driving force as to make it uncomfortable for the ladies who appeared in the Streets. But it is the day before Christmas, and sights were to be seen, notwithstanding the descending snow and the keen wind. There was a very lively bustle along the principal thoroughfares, Chestnut Street especially, occasioned by the passing to and fro of the shopping pedestrians. In the evening the snow came down rapidly. The Streets were crowded and the sleighs flew merrily along.

25 December 1845. At the office in the morning until about 1/4 of 10 o'clock, then went up to St. Phillip's Church and heard an excellent sermon delivered by Mr. Neville. After church took a walk down Chestnut Street and then up to Mr. Edward Roberts where I had been invited to dine with the family. Upon going to the dinner table melancholy reflections were brought to mind, reflections that were fraught with the deepest gloom, when I thought on this day one year ago I sat at a table with my dear father, grandmother, mother and sister. Now, one short year has glided away. Mark the change: a dear parent, a father, has been laid low, snatched from me when I most needed his fostering hand. A dear grandmother has also been removed from among us never to be seen again by mortal eye. Now, three remain out of the five that were then so happy together.

Oh may we all be prepared to die. And again I have been separated from a dear mother and sister though not by the hand of death, thank God, and left as it were alone in the world with no one to care for me. It is a gloomy thought to know that in the space of one short year such great changes are brought about. But, to pleasanter thoughts and something of the day.

Christmas was spent in the exercise of those pleasant feelings which belong to the day and the season. Though the storm was disagreeable, and the sky gloomy, even unto tears, at times, yet the general hilarity could not be subdued. The thronged churches and thronged streets gave practical evidence of the spiritual and secular observance of the holy day. It mattered but little that the walking was excessively disagreeable, that the air was damp and a faint approach to a fog somewhat dimmed the clear aspect of objects. Pedestrians picked their way along the muddy streets, secure in the protection of their "India rubbers," too light hearted to think anything disagreeable or annoying. Of course the shops were full during the day and evening, and those who had provided largely found themselves called upon to answer large demands. We saw numerous toys borne along by rosy-faced youngsters with more pride than a conqueror could possibly entertain for the trophies of his victory. The places of amusement were filled to their uttermost capacity, and in all places where amusement was to be had, eager expectants crowded to enjoy it. I trust all who set apart the day as a holy day enjoyed it rightly and well, that the heart was pure and the pleasure of the character which leaves, always, pleasant remembrances.

28 December 1845. At the Unitarian Church in the morning with Mr. Welch. Mr. Furness preached. Afternoon at Grace Church with Welch. I was very much surprised to see Charles West Thompson enter the pulpit to preach. I had no idea he had been studying for the pulpit.

The above sermon delivered by Mr. Thompson was the first delivered in this City.

29 December 1845. At the office all day and in the evening Jim Welch and myself went around to the "Bazaar" now being held through the Christmas holidays for the sale of fancy articles at the Museum Building at the corner of 9th and George Street in the upper saloon. Left there about 9 o'clock and went around to the National Circus to see a pantomime. It was a very amusing piece and well played.

31 December 1845. With this day we close another year. It is good for a man to take a solemn farewell of the year, as if it were the last with which he would shake hands before he entered the ocean of unbroken cycles, years, months, and days. It is nothing against all this, that these divisions of time are arbitrary. They are understood. They create proper feelings, and as they come and go they remind us not only how much is gone from our allotted portion, but they serve to remind us of the incidents that have marked the passage of time thus closing.

We close, on this day, a year of remarkable prosperity to our country - a prosperity not equaled by any other period and diminished only by disturbing causes not arising out of the ordinary elements of success, causes that lie in a mistake of true national policy. The retrospect then must be pleasant, and ought to be profitable. We know, all know, that in this period of time, events have occurred that brought sorrow to blossom of individuals and disturbed the quiet flow of happiness. These are the ordinary events of our life. We must learn to meet these with the full expectancy of their occurrence, but not with the affectation of stoicism that would contemplate death without a shudder, or the loss of friends without a tear. We neither cherish nor recommend such a state of feelings. Tears fall with the good, like the raindrops of June, to enrich and beautify; returning pleasure, quiet, sober, rich pleasure pours its beams upon the passing tears, and gilds them with prismatic hues, rainbow beauties that fill the heart with promises of peace, promises that fulfill themselves, that work out every good which they indicate. Individual afflictions, that are in the ordinary course of human events, may not be computed for deduction from the amount of happiness, because the Providence that afflicts makes profitable the suffering. And he that hath not made his calculations for these sorrows is incapable of appreciating the whole good of his time.

We look back, then, upon a year whose fruits should excite in us gratitude. The abundance of the harvest, the smiles of sunshine, and profit of rain; the health-giving frosts that fall with enriching power, and snow, that is sent like wool to warm the earth, these things make for the comfort of our kind; and a grateful appreciation of the good, and a recognition of their source, works in us more good, more true excellence, than does the earth receive from all the stimulating and fruit producing gifts of the clouds. And while we sum up the whole matter, public good, social improvement, domestic improvement, and individual comfort, shall we not rejoice, that we have had a share in these?


Notes:

(1) Andrew Crawford Barclay, the shipping merchant. JFD

(2) Mary Johnson Drexel, daughter of artist-banker Francis Martin Drexel, and future wife of Dr. John D. Lankenau. JFD

(3) Lydia Roberts (1783-1862) unmarried daughter of Algernon Roberts and Tacy Warner Roberts.

(4) Edward P. Borden, son of Francis Borden and Letitia Erwin, his second wife.

(5) Henry Erwin was buried in his family's plot at the First Presbyterian Church, 10th and Market Streets, Wilmington. In 1917, the church building was moved to 11th and Monument Streets, Wilmington. The grave stones and remains were re-interred in the Wilmington/Brandywine Cemetery, 701 Delaware Avenue, Wilmington.

(6) Andrew Jackson. 1767-1845. Seventh president of the United States 1829-1837.

(7) Aaron Clark, Mayor of New York 1837. Notable Names in American History, James C. White & Company, Clifton,NJ. 1973.

(8) The Sun, built in 1824 by James P. Allaire, was one of the first compound steamboat engines. She had four cylinders of 16 inches with 30 inch diameter by a four foot stroke and was one of the fastest steamships on the Albany run when new, but was latter sent to the Delaware River. Steam Navigation, p. 48.

(9) Calomel, a white compound (mercurous chloride) used as a purgative. Webster's Collegiate Dictionary.

(10) Joseph Warner Erwin was born on September 12, 1824. This was his 21st birthday.

(11) Mary Crim, Boarding House, 108 Walnut Street. McElroy's Philadelphia Directory, 1847.

Mary (Weatherby) Crim (c1778-1886) of Burlington, NJ and Philadelphia, PA, a member of the Religious Society of Friends. FJD.

(12) "The Walnut Street Theater, northeast corner 9th and Walnut Streets, is the oldest playhouse in the English speaking world that is still in active use." It opened in 1809 as 'The New Circus,' was renamed the 'Olympic Theatre', then the 'American Theatre,' in the 1820's. In the 1830's became known as the Walnut Street Theater. 1972 Bulletin Almanac, The Evening and Sunday Bulletin, Philadelphia, 1972, p. 337.