1847

JANUARY

1 January 1847. The portals of another year have been opened, and we have our feet placed upon the dim and mysterious threshold. Within its brief cycle we may find the greatest amount of earthly blessings, good health, high hope, prosperous business and an unbroken series of social enjoyments; it may also be fraught with evils sufficient to crush the proudest spirit, and bow the heart in bitterness and anguish down to the dust. Every brief revolution of time presents diversities like these; every year has its pangs, its sorrows, its hopes, it fears, its anticipations, its regrets. Hope, the steadfast friend of man, naturally, however, springs up in his breast at such a season as this, and presents to him visions of coming joys, which, whether realized or not, contribute for the time by their illusions to his enjoyments, and impart a foretaste of the good thing that he anticipates. Happiness is the wish of all, the aim and motive of all our actions, and though the circumstances which diffuse it around our lives are not always completely within our control, yet much remains in our power, and good or evil is often the legitimate effect of one's own acts more than many are willing to believe.

The beginning of a new year seems to be an appropriate time to take a review of the past, for the better guidance of the future, and from the errors that have been committed to pluck the experience and knowledge which shall direct our steps wisely through that portion of the path of life we have yet to travel. In thus reverting to the past we shall find individually many duties omitted, the fulfillment of which would impart, at this time, additional satisfaction to our minds - many things done which have been a source of annoyance and regret. Let us endeavor, in the year upon which we have just entered, to avoid both causes of error, to resolve to act justly upon all occasions, to do what is right, no matter what the motive of interest, a passion which may tempt to the contrary. Those who act upon this rule will find themselves sustained in their misfortunes with the proud consciousness of rectitude, and in their prosperity receive additional gratification from the thought that it is the reward of their virtue and integrity. Gratitude for the good which we enjoy, and an endeavor to spread blessings among all classes of our fellow beings, will contribute to that internal satisfaction and serenity of spirit which makes every year of a good man's life a happy one.

The celebration of the first of the year, today, seemed to be universal, and the compliments of the season very freely passed around. A more beautiful New Year's Day never dawned in the latitude of forty. The weather seemed to be on its best behavior, and put on its brightest aspect. The atmosphere was mild and clear as a morning in May. Winter cast off its icy fetters, and indulged us with a foretaste of Spring. The effect was the most delightful and inspiring upon the feelings, and everyone seemed to feel its influence and to be inspired with generous warmth. The streets were crowded with gaily dressed and smiling faced ladies, and the beaux naturally reflected the same looks and smiles too. The usual wish of a happy New Year seemed to be no vain compliment, for everyone seemed as if he was really happy, and made up his mind to remain so. We trust that so pleasant a day may be a harbinger and prognostic of the whole year.

I was at the office with but little exception until 3 p.m., then went over to dinner, and at about 4 p.m returned to the office. A short time after Messrs. Welch, Maginnis & myself took a walk. The night was as light as day, and quite warm. I met Mr. Phillips on the steps, and we stood talking for about an hour, when I went up to Mr. & Mrs. Ware in Broad below Walnut having an invitation to spend the evening there where Ma & sister had been up spending the day. All the Roberts family were there and we spent quite a pleasant evening. Had a very nice oyster supper.

2 January 1847. In the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater with Messrs. Welch, Prout and Maginnis. Besides us four from Mrs. Crim's, there were eight others. The piece performed was an excellent one entitledThe Robbers, it has not been performed for ten years. Mr. Anderson sustained the principal character. The after piece was Did You Ever Send Your Wife to Burlington?, rather amusing.

3 January 1847. At St. Phillip's Church in the morning, Mr. Clark preached. Also went up there in the afternoon but found the body of the Church filled with Sunday school children, then left and went up to Grace Church, also found a Sunday school celebration going on there. In the evening about 1/2 past 6 called down for Miss Clarke to accompany her to Church, but found she was in Trenton. Went in however and sat conversing until about 1/2 past 8 with Mr. & Mrs. Clarke. Ma and sister went to Wilmington yesterday to be gone a week or two.

4 January 1847. In the evening Messrs. Samuel & Alexander Ludlow, Welch and myself had a game of whist.

5 January 1847. Clear, delightful and spring like weather, overcoats & cloaks have been unnecessary for several days with the exception of yesterday. In the evening Maginnis, Welch and myself went up to the Walnut Street Theater to see Forrest play Richelieu. He performed his character admirably, indeed it was one of the best pieces of acting I ever witnessed. He has a fine conception of the character and appears to be the result of great study. Mr. Forrest was well sustained this evening. The last piece, a farce entitled Highways and Byways, was very amusing and full of interest. The House was well filled. As usual our boarding house was well represented there being 10 there.

6 January 1847. In the evening went up to see a little company given by Mr. & Mrs. William. H. Smith in Vine Street below 3rd. I spent a delightful evening, and made the acquaintance of several pretty ladies. We spent the evening dancing, and had some very pretty singing and playing.

7 January 1847. Rained hard all day. About 1/2 past 2 p.m I never saw it rain harder, and it blew a perfect hurricane. Was out in the midst of the rain during the greater part of the morning attending to business. In the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater to see Forrest play Macbeth, King of Scotland. I cannot say I was much pleased, the cast was not good. Mrs. A. R. Blake played Lady Macbeth for the first time this evening.

The after piece was very amusing and well played, the name of it was The Happiest Day of My Life.

8 January 1847. The weather today was exceedingly cold, and contrasted greatly with the mildness and warmth of the several past weeks. The difference between the range of the thermometer and the two days immediately preceding was about 38°. On Tuesday and Wednesday last farmers were plowing, but if this weather should continue a day or two, dealers in ice would be busy getting in their supply of the greatest luxuries of the summer season.

The weather of yesterday was so mild that the mercury ran up to 54°, but a sudden change took place in the evening, and the cold increased so fast, as to sink the mercury 38° by this morning at sunrise when the mercury rested at 16° above zero, which is 16° below the freezing point.

At the office all day, and in the evening Mr. Welch and myself went up to a celebration of a Society in the Franklin Hall in 6th below Arch. Remained there but a short time and then called up to see the Misses Leeds. Found them both in and met Mr. Jenks there. I spent rather a dull evening and left a little before 10. On our way home stopped at Guys in 7th below Chestnut to get some oysters, met Bob McKinley there.

9 January 1847. At the office all day with the exception of about an hour in the afternoon occupied in taking a stroll in Chestnut Street. There were many ladies out, and many of them very pretty. Among them was one who attracted my attention for some time. I met her a number of times, when she looked and smiled as if acquainted. I afterwards succeeded in finding out her name, which was Miss Kirk.(1) She lives at No. 2 Colonnade Row, and I think I shall make strong endeavors to make her acquaintance, as she is remarkably pretty. I noticed her for the first time on the street a few days since.

10 January 1847. About 10 a.m. commenced sprinkling snow which continued at intervals until about 1 p.m. when it commenced in real earnest. The flakes seemed, however, to come down lazily and settle quietly, as if they intended to make a stay with us, & the accumulated mass, which covered the earth this evening at bed time, gave fair promise of good sleighing, a luxury which for some years past has been rarely enjoyed in this meridian.

Went up to St. Luke's Church this morning with Mr. Maginnis. Sat in Mr. Burroughs' pew, and heard a very good sermon from Mr. Howe. After Church went home and did not go out again. After dinner went up to Mr. Sentnay's room & smoked a cigar with Mr. Maginnis then went down into the parlor about 4. Was very much amused with people falling, &c.

11 January 1847. Cloudy and the snow continued falling slowly until about 12 N, but towards evening it cleared up. The snow is about 8 inches deep and the sleighing excellent, being the first we have had this season.

At the office all day, and in the evening Messrs. Lloyd, Prout, Maginnis and myself hired a sleigh and pair of horses and drove out to the falls of Schuylkill. On our way out stopped at a tavern in which we found a pretty hard party, among whom were an uncertain class of females dancing a straight forward with a number of rough fellows. They had for music a tambourine violin. We remained there long enough to get warm and then drove on to the falls and stopped at Boly Evans. Found a large number of persons there. Met Mr. Sentnay and Parry Wood and with them the youngest Miss Shankland and her cousin. After getting some whiskey punch, &c. drove in as far as the "Moss Cottage" where we met Sentnay and his party again. We had considerable sport here in dancing, &c.

12 January 1847. I had quite an adventure today at about 1 o'clock. The circumstances of the case were these. Last summer in New York I met a very pretty young lady by the name of Miss Wilson from Wilmington, Delaware. Last Saturday afternoon I met on the Street a young lady whose face was quite familiar, but I could not tell where to place her. I met her a number of times, and every time she looked as if she recognized me. I met Mr. Toppan who informed me she was a Miss Kirk, but this turned out to be a mistake, as the lady she was with was of that name, and not the lady in question. On Sunday evening in a casual conversation with Mr. Alexander Ludlow about young ladies in Wilmington, Delaware, he asked me if I knew a Miss Williamson of that place. I at once associated her name with that of Miss Wilson who I met last Summer in New York, and concluded the young lady that I had met so often on Chestnut Street must be the Miss Wilson. At once resolved to make a call on her, so I took the address and this morning called on her. I was much surprised on the lady's coming into the parlor to find that I did not know her at all, and that I had been led into a mistake. The worst of it was that I could not explain myself, for I did not know until after my return home, & upon reference to my journal, that the lady I wanted to see was Miss Wilson instead of Miss Williamson. After some little explanation and considerable embarrassment on the part of the lady, I returned heartily glad to get out of so unpleasant a situation. The young lady was very pretty, and the best of the joke was, that she gave me an invitation to call again. In a few words the whole difficulty arose thus:

About four years ago when I was in Wilmington I was introduced into the family of the Misses Williamson, and when introduced to Miss Wilson last summer, I associated her name with that of the Misses Williamson and supposed they were one and the same family, and not having seen each other for a long while had been forgotten on both sides. When Mr. Ludlow mentioned the Misses Williamson were in town I at once supposed they were the ladies I had met last summer. I think I must call again as she was very pretty & polite and gave me an invitation.

In the evening I went up to Miss Kirk's at No. 2 Colonnade Row to try and find the Miss Wilson I am in search of. The windows being open, I saw there was a room full of company, among whom I did not see the lady I was in search of so I concluded to make a day call, and if she was stopping there could see her alone. On my way home stopped and got some oysters.

13 January 1847. The merry sound of sleigh bells still continued today. There was much ice in the river today, and the ferry boats had great difficulty in crossing. At the office all day, and in the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater with Silas George and J.C. Welch to see Forrest in The Broker of Bogota. I was much pleased with the piece; it was full of interest and excitement and many parts affecting. Between the pieces Miss Walters gave us an exhibition of some very pretty dancing. In the after piece, entitled The House Dog, she was full of fun and frolic and drew down much applause and many a hearty laugh. Chapman, as Dust, the House Dog, was the most amusing, though we will not except Mrs. Thayer as Betty Buncle. This piece is something on the same order as the mummery.

14 January 1847. Cloudy all day and the weather moderated very much which soon did away with the snow and sleighing. The walking was very bad throughout the day.

15 January 1847. About 2 p.m called up to see Miss Wilson from Wilmington, Delaware. She is staying at Miss Kirk's, No. 2 Colonnade Row. She looked very pretty today. She is the lady that I have met so often on the street lately, and have not known where to place her though her face was quite familiar.

In the evening about 8 1/4 o'clock went around to the Sociable which met at Miss Hinman's, met the Misses Carter, the Misses Hueston, and the other members generally. I only remained about an hour and a half, then went out and got some oysters & then home, found the boarders in the parlor dancing, I danced once with the eldest Miss Jackson.

16 January 1847. I left Philadelphia this morning in the 8 o'clock Baltimore train of cars for Wilmington. Arrived at about 10 o'clock without accident or incident. Our car ran into a coal yard on Broad Street below Walnut much to our surprise, caused by the switch being out of place.

After attending to my business, walked out through mud about 2 inches deep (certainly not very pleasant) to Dr. Gibbons where I found mother and sister quite well and glad to see me. The Gibbons family were also all well. Remained for dinner, after which Edward Gibbons and I went into the office and smoked a cigar. About 4 o'clock went down into town again, called to see Miss Wilson, sister to the one now in town, but did not find her in. However, I went in, sat a while and saw her mother and father.

In the evening all went over to see Mr. & Mrs. O.J. Adams and daughter. We had considerable difficulty getting through the mud. Spent a delightful evening dancing, &c. Met there Miss Caroline Bowne of Ohio. She is a very beautiful looking girl, with a fine noble figure. She is also very agreeable. The eldest Miss Adams (Isabella) is not very pretty but very ladylike and agreeable in her manners. The next daughter is quite pretty though as yet quite young. The youngest is one who will be, and is now, very pretty. She is quite a child. We left about 11 o'clock and had very little difficulty in getting home as the road was frozen.

17 January 1847. Ice made plentifully again last night. Got up this morning about 20 m. of 8, breakfasted at 1/2 past 9, and at about 1/4 past 10 called over at Mr. Adams to wait upon Miss Bowne and Isabella Adams to Episcopal Church.(2) Mr. Cullough preached. After Church we stopped at Miss Adams on King Street where we waited until the carriage sent in for us. We all got in and I drove out to Mr. Adams and went in. Upon my attempting to leave, both Mrs. Adams and the young ladies requested me to dine and stay with them which I consented with pleasure to do. We had a very fine dinner, and I remained until about 3 o'clock.

I found Miss Isabella Adams to be a very agreeable and pleasant young lady. I was much more pleased with her when I became better acquainted. She improves very much on acquaintance. Miss Bowne is also very agreeable and looks much prettier by daylight than at night. She is also a very agreeable lady in her Manners.

18 January 1847. I got up this morning at about 1/2 past 6, and at 7 got breakfast. After bidding the family farewell, I started for the cars on foot with Rodmond and James Gibbons. Ma and Lydia rode down. At 8 o'clock left Wilmington, and after a rather tedious ride of 2 1/2 hours arrived at Philadelphia without accident or incident.

At the office from 11 until 6 1/4 p.m. and in the evening went to see the "Kean's" in Ion. I was not as much pleased with this piece as I expected. It is very tame, and very little interest throughout. Mrs. Kean as Ion played admirably, but Mr. Kean's acting, I thought, quite poor, certainly not as good as some of the stock actors. Miss Crocker as Clemathe played very well. Miss Walters danced a very pretty dance, called Pas Tambourine from the ballet Urielle. The after piece was full of fun and interest, name Deaf as a Post.

19 January 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening called up to see Miss Anne Wilson of Wilmington, Delaware at Miss Kirk's in Chestnut Street, 2nd door above Schuylkill 8th Street. I found her in and also Miss Kirk, met a Mr. Ridgway there. Miss Wilson looked very pretty and fascinating, and I spent a very pleasant evening in her company. She is a lady full of fun and life, and one with whom you could not help but enjoy yourself.

21 January 1847. Clear and very cold all day and throughout the evening. Ice made throughout the day. At the office all day, and in the evening went down to a small party given by Mr. and Mrs. F.A. Godwin. They live in Pine Street, South side above 5th. Mr. J.C. Welch was with me. I spent rather a pleasant evening dancing, &c. About 1/2 past 11 had a very fine oyster supper for the benefit of the inward man. To take the company all together there was not a pretty girl among them, though several fine looking.

22 January 1847. Ice made in my room last night. The Schuylkill River is frozen over and hundreds people on it today skating. The Delaware River is frozen over at Burlington, and was fast this morning opposite the City. At the office all day, and in the evening went down to a small company at Edward P. Border's. Among the ladies met Miss Levinia Williamson, sister to the lady that I had the adventure with in calling upon her some days since. She is quite pretty and agreeable in her manners.

23 January 1847. At the office during the morning, and during the afternoon about 2 o'clock J.C. Welch & myself went on the Schuylkill above the dam to skate. There were a large number of persons on the ice, and the skating very fine. Left at about 1/2 past 4, went down to Harding's, got some porter, and then started for the other side of the river. In crossing the bridge met the younger Mr. Feltz. We all three took the omnibus and rode into town. Spent the evening until about 9 o'clock in playing whist.

24 January 1847. Cloudy all day with the appearance of rain or snow. It rained for a short time about 3 p.m. Attended Grace Church in the morning with Lydia, heard a very excellent sermon from Mr. Suddards. In the afternoon attended St. Andrew's Church. Mr. Clark delivered a very beautiful and affecting discourse.

After tea called up at Miss Kirk's for Miss Wilson to accompany her to St. Phillip's Church according to engagement. The Misses Kirk wished to go to Mr. Parker's Church at the corner of Clinton and 10th Streets. We concluded to go too. Mr. Parker preached a sermon on Temperance which was very good but rather long. He advanced some arguments which I never heard mentioned before in that cause. After Church waited upon Miss Wilson home.

25 January 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening went up to a party given by the Misses Leeds. J.C. Welch went up with me. Spent a very pleasant evening and left at about 1 a.m. I was much amused with an Englishman (who accompanied Miss Graves) in his peculiar mode of dancing, and also for the peculiarity of a certain pair of whiskers & moustache.

26 January 1847. In the evening in Mr. Ludlow's room until about 1/2 past 8 playing whist. Afterwards went into Ma's room and played whist until 1/4 past 10.

27 January 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening about 8 o'clock went in to see Miss Lizzy Ludlow, being my first visit since her return from New York. Spent the evening pleasantly playing speculation with cards.

28 January 1847. In the evening at 1/4 of 8 went up to the "Odd Fellows" oyster saloon to see Mr. Samuel Bonnell with whom I had an engagement to call upon Miss Kate Smith,(3) who lives in 8th Street above Green. She is a young lady who formerly was at St. Mary's boarding school. This was my first visit. I spent a very pleasant evening. Met a cousin of Miss K. Smith's, a Miss Mary Ann Smith from Reading. She is a very pretty and agreeable young lady.

We amused ourselves through the greater part of the evening playing whist. After becoming tired of that game I proposed a little trick with cards viz. to place ten cards in a row and to place them in 5 parcels of two each by jumping over two each time. We all tried for about one hour but could not succeed, and finally Mr. Leibert bet me a 12 pound black cake that it could not be done, which I took up. I am to prove that it can be done next Wednesday night. We had quite an animated discussion about it and a great deal of fun. Mr. Leibert being confident of winning the bet wanted to bet more, but I thought I had "stuck" him enough.

29 January 1847. A cloudy, raw damp and rainy day. Rained very hard during the evening. At the office all day. Spent the evening at home in my mother's room playing whist until about 1/2 past 10, then went down in the dining room with Maginnis & smoked a cigar.

30 January 1847. Very unpleasant out on account of a high wind that prevailed throughout the day and evening. At the office during the morning and in the afternoon until about 5 o'clock, then went out to take a little walk. I joined Miss Anne Wilson of Wilmington, Delaware on Chestnut Street just above 5th and walked out with her to Miss Kirk's in Chestnut above Schuylkill 8th Street.

31 January 1847. Started this morning in the 9 o'clock line for Burlington, where we arrived after a pleasant ride at about 1/4 past 10. Were obliged to go around the Island. Found considerable floating ice in the river. Went to St. Mary's Church in the morning and heard the Bishop both this morning and this afternoon. I noticed a very pretty young lady among the scholars of St. Mary's Hall, she appeared to be full of fun and life & rather disposed to flirt a little. I found (through Miss Lippincott) her name to be Miss Anna Redfield. 8 o'clock started for Philadelphia.

FEBRUARY

1 February 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening Mr. J.G. Welch and myself went up to spend the evening with the Misses Leeds. Just as we entered the house we found them ready with their cloaks and bonnets on to go out, as we supposed to spend the evening sociably. They invited us to accompany them, and they went down to Mr. John Anspach, No. 345 N. 6th opposite Spring Garden Street.

Upon entering the house Mr. Welch and I were very much surprised that there was to be some company there, as neither of us were prepared in our dress to attend a party, particularly myself, as I had an old pair of pants and coat, and not at all dressed for a company. But as we were in for it were obliged to go in. I spent a very pleasant evening, was introduced to Miss Amanda Wanner, a very pretty girl, stepdaughter of Mr. Anspach. She was very agreeable and interesting in her manners as well as pretty. I had met her before but was never introduced. Mr. Anspach's house is furnished in a most beautiful manner. I never saw more taste displayed in my life. Everything seemed to be in harmony and good keeping. The furniture, glasses &c. were of the most superb order. The parlors opened into a beautiful conservatory which was lit with gas. He has something like 50 different rarities of japonicas besides numerous other flowers. Left at about 1/2 past 11, waited upon the Misses Leeds home, and then went home ourselves, stopping in at "Guys" in 7th below Chestnut to get some oysters, &c.

2 February 1847. In the evening at about 1/2 past 7 Mr. Chambers called for me to go up to see Miss Wilson at Miss Kirk's. We sat for a short time in our room and then went up, found Miss Kirk and Miss Wilson both in. Spent a pleasant evening and left at about 10 o'clock. I then went up to the Roberts' in 9th Street for Ma. She had gone to bed. I returned home, went to the parlor, sat for a short time & then went out with Maginnis & got some oysters.

3 February 1847. Poured rain until about 2 1/2 p.m., and the wind blew a perfect hurricane all day and night, blowing down and unroofing houses, tearing up trees, blowing down awnings, turning umbrellas inside out &c., &c. I have no doubt but we will hear of some fearful accidents both on sea and land in the course of a day or two. It did not rain much after 3 p.m. About 5 p.m. the wind shifted and for a time wore the appearance of clearing. About 12 p.m. had a slight fall of snow and it became quite cold.

I was out during the greater part of the morning attending to business. About 1 p.m. called to see Miss Sally Roberts to offer my services to wait upon her to Miss Mitchell's this evening. At the office during the afternoon. After tea dressed myself, and about 1/4 of 8 my chaise called which took me up to Miss Mary C. Smith's (or Kate Smith as she is commonly called) to decide the bet I made last Thursday with Mr. Leibert in reference to the placing of 10 cards in 5 parcels each time jumping over two.

Leibert did not make his appearance. I suppose being afraid of hearing too much sport made of him; he however acted the part of a gentleman and sent the bet, viz., two six pound cakes, one black and the other pound cake. He also sent two quarts of ice cream and other cakes. I remained but about 20 minutes having to wait upon Miss Sally Roberts & sister to a party given by Mr. & Mrs. Mitchell & daughter. We are, however, to meet tomorrow at Miss Smith's to cut the cake and have a little frolic. After leaving Miss Smith's drove down for Sally Roberts, took her in and then drove down home for Lydia.

Entered the room about 9 o'clock with Sally and sister. The first lady that met my eye was Miss Louisa M. Clarke. I have not been to see her for the last 5 weeks, for the simple reason that I have been trying to forget her. I thought that I had weaned my love from her, but with this meeting it returned two fold. I could not keep myself away from her, she looked more interesting, more lively, more charming than ever. I shall resume my visits, I cannot help it, and I will gain her if I can. I never saw one I loved so well before. She is one that has won my love, and I cannot give her up. I never loved, as I do her. She, I regret to say, looked very unwell this evening. I hope she may soon recover. I spent the greater part of the evening in her company, danced with her twice. I spent a very agreeable evening and left at about 1/2 past 12. Miss Clarke left before I did, but it seemed as soon as she had gone, all that had attracted me had fled, and I felt no further desire to remain. I left in a very few minutes afterwards though they wanted us to stay and dance another cotillion.

4 February 1847. In the evening about 1/4 of 8 went up to the Odd Fellows Oyster Saloon, where I met Mr. Samuel Bonnell. We started up to see Miss Mary C. Smith as per engagement, as this was the evening appointed to cut the cake won by me. Met a Miss Reeves there. Mr. Leibert did not make an appearance, nor has he since the bet was lost. We spent a very merry time in drinking egg nog & eating cake, &c., &c.

5 February 1847. In the evening went down at Miss L.M. Clarke's. As usual she looked pretty and interesting. I spent a very pleasant evening, as I always do in her company. I have not been there for about 5 weeks until this evening on account of certain occurrences which I do not think necessary to place on these pages. But I hope what has prevented me from visiting her will not hereafter. Met there a Mr. Gibbons and a Mr. Sulger.

6 February 1847. I was very unwell throughout the day. I had a very bad cold and a headache.

7 February 1847. At about 1/2 past 7 or 1/4 of 8 it commenced snowing & hailing and continued during the evening. Not feeling very well this morning did not go out. However, in the afternoon feeling much better walked up as far as St. Phillip's Church. Did not go in, but returned as far as St. James. Went in and remained during the service. Heard rather a dull sermon. About 1/4 past 6 called down for Miss Clarke to accompany her to Church. We started at about 1/2 past 6 having to go very early as the Church is always very much crowded. On my way to Church had a very interesting conversation with Miss Clarke in which I had some explications very satisfactory to me. We had an excellent sermon from the Reverend Mr. Clark from the text of "The summer is past, and the harvest is over, and we are not saved." I never heard a more beautiful sermon than that preached this evening.

When Church was out found it snowing very fast and the walking very wet. I was rather in a quandary how to get my lady home, but as good luck would have it I succeeded in getting a chaise, and we got home without difficulty, much to my gratification as I feared Miss Clarke would take cold in so long a walk. I went in and remained about 1/2 an hour, and then went home through the snow, which did not certainly do my cold any good.

8 February 1847. Clear and quite mild all day, the snow of last night disappeared rapidly, making very bad walking.

9 February 1847. In the evening about 1/2 past 8 went up to a party given by Miss Mary C. Smith. There were from 60 to 70 others and among the ladies some very pretty ones. From some cause or other, I know not what, I spent a very dull evening. It was not the fault either of the Misses Mary C. or Mary Anne Smith, because they did everything in their power to make the evening pass agreeably. The other portion of the company appeared to enjoy themselves. I danced several times. They had very good hired music. Did not go in to the supper room, not feeling any desire to eat. Met this evening Mr. Leibert the first time since the bet. He did not seemed disposed to say anything about it, which I soon discovered, and did not mention it to him.

10 February 1847. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, and as usual when in her company spent a very pleasant evening. She looked remarkably pretty. Left at about 1/2 past 10 p.m. On my way home stopped in at "Our House" and took a whiskey punch. While there Mr. Harry Adams came in and he drank with me.

11 February 1847. At the office all day and in the evening attended a party given by Miss Emma Mulford at her boarding house, Mrs. Carr's(4) at No. 131 South 3rd Street. I accompanied Lydia and we entered the room about 1/4 past 9. I spent a delightful evening in dancing, &c. We had very good music for dancing, a violin, violoncello, & flagellate. The supper was served at about 1/2 past 12 in good taste and plenty, but no liquors. I was a great deal in the company of the Misses Smith this evening, and admire them more, the more I see of them. I was introduced to two ladies this evening. I do not remember their names, nor does it matter much as they were neither agreeable nor pleasant to me.

12 February 1847. In the evening went down to meet the Sociable which met at the Misses Carter's this evening. Nearly all the company were present. We had a very pleasant time. In the course of the evening we had a number of tableaus(5) which were well gotten up and quite pretty.

13 February 1847. In the evening at home in my mother's room until about 10 o'clock, then went down into the parlor where I remained for some 15 minutes when a party of us went up into Samuel Ludlow's room, having an invitation to an oyster supper given by him. On account of some mistake did not get our oysters until 1/2 past 11. We had a merry time and the drinking and toasting ran high among some until about 1/2 past 1 a.m.

Mr. Prout became very unruly, in fact deranged, so that it exerted all the force of Mr. J.C. Welch and myself to make him go upstairs to bed. And when we got him up he insisted it was not his room, and he broke loose and ran downstairs. I remained with him until 1/2 past 2, and Robert Ludlow & J.C. Welch until 1/4 of 5, as it was not safe to leave him alone. Every 5 or 10 minutes he would jump up and start for the door, uttering some wild expressions. I never saw anybody act so singularly. The whole house was in an uproar, and believe half the ladies frightened half to death.

14 February 1847. Never do I remember a more delightful day. It was neither too cool nor too warm, just such a one as was suitable for walking. At St. Phillip's Church in the morning. Mr. Neville gave us an excellent sermon. After Church walked home with Miss L.M. Clarke, as usual pleasant and agreeable.

Mr. James of Rising Sun, Indiana went to Church today with sister & Ma, and dined with us in the "Schuylkill House," the last house on Chestnut Street before coming to the Schuylkill. Found him as usual, remained about 20 minutes, and then continued our walk over the Market Street Bridge, up as far as Hardings, crossed the Wire Bridge,(6) walked around Fair Mount, up the steps to the basins, and finally home.

15 February 1847. At the office until 12 N, then took a walk as far as 2nd and Green with James C. Welch to see our bootmaker. From there called up to make my party call on Miss Kate Smith in 8th Street above Green. Spent about 20 m. with her and her cousin Mary Ann Smith, very pleasantly. After leaving there returned to the office, stopping one or two places on my road. Remained at the office but a few minutes, then called over at our house for Lydia to make a party call on Miss Emma Mulford.

16 February 1847. There was considerable snow on the ground this morning, which, with the rain that commenced to fall in the afternoon, made miserable walking. The rain continued through the evening. Spent the evening at home in my mother's room. We first had two games of whist, Messrs. J.C. Welch, Samuel Ludlow, my sister and self. Miss Anna Ludlow and Mr. Maginnis coming in we gave up whist and played "Speculation" so as we could all join in. Spent a very pleasant evening. Ma met with a misfortune in attempting to lift a five gallon demijohn of wine. It fell and broke, and lost all of the wine which was a very superior article. We lost about 3 gallons, with $4 per gallon.

17 February 1847. In the evening called down to see Miss L. M. Clarke, but found she had left for Washington this morning. I regretted exceedingly not having seen her before she started. I suppose she will remain until the end of the session.

18 February 1847. In the evening Ma, sister and myself went over to Mr. & Mrs. Ludlow's room per engagement. Her family were all there. We spent the evening very pleasantly playing Speculation, &c. until about 12 past 10, when we all went over to Samuel and Robert Ludlow's room, where we had a very nice oyster supper, after which ice cream, wine, cake, &c.

19 February 1847. In the evening about 8 p.m. called down to see Frank & Rodmond Gibbons at their brother Henry's house. Frank was not in, and found Rodmond had changed his residence. I then went to find it but did not succeed. Being in the neighborhood of 4th and Spruce called upon Miss Caroline Snyder.

20 February 1847. In the evening called down to see Frank Gibbons, went in & saw Mrs. Gibbons but Frank was not at home.

21 February 1847. At St. Andrew's Church in the morning. The day being so disagreeable did not go out after returning home.

22 February 1847. Today was rather an unpleasant one for the celebration of Washington's birthday. In the morning the pavements were covered with sleet. Afterwards commenced hailing, and finally commenced snowing, which continued until late in the night. There were some military companies out celebrating the day, but I think soldiering was but poor fun. St. Peter's and Christ Church bells rung out a merry peal in celebration of the day.

At the office all day, and in the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater to see the "Keans" in Richard the 3rd. Mr. Charles Kean as Richard performed his part admirably, he appeared to have the right conception of the character, and one that suited me exactly. Mr. Leman played Henry the 6th with much feeling. The pageantry, dresses, &c., &c. were beautiful in the extreme. I never saw a play got up in better taste. The after piece entitled Spring Gardens was, as most farces, amusing in its way, and brought down some applause. Theater out about 1/2 past 11.

23 February 1847. After tea called down to see Mrs. Clarke, and to enquire about her daughter who is now in Washington. Found her at home and as agreeable as ever. She showed me Louisa's Valentines among which I saw mine, but of course could say nothing. Left about 8 o'clock and went up to the oyster saloon of the Odd fellows Hall, where I was to meet Welch. We then went up to see the Misses Leeds.

25 February 1847. It commenced snowing this morning before daylight, and continued in regular old-fashioned style until about 12 N when the snow ceased falling and it cleared up. There was some 5 inches of snow on the ground, which made fine sleighing. The sun, however, made it through rapidly.

We had quite a disturbance this evening in the house, about tea time. It appears that a Mr. Bellows from New York now stopping at our house had, during the afternoon, in the presence of ladies, insulted Aikman Welch. As soon as the ladies left the parlors, Welch mounted and knocked him down, and was giving it to him roundly when the boarders separated them. In coming out from tea Welch knocked him down again, and got his knee on his breast. He would, no doubt, have injured Bellows very much had they not been separated. In the melee Bellows lost his wig which mortified him very much. He was rather intoxicated. The ladies as well as the boarders generally approved of Welch, of course, as they all admitted he had been insulted. Bellows is a presuming character, and I have no doubt but what his pride will now be lessened. I think he had better "be taken with a leaving."

26 February 1847. At the office in the morning until about 1/4 past 10, when Mr. Augustus Sentnay called to take me sleighing. We rode all over the City and then out to the "Moss Cottage." He has a splendid animal, the fastest I ever rode behind, he would trot his mile in 2 minutes 40 seconds. We passed everything on the road. In the evening went up to Guy's and got some oysters.

27 February 1847. In the evening after tea in the parlor until about 8 o'clock. There were a number of young men in the parlor, the elder Mr. Felters got his violin, and we had a regular dance and a great deal of sport.

28 February 1847. At Grace Church in the morning with Ma & Lydia, after which went up to Algernon S. Roberts to dine. Found the family all well. After dinner went up to the sitting room with Cuthert(7) & Sydney and smoked cigars until about 3 o'clock. Then took a walk out to Fairmount with Sidney to see the freshet occasioned by the late heavy rains and melting of the snow. The water was very high on the dam.

After leaving Fairmount crossed the Bridge to "Handings Hotel." The walking was very muddy. In the evening went up to St. Phillip's Church and took a seat in Mr. Clarke's pew. None of his family were there. Some officious fellow with "specks" on kept throwing my pew door open for persons coming in. He finally threw me out of my seat entirely and I had to leave the church. This was Confirmation evening.

MARCH

1 March 1847. Clear, cold and blustering. Evening clear and moonlight. To use an old expression, March "came in like a lion."

3 March 1847. After tea went over to the office with J.C. Welch, and made some whiskey punch, which we drank and found very fine.

4 March 1847. At the office all day until 5 p.m. when J.C. Welch and I took a walk out to see Colonel Tucker on Chestnut Street near the Schuylkill River. In the evening Welch and I want up to the Circus to see the Merchant Steed of Syracuse, in other words, Damon & Pythias - cut up and murdered in some parts. The pageantry was beautiful indeed and the piece was gotten up well so far as the scenery. The ponies, "Romeo & Juliet," were well trained and performed well. The Pony races were full of fun and very amusing.

5 March 1847. In the evening about 1/4 of 8 went up to the oyster saloon of the "Odd Fellows Hall" where I had an engagement to meet Samuel Bonnell to go up to see Miss Mary C. (Kate) Smith. Both the Misses Smith were as agreeable as ever, and their amiable brother as disagreeable as ever during the short time he was in the parlor.

6 March 1847. Got up this morning about 1/4 of 7, got breakfast about 20 m. of 8 and then went over to the office, remained but a few minutes and then went up to the Reading cars at the corner of Broad and Vine Streets to see Miss Mary Ann Smith of Reading off. She leaves today for home. Met Mr. Samuel Bonnell at the depot. A few minutes after I got up there Miss Smith came up in a chaise with her cousin Henry Smith, who this morning was disagreeable and behaved as ungentlemanly as ever. After Mr. Smith left, Bonnell and I went into the cars, and had quite a pleasant chat of about half an hour with Miss Smith. We rode up as far as Broad and Willow, when we bade her farewell and left the cars. Spent the evening at home, part of the time in my mother's room and the balance in the parlor. Lydia has been quite sick today and yesterday. She appears to have some fever.

7 March 1847. At St. Phillip's Church in the morning, sat in Mr. Clarke's pew. Mr. Neville preached a very beautiful discourse on the sufferings of the poor from famine in Europe. A collection was taken up. After Church, walked home with Miss Louisa Clarke. She returned from Washington last Thursday. In the afternoon walked up to Port Richmond with Henry Felters of Woodville, Mississippi. I had never been up there before today and was astonished at the vast improvement. Before we had much time to look around it commenced raining & we were obliged to walk home in it without umbrellas.

8 March 1847. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa Clarke. Found her in and spent a pleasant evening of course. Mr. Clarke was also in the parlor. Mr. James Dayton came in about 1/4 past 8 and stayed until 10.

9 March 1847. Spent the evening in Mr. Ludlow's parlor, playing whist and other games of cards with Miss Elizabeth Ludlow, Samuel and Robert Ludlow and my sister.

10 March 1847. Poured rain very hard very early in the morning and we had some thunder and lightning, the 1st of the season. About 1/4 of 6 took a walk up Chestnut Street as far as Broad with J.C. Welch. Met a large number of ladies on the promenade. In the evening Welch and I called down to see the Misses Carter. It was his first visit. There was some company there and we spent a very pleasant evening dancing. Left at about 11 o'clock. Welch and I went down to see the fire which we heard was at 2nd and Pine. It was out by the time we got there.

11 March 1847. In the evening went down to Miss Ellen Henman's to attend one of the sociable parties, given by the Misses Carter and others. I spent a very delightful evening dancing, &c. Was introduced to Miss Keen this evening who I found to be a very agreeable, and intelligent lady. I was much pleased with her.

This evening the gentlemen were each presented with rosettes to be worn on the left breast of the coat for the remainder of the parties. On the back was inscribed the name, and remarks as regards his regular attendance. The rosettes also differed as to color. Those that were "tried and found true" wore blue rosettes, others red, white and stone color. On the back of the stone colored rosettes were a pair of scales, with the words "Found wanting" underneath. I was one of that order not having attended very regularly.

12 March 1847. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke. Found her in and well. Mr. Dayton came in a few minutes after I came in, and I left early, say 1/2 past 9. Mr. Graham also came in while I was there. After leaving Miss Clarke, went up to Guy's and got some oysters for Ma and Lydia, and took them home.

13 March 1847. There was a fall of snow to the depth of about an inch last night, and the City wore again the appearance of winter this morning. It cleared off about 10 o'clock, and the snow soon disappeared under the melting influence of the sun.

14 March 1847. At St. Phillip's Church in the morning. After church walked home with Miss Louisa M. Clarke. As usual she was agreeable. Invited her to go to Mr. Luddards in Grace Church this evening. In the afternoon went up to St. Luke's Church with Anna Roberts. After tea called down for Miss Clarke.

15 March 1847. About 1/2 Past 8 it clouded over and we had a snow squall, it lasted but a few minutes.

16 March 1847. Today was a succession of sunshine and snow storms. We had several of the greatest snow storms I ever witnessed. In a few minutes the ground was covered. They were, however, of but short duration. At the office all day and in the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in.

18 March 1847. In the evening called down with sister to see Miss Emma Mulford. Found her in and spent rather a pleasant evening.

19 March 1847. At the office all day and in the evening until about 8 o'clock, writing. After which I went home, dressed, and called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke. Found her in and spent, as I usually do when in her company, a very pleasant evening. Her mother was in the parlor. Left about 1/4 past 10 and went around to the office again for the purpose of writing, but could not get in. Met Mr. Kelly as I was coming off the steps and walked up with him to Guy's and got some oysters.

20 March 1847. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. started for Burlington on board the Steamer John Stevens with mysister and James C. Welch. We had a very pleasant and quick trip up. Upon landing, walked up to Mr. James H. Sterling's with sister where she intends spending her time while in Burlington.

We then took a stroll down to St. Mary's Hall, not seeing any of the young ladies, went up home with Mr. Welch. Took a walk up to Dugdale's Mill, and through the upper part of Burlington to see the improvements, which are quite numerous. I forgot to mention while down at the Hall, I went into the Chapel of the "Holy Innocents" connected with the school. It is a neat structure in the Gothic style, and is capable of accommodating about 320. It has a neat organ, the windows are of stained glass, and withal it has quite an antique appearance. It is to be consecrated next Thursday, in which occasion the young ladies are to have their biennial rehearsal.

21 March 1847. Got up this morning about 7 o'clock after a night of uneasiness, occasioned by a severe tooth ache. After breakfast took a walk in the neighborhood of the Hall, but could see nothing so returned home. Went to the Episcopal Church in the morning. Was obliged to go out when the service was about half over on account of a severe tooth ache. Went down to Billy Allison's, got it relieved and then returned to Church. After dinner got a horse and wagon and drove over to "Franklin Park" to see about engaging board for Ma and Lydia for next summer. It appears to be quite a pleasant place and healthy. We concluded to go down to the City this evening. Was much amused at the conversation of two drunken men while waiting for the cars.

22 March 1847. The vernal equinox has been extraordinarily prompt in its visitation this season, and since yesterday morning has been deluging us with rain, and blown us about at a great rate by gales from all points.

At the office all day, and in the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke. Found her in as well as her mother. Spent quite a pleasant evening. Mrs. Williamson next door still continues with her tiresome "ding dong" tunes on the piano. She has been practicing some 5 to 6 hours every day for the last six months or more. Quite disagreeable to neighbors. Mrs. Clarke still persists in a desire to read this journal. I am of opinion she would see something to astonish her in it. I am afraid I cannot satisfy her.

23 March 1847. About 4 p.m. it commenced raining and continued without intermission through the remainder of the afternoon and through the evening. Went out to see Mr. Carver(8) at 9th and Filbert Streets and from there out to see Colonel Tucker at the corner of Broad & Chestnut Streets. Not finding him in waited a while until he returned. I did not remain but a few minutes, as I had a chance of going down to the office in a chaise, which I did not like to lose as it was very unpleasant walking and raining quite hard.

In the evening about 8 o'clock a chaise called, which conveyed me up to Miss Belangee's, having an invitation to a tableau party. There were a large number there, with many of whom I was acquainted. The first series of tableaux were scenes taken from Claude Melnotte and were well gotten up. The dresses were very fine having been procured from the theaters expressly for the occasion. Mr. Heiskell figured as Claude Melnotte, Miss H.A. Myers as Pauline, Miss Louisa Wood as the mother of Pauline, Miss Taylor as the widow Melnotte, and I as Colonel Dumas. There were a number of other tableaux, representing Turkish scenes, which were admirable. The best tableaux, however, was The Game of Draught in which one of the players seems to be in a deep study, having been beaten, while his opponent is exulting by laying back and pointing at the board. This was well received. Miss Myers, Miss Wood, Miss Taylor, and Mr. Heiskell were the principal performers. My sister appeared in one piece as a Turkish lady in a reclining position, with a page in the act of handing her oranges. They all passed off well and in good taste.

24 March 1847. The gentleness of Spring is upon us, and the scowl of the Equinox has faded before the glance of as bright and lovable a day as ever blessed the earth. The rain, indeed, seemed to have been sent only to rid us of impurities which the storms of winter had left behind and prepare everything to reflect the purity and brightness of the skies that were, today, in the full glory of unclouded blue. Chestnut Street, and every other street, in fact had more than the unusual throng, but the great thoroughfare of fashion, especially, was made brilliant by the crowds of ladies who pressed along it. Youth and beauty found their fitting opportunity for display in the gentleness of the day, the aged a pleasure in the exercise which its free and pure air permitted them to take - and the invalid a glad relief from the close room, in the warm sunshine & the gentle and invigorating breeze. His heart must have been cold indeed that did not feel the gentler sympathies stirring around it under the cheerful influences of the day - and flinty beyond compare if there was not an entertained sense of thankfulness for the boon of sunshine.

In the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater to see the far-famed and much talked of Viennoises Danseuses, being 48 in number composed entirely of children. The first dance, viz., "Pas Des Fleurs" was certainly the most beautiful spectacle I ever witnessed. The grouping of the dances were indeed superb. It would be impossible to describe the various movements made by them, and with such accuracy as was really surprising among those so young. The second dance Pas Horrois was a very beautiful thing, it was performed by only 24, one half of which were dressed in male attire. The last dance, entitled the Grand Pas Oriental was superb. The groupings in this piece were beautiful indeed, and the rapid changes through which they passed with the white and red scarfs was astonishing. In this piece one half of the dancers are dressed as Moors. These dances are surely worth seeing by everyone. There were two farces played besides, viz., Our Mary Anne and Weak Points, both very good in their way.

25 March 1847. In the evening about 1/2 past 8 by invitation went down to Miss Louisa M. Clarke's to meet the three Misses Patrullo who are quite agreeable in their manners and are quite pretty (that is the one with curls). The elder Miss Patrullo is quite a pretty looking lady but I had no conversation with her. We danced one cotillion. My partner was Miss Anna Patrullo. Miss Clarke as usual looked pretty and interesting this evening. There were several gentlemen there, viz. Messrs. Fry, Robert Ross, James Dayton, and Stille. Waited upon Mrs. Petrullo and some other elderly ladies home.

26 March 1847. The anticipations of Spring, gentle breezes and bright sunshine were woefully clouded and dampened to day, by a persevering rain, which shortly after sunset, turned into a regular and dense snow storm. We might have imagined the rain to be but a Spring shower, but the unexpected snow was a matter of fact argument which put Spring to the rout at once. The wind, too, had a rollicking time of it, and blew as steadily as if it had come out on purpose to wage a ruinous war against those special defenses from rain - the unoffending umbrellas. The snow continued with unabated fury throughout the night and by about 10 o'clock the slush was some three inches deep. Never do I remember a more dreadful night. The wind blew a perfect hurricane, and I have no doubt but we will hear of many sad disasters on our coast.

In the evening about 1/4 of 7, went up to Mr. Hueston's at N.W. corner of 11th and Girard Streets notwithstanding the storm to accompany him out to Miss McIlvaine's to attend the sociable, which meets there this evening. The ladies had all gone out in the afternoon in an omnibus. We succeeded in getting into an omnibus at 11th and Market. The driver complained bitterly of the weather, and I did not wonder at it. Shortly after crossing the bridge he said he could stand it no longer, and he had to get another driver, who conveyed us to Miss McIlvain's house, some three or four squares over the bridge. We found the ladies all there, and some of the West Philadelphia men. They were rather surprised to see us. Mr. Byrd came out after us. We spent a pleasant evening, and left at about 11 o'clock, in an omnibus chartered for the occasion. We got the ladies all home very well. I left the omnibus at 9th and Walnut and walked down through the slush. I had a good pair of gum shoes on therefore secure from wet feet, though never do I remember such walking.

27 March 1847. The walking was miserable during the morning, but as the day advanced, the pavements were cleared and the walking became possible. The City wore quite the appearance of winter again. Spent the evening at home in Ma's room playing whist.

28 March 1847. The wind & storm of yesterday & day before has done great damage. Nearly all the telegraph poles between this City and New York were blown down & many between this City & Baltimore. Two large trees were blown down in the Independence Square.

About 20 m. past 6 called around at Mr. Clarke's to take Miss Louisa to Church, but I regret to say that she was sick, and confined to her bed since yesterday morning. I remained about half an hour and then returned home again, not wishing to go to Church without her.

About 1/2 past 8 the state house bell(9) struck for fire in an eastern direction, went down as far as 3rd and Dock & then returned not being able to find anything like fire.

29 March 1847. After tea went up to the "Odd Fellow's Oyster Saloon" where I met Mr. Samuel Bonnell according to engagement. We then went up to Miss Reeve's in Delaware 8th above Green. Met Miss Kate Smith and Miss L. Snyder there. Spent a pleasant evening playing whist.

30 March 1847. About 10 o'clock commenced hailing. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in, and spent a pleasant evening. She has partially recovered from her indisposition. Mr. James Dayton came in shortly after me. He appeared to be quite dull and left about 12 past 9. I left a few minutes after.

31 March 1847. At the office during the day until 4 1/2 p.m. when Henry Felters and I went out to look at some property in McDuffe Street west of Schuylkill 3rd. After making our examination, continued our walk down to Gray's Ferry, crossed the bridge, and went around up through Maglandville & by the Almshouse & Woodland Cemetery. We found the walking very good until we got opposite the Cemetery wall, when I got in the mud over shoe top & had considerable difficulty in getting through much to the amusement of Mr. Felters, who was more successful than I. In my difficulties one of my overshoes came off and got so full of mud that I had to carry it some distance until we could find water to wash it out. Went down through the Almshouse grounds & up to Market Street bridge where we crossed and made for home.

In the evening called up to see the Misses Leeds. Left a few minutes after 10 & on our way down stopped in the Odd Fellow's Saloon & got some brandy punch.

APRIL

1 April 1847. Clear and quite cold until towards evening when it clouded over and became quite raw and unpleasant. At the office all day with the exception of about 3/4 of an hour between 4 & 5 o'clock p.m. occupied in going out to see the military escort and procession on the occasion of the burial of Lieutenant Blake who was killed in Mexico last May. The military display, & in fact the whole escort, was very imposing. Returned to the office a few minutes before 5, and a short time afterwards was much surprised by a visit from the Misses Arethusa & Sarah E. Leeds. They remained about half an hour and were very lively and full of fun.

2 April 1847. At the office all day and in the evening accompanied Miss Elizabeth Ellis of Freehold and my sister to the Walnut Street Theater to see Les Danseuses Viennoises. The dances performed by them this evening were Polka Paysanne, Pas Des Fleurs and the Grand Pas Oriental. The first named dance was rather a singular affair, but quite amusing. I did not like it as well as the others. The last named two are the same as I saw on the 24th of March last, one of which, the "flower dance" I could look at all night. It is impossible to describe it, it must be seen to be appreciated. The farces Did You Ever Send Your Wife to Burlington? and The Lottery Ticket were quite amusing. The boxes were very much crowded, but pit quite slim. Miss Kate [Smith] and her father and mother sat in the seats before us, she looked quite pretty.

3 April 1847. At the office during the morning until about 1/2 past 11, when I went up to the "Commencement of the University." Found that the room ("The Musical Fund") was crowded to excess, but by waiting until the graduates came in procession we succeeded in getting in with them, and obtained an excellent seat. The Hall was crowded with the beauty and fashion of the City. The address by Dr. Chapman, I have no doubt was very good, but I could not understand him, he having a very indistinct voice. The greater part of the audience were laboring under the same difficulty, making his address very uninteresting. I was acquainted with several of the graduates among whom were Robert D. Ross of Cherokee Nation, Franklin Gaunt, NJ, and J. Luddars of Philadelphia. After the exercises I walked home with Miss Anna Patrullo, quite a pretty and interesting young lady.

4 April 1847. Walked up to Grace Church with Ma in the morning. Left her there and went up to Mr. Nevill's, sat in Dr. Irwin's pew. Mr. Neville gave us an excellent sermon. After Church went up to Grace Church for Ma but found them at communion. In the afternoon went up to St. Phillip's Church, a stranger preached. Sat in Mr. Clarke's pew. The Misses Anna and Meta Patrullo were also in the pew. Walked home with Miss Clarke, went in and sat for about 20 minutes.

5 April 1847. In the evening went up to the Chestnut Street Theater to see the opera of Norma performed by the Seguins. This was the first night of the opening of the theater this spring. The audience was large and fashionable. They have a new and very pleasant arrangement. It is the turning of the pit into a parquet, with an entrance from the boxes. The opera was pretty well performed, though the chorus was too light. The orchestra was not much.

6 April 1847. Cloudy, rainy, damp and unpleasant all day, and during the evening. At the office during the greater part of the day, and in the evening went up to Miss Hannah Ann Myers by invitation, as there was to be some little company there. Lydia was to have gone with me but as she was not very well and the weather so unpleasant she did not. Met there Miss Louisa Wood & her brother James, Mr. Shuff and Mr. Heiskell. There were to have been some others there but on account, I suppose, of the inclemency of the weather did not come. Miss Ford, from the country, who is now staying with Miss Myers, was also there. She is a very pretty girl, and pleasing in her manners. I took a great fancy to her. This was my first visit to Miss Myers since their residence in the new house. It is a magnificent affair, and is furnished in beautiful style.

7 April 1847. Today was a charming one, clear and mild. The streets, generally, were crowded with pedestrians and Chestnut Street, in particular, shone with the bright eyes of the ladies. The greatest display of the season was made of rich and costly apparel. In the evening went up to the Museum with Miss Ellen Ludlow and my sister. The pieces performed were quite amusing and full of fun, viz., The Fair One With Golden Locks and Boots of the Swan. They were of but little interest to me, as I have seen so many of the same kind of pieces. The ladies, however, were pleased, and that was sufficient to please me. Mr. Heiskell and Miss Hannah Ann Myers were there, accompanied by Miss Ford, who as usual looked quite pretty this evening.

8 April 1847. In the evening at about 1/2 past 8 my chaise called for me and I went up to Miss Annie Roberts, to wait upon her to a wedding party given by Mr. & Mrs. Williamson for the late Miss Gaul, married this evening. We entered the room about 1/2 past 9, There was a very large number present, say 200 or 250. The parlors were crowded, though not very many pretty ladies. The evening was quite stiff on account of no dancing, and the company all left by or before 12. The supper was a beautiful affair, and got up with much taste and elegance. The pyramid of flowers in the center of the table was beautiful indeed, it was some 4 feet high composed of japonicas and other beautiful flowers. It was so arranged that it separated into different bouquets which were distributed among the ladies. The company were principally strangers to me. The bride and groom looked very well, the bride I think rather pretty. There were four bridesmaids and groomsmen.

9 April 1847. Clear and delightful throughout the day and evening, and quite warm. At the office during the morning. About 1/4 past 7 called up for the Messrs. Hueston to accompany us to Miss Keen's in West Philadelphia where our sociable is to meet this evening. The Doctor only accompanied me, his brother not being quite ready. It was some time before we could meet with an omnibus, having to walk nearly to 8th Street before coming across one, we however got out safely and pleasantly. Found all the ladies there with the exception of the Misses Whitner. We spent a delightful evening in dancing, &c. Several of the gentlemen played on violins, & we had good music. The company left shortly after 11, and we had a very pleasant walk home. I believe this is the last meeting for this season, though there is talk of meeting once more at the Misses Carter's.

10 April 1847. There was a great excitement in the City today, occasioned by the news of the taking of the castle of San Juan de Ulloa. If there had been a tremendous coal fire - something like a volcano - burning under the City today, or if a vertical sun had been shedding its rays down upon it unceasingly for a week, it could hardly have equaled the severe heat of excitement which raged and boiled & effervesced in our City today. Due warning had been given. Over their cups in the morning the citizens had been informed, by the well informed newspapers, that the news was coming, and they had all day before them to get up the excitement. It spread like the cholera or some other contagion, & though many people started to go brief distances, we did not hear that anybody arrived anywhere, because of the universal stopping of friends and acquaintances in the street, the discussion of the news, double thumbing of extras, wise suppositions as to the probability of its not having been taken, and theoretic disquisitions on the line of propriety which General Scott(10) should pursue in case the proud banner of Mexico should have been sailed before him.

Mingling with these uprisings of excitement there was a deeper feeling which in many sunk to the depression of anxiety. Could they tell who carelessly read the extra and carried the consequences of the capture solely as regarded the national glory or the prospect of ending the war. Could they, whose hearts had no tie to draw them to the place of battle by the presence there of relative or friend, realize all the feelings with which many eagerly seized upon and devoured the outline of information which the extra afforded. How many wild hopes - how many depressing fears fluttered the heart of woman, and moved the sterner sympathies of men - how many cast the paper down in unsatisfied anxiety, to wait the slow coming of other news to inform them whether father, husband or brother were safe, were wounded, or with the silent dead. Amid the rejoicings which swelled in the universal voice, amid the triumph which beamed from every eye, there must have been other words than those of rejoicing; and other looks than those of triumphs, and while we rejoice that the act has been completed, it is with a mingling of sorrow for those who are fallen, and a deep thankfulness that so few felt the scourge of war.

This evening there were several illuminations that were very pretty, one in Market Street and another in front of the Chestnut Street Theater. The North American Office was also beautifully illuminated together with beautiful transparencies. The Council of the City have approximately $500 for the illumination of the public buildings, and the Mayor has issued a request that the Citizens generally participate in a general illumination in honor of our victories at Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma, Monterey, Buena Vista & Vera Cruz. The illumination is to come off on Monday evening a week, the 19th inst.

Flags were stirring across the Streets during the day, the shipping was dressed in bunting, & our enthusiastic neighbors in Camden made a resolve that on Monday morning at sunrise they would fire a salute of 100 guns.

At the office during the greater part of the day. In the evening went up to the Circus to see the new piece Jadda or the Black Enchanter now in course of performance. The scenery throughout was beautiful indeed, & some of the acting rather ludicrous. The scene is laid in China, and the dresses, pageantry & processions are very elegant. The number engaged in the performance is very large, say from 150 to 200 people. The house was crowded, though with an inferior class of people.

11 April 1847. In the morning went up to Grace Church with Ma and Lydia. In the afternoon went up to St. Phillip's Church, sat in Mr. Clarke's pew, Mr. Neville preached. After Church walked home with Miss Louisa. She looked remarkably pretty this afternoon. After accompanying her home went in and sat for 1/2 or 3/4 of an hour, in agreeable conversation with Mrs. Clarke and Louisa. I left at about 6 o'clock, though not without first having a kind invitation to remain & take tea, by Mrs. Clarke. In the evening went up to Grace Church with Ma.

12 April 1847. In the evening had several showers of rain, accompanied with considerable thunder and lightning. Went into Miss Lizzie Ludlow's room with Lydia as she was to have some of the boarders there for the purpose of having a dance. I danced once and then left as it was rather stiff & not very agreeable to me.

13 April 1847. At the office all day until about 20 minutes past 4 p.m. when Henry Felters and I took a walk up to Richmond. After looking around about the works, got on board the steamer George Washington which was just about leaving the wharf and came down to the City where we arrived at about 10 minutes of 6, making the trip in 20 minutes. Then went up to the office, then went over to the barber's & from there to tea. In the evening called down to see Miss L.M. Clarke, found her at home looking as pleasant and being as agreeable as ever. Mrs. Clarke was in the room, who as usual was pleasant and agreeable. Mr. Dayton was there as usual.

14 April 1847. At the office all day until 6 p.m. when Mr. Welch and I went up to Market above 11th Street to get some candle holders for the illumination next Monday night. From there went up in Callowhill Street below 12th to see Mr. Robert Jarden on some business, but on approaching the door noticed crepe on the bell knob, & upon enquiry found that his wife had died this afternoon & we of course did not go in. She has been an invalid for some time.

15 April 1847. The season is certainly very backward, none of the trees are yet out in blossom. The farmers say they do not remember of so backward a season for many years. Long before this time last year the trees were all in bloom. In the evening called down to see Miss L.M. Clarke, found her at home and spent a pleasant evening. Met there again Mr. Dayton. Surely I wish I could not meet him so often, it is very disagreeable. Mrs. Clarke was in the room during the whole evening & her son Graham during the latter part.

16 April 1847. About 7 o'clock my chaise called for me, took sister and drove around to Miss Clarke's in Arch above 3rd for her to accompany us to the opera. Found her all ready and we drove up to the Theater (Chestnut Street) by 1/2 past 7, but found we were unusually early. Though they advertise to commence at 1/4 of 8, did not commence until some time after. The opera performed this evening was Maritana which, according to my idea, is a very beautiful affair. I have heard it before but am still pleased. The singers appeared to be all in good voice and everything passed off well. The orchestra and chorus have much improved since I last heard them out. Miss Clarke looked very pretty this evening. The House was but poorly filled. Mr. Welch was with us in the same box.

17 April 1847. In the evening at home part of the time, in the parlor and the remainder of the time in Ma's room. Our parlors at Mrs. Crim's are once more in order but much improved; the carpets are elegant and every thing looks very pretty.

18 April 1847. Clear, cold and blustering. I believe there is ice made early this morning. In the afternoon about 1/2 past 3 went down to the Walnut Street wharf with J.C. Welch and crossed to Camden, then went up to Hollingshead's Hotel with him to see Mr. B. Wollison. Not finding him in, and it being too dusty, cold and unpleasant to take a walk, returned to the City by the Market Street ferry. In the evening about 1/4 of 8 called on Miss Louisa M. Clarke. Found her in and as usual very agreeable.

19 April 1847. At the office during the morning until about 12 o'clock, then called up for Miss Anna Roberts to make our party call on Mr. & Mrs. Williamson, late Miss Gaul, at her father's residence in Arch above 12th Street. Found the bride at home and her sister.

At the office in the afternoon until about 1/2 past 5 when I went down with J.C. Welch to see Mr. Godwin at his store on the wharf below Spruce Street about places for ladies to see the fireworks to be set off on the Island this evening.

After tea I took Ma & Miss Lizzy Ludlow, & Mr. Alexander Ludlow took my sister and together we sallied out to see the illumination which was all that the most sanguine could have anticipated. While there was a richness and variety of display, there was also the propriety of conduct on the part of those who thronged the streets which put an additional pleasure to the rejoicing.(11) The merry peal of bells in the steeples of Christ Church and St. Peter's ushered in the day, in unison with the roar of cannon, and during the day while the bells continued to peal forth pleasant strains - the frequent and heavy reports of artillery proved that the other noisy demonstrations of rejoicing had not been forgotten. The streets were thronged with persons throughout the afternoon and evening.

The City rejoiced not only because victory had attended our army in Mexico, but for the pleasant prospect of coming peace, which those victories have opened up to the nation. The blazing lights, the showy transparencies, brilliant fireworks, thundering cannon, waving flags and pretty mottoes were the outward expressions of a heart-felt joy that through the blood and turmoil of hard fought battles - with sacrifice of death, the pain of wounds and the desolation of firesides, the nation is brought again to a point whence it may look for the calm tranquility which shall hood over the sorrowing as well as the rejoicing for these battles and these victories. It was a rejoicing for glorious manifestations of prowess by our Army and Navy - for martial courage in its most elevated point of view, and for the exercises of humanity by which the horrors of war were lessened and the glory of the nation enhanced.

The whole of the public buildings on Independence Square blazed with light, and over the principal entrance was a transparency representing General Washington. It was a happy thought in the committee thus to set in view, near the place where the Declaration of Independence was signed, the figure of the Father of his country. It was better, too, to bring the patriot to the highest place of honor, that there might be no feeling of party - no taint of politics about the demonstration, so far as the City itself was concerned, and best of all, that all men could be reminded that in the fullness of present joy for present victories, there should be remembrance of him who gained greater victories in past days, and who has himself passed away.

At the Eastern wing of the State House a handsome banner hung from the old balcony, and beneath it rested a large golden star edged with light. The Custom House was set forth in very neat style. Gas pipes were led out into the portico and arches thrown from pillar to pillar, midway up. On the crown of each arch was a large star lit with gas, and the effect was very simple and beautiful. The Arch Street Theater was gorgeously illuminated. A large transparency was placed on the balcony, and along the front of the building and the entablature, the names of the battle fields of Mexico, flamed forth in variegated hues of light. The American flag floated over all, and added to the general and imposing effect.

The Chestnut Street Theater displayed a beautiful transparency representing the American fleet saluting their stars and stripes floating over the castle of San Juan de Ulloa. On each side of this were tents, outlined with double rows of lights. These, with nearly all the public buildings in the City and Districts, together with a large number of the private residences were illuminated in beautiful style from the lower stories to the garret. Many of the Houses had beautiful bouquets and flowers arranged in the windows. The display around the several squares was very imposing. The streets were thronged until a late hour, and the whole affair passed off quietly. At 11 o'clock the lights were generally extinguished, though the enthusiasm of some led them to protract the illumination.

The Exchange was lit on all sides, and the portico especially presented a beautiful appearance. On the western front were placed two handsome transparencies & these aided the general effect very much. A large number of persons were disappointed by the fireworks not going off as they were announced for 9 o'clock from the Island opposite the City. Thousands congregated on the wharf & these waited some two hours but were disappointed. We (that is Ma, Lydia, Miss Ludlow & her brother Alexander & myself) all went down to Mr. Godwin's store, but as with the others were disappointed. A number of rockets were sent up & one or two reels set off but nothing further. We returned home about 11 o'clock much fatigued. Mr. Welch and I did our share, or as much as we could, towards the illumination, that is we illuminated our office by placing a candle to each pane of glass and lighting all four burners of our gas. Upon the whole it was a brilliant affair and likely to be remembered and talked of for many years hence. There has not been an illumination in this City of a general character since September 1824.

20 April 1847. In the evening went to the Chestnut Street Theater to see the Seguins in the Bohemian Girl.

21 April 1847. The warmest day we have had this season. In the evening called down to see Miss Clarke, as usual spent the evening pleasantly.

22 April 1847. Complaints of cold weather have ceased for the present for we have leaped suddenly into a temperature fit for mid summer, and the sudden change is a wonderful provocative of listlessness and "the spring fever." Vegetation has made almost its first advances within the last few days. The trees are all now putting out finely, and the grass in the square opposite assumes a luxuriant appearance. The first trees are also beginning to bloom, though very late.

At the office all day. In the evening it was clear, warm, delightful and moonlight. I called up to see Miss Kate Smith. Our conversation this evening was principally concerning Miss Mary Anderson of Charleston, South Carolina.

23 April 1847. In the morning it was quite warm, but before night there was a great change. It became quite cold.

In the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater with J.C. Welch to see Booth in Venice Preserved or the Plot Discovered. He played Pierre very well, but he is not the actor he was some years ago. He is much broken. There were two farces performed besides, viz. the Stage Struck Yankee in which Dan Marble played Diggory, bringing down much laughter, and turning tragedy into farce, and Mayor of Garratt in which Mr. Booth played Jerry Sneak. He created considerable fun and laughter & played his part admirably. I hardly thought that he, so eminent a tragedian, would play such low comedy.

25 April 1847. In the morning walked up to Grace Church with Ma & Lydia. I then left them and went down to St. Phillip's Church, heard an excellent sermon delivered by a stranger. After Church walked home with Miss Louisa Clarke, did not go in.

I concluded to go up to Mr. Algernon Roberts to dinner. The family had just sat down as I got up there. Went in & dined with them. Found that Sydney & Percival were going out to Isaac Roberts'(12) this afternoon, & they invited me to go out with them. Started at about 2 o'clock and got out there a little after 3, having a very pleasant ride. Found Mr. & Mrs. I. Roberts (13) at home & also the rest of the family. All are well. Went in and sat conversing until about 1/2 past 4, when we, accompanied by Algernon Roberts (son of Isaac), took a walk over to George Roberts place. It is much altered since I last saw it, it is very much out of repair. Went back to the House about 1/2 past 5 and had a very excellent supper, after which sat conversing until about 1/4 past 7, and then started for town.

26 April 1847. Clear and warm, but quite blustering and dusty. At the office during the morning and in the afternoon until about 4 o'clock when Henry Felters, of Mississippi, and I started out to take a walk. Went out to Market Street Bridge, crossed & went up the tow path on the other side of the Schuylkill to the Reading Rail Road bridge at the falls. We stopped at a Hotel there and got some porter, then crossed the bridge, and walked down the Ridge Road to town. Got home about 1/2 past 7. We walked from the Falls to 5th and Walnut in one hour and 10 minutes. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in and well. Her mother was in the parlor. Met Mr. Dayton there. I do not think I shall go there very soon again for certain reasons best known to myself.

27 April 1847. There has not been any rain for some days, and the dust is at full liberty. The wind got rather high today, and provoked the dust to a most unseemly revel. It drove through every street and into every place, filled many eyes with tears, and caused serious necessity for dusting many garments. The wind played pranks with the dresses of the ladies, and fluttered and disarranged ribbons and shawls, if not with coolness, at least with considerable impetuosity. The sun smiled down upon the sport as if it enjoyed it, but retired at the approach of a dark looking cloud that seemed as if it came on purpose to settle the vagarious dust, if not the wind. His solar Majesty looked out furtively now and then, to see how affairs were coming on, and took courage to shine out again when the cloud had passed off. The dust spoiled many a pleasure trip, for the roads had whirls in abundance, and the fresh verdure of the country had the appearance of good clothes after the soils of a hard day's journey. There was an expectation of rain in the course of the afternoon, and the sky warranted the belief that there would be a downpour. But the wind being too high, kept the clouds too high, and both being considerable elevated, could not condescend to permit the earth to enjoy its needed refreshment and purification.

In the evening called up to see the Misses Leeds, found that they were in but were unable to see them on account of the severe illness of a younger sister. We were invited into the parlor where we found Mr. Jenks, who after being called out, gave us the above information. He appeared to be quite at home.

28 April 1847. Got up this morning at 1/4 past 6, dressed, and on going down stairs met Ma and Lydia about starting out to take a walk, I accompanied them. At the office during the greater part of the day, and between 6 & 7 p.m. walked up Chestnut Street as far as 12th, but did not meet many on the promenade. In the evening went up to the oyster saloon at the "Odd Fellow's Hall" to meet Mr. Samuel Bonnell, Jr. to go up to see Miss Kate Smith. He came in a few minutes, and according to engagement went up together. Found Miss Kate at home, well and as agreeable as ever.

On our way down stopped and got some ice cream, also stopped in under the Odd Fellow's Hall and got some oysters, &c. & then went home. Got to bed at 10 m. past 12 but was awakened again at about 25 of 1 by the State House bell striking in rapid succession. Seeing a reflection of the fire, Mr. Welch and I concluded to go out to see where it was. Found it to be a large building in Hudson alley above Harmony Court, it burned with great fury, but the firemen confined it to the one building.

29 April 1847. Got up this morning at 1/4 past 5, dressed and by 6 o'clock called up for Miss Kate Smith, according to appointment made last evening, to take a walk. She lives in 8th Street above Green. Found her up & waiting for me. We walked up to the house they have lately purchased and are about to occupy, in Washington Street above 11th. I went through the House with her which appears to be a very convenient one, got some flowers out of the garden, which, with a rose, she presented to me. Returned home with her by about 7 o'clock, and then went down home to breakfast, though not without having an invitation from her to breakfast.

At the office all day. In the evening my sister and self were unexpectedly invited to join Miss Ludlow and party to go to the circus. The party was composed of 9. We had a private box, & spent quite a pleasant evening though the entertainment was not very refined. In the course of the evening a foolish fellow attempted to drink 3 gallons of water, he drank 15 tumblers and gave out. It was well he did.

The piece played on the stage this evening was entitled Victory on Victory, a representation of several of our late battles in Mexico. Some parts of it quite amusing.

30 April 1847. In the evening went up to the Chestnut Street Theater with Frank Taylor and Harry Adams to see the opera of Masaniello or the Dumb Girl of Portici. I was very much pleased with this opera. The music in many parts is beautiful, with a number of beautiful songs. Behold! How Brightly Breaks the Morning is beautiful indeed, and sung with great effect by Mr. Frazier. The scenery in many parts very fine.

MAY

1 May 1847. We might hold a pleasant discourse how May came in upon us.

With sky and sunshine & with breeze and balms and dilate with unction upon the young flowers and green rolls of grass with which nature decked herself in honor of the fair and gentle May morning. There could be, too, a world of commentary of the enjoyment which found a changing but always fascinating expression in the faces of a bevy of youngsters who I saw laden with the triumphs of the season and of their explorations. It would be easy to do all this, and we should do right in so doing. But then it was only a May morning not a May day; and that defection from entire perfection must clip the words of praise and stunt the utterance of joyous feeling. The morning was gentle and sunny, with the balmy breath that comes laden with fragrance of swelling buds and tender leaves that venture timidly in their unfoldings into light and air - the afternoon was chilly enough to send us back in feeling a month or two, and cause serious thought of the blessing of the genial warmth of fire. But it was a blessing to have sunshine and a gentle breeze, that blessing did not depart when the ruder wind blew, and the clouds stretched upward from the horizon. All knew that a storm impended, and there was a general spirit of thankfulness for the promised boon. The farmer was gladdened in the prospect of his refreshed fields, and the citizen longed to feel the ground and the hard bricks beneath his feet made cool, the dust upon the streets subdued, and the parched aspect of the trees removed by the gentle influence of descended rain. The blessing was varied, but it was equally acceptable.

After tea, about 8 o'clock called up to see Mr. & Mrs. William H. Smith in Vine Street, below 3rd. Saw Mr. S. but not his lady. Smoked a cigar with him & left at about 1/2 past 9, went over to the oyster cellar at the corner of 3rd and Vine.

2 May 1847. We had a steady fall of rain until towards 4 p.m., which I have no doubt will do the country great benefit, as we have had no rain for nearly a month. I was at home during the morning & afternoon until about 3. I then called around to see Colonel Tucker and spent about an hour and a half with him. In the evening went to St. Andrew's Church.

3 May 1847. In the evening went up to the Museum with Lydia. This was the first night of its reopening. It has been closed for some time making preparations to play a new piece called the Crock of Gold. It is pretty good, rather on the tragic order. The farce played was The Loan of a Lover, very laughable.

4 May 1847. In the evening after tea took a walk and then returned to the House, went into the parlor and conversed with Mrs. Ludlow & daughter Anna. I found Anna to be much disappointed at not being able to go to the Museum. A short time after went up stairs with Welch to dress, to call upon the Misses Carter. When I mentioned Anne's disappointment to him and proposed taking her and her sister Elizabeth with my sister, he went down and invited them & they consented to go, got up there in good time. The house was not so much crowded as last night. The pieces announced were the Rock of Gold and the Omnibus. The former could not be played on account of the sudden illness of Mr. Johnson. The latter went off well, amid much laughter. The piece played in the stead of the Golden Crock was The Two Friends which was full of interest and admirably played.

5 May 1847. J.C. Welch moved his desk and took down his signs from the office today.

6 May 1847. Large numbers on the promenade. In the evening, according to engagement, met Samuel Bonnell, Jr. at the oyster saloon at the Odd Fellow's Hall. We went together to see Miss Kate Smith, called at the old house in 8th above Green but found they had partially moved and she with Miss Snyder were up at the new house in Washington Street above 11th to which place we wended our way. We had two tables of whist and a very pleasant time. About 9 o'clock Mr. Bonnell and I went down and ordered two quarts of ice cream to be sent up. This was the first night of the Smiths in the new House.

7 May 1847. In the evening called to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, who looked as pretty and was as agreeable as ever, but my visits I fear must be limited there. I am not the favored one.

8 May 1847. At 2 p.m. left Philadelphia on board the Steamer Trenton for Burlington. Met Mr. J.C. Welch on the wharf with whom I am to remain until Monday. We wended our way down the bank as far as the Hall, but were unable to see any of the young ladies. We felt a desire to go in and see the beautiful painted window which has lately been placed in the newly erected chapel connected with St. Mary's Hall. George Doane, son of the Bishop, came along just as we were expressing our desire to each other, and we asked of him to obtain the consent of his father to let us go in, which he very politely did. We obtained consent and then admission through the school, and met a number of the young ladies in the passages among whom was Miss Lizzie Davis. We were shown into the Chapel by Miss Lane, who was very polite, and exhibited to us the power and beauty of the organ by playing several pieces on it. The whole interior arrangement of the chapel is simple and neat in its appearance in the old English style of architecture. The window over the chancel is beautiful indeed. It has various emblems beautifully painted, with the words "Behold the Handmaid of the Lord" traced on a scroll extending over the window. The window was the gift of a single lady. After leaving the Chapel walked up into town. After tea Mr. Welch and I got a sail boat & sailed across the River & down by the Hall.

9 May 1847. Remained about the house until near 10, when J.C. Welch and I got a horse and vehicle and started out to see some of Welch's friends previous to his going to the West.

10 May 1847. 8 o'clock left Burlington on board the Steamer Trenton for Philadelphia.

11 May 1847. After tea went up to see Mad'lle Blaugy and Mr. Bouxany in the beautiful Ballet of La Sylphide. Mad'lle Vallee also performed in the ballet. The dancing was beautiful indeed, particularly that of Mad'lles Blaugy and Vallee. Dan Noddy's Secret was played, quite an amusing comedy. The last dance, a new Pas de Trois called Les Viennoise was a very beautiful affair and was greatly applauded & encored.

13 May 1847. At Chestnut and 9th Streets, at about 1 o'clock I saw quite a curiosity in the shape of a miniature carriage, belonging to "Tom Thumb," a dwarf now exhibiting in our City. It was the smallest thing of the kind I ever saw and complete in every respect. There were a pair of horses not over two and a half feet high. On the box a coachman, and behind a footman dressed in full livery, with white wigs, &c. It was presented to him, I believe, by the Queen of England.

In the evening went over to see Auber's celebrated Ballet opera, entitled Maid of Cachmere or Le Dieu et la Bayadere with Miss Elizabeth Ludlow & my sister. It was performed admirably to a large and fashionable house. The closing scene, where Zelica ascends with Brahma to the Indian heaven, was too beautiful for me to pretend to describe. The music throughout is elegant.

14 May 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening at 8 p.m. met Samuel Bonnell at the oyster Saloon at the Odd Fellow's Hall according to agreement and then went up to see Miss Kate Smith, who has now moved in Washington Street above 11th. We spent a very pleasant evening playing whist.

15 May 1847. I was turned out of my office the greater part of the morning on account of cleaning which I had not done until it was thoroughly wanted. About 1/2 past 6 went down to Thomas Auction store, to get the proceeds of sale of some goods. In the evening went up to the opera at the Chestnut Street Theater to see the Maid of Cachmere. It was well performed with the same cast as the night before. The dances were performed beautifully, though I thought they might have occasioned some blushes on the faces of some of the fair ones present. I was very unwell throughout the day, but feel much better this evening.

16 May 1847. In the morning before breakfast went over to the barbers. Got shaved. Went up to Grace Church with Ma & Lydia and Miss Ludlow. We concluded to call up and see Miss Hannah Burton who lives in Delaware 7th Street, 3 or 4 doors below Spring Garden. Found her at home looking quite pretty. This is only the 2nd time I have been in this lady's company, and have become very much pleased with her, she is gay and pleasing in her manners and quite pretty in her appearance. There is an openness & frankness in her manners that I like exceedingly. She has eyes that would charm anyone.

The Streets were crowded out as far as Schuylkill 4th Street. It was the fashionable promenade of a Sunday afternoon after church. About 8 o'clock went up to Mr. Edward Roberts'. Found the family all home but rather drowsy. Mr. Roberts slept nearly all evening (a great compliment to my company). Mrs. Roberts yawned, and when Anna was in the midst of a tremendous gap, I got up and left quite abruptly.

17 May 1847. Went up to Roberts' in 9th Street & spent the evening there until 10 o'clock, found them all at home. On my way home stopped in at Mrs. Harbacher's and got some ice cream & candy for Ma.

18 May 1847. In the evening about 12 past 8 called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke found her in and as agreeable as ever. She was not very well. Mr. Clarke was in the room the whole evening. Just as I was about leaving the Misses Patrullo's name was mentioned, when I remarked to Mrs. Clarke that I had met one of them on the Street a few days since when she "cut me dead" and asked whether she knew the cause of it. It appears that some mean person has been telling them some falsehoods of assertions that I had made about them. They were these that, at the Commencement a month or two since when I walked home with one of the Misses Petrullo, they had called me over to them, and some others of a like nature, which I asserted were all false, and informed Mrs. Clarke to tell them so. I know of nothing so mean as to circulate a false report of this kind. I should like very much to find out who started it.

19 May 1847. After tea went up to Odd Fellows' Oyster saloon where I met Mr. S. Bonnell, Jr. according to engagement to go up to Miss Kate Smith's to partake of an oyster supper with others given by Mr. Bonnell & myself, on a bet we lost with Mr. Redmund Cooper a week or two since. Mr. Bonnell and I furnished the oysters, viz., 4 doz. fried & 6 dozen stewed, and Miss Smith the trimmings - being some very fine coffee and flour cakes, bread & butter, pickles, &c. &c. Never do I remember sitting down to a finer supper. Left at about 1/2 past 11, and I waited upon Miss Burton, who, as I have before said, is very pretty & agreeable. I become more pleased with her every time we meet. We came across a serenading party (full band) in an alley running South from Vine below 6th, stood and heard them discourse some elegant music.

21 May 1847. In the evening went out with Lydia to spend the evening with Miss Mary Belangee in Green Street below 5th. Found her at home, and also her brother, spent the evening very pleasantly playing whist.

23 May 1847. During the evening had several very heavy showers of rain, one in particular about 1/2 past 9. This rain will do the country immense service, as it is now almost parched up, and vegetation is suffering much. In the morning went around to St. Mary's (Catholic) Church with Henry J. Felters. The music was very fine, they had the full orchestra of the Musical Fund Society. It being so exceedingly warm did not remain until it was out. Upon leaving the Church went home for a while and then walked up to St. Phillip's Church to see the people come out. Among them I saw Miss Clarke who as usual looked quite pretty. After which returned home where I remained until about 4 p.m. then went up to St. Andrew's Church & heard a very good sermon from a stranger. Noticed a few pews behind me a very pretty young lady I should like very much to know who she is. After Church returned home and in the evening went up to St. Phillip's Church with H. J. Felters. Mr. Neville gave us a delightful sermon. We sat in the pew before Miss Clarke's. I was much surprised at seeing her there on so unfavorable an evening, she had to walk home in the midst of the rain, I fear she will take cold. After Church had some little conversation with her, while waiting for the shower to subside.

24 May 1847. We had a glorious rain and plenty of it today, and through last night. The earth has drunk its fill, and the overplus has gone to replenish streams that had dwindled within their banks. Grass and trees revived and strengthened, look green and fresh again, and the air is balmy with the fragrance of flowers - pure too, for the dust has settled, and grateful, in its coolness to the senses. We think everyone should illuminate in honor of the rain. It is certainly most worthy of it. The blessing that cometh in the descending shower is inappreciable, and conquest and victories are as nothing to the gentle minister that sustains to maturity the means of life. The golden shower of Danae would be valueless in comparison to the storm we had today, and while I write I have a faint imagining of what a happy, contented set of beings the farmers must now be; and when they are happy and contented it means that the earth is giving or realizing promises of fruitfulness and abundance. The clouds have been lowering for several days in their gloomy appearance, not improperly a type of the gloomy anticipations which the drought has occasioned.

It grew lighter while the rain was descending, even as men's hearts rose in thankfulness for the blessing. When rain and storm clouds had passed off to their office elsewhere, and the earth was replenished, the sun burst forth over the City like the smile of the Creator rejoicing for the changed and glorious aspect of what lay beneath its diffused rays. From the darkness of the storm to the refulgence of the sun, it seemed like the transition from despair to hope, and men felt that they experienced some such change while the day was journeying its round. The evening was clear, warm, moonlight & delightful, being in sweet harmony with the latter part of the day.

At the office through the greater part of the day. About 6 p.m. called up to see the Misses Leeds, with J.C. Welch, he wishing to make his farewell call previous to leaving for the West. Found them both at home, also their mother. It is the first time I have seen them since the loss of their sister Josephine. Mrs. Leeds as well as the daughters appeared to be much depressed on account of their loss. In the evening at about 1/2 past 8 called up with Mr. Hays to see the Misses Atlee(14) at No. 8 Colonnade Row. I am to wait upon one of them as bridesmaid for Miss Caroline Davis, who Mr. Hays is to marry on the 8th of next month. As the rooms were rather dark I cannot remark as to the beauty of the Misses Atlee, though I can say they were very agreeable in their manners. Left at about 1/4 of 11, walked down as far as Guys & took some oysters & a cherry cobbler.

25 May 1847. In the evening met Mr. S. Bonnell at our usual meeting place, the Odd Fellow's Hall, at 8 o'clock. Then called up to see the Misses Leeds and found them at home and well. Left at 9 o'clock and called up to see Miss Kate Smith.

26 May 1847. About 25 m. of 9 called to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke. She was well but appeared to be very dull this evening, and had very little to say. Mr. Clarke was in the parlor during the time I was there. Met Mr. Dayton there and consequently I left quite early. It was about 25 minutes past 9.

27 May 1847. Went up to Mr. & Mrs. Ware's. Was invited up stairs into the front chamber, where I saw, for the first time, Mrs. Ware's 1st child, Mary Ware. They seem to think a great deal of it, & that there is none other like it.

29 May 1847. At the office through the greater part of the day until about 1/4 past 4 p.m. Then went down to the steamer John Stevens with J.C. Welch and at 1/2 past 4 started for Burlington. I took a walk down on the bank as far as Bishop Doane's, I wishing to see him on some business. He not being in, returned up the bank and called at J. Hunter Sterling to see Ma and sister who have been there since Thursday last. Remained about half an hour and then went down to see the Bishop again, leaving Mr. Welch to take a walk with my sister. Found the Bishop in, settled my business, and then went on up the bank.

30 May 1847. The change in the thermometer from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. was 25°, being 85° at the former and 60° at the latter named hour. A fire was quite comfortable at 1 p.m. White pants at 8 a.m.

31 May 1847. A cloudy, raw, damp, cold and disagreeable day, though I have no doubt this weather is hailed with pleasure by the farmer, as there has been so much dry weather of late that there was apprehension of scarcity of crops. The country from the effects of the late rains is now looking beautiful, and we may look for excellent crops during the ensuing season. Strawberries are now abundant in market, and have been for sale for the last week or 10 days though scarce. Green peas and other vegetables are Making their appearance.

At the office during the greater part of the day. After tea Mr. E.J. Maginnis and I went up with the Messrs. Felters to their room to play whist. Henry J. Felters and I were partners. We beat them two out of three games. After which we got to singing, while W.J. Felters played the violin, and kicking up a devil of a fuss until Miss Crim sent up word for us to be quiet. In a short time we adjourned. Bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

JUNE

1 June 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening about 1/2 past 7 called up to see Miss Atlee at No. 8 Colonnade Row. She is the lady I am to wait upon as bridesmaid, at Mr. Hays' wedding on this day week. I found her to be quite a pleasant, pretty and agreeable young lady, and spent a very social evening.

2 June 1847. A clear and delightful day, just such a one as was suitable for our picnic which came off to day. Yesterday we had serious apprehensions of unfavorable weather, but in the night it cleared off beautifully, and if we had our choice of all the days in the year, we could not have selected one more favorable. Different portions of the company were to meet at different points, ours was to meet at Dr. Huston's(15) at the corner of 11th and Girard.

After breakfast or about 8 o'clock Mr. E.J. Maginnis and I went up to Miss Huston's, where we found a number of ladies assembled in the parlor with some gentlemen. I introduced Mr. Maginnis to the ladies, and learned some of their arrangements. Then he and I went down to the steamer Trenton to meet my sister who was to accompany us on the picnic, and who we expected last night. We found her and Ma on board, and immediately went up home.

I left her there to change her dress &c., and Mr. Maginnis to wait upon her up to Miss Huston's. I went up first to detain the omnibus in case they had not gone, but was too late as they had left some 15 minutes before. When Mr. Maginnis and my sister came up, we thought it would be too late to overtake the omnibus, so took a chaise and drove directly out to the place where the picnic was to be held viz. "Eaglesfield"(16) about a mile from the wire bridge, above the dam. We arrived there nearly as soon as the omnibus.

The situation of the place is charming. It is very high and overlooks the Schuylkill for some distance both up and down. There are many shady walks which we did not fail to enjoy. The party was composed of between 50 and 60 ladies and gentlemen, being made up of two sociable parties who met last winter, and a number of invited guests. In the early part of the day I feared the day was not to be an agreeable one as the ladies had divided themselves into two parties, and seemed destined to remain so until the committee got up a dance. They gradually became more sociable, until they all seemed to become acquainted, and enjoyed themselves. The first thing after the ladies had made their toilet, after our arrival, was to take a ramble over the place. Then we returned to the House and danced until about 1, when dinner was announced. After that, the ladies retired for a while, then we again had dancing until about 6, when we had strawberries and cream, cakes, &c. in the greatest abundance. We then took a stroll down to the river. I had Miss Potts. Upon our return to the House had supper of coffee &c., then dancing, then ice creams, strawberries, &c., then a royal dance in which we had much fun until 10 o'clock.

I had several strolls in the course of the day, one with Miss Ellen Wilcox, which created some remarks. She and I went out and sat under a tree alone, in sight of the house. We remained there about half an hour, when we were joined by Mr. Maginnis, and afterwards by some other ladies and gentlemen when we all left and took a walk down towards the river. I left Mr. Maginnis in company with Miss Wilcox, and went up to the House, where we had some delightful flute and guitar music by Messrs. L. & Y.C. Huston and Whitmer on the flutes and Miss S. Whitmer on the guitar. Miss Penn-Gaskell,(17) I met some few years ago, but of late have not spoken to, towards the close of the day I spoke to and found her quite pleasant and agreeable. I think her quite pretty & very fine looking in her person. I danced twice with her, had a very delightful stroll on the porch, and sat next to her going home. I shall not forget the ride for a long while. I took a great fancy to her. She gave me a very polite invitation to call, which I shall certainly do.

The party left about 1/2 past 10, in 3 six horse omnibuses, after all having apparently spent a very delightful day. We got home about 1/2 past 11. Mr. Maginnis and I then went into a new house just opened last Saturday evening next door but one to our boarding house, in the house formerly owned and occupied by Kenderton Smith, & got two cherry cobblers & some cigars.

3 June 1847. At the office all day until about 6 p.m. when I went to my wash woman's at Schuylkill 8th and Race Streets.

4 June 1847. In the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater with Samuel Bonnell, Jr. and Henry J. Felters to see the Viennoises Danseuses. The entertainment commenced with the dance called "L'Allemande" which was a very chaste and beautiful affair. This was followed by the farce called Loan of a Lover, quite amusing and laughable. I have seen it several times before, thence the dance called Les Sauvages et le Minoir. This was the most beautiful and most astonishing dance I ever witnessed. It is performed in the following manner: A large piece of white gauze or crepe is placed on the stage in a frame so as to represent an immense looking glass. A part of the dancers perform on the front of the stage, while another party perform behind the gauze or crepe in complete harmony with those in front as to make the illusion complete. I never saw anything more beautiful. How they can have everything so completely arranged is impossible for me to comprehend. If one is standing by the edge of the glass, and places even her arm out it is reflected by one on the other side, the same as if before a real glass. The moving of every dancer before the glass is represented in every particular so that the illusion is complete. It is certainly well worth seeing. This dance was followed by the farce of the Two Thompsons quite an amusing and laughable affair, which was followed by the dance called La Tyolienne by 24 dancers which was, as were their other dances, quite beautiful. Next was the farce of a Pleasant Neighbor and the evening concluded with the beautiful dance called Le Gallop Des Drapeaux or the Great National Flag Dance in which the whole 48 dancers performed. One half were dressed in red, and the remainder in white each one bearing an American flag. Their maneuvers were beautiful indeed, and drew down much applause. In the last part there was a beautiful tableaux composed by the whole troop of dancers and flags, illuminated with blue & red lights, with the words America Victorious & Honor to the Brave.

5 June 1847. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. left for Burlington on board the Steamer Trenton to accompany Miss Atlee to Burlington and thence to Mr. Bullock's near Recklesstown about 15 minutes from Burlington. I am to wait upon her as a bridesmaid on Tuesday next. Arrived at Burlington about 1/2 past 3, met Mr. Hays on the wharf, and went up to the hotel where we remained about an hour. I was to have taken Miss Atlee out alone, but as I was not very well acquainted with the road, Mr. Hays concluded to go with us. After a pleasant ride of 2 hours and a half arrived at Mr. Bullock's.

6 June 1847. After breakfast took a walk with the ladies, Mr. Hays (of course) with Miss C. Davis and I with Miss Atlee. We had a delightful walk up over the hill back of the house and through the woods. We returned about 9 o'clock. From the top of the hill you have a beautiful view of the surrounding country, and of the whole of Mr. Bullock's Place which contains about 300 acres, and is one of the most beautifully located farms I ever met with.

I am very much pleased with Miss Atlee, as I find her to be a lady of much intelligence and of sound sense, and withal quite pretty and pleasing in her manners. We left Mr. Bullock's about 10 o'clock & drove down to Mr. Hay's father's place about 3 miles from Burlington by about 12 N. We had a delightful ride as the day was so clear, cool and pleasant. At Mr. Hays' saw his father & mother, 3 of his sisters, 3 other ladies & a gentleman whose names I do not remember.

At about 1/4 past 4 started for Philadelphia on board the steamer Sun. I cannot say we had the most select party in the world on board. We were two hours and a half before we were landed at the Chestnut Street wharf. I expected to have got in town by 1/2 past 6 or 1/4 of 7.

Upon my arrival went up home, got a little supper and then went up to Mr. Jones' in Chestnut above 8th to deliver a couple of letters, then down in Pine Street below 8th to call upon Miss Louisa M. Clarke, but found the family had not yet moved there. I then went around to the old house in Arch below 3rd. Found her in looking as pretty as ever, and spent a very pleasant evening.

7 June 1847. At the office during the greater part of the day until 1/2 past 4 p.m. when I left Philadelphia on board the John Stevens for Burlington where we arrived after a stoppage at Bristol, and pleasant trip at about 6 p.m. Met on board a Mr. Whitman on his way to Trenton, and Mr. Theodore Hart. Upon my arrival at the wharf met Mr. William Hays, whom I am to wait upon as groomsman tomorrow. He had a pair of horses and carriage in waiting and we drove out to his father's place first stopping at James H. Sterling's for me to leave a package for Mr. Sterling.

Employed myself during the greater part of the evening attending to some little matters for Mr. Hays. Up 20 m. of 6 a.m. and went over to the office, and was employed until breakfast time preparing cards to be sent out after Mr. Hays' wedding.

8 June 1847. Clear cool and pleasant all day and during the evening. Got up this morning at 1/4 of 7, dressed, and went down to breakfast. At about 1/2 past 8 Mr. Hays and I started in a two horse carriage, driven by a black driver, for Mr. William W. Bullock's about 2 miles from Recklesstown, where we arrived at about 1/2 past 10, after attending to several different matters. Went up into the dressing room to prepare the groom & myself in the way of dressing, for the anticipated nuptials.

About 1/2 past 11 Bishop G.W. Doane of Burlington arrived to perform the ceremony. I went down, received & introduced him, & then finished my toilet. At 12 o'clock, the company being in the parlor, together with the Bishop, the bridal party came down in the following order, viz., Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin W. Jones (who were married this day a week ago, his wife being the twin sister of the lady to be married today), Miss Eliza Atlee, and myself. Then came Mr. William H. Hays and Miss Caroline Davis, the pair to be united.

The ceremony was gone through in a very solemn manner, and both Mr. Hays and Miss Davis got through admirably. As soon as the congratulations were over, cake and wine were handed and at about 1 o'clock the company passed into an adjoining room where was placed a table well filled with all the delicacies of the season, including oysters fried & stewed, cold meats & fowls, chicken salad, champagne, wines, &c. Everyone seemed to do justice to the vittles, and the mirth and hilarity of the company ran high. Bishop Doane was very lively and seemed not to mind any jokes. He added much to the mirth of the company. A short time after the entertainment, I cut the bride's cake and had it handed around.

About 1/2 past 2, the ladies left the parlor to change their dresses and prepare for leaving. Mr. & Mrs. Hays and Mr. & Mrs. B.W. Jones are to leave for Niagara, Montreal, Quebec, &c. this afternoon. At about 1/4 past 4 the bridal party, that is Mr. & Mrs. Hays and Miss Eliza Atlee & I in one carriage, Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin W. Jones in another, followed by their bridesmaid driven by Mr. W. Bullock, their groomsman, with Mr. Henniss in our carriage, drove over to Bordentown and stopped at Kesters Hotel. At 1/4 of 6 left Bordentown for Trenton in the cars, where we arrived in about 15 minutes. In a short time the cars for Philadelphia came along, & the two brides and grooms left us to proceed on their journey. They go as far as Newark tonight. I hope they may have a pleasant trip, and a long life of pleasure.

After the cars started we took a walk down along by the cottages & returned in time to take the cars for Philadelphia which passed along about 1/4 past 7.

9 June 1847. In the evening at 8 p.m. met Mr. S. Bonnell, Jr. according to engagement at the "Odd Fellows' Hall." We then called up to see Miss Kate Smith in Washington Street above 11th but found she had gone to Reading on Monday last to spend the summer.

10 June 1847. At the office all day. In the evening about 8 o'clock called up to see Miss Eliza Atlee at No. 8 Colonnade Row. Found her with her bonnet on just about to go down to the Academy of Fine Arts with her father. Found her quite well and remained but a few minutes. Then called up to see Miss Elizabeth Penn-Gaskell in Schuylkill 5th Street West side, a few doors above Arch. I found her in looking quite pretty and fascinating. She was very agreeable and entertaining. She favored us with some beautiful songs, with guitar accompaniment, and some favorite airs on the piano, with singing. I think her a charming girl, and I do not remember when I spent an evening more agreeably. This was my first visit at the house, though I may say that I have known her for the last 3 years, though we have not spoken for the last year (for no particular cause) until we met at the picnic. I have taken a great fancy to her, and I think if my visits hereafter shall be as favorably received as that of to night, they will be more often.

I left about 1/4 past l0 though not without first having made an engagement to go to the Academy of Fine Arts tomorrow. On my way home met Mr. J. VanSciver at the corner of 9th & Chestnut. I stopped and talked with him some 15 minutes when Samuel Bonnell came along when he invited us to go up to Brooks in 8th above Cherry to take some ice cream.

11 June 1847. At the office all day and in the evening about 8 o'clock called up for Miss Elizabeth Penn-Gaskell to accompany her to the Academy of Fine Arts as per the engagement made last evening. On our way down we stopped at Miss Addie Brincklé, Miss Penn-Gaskell wishing to see her. It was proposed by Miss Penn-Gaskell that Miss Brincklé accompany us which after some little hesitation she consented to do. We did not get down to the Exhibition until after 9 o'clock. The display of paintings was very fine. It is said the finest that has ever been exhibited in the United States. The arrangements are beautiful.

Miss Brincklé remained with us but very little after entering the room as she met there the gentleman to whom she is engaged to be married, a Mr. Jonathan Bunker. He did not appear to be pleased with the idea of her being with me and so accompanied her home. I was not sorry as I preferred the exclusive company of Miss Penn-Gaskell. When we were about leaving found it raining but in a short time it stopped when Miss Penn-Gaskell and I went over to an Ice Cream store in Chestnut above 11th and got some ice cream.

Upon leaving the store we had scarcely got to 12th and Chestnut when it commenced raining and we were obliged to stop in the drug store at the corner. After it ceased, we returned to Addie Brincklé's to get an umbrella but it seemed they had retired as the only summons we got to ringing of the bell was to have someone poke their head out of the windows without saying a word. Upon noticing the stars were out we started home where we arrived safe without a ducking. Bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m.

12 June 1847. In the evening went up to the Academy of Fine Arts with Edward J. Maginnis and Henry J. Felters. There were but few persons there this evening.

13 June 1847. At St Phillip's Church in the morning with H.J. Felters. Sat in Dr. William Irwin's pew. Mr. Neville preached. After church took a walk. After dinner went to my room, took a nap until about 1/4 of 4, then got up & walked up as far as St. Phillip's Church, remained but a few minutes.a

14 June 1847. The weather today was very changeable. It was rainy and clear alternately throughout the day. We had one very heavy shower. In the morning it was quite warm, but towards night became very cold & blew tremendous hard, a fire would have been quite comfortable. At the office all day, until about 1/2 past 5, when I called upon Mr. Jonathan Wood to collect six months ground rent for Sally Ann Crim. He lives on Jefferson Street below Howard, Kensington, quite a long walk. Henry J. Felters accompanied me. We walked up there in half an hour & returned in same time. In the evening called up to see Miss Ellen Wilcox, but was unlucky enough to find her out. They said she was out of town. Then went down to the Academy of Fine Arts. Found quite a large company there.

15 June 1847. Clear, and quite cold for this season of the year. Thick winter clothes quite comfortable. At the office all day, very busy. In the evening went up with Ma and Lydia to spend the evening with Mr. & Mrs. Charles Leland. Spent quite a pleasant evening. Their twin daughters were in the parlor, though they had but little to say. They are quite pretty, one in particular. Left at about 1/4 past 10.

The Sons of Temperance had a great procession in the City today. I am told it was very long, though I did not see it, as I was very much engaged. I saw but a few of the divisions.

Mr. James Barr moved into my front office yesterday.

16 June 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening called up to see Miss Eliza Atlee, but did not find her in. Went in for a few minutes and saw her sister, Edith(18) , from there went up to see Miss Elizabeth Penn-Gaskell. Found her in and spent a very agreeable evening with her. She is a very pleasant young lady. Her father, aunt & some others were in the parlor during the early part of the evening but they soon left.

17 June 1847. In the evening called up to see the Misses Carter, found them in & well. Met some company there. There was one quite pretty young lady there, from Poughkeepsie, I think. We had one or two dances, & spent rather a pleasant evening. In the latter part of the evening the greater part of the company seemed to enjoy a kind of mock trial. They got up to try one of the gentlemen present, for running off with Mr. Carter's horse & carriage from Laurel Hill. It was not very interesting to me. Left at about 1/2 past 11.

18 June 1847. A clear and delightful though rather warm day and evening. A fine breeze was stirring throughout the day. Got up this morning at 1/4 past 6, went over to the office, attended to some little matters, and then went over to breakfast after which attended to some business. Then called up at Miss Louisa Wood's in Arch below 9th Street where I was to meet her and my sister. Accompanied them up to Miss Penn-Gaskell's in Schuylkill 5th above Arch, where the Omnibus started to convey us out to the picnic grounds at "Eaglesfield" on the Schuylkill River about a mile and a half above the wire bridge.

We found the omnibus nearly full of ladies, and waiting, so we started a few minutes afterward and drove over to Hamilton Village, where we met one of the other Omnibuses waiting for us. We remained for some 15 minutes waiting for a 3rd, but becoming tired the two omnibuses started. In going down Washington Street met the other coach when we all proceeded on our way to "Eaglesfield" where we arrived after quite a pleasant though rather dusty ride.

We had a party of young men in our coach who I think were not acquainted with the rules of common politeness. They were making a great noise all the way out & behaving in a very ungentlemanly manner. The day was passed principally in dancing, strolling about and some little boating. We had an eight oar barge and I was out twice during the afternoon rowing. The first time we had no ladies. Afterwards we took out Miss L. Wood and Miss E. Penn-Gaskell. Several other parties went out in the boat too.

The refreshments were very scarce and indifferent, but there appeared to be much complaint. I enjoyed myself pretty well, though not near so much as on the picnic of the 2nd Inst. We had considerable dancing in the evening and left at about 9 o'clock. I waited upon Miss L[ouisa] Wood(19) in, but was obliged to stand all the way until I got to Schuylkill 5th and Arch, owing to the ungentlemanly conduct of Tilfner and some others in not allowing me to sit down though there was room if they had chosen to make it for me. I got home about 1/2 past 11 very tired, and I think this will be the last picnic I shall go out on this season.

19 June 1847. In the evening at home. Sat in the entry with Maginnis & Adams. Mr. Adams was entertaining us with a very interesting conversation descriptive of a bull bait in South America which he had witnessed. About 9 o'clock went up to Ma's room. Old Flora was there spending the evening.

20 June 1847. Very warm and oppressive throughout the day. Went over to the office this morning about 10 o'clock and remained there until near 1, writing two letters, one to Mrs. James E. Welch, and the other to James C. Welch, the latter one nearly eight pages long. Then went down to the post office and from there home to dinner.

21 June 1847. At the office all day until about 1/4 past 4 p.m. then took a ride out with Dr. Elkinton to McDuffee Street west of Schuylkill 3rd to look at a property. From there went to Schuylkill 6th and Spruce to see Mr. Maul. Then returned to the office for a few minutes, and again started out with Dr. Elkinton and rode out to Phoenix Street above Front Kensington to look at another property. We returned to the Doctor's office about 6 p.m. where I left him and walked down to the office. Remained there a short time and then took a walk up Chestnut as far as Schuylkill 6th with William J. Felters. On our way up I left a letter for Miss Eliza Atlee which I had received from William H. Hays this afternoon. On our return saw Miss Atlee at the window. She came to the door and returned the letter. She looked quite pretty this afternoon. Returned home to tea about 1/4 past 7. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke in their new house. This was my first visit since their moving. The house is in Pine Street South side a few doors below 8th. Found Miss Clarke in looking quite as pretty and as agreeable as ever.

22 June 1847. At the office all day until about 6 p.m. then went over to the barbers and from there up to Roberts' in 9th Street to offer my services to do any thing for the family as Cousin Tacy(20) died this morning about 1/2 past 1. Her death was not looked for so soon but still expected. Her disease was consumption. She has been ill for a long while. My services not being required returned home.

23 June 1847. About 1/2 past 4 p.m. a procession of military passed my office as an escort to President James K. Polk(21) who arrived in the City from Washington this afternoon. He was in a carriage drawn by 4 horses. Judge John K. Kane(22) was in the same vehicle with him. The President is a man rather under the usual size and much older than I expected to see him. His hair is quite long and gray. His countenance was not very pleasing. The train of carriages that followed were numerous, and in them some distinguished personages. I noticed in one of the carriages Commodore Stewart(23) and General Patterson.

About 6 p.m. took a walk up to the Academy of Fine Arts with Henry J. Felters, there was but very few there. After tea went up to the Odd Fellows' Oyster Saloon where I found Samuel Bonnell, Jr. waiting for me according to engagement. We took cherry cobblers together and then called up to see Miss Hannah Burton(24) in 7th Street below Spring Garden, but did not find her in. Miss Smith has not yet returned from Reading, nor is she expected for some time. We had some idea of going down to hear the serenade given to the President at George M. Dallas'(25) where he is stopping, but feeling too much fatigued gave it out and went home. Ma made Lydia and me a present of a silver fork each today.

24 June 1847. At the office all day until about 6 p.m. then took walk up to the Academy of Fine Arts with Henry J. Felters, Jr. There not being many there, soon left. In the evening went up to the Academy again with Felters. It was reported that the President was to be there, and consequently there was a large audience, among whom were a number of pretty girls. I noticed one in particular, with dark eyes and hair, fine figure and dressed in black with a heavy worked lace shawl. She was very pretty, and I remember seeing her some weeks since at St. Andrew's Church, when our notice of each other seemed to be mutual. It was the same this evening. After the Exhibition was over Bonnell, Maginnis and I (Felters having got separated from us) walked.

Cousin Tacy was buried today at Merion.(26) Ma went to the funeral but I did not, as I could not leave my office.

25 June 1847. About 1/4 past 5 Samuel Bonnell called for me went over to Cooper's point and took a swim, it was the first one I have had this season in the river. Found the tide quite low and water rather muddy, but the temperature of the water quite pleasant. Met some others over there. After tea called up to see Miss Elizabeth Penn-Gaskell, found her in and well and looking as pretty as ever. I met three gentlemen there, viz. Messrs. Craig, Boyd and one whose name I do not remember. Messrs. Craig and Boyd left a few minutes after I came. Miss Farnum came in shortly afterwards. I remained but half an hour, leaving at 1/4 past 9. It was but little pleasure for me to sit while so many were there. After leaving went down to the Academy of Fine Arts. There were very few there, though among whom I met Miss Eliza Atlee. I had some little conversation with her.

26 June 1847. The warmest day we have had this season. At the office during the morning. At 2 o'clock p.m. left Arch Street wharf on board of the steamer Barclay in company with Ma and Lydia for "Franklin Park" on the Rancocas Creek about 9 miles from its mouth. The trip up was exceedingly unpleasant, as the weather was excessively warm, the boat small and crowded with passengers baskets, boxes, cattle, &c. We were nearly two hours and a half before we reached the object of our destination. I do not think I shall favor this line again very soon. We found a carriage waiting for us on the wharf which conveyed us up to the house, which is a delightful spot. The location is high, and very shady. Soon found it to be very cool and pleasant. Spent the time until supper was ready laying about on the grass, part of the time in conversation with Dr. Bache and Messrs. Thomas Fay and Thomas Miles, boarders at the House.

We had a very nice plain supper, good coffee, bread & butter, &c. Every thing neat & clean. After supper took a walk down in the garden with Ma and Lydia, then returned to the House, and then went out into a field adjoining the house, where I found several of the ladies belonging to the house & some of the gentlemen - Messrs. Fay & Miles were playing quoits. I was much amused at Mr. F. while playing. He has very singular manners. I took a couple of games with Mr. Miles, afterwards in one of which I beat him. I do not suppose I have pitched a quoit for the last 3 or 4 years.

27 June 1847. Clear and excessively warm all day and during the evening which was moonlight. Got up this morning at about 1/2 past 5, dressed and took a walk down to the creek, returned, and in about 3/4 of an hour got breakfast, which, as the supper last night, was served up in good plain and substantial style. About 9 o'clock I started and walked over to Burlington, distance 5 miles. The walk was rather pleasant than otherwise though at times rather warm. A large portion of the way was shady. I accomplished it in an hour and a quarter. I got to Burlington just as persons were going to Church. Went down to the Hotel and waited until the boat came over. Met Hugh Nesbit in the bar room. Went over to Bristol. Started for the City about 1/4 of 1. Got up to the House just in time to be late for dinner.

About 7 p.m. called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, to ask her to go to Church, but the evening being so oppressive concluded not to go. I spent a very pleasant evening in her company, she looked more fascinating than ever this evening. I fear I shall not be able to abstain from visiting, as she is really a charming lady. We were sitting for some time during the evening on the veranda back of the House where we had a full view of the moon in all her grandeur.

29 June 1847. In the evening at home until about 20 minutes past 8 when Henry J. Felters and I went up to the Arch Street Theater to see the Ravel family. They performed some astonishing feats in tight rope dancing. Gabriel Ravel, who performed the astonishing walking or rather jumping across the stage on a single pole l5 feet high, balancing himself at the top of it. The Classic Grouping was something very fine, the groups seemed really to be made of marble. The Pantomime was very amusing.

30 June 1847. Tuesday's welcome shower continued its kindly outpourings until this morning, and so long that it wept every tear out of the blue eyes of the sky, and the face of Heaven today was as pure and bright, in its eternal youth, as the young aspect of human love. The rain fell upon the spirits, as if a champagne fountain had suddenly burst forth into the air, exhaled a sparkling influence, which refreshed the heart and wreathed the brain with pleasant fancies.

About 1/2 past 7 p.m. S. Bonnell, Jr. called for me, and I went up with him to his house to change his dress. We called on the Misses Leeds. On our way home stopped at the Odd Fellows' Oyster saloon & to get something to eat. We had a wedding party from our house this morning: Mr. Coleman to Miss Love. He a widower, and she approaching an old maid. They were married at Boardman's Church at the corner of 12th & Walnut & started for Niagara this morning. I had an invitation but did not go. Both are from Virginia.

JULY

1 July 1847. In the evening took a long walk with Henry J. Felters into the upper end of Hamilton Village, returned at about 1/2 past 10. On our way home went around by Mrs. Harbacher's in 8th below Arch and got some ice cream.

I received through Mrs. Welch, today, the melancholy intelligence of the death of my friend William H. Hays of Burlington. But little over three weeks ago I was groomsman at his wedding, and now he is no more. O! how it pains me to think of it, what must his late bride, now widow, suffer. Surely "in the midst of life we are in death." His sickness was of but short duration, I believe only three days. He died yesterday at Saratoga Springs. He had been to Niagara Falls, Montreal & Quebec & was returning by way of Saratoga, when death caught him in his iron grasp. It seems that I cannot realize it, to think but three short weeks ago, we saw him with his bride start for a merry party, and now numbered with the dead. I will say no more, It grieves me too much to think of this melancholy subject. Tomorrow I shall pay the last tribute of respect to his remains by attending his funeral. A wedding, a funeral, in three weeks. Oh, do not think of it.

2 July 1847. Got up this morning at 1/4 of 6 & went over to the office attended to some business until 1/2 past 8, then called down to see Mr. S. Bonnell, Jr. and from there went down to the Steamer John Stevens to start for Burlington to attend the funeral of my late dear friend William H. Hays. Met on board Miss Eliza Atlee, who I was to accompany up. How different this meeting to go to Burlington from the one but little over 3 weeks since, then to attend the bridal ceremony of our departed friend, now to attend his funeral ceremony.

Upon arrival at Burlington, got a carriage and drove out to Mr. Hays' father's, with Miss Atlee. Saw Mrs. Dewees and remained but a few minutes and then drove over to Burlington again and from there over to "Franklin Park" to see Ma and sister. The ride was delightful and I got over there about 20 m. past 12. They were both very much surprised to see me. I got some bread and milk and remained but about half an hour, and then drove over to Mr. Hays' again via Burlington. There were a large number then there. I was invited up into the room of the family and appointed to wait upon Miss Amanda Hays. In a few minutes afterwards the family went down to take leave of the corpse. Never do I remember a more distressing scene, it seemed they could not leave it, the young wife hung over the corpse of her loved one and kissed the cold yet unconscious brow, his dear sisters seemed as if they could not be consoled, hung over his cold body and kissed his cold forehead, while his parents stood leaning over their dear departed one with deep anguish depicted on their countenance. It seemed as if his sisters at times would become deranged so hard did they receive their bereavement. I pity the late bride, now widow, to my inmost soul. She appeared to have almost lost her senses, though no outward signs of grief were visible. She sat like a statue with her eyes closed, and hands clasped, without shedding a tear. But who can imagine her feelings, who can tell the deep anguish then in her soul. A bride, a widow, all in the space of less than four short weeks. Her cup of joy soon flowed out and cast her from him whom she loved. O God grant she may be strengthened in her deep affliction.

Mr. Hays' funeral was very large and respectable. It was attended by the company of soldiers of which he was the late captain, and also by the Order of Odd Fellows of which he was a member. He was buried in the family burying ground about half a mile above the House. We returned from the funeral about 1/2 past 4, when I immediately drove into Burlington with Miss Atlee in time for the steamer Sun. We left the wharf at about 1/2 past 5, and arrived in town by a few minutes after 7. I walked up as far as the Exchange and, and at her request, put her in an Omnibus to go up home. She met a friend there so it was useless for me to go up further with her. About 8 o'clock Mr. S. Bonnell, Jr. called for me & we walked up by Miss Burton's, and invited her to go up to see Miss Louisa Snyder with us. She acceded, went up and found Miss Snyder in.

3 July 1847. 1/4 of 9 stopped down for Samuel Bonnell, Jr. when he and I went down to the Steamer John Stevens and at 9 o'clock started for New York. Had a very large number of passengers on board, & consequently much detention. There were fourteen eight wheeled cars in the train, all filled. Did not arrive in New York until 1/2 past 3.

Upon arrival went up immediately to Mrs. Robeson's, No. 96 Liberty Street below Broadway, where we took board. She appears to be a very pleasant lady, and gave us a very fine room in the second floor back. In a short time dinner was prepared which we did justice to. Afterwards went up to our rooms, dressed, and then walked up Chatham Street above Broadway where we took one of the Astoria & Yorkville omnibuses. Rode up the 3rd Avenue to 81 Street to see Miss A. Matilda Clark, daughter of ex-Mayor Clark. Found her at home and quite agreeable. She is rather a pretty girl and has a pair of eyes with considerable meaning. They have a very delightful residence quite out of town. Saw Mr. Clark who was quite pleasant. The distance is about 4 miles from the City Hall, for which the charge was only a sixpence.

We strolled up Broadway where there were a large concourse of people, and stopped in several of the oyster saloons among which was "Florence's New Saloon," a splendid affair. On our way down stopped in "Gothic Hall Bowling Saloon" in Broadway. This is one of the most beautiful affairs of the kind I have ever witnessed. The room is fitted up in superb style, with 9 alleys. The greater number of our party commenced bowling, we remained there for some time when, feeling fatigued, concluded to go home. Got some very fine ice cream on our way down.

4 July 1847. Got up this morning about 6 o'clock, dressed and went out & got a shave in a very splendid establishment in Broadway, fitted up with velvet lounges, chairs, &c., &c. After breakfast at about 8 o'clock went up to the Park and got into one of Harlem cars and rode up as far as Grace Church. This is a splendid structure of light stone. I think it handsomer than "Trinity Church." Were not able to get on the inside. From there went down to the foot of Hamilton Street to start at 9 1/4 o'clock in the Steamer Gazelle for Fort Hamilton with the expectations of being the first boat down, but instead of being the first we were the last boat down, on account of foolish delays.

Walked up to the residence of Captain Paul A. Oliver,(27) an Uncle of Mr. Bonnell's, a distance about half a mile. He has a delightful high and cool situation, directly on the Bay. We were invited into the parlor where we sat conversing until about 1/4 past 3 when dinner was announced, finished off with some good wine at about 1/2 Past 4. We had some very fine black cake all the way from New Orleans. It was a wedding cake of their son Washington, recently married. Shortly after dinner Sam and I left to go to the boat, though not without first having a pressing invitation to remain & and to call again. The boat started just before we got down, therefore concluded to walk down through Fort Hamilton. It is a very fine and substantial place, but rather out of repair and very little order observed. From the walls there are some fine views. Upon leaving the Fort went up to the Hamilton House, a fine large Hotel, where a large number of boarders put up during the summer season. Returned to New York by 8 o'clock, and went up to Florence's Oyster Saloon and got supper. After which took a stroll up Broadway where we found a large concourse of people. We then called on Mr. Schlesinger in White Street below Broadway, quite a pleasant German gentleman.

5 July 1847. Got up this morning about 6 o'clock when Mr. Bonnell and I went out to take a walk. Went down towards the North River, and then at the foot of Barclay Street saw that the Troy boat was just about starting, when we concluded to take a trip up the North River as far as West Point. Arrived at the Point about 1/4 of 11 o'clock. We then went up to the Hotel where we found quite a large number of visitors, then took a walk around the grounds, first visited Kosciusko Monument, then some of the buildings connected with the Institution, not excepting the Barracks. After which took a walk up to the ruins of Old Fort Putnam, in the Mountain back of the Plain. The walk is tiresome and tedious, but one is fully repaid for his labors by the beautiful view obtained of the Hudson River as it takes its course through the highlands, with various other beauties of nature.

Upon our return to the Plain saw one company of the cadets in full dress marching into camp. They had a magnificent band of music which is connected with the Point. The cadets are now encamped out. Returned to the Hotel, and took a seat on the Northern porch of the Hotel from which you have a full view of the Highlands, and Newburg in the distance. The boat (Niagara) came along about 1/2 past 12 and we took passage for New York, where we arrived after a delightful trip down the picturesque river. Then went down to Pier No. 1 for the purpose of taking the 4 o'clock boat to Fort Hamilton but on account of some delay she did not come, so we gave up the idea of going down. We then returned to our boarding house, washed and dressed, and went out and took a little walk up Broadway returning in time for tea. After which went up into Dr. Clarke's room (2nd story front) where we had considerable sport setting off fire crackers, lighting them and throwing them into the street. We lit several packs and threw them into the street; others we tied to a long pole and held it out of the window, allowing them to drop and crack as they burnt off. All law and order seems to be put aside in New York in celebrating the 4th of July. Everyone does as he pleases. You could scarcely walk 20 yards without having a pack of crackers thrown under your feet, and every little shaver that can get a pistol with some little powder is loading and firing at random while others were loading and firing guns at pleasure.

About 8 o'clock Bonnell, Mr. Robeson, Dr. and I went up to the Park to see the fire works prepared under the direction of the City council. It was a very beautiful display. Rockets of every kind were set off from the top of the City Hall, while many were set off from the Park by the boys, others from the top of the "Astor House," "American Hotel," Museum, &c. After the fire works were over went up to "Ryle's Hotel," the bar room of which is a perfect museum. The Dr. having left us, got a cherry cobbler, and remained there until about 1/2 past 10. In going down Broadway it was hardly possible to get along for the crackers thrown at your feet and you could scarcely hear anything other than the continuous crack, crack, crack of the crackers and the report of guns, pistols, &c. Surely this New York is a great place to spend the glorious 4th.

6 July 1847. After breakfast went down to Pier No.1 North River having some idea of going down to Fort Hamilton again, but the boat not being there concluded to go on to Philadelphia at 9.

While down at the pier went on board of the Steamer Origin (?) which is certainly a very magnificent boat. Her accommodations are very fine, and the cabins and state rooms fitted up in superb style. After leaving this boat went up to our boarding house, got our valises, and went down to the ferry. At 9 o'clock started in an immense crowd for Philadelphia. Had considerable difficulty in getting into the car house, and of obtaining a seat, but when I did obtain my seat I was well satisfied, as it was by the side of a very beautiful young lady, with whom I had some conversation. She however left at New Brunswick.

Among the passengers we had the President of the United States, James K. Polk,(28) Mr. Buchanan(29) , Benjamin Stewart and other distinguished persons. They caused much delay in getting through, as the President was obliged to make several addresses at different points. He and his suite left at Trenton. I was in the same car with him, and it was very amusing to see the eager faces peering through the windows exclaiming, "Where is he?", "Which is him?", while some of them would have their faces within a short distance & looking him directly in the face while asking the question. Did not arrive in Philadelphia until after 3 o'clock. We had 11 eight wheeled cars all full, & some with great rowdies.

In the evening called up to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke. I did not find her in she having gone to Trenton on Friday last.

8 July 1847. At the office all day and in the evening about 8 o'clock called up to see Miss Eliza Atlee found her in and quite as agreeable as ever. About 20 m. of 9 left and called up to see Miss Lizzie Penn-Gaskell not finding her in.

9 July 1847. At the office all day until about 1/4 of 6 p.m., then took a walk up to the Academy of Fine Arts with Henry J. Felters. Found quite a number there. Remained a short time and then went up to D.C. Lockwood's,(30) No. 10 Cherry Street above Schuylkill 8th, to pay a tax bill. I called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke found her in and as well as usual. Spent a pleasant evening.

10 July 1847. About 1/4 past 4 went down to the 1st wharf below Chestnut Street with Henry J. Felters and about 5 p.m. started on board of the steamer Stranger for Gloucester point. Upon our arrival, which was about 1/2 past 5, took a walk through some of the gardens, took some ice cream and then called up to see Dr. Burr, an old acquaintance who has settled, built a house, and is practicing here. About 8 o'clock Mr. H.J. Felters and I went up to the Academy of Fine Arts. The rooms were rather full, this is the last evening of the exhibition. Went home took a shower bath & then to bed.

11 July 1847. At 9 o'clock this morning Mr. E.J. Maginnis, Mr. H.J. Felters and I started on board of the steamer John Stevens for Burlington. Upon our arrival went up around by the Church, saw the young ladies of St. Mary's Hall going in, among whom was Miss Anna Redfield looking as pretty as ever. We then started to walk over to "Franklin Park" distance about 4 1/2 miles. Found the walk very warm. Got over there about 12 o'clock, took a wash and then went into the House, where we found Ma and Lydia quite well. Then went out and took a seat under the trees until dinner time. Had a very good plain dinner, after which went out under the trees again but it soon came on to rain, so we adjourned to the house. After the rain was over, or about 1/2 past 4, Mr. Felters and I took a walk down to the creek for the purpose of getting the boat to row over to the other House. Found it full of water & consequently could not go, then returned home.

After tea Miss Louisa Kerr (quite a pretty and agreeable young girl), my sister, Messrs. Maginnis & Felters & myself took a walk down to the creek, where we met Lehman,(31) Edward(32) & Sydney Roberts, with others just coming over in a boat which we borrowed and took the ladies out rowing. Went over to the other house and then returned, it becoming quite damp.

12 July 1847. Got up this morning at 1/2 past 3, and at 4 a. m. Messrs. E.J. Maginnis, H.J. Felters, Burk of New York, and myself started for Burlington. At the office all day. Went home stopping to get some ice cream on our way. Took a shower bath before going to bed.

13 July 1847. Clear and excessively warm until after the sun went down when a thunder storm rose up in the East, and drawing a huge mottled blanket over his shoulders, strode over the City with a watering pot in one hand, and fire works in the other. The air grew strong in thankfulness, and the panting City breathed freer and deeper.

At the office all day and in the evening called down to see Miss Louisa Clarke, found her in and well. Saw Mrs. Clarke. Mr. James Dayton came in soon after I did, and I left about 20 m. of 10.

14 July 1847. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. started for Burlington by steamer Trenton. Found a large number of passengers on the boat. Arrived there about 20 m. past 3, hired a sail boat, and started to go up to Mr. Hays. On account of but little wind, and having to tack, did not get up there until about 20 m. past 5. Went up to the house and saw all of the family with the exception of Mrs. Hays (the widow). I intended starting back in a short time but they insisted on my staying to tea. It was 1/2 past 6 when I started for Burlington. I did not get down until it was too late to go down in the John Stevens as was my intention. Finding myself left, called up to see Mrs. Welch and daughter, found them in and well. I remained but a short time as they wished to go to a prayer meeting, though they first invited me to remain through the night, which I accepted.

15 July 1847. At 1/2 past 7 started on board of the steamer Trenton for Philadelphia. In the evening went up to the Odd Fellows' oyster saloon where I met S. Bonnell, Jr. and we both called up to see the Misses Leeds. On my way home stopped in Chestnut above 5th and got some oysters and a porter.

16 July 1847. At the office through the greater part of the day until 1/2 past 4 p.m. then left on board of the steamer John Stevens for Burlington, in company with Henry J. Felters. Had a very pleasant sail up. Upon arrival at Burlington got a sail boat & went out on the river, but finding no wind of any account, returned and got a row boat and went down to just below the Bishop's. Saw some of the ladies of the school on the banks. Returned in time for the Stevens.

17 July 1847. Got up this morning at 1/2 past 5 dressed and walked up to my wash woman's in Race Street above Schuylkill 8th Street and returned in time for breakfast. In the evening went up to the Chestnut Street Theater with Henry J. Felters to see the Virginia Serenaders, a band of Negro, say singers, great humbugs. They attempted to play a burlesque on the opera Safo called Stuffo. It was very appropriately named, as it was one of the greatest humbugs I ever witnessed.

18 July 1847. At St. Phillip's Church this morning. Robert Parvin preached. He was an old associate of mine. It was the first sermon I ever heard him preach. Thought it was pretty good. Sat in Miss Clarke's pew & walked home as far as 8th and Walnut Street with the two boys Graham & William.

19 July 1847. The heat of today was really dreadful. The thermometer measured variously at various places, as it always does, but I believe a fair average would show 96° or 97° Fahrenheit. In the evening about 8 o'clock called up at the Odd Fellows' Hall where I met S. Bonnell, Jr. and we called up together to see Miss Louisa Snyder.

20 July 1847. At 1/4 past 4 started for Burlington. Took a walk down along the banks as far as the Bishop's. Saw a number of the young ladies from the school on the bank. At 1/4 of 8 left for the City.

21 July 1847. In the evening went up to the Italian opera to hear La Somnambula. I never heard it performed so well. The singers were all in excellent voice, and bouquets in plenty were thrown on the stage. There were seven from our house there.

22 July 1847. Clear and very warm until about 6 p.m. when it clouded up very heavily, and we had a heavy shower of rain. The rain lasted during all the evening. We had considerable lightning, and one very sharp flash and tremendous heavy clap of thunder which frightened me considerably. I was walking along 5th Street above Walnut with Henry J. Felters.

At the Office all day until about 1/2 past 4 p.m. when the Messrs. Felters, Freeman, and I walked down to the Navy Yard to see the Steamer Princeton as she is to sail for the Mediterranean tomorrow. Were not able to get on board, though Mr. Freeman succeeded and left his company. We then went up home stopping in to see Dick Christiani on our road up. In the evening at home until about 8 o'clock, then over to the barbers, and then to my office.

24 July 1847. Cloudy early in the morning with the appearance of rain, about 12 N. cleared off warm. Evening clear and moonlight.

Got up this morning at 4 o'clock and at 5 a.m. left in company with Henry J. Felters for Burlington N.J. Arrived there a few minutes after 6, then went down to Mr. Holt's Hotel and got breakfast. At 7 o'clock started for "Franklin Park" to sail down to the mouth of the Rancocas Creek, and then up the Creek in a boat I wished to take around to keep while boarding. We found it a very laborious undertaking, and I never did get so tired of anything in my life. We did not arrive at "Franklin Park" wharf until 1/2 past 5 p.m., though the distance was only 14 or 15 miles. The delay was occasioned by head wind and tide nearly the whole distance. Upon arrival saw Ma. Then dressed and got tea, after which had a delightful sail on the creek, then returned home went into the ball room where they were dancing.

25 July 1847. Little after 7 got breakfast, after which Henry J. Felters walked with me down to the creek. Finding a fine breeze blowing, got our sail and boat and went out on the creek sailing. Went down for about a mile and then beat up, as far as where Mrs. Reiford and the Roberts' are boarding ("Borton's House"). Went ashore, saw Mrs. Reiford & remained about 15 minutes, then started out on the creek again taking with us Sydney Roberts. We sailed about for some time and then went over to our wharf. After dinner remained about the place in the orchard, &c. until about 4 o'clock then went up stairs into our room & took a nap getting up in time for tea. After tea Mr. Felters, Mr. William Taggart and myself went down to the creek, got my boat and rowed up some distance. On our return had quite an exciting race with Roberts & others in their boat called the Rainbow, we having the satisfaction of beating.

26 July 1847. Ma and I in company with five or six others from "Franklin Park," started this morning at about 1/4 of 8 for Philadelphia in the steamer Barclay where we arrived at about 10 o'clock. Mr. H.J. Felters also went down with us under whose charge I put Ma on our arrival at the City. I went up to see the Messrs. Roberts on some business after which went around to Miss Crim's where I saw Ma, then went over to the office where I remained until about 1 p.m. Then up to "Hammonds" at corner of Market & Decatur & got dinner. At 2 p.m. left Philadelphia again for "Franklin Park" on board the Barclay, where I arrived at about 4 p.m. In the evening Miss L. Whitmer, Mrs. Thomas Fay, sister & myself had a game of whist, the two first named were our opponents, we beat 3 out of 4 games.

27 July 1847. After breakfast Mr. Thomas J. Niles and myself took my pistols and practiced firing at a mark for a while, but becoming tired, concluded going sailing. Mr. William Taggart & Mr. Miles accompanied me. We had a very fine breeze though very heavy and foggy at times. We beat down nearly to Bridgeboro, when the tide turned to go up and we had to return.

Got up to the house in time for dinner after which I went up stairs and took a nap and slept until about 4, then started down to the boat, but on my way met the wagon coming up. Found Ma had not come up. We received a letter saying she intends staying two or three days. I then returned to the house and read the papers of today until tea time, after which Miss Louisa Kerr, Miss Taylor, my sister, Messrs. Taggart & 2 Harknesses and myself went down to the creek and I took them out rowing in my boat. We had a delightful row up the creek, nearly up to Centerton, and then returned as far as "Borton's House" or "Rancocas Springs," as he calls his house, & went on shore. Went up to the house and had considerable sport in dancing through the evening. I danced twice.

28 July 1847. Clear, cool and very pleasant all day. The change in the weather is very great. The thermometer dropped 28° between the hours of 2 p.m. on Monday last, and 4 a.m. the next morning.

After breakfast Messrs. Thomas J. Miles, William Taggart, Harkness & myself got my boat & sailed some distance down the creek to fish. Met with but little success and returned home by about 1/2 past 12. At 1 p.m. got dinner after which took a walk down to the creek with Mr. Burk and laid there until about 10 m. of 4, when Ma came up. I remained waiting some time with her for Mr. Buzby to send the carriage down after her. Some of the boys coming with my sail boat, went out to take a sail with W. Taggart, but not finding enough wind concluded to wash her out which the boys did. In the evening all the boarders came over from the other house and we had quite a merry dance.

29 July 1847. Got up this morning at 6 o'clock, got breakfast and shortly afterwards Miss Louisa Kerr, my sister, William Taggart & myself took a walk down to the creek. Got my boat, and then took a row up to Centerton. Upon our arrival walked up through the town and up into some woods where we sat for about 3/4 of an hour making wreaths. Then we returned to our boat and rowed down to our wharf again when the ladies went up home. Shortly afterwards went up to the old woman's on the bank, and got some cakes and milk while sitting there. After dinner William Taggart, Charles Harkness and myself went down and got my boat and went out sail. First went down the creek before the wind. It blew so hard that it threw our sail all out of place so we had to go on shore and reef. When we beat up the creek as far as Centerton, went on shore, and got something to drink. Got my boot mended and then returned home to tea. In the evening playing whist. Not feeling very well I went to bed.

30 July 1847. After breakfast took a walk up to the village of Rancocas, distance about a mile, with William Taggart to make some few purchases. Hired a horse and carriage there and then drove back to the "Park" where I took Miss Louisa Kerr, Miss Whitmer & my sister in. Then drove over to Burlington. I put them out at Mr. Woolman's store, then drove down to Mr. Welch's and got my gun, &c. Then I drove out to Mr. Hays to see the family. After tea read until dark, then went into the ball room where some of the ladies and gentlemen were dancing. Then up stairs into "Stag Hall" where a lot of the boys were singing "Niger Soup."

31 July 1847. After breakfast Mr. William Taggart and myself went out gunning, but not finding much to shoot went down to the river and got my sail boat. Had a pretty good breeze and went up to Centerton and back twice. Upon our return went up to the old woman's in the bank, and got some bread & butter and milk. Then went up home, cleared our guns and then dressed for dinner. After dinner went up in "Stag Hall" for a few minutes. After supper went boating, and as far as "Borton's" to try to pursue some of the ladies, with the gentlemen, to come over to our house & have a dance, but they would not. However some of the gentlemen came over. I walked up home with Miss L. Kerr, who I find to be quite a pretty and agreeable young lady. I daily become more pleased with her. In the evening played whist. I was very much surprised while playing to see Mr. S. Bonnell, Jr. come in. He walked over from Burlington, I expected him up at 2.

AUGUST

1 August 1847. After breakfast this morning Mr. S. Bonnell, Jr. and myself went down to the creek. Finding a good breeze, I put [the] sail in my boat, and started for Bridgeborough, distance about 4 miles. Went down in fine style, and arrived there in little over half an hour. Upon our arrival started to go out to the Negro camp meeting ground, but it was coming on to rain, so we returned to the hotel, a rickety old place, where we remained about an hour and a half until the rain abated. We started for home with a head tide & a laying breeze, and made it up the River about a mile, when we were obliged to take shelter under an old tree for half an hour. We again started, and met the same fate. This time we took refuge in an old log cabin, first obliging a number of hogs to evacuate the premises. Were obliged to wade through the mud six inches deep some distance before we could gain the shelter, and then were obliged to remain two hours, before starting. Then in a few minutes after to meet the same fate! Mr. Bonnell got out and towed the boat for some distance, then I took the oars and rowed just in time to escape a heavy shower. Took refuge under a cart but the rain was coming on too hard. Ran up to a house where we got shelter until the rain ceased. Upon leaving this place the sail of the boat caught under the float opposite the house, and in endeavoring to extricate it, came very near to pitching in head foremost. I got both arms in the water, and caught the boat, which being on one side, filled. We pulled her up on the float, upset her, put in the sail again & started up the creek but the rain came on again. Again we put into another house where we found them very kind. Went into their kitchen to the fire, where we partially dried our clothes, and then started for home, the rain having ceased. It was blowing pretty fresh, succeeded in getting up in a very short time, it then being about 4 o'clock p.m. I never thought to experience such a trouble in getting up the creek again. I was nearly out of patience a couple of times. Upon our arrival went up home and dressed for supper, which we did ample justice to when ready, as we had not eaten anything since breakfast time.

2 August 1847. Clear and pleasant all day. Got up at 20 m. past 6 a.m., dressed and went down to breakfast, after which went down to the boat, and at about 8 o'clock started for the City, with quite a company from our house, some of whom were: Mr. & Mrs. Brown, Mrs. Brown's mother, Mr. Kerr, Jr., Mrs. Kerr, Mr. & Mrs. Mitchell & child, & Mr. Miles. Arrived in the City a few minutes before 10. Went up to the office and remained there a short time. I went up to Mrs. Ford's in Race above Schuylkill 8th to leave my dirty clothes. At 2 p.m. left for "Franklin Park" again.

3 August 1847. Got my sailboat and went up the creek as far as Borton's. Went on shore and then up to the house and afterwards went and took a seat on a bench under some trees where we found Miss Louisa Kerr and my sister. Sat there for about an hour, smoked a cigar, &c. Miss Kerr also joined us in smoking, she got through a whole cigar. After dinner went up to Rancocas village to try and get a carriage to take a ride but was unsuccessful. Returned home about 3 o'clock and went up to my room and took a nap until near 5, though dreadfully plagued with flies. Evening about the house smoking cigar, &c., also amused ourselves blacking Miss L. Kerr's face with some others.

4 August 1847. This morning it was proposed to take a fishing excursion, the place selected was "Dunk's Ferry." After sundry preparations we started in Mr. Buzby's two horse wagon with provisions for the day. The party was composed of Messrs. Lewis Belrose, Thomas J. Miles, Charles Harkness, William Taggart, & myself, Mrs. Belrose, Mrs. Miles, Miss Louisa Kerr & sister Gertrude, with Mrs. Miles' son Thomas. Mrs. Belrose's child rode over with us to return with Mr. Buzby. Had a delightful ride over, distance about 4 miles.

We hired a boat from the keeper of the Hotel, and got some mineral water and ale, and then started out to try our luck. Found we could catch nothing, so we hauled under the bridge part of the new wharf, where we found it cool and shady, and caught some few rock. Becoming tired about 1/2 past 11, took a drink and pulled to the other side of the river, but our success was as heretofore poor. About 1/2 past 12 went ashore and, selecting a cool shady spot, we enjoyed our dinner exceedingly. We had some good brandy, ale & mineral water, which with ice we brought along, made it very fine. We remained ashore about an hour and a half having considerable sport, and then went out to try our luck again but with like success. Finding it very warm went on shore, and was much amused with several men half drunk, making bets, quarreling, &c. Messrs. Miles, Belrose and Taggart went out again on the young flood & were just meeting with some success, as Mr. Buzby came with the wagon, it then being 5 o'clock so they had to return. Had a very pleasant ride home. I remained about the house during the evening, the company were playing whist and chess, but I feeling quite tired retired soon.

5 August 1847. Out sailing all morning. Mr. Marshall and Mr. William Taggat were out with me first, afterwards alone. Went up to Centerton. On my return, while sailing along finely, in the presence of the ladies, the step of the mast came out, and in an instant sail, mast, and boom all went overboard. I was obliged to toe it in and then made sail again down to Borton's where I partially fixed the mast. Had some little sailing, and was about returning home when the sail went over again, and was obliged to toe it to the shore.

Repaired the boat and then went up home where I remained until about 1/2 past 2 when a party rowed over to Centerton to see Dr. Hull. A friend of Mrs. Burke accompanied us. There were 13 in one wagon. We took the Doctor rather by surprise, as he received the note informing him of our coming just as we arrived. He however treated us well and was very polite & agreeable. We had some very fine cantaloupes, the first I have had this season. The Doctor's daughter was quite an agreeable young lady. We also went over to the steam saw mill, the working of which afforded much amusement to the ladies. We had quite a jolly ride home, where we arrived at about 1/2 past 5. I had a very pleasant seat between Miss L. Kerr and Miss Taylor.

Upon my return home found Mr. Loughead & William J. Felters had come up in the boat to see me. After tea Miss Lydia & Susan Whitmer, Miss Kerr, my sister & others took a walk down to the creek, and some of us went out boating. Returned home about 8 o'clock. There was several whist parties through the evening, and at 10 o'clock we went to our room for the purpose of sleeping but that was impossible as the boys sleeping in "Stag Hall" were determined they would play some trick on Messrs. Felters & Loughead & me, as this was to be my last night. They had taken the fastening off my door, so that we had to push the bed against the door to prevent them from coming in. We ducked them several times with water, & finally got them quiet, but they afterwards tied our door fast so that we could not get out. I expect to have a time in the morning before we can get out.

6 August 1847. Got up this morning at 6 o'clock, and had to cut our way out of the room, by first cutting a strap & then bursting the handle off the door. Got my sail boat out with Felters & Loughead, but found it too calm to sail & soon returned. Remained about the wharf for some time. Saw Miss L. Kerr and Miss Taylor go in to bathe with some of the gentlemen, and then went up to the house. I packed my trunk, wrote my journal, ate some very fine cantaloupe, &c. About 1/4 past 5 we started for Burlington in Mr. Buzby's wagon in the midst of the rain. We had in the wagon my boat, sail &c. Arrived safely at Burlington about 20 m. past 6, left the boat with Mr. Miller, and then went down on board of the John Stevens. Found everything as usual at "Crim Castle." Took possession of my room again, and 1/4 of 11 went to bed.

7 August 1847. In the evening Harry Adams and I went up to the Arch Street Theater but were unable to get in on account of a great crowd. Then went around to the Walnut Street Theater, the performance had commenced for some time before entering. The pieces performed were Speed the Plough and The Swiss Cottage, both very good pieces. Out about 1/4 past 11. Upon returning home found my room door locked and the key taken away, and I was obliged to burst the door open. I think it very strange proceedings.

8 August 1847. At St. Phillip's Church in the morning, sat in William M. Clarke's pew. None of the family were there. Mr. Stephen Tyng preached. After church returned home to dinner after which smoked a cigar and then went up to my room to lay down with the intention of getting up soon enough to go to Church, but over slept myself and did not wake until 4 1/2. In the evening called to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke who looked as pretty and interesting as ever.

9 August 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening called up to see Miss Hannah Burton. Also met Mr. Samuel Bonnell, Jr. there.

10 August 1847. In the evening went up to see the Chinese Museum with Mr. Henry Adams. This Museum is certainly worth visiting, as the customs of the Chinese are exhibited to a great extent. Specimens of all the articles in general use are to be seen. Two Chinamen are also with the collection, one of whom gave us some idea of their mode of playing & singing which was very amusing and quite ridiculous to us. The other one employed himself writing cards for visitors. He wrote a very pretty hand. His finger nails were quite a curiosity, on one hand they were over an inch in length.

11 August 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening called up to see the Misses Carter, but not finding them in returned down Pine Street. Saw Miss Louisa Clarke setting at the window, and stopped to converse a few minutes. They very politely invited me in and Mr. Clarke opened the door. I did not intend remaining long, but Miss Louisa's company, as usual, was so agreeable I did not leave until about 1/2 past 10. Mr. Clarke came in a few minutes before my leaving. Upon going home took a shower bath & then to bed.

12 August 1847. In the evening took some clothes up to Mrs. Ford to be washed, then called to see Miss Lizzy Penn-Gaskell in Schuylkill 5th above Arch but found she was out of town. On my way home stopped in and took some ice cream.

13 August 1847. At the office all day and quite busy. I called over to see Miss Eliza Atlee found her in.

14 August 1847. At the office through the day. At 4 1/2 p.m. Joseph P. Loughead, E. J. Maginnis and myself started on board the steamer John Stevens for Burlington on our way to "Franklin Park." We arrived there at 1/4 of 6, and expected to meet Mr. Buzby's carriage there waiting, who we had directed to come over for us, but on account of the horses being out they did not send. Mr. Browning and Mr. Marshall were both over, with some ladies. Their carriages not being entirely full, could have accommodated us, with some little inconvenience, if they had been so disposed, which they did not think proper to do, and I think, as well as my companions, a rather ungentlemanly act. Mr. Marshall after made an apology for himself, which was in a measure satisfactory.

After running for an hour and a half to every stable in the place succeeded in obtaining a carriage, and at about 8 o'clock started off. We arrived at about 1/4 of 9. Had quite a pleasant time going over in singing. We got one or two Irish songs out of our driver, an Irishman. Upon arrival at the "Park" found quite a large party of ladies and gentlemen congregated in the ball room. After "fixing" a little and getting our suppers, went in and participated in the dance. Dr. Hull, with his daughter & son who we called on a week or two since, were there, also a Miss West & a Miss Fletcher who accompanied him. I was introduced to the former. She was quite agreeable but not pretty. Miss Fletcher was quite pretty. We adjourned to the dining room about 10 o'clock where we had a fruit supper and a very lively time. We had also some good brandy for the gentlemen. I retired about 1/2 past 11, but some of the party did not get to bed until about 2. There were several of the gentlemen boarders over from the other house, one of whom became pretty high before leaving.

15 August 1847. Got up this morning about 6 o'clock, took breakfast at 7, after which remained about the house talking to the ladies, smoking, &c. until about 1/2 past 8 or 9, when Messrs. Thibault, T.J. Miles, Sadler, Hewitt, Loughead and myself took a walk down to the creek. Got the boat and went over to "Borton." Upon landing met a number of the gentlemen, went up to the house and "had something to take" and then took a walk up by the mill. When we returned got our boat & went over to our wharf with one oar, we having borrowed a pair to go over with. We landed at the bath house and some of the party went in.

I remained about the house for half an hour when I saw the wagon going down. I jumped in and went down with it. Saw the ladies in to bathe, and regretted I could not too, for want of clothes. Returned home with the ladies in time for dinner, after which went up into "Stag Hall," our sleeping apartment, for the purpose of taking a nap but found it no use, as the boys occupying the other beds kept up such a tremendous racket found it impossible. There are five beds in this room, with two small rooms adjoining in which there are three more. Sat around till tea time, after which Mrs. Kerr, Miss Copeland, my sister, Messrs. Maginnis, W.J. Felters, C. Harkness, Hewitt and myself took a walk down to the creek. I had, alone, as my companion, Miss Copeland, who, though not a very pretty young lady, is fine looking & very agreeable in her manners. She is quite pretty when she smiles. I was introduced to her yesterday by Miss Kerr in the carriage at Burlington and am much pleased with her.

Upon arrival at the creek took the ladies out rowing. After found all the boarders assembled on the porch. I took a seat with Miss Copeland and had a very pleasant conversation until about 1/2 past 10 when she retired.

We had quite an animated discussion on one end of the porch this evening between Messrs. Thomas Fay, Thomas J. Miles, & Loughead, in relation to something concerning lawyers. I could not hear distinctly, as I was engaged talking with Miss Copeland. Retired to my room about 1/2 past 10 but not to get to sleep until after 12, as the boys were carrying on high, blacking each other's faces, posteriors, &c. &c. Really this "Stag Hall" is hard, I should not like to sleep many nights in it.

16 August 1847. Started about 8 o'clock for Philadelphia where we arrived after a tedious passage at 10 o'clock. The boat was very much crowded and consequently very uncomfortable. At the office. About 1/2 past 8 p.m. called down to see Miss L.M. Clarke, found her in and about as well as usual, though I regret to find she still has a cough, which I should like very much to see her rid of, as I fear it may result in something serious.

I received today through Mr. Hall of Burlington the melancholy intelligence of the death of my old friend and chum, James C. Welch late of Burlington. He died on the evening of Sunday the 1st of August of bilious fever(33) . I regret the event exceedingly, as he was an old & tried friend. Peace to his remains.

17 August 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening at about 1/4 of 8 called up at the oyster salon in the Odd Fellows' Hall, where I met Samuel Bonnell Jr. according to engagement. Then called up to see the Misses Burton.

18 August 1847. At the office until 2 p.m. (with the exception of short intervals out on business) at which time I started on board the Steamer Barclay for "Franklin Park," Mr. Edward Roberts having informed me that a party was made up from there to go to "Brown's Mills" tomorrow which I wished to join. Went up stairs, arranged my toilet, and then saw my mother and sister. Remained about the house until after tea, when I took a walk with the ladies down to the creek.

Captain Buzby very politely offered to take the party out sailing in his sloop which was accepted. We had a very pleasant time while on the creek, singing &c. Upon leaving I escorted Miss Thibault home. She is quite a pretty and interesting young lady. I am much pleased with her. Upon going home lit up the ball room, and we had a very pleasant dance until about 10 o'clock, when we retired.

The boys of "Stag Hall" had a grand spree this evening, it was given to the boys of "Borton's House." Upon going into the room I found several card tables in full operation, and considerable liquor in course of being drunk. They kept up considerable noise, until requested by the family, through Mr. Marshall, to cease. I succeeded in getting a cot, and placed it in George & Norris Harkness' room, where I slept very well.

19 August 1847. A clear, cool and delightful day, just such a one as suits our anticipated visit to "Brown's Mills." The party started for the Mills about 7 a.m. in four carriages. It consisted of about 20 including Mr. Enoch Brewster (a very disagreeable gentleman to nearly the whole company). Mr. Marshall & Miss Copeland rode alone in Mr. Marshall's single horse carriage, & we joked them considerably on the road. We passed through Mt. Holly and Pemberton, and arrived at Greenwood, rather a dreary looking place at about 1/4 of 11 o'clock. They all got out, and went to the ten pin alleys, where the ladies and gentlemen played for about half an hour. Then we returned to our carriages and started for the mills, where we arrived about l/2 past 12. This was my first visit to the "Mills." They are certainly anything but a pleasant looking place. The Houses are of the roughest material, dirty & rooms contracted. I think nothing would induce me to remain except very fine company. The mill dam, and scenery around it, is the only redeeming beauty of the place. The party spent the time until dinner was ready in strolling around, and playing ten pins. The dinner was a miserable affair not more than half enough of it, they say owing to the hurry it was prepared in.

After dinner I took a walk by the two springs with Miss Sarah E. Leeds(34) who I unexpectedly met up here. I remained with her up to the time of our starting which was about 1/2 past 4. After riding about half a mile found that I had left a thin coat behind. I concluded to walk back for it, finding that S. Buzby who was driving our wagon, not willing to drive back, with the request that he should wait. I found Mr. Marshall had not yet started. He kindly gave me an invitation to take a seat with him and he would take me up to the wagons. Upon arriving at the spot I had left them I found them gone, so I had to ride several miles with him before overtaking them, when I got into my old place.

20 August 1847. Rode down in the wagon to the landing, but was obliged to wait some 3/4 of an hour for the boat. Arrived in the City about 20 m. of 11. Went up to the office.

In the evening called up to see Miss Arethusa Leeds, to deliver a message from her sister Sarah Elizabeth. Found her in and well. Met Mr. Jenks there, also Mr. D. Blanchard. I remained but a few minutes, as Mrs. Leeds made some uncalled for remarks concerning my late friend J.C. Welch, which hurt my feelings and offended me. I then called up to see Miss Kate Smith who returned home from Reading on Thursday last.

21 August 1847. About 1/4 past 4 went down to the Steamer John Stevens to start for Burlington thence to proceed to "Franklin Park" to attend a ball given by the boarders this evening. Met quite a number on board with whom I was acquainted, among whom was Louisa M. Clarke. I was in company with Miss Louisa nearly all the way up, and found her as agreeable as ever. She was on her way to Trenton. Mr. S. Anderson accompanied her. We arrived safely at the Park about 8 o'clock, where we found everything in readiness for the ball. We got supper shortly afterwards, when the ball room was lit up & possession was taken by the company.

The room was beautifully decorated with oak leaf wreaths, hung in festoons, across the ceiling and on the walls. From the center of the room hung a chandelier, made of the same material which gave a finish of much beauty to the room. The ladies deserve much credit for the taste displayed in the decoration of the room. I waited upon Miss Copeland into the room and danced the first set with her. Many thanks are due to Mr. Marshall for the bouquets presented by him to a number of the ladies. The ladies generally speaking all looked very well.

Since I left yesterday there has been some rare sport among the ladies. It appears, or I have noticed, that Mr. Cornelius Hewitt has been very attentive to Miss Louisa Kerr, and he had the vanity to think that she was in love with him. Miss Kerr, becoming tired of his attentions, asked Mr. William J. Felters to accompany her down to the creek to take a row, & to get rid of Mr. Hewitt, which after some persuasion he consented to do, and went to considerable trouble to help her over fences to get into the road so as not to be seen by Mr. Hewitt. But the best of the joke was that when Miss Kerr got Mr. Felters down to the creek she saw Sydney Roberts, who she is very fond of, so she deserted Felters and went out boating with Roberts. Felters of course became affronted and went up home & told the story, which caused considerable sport. Miss Kerr came alone about 1 o'clock in the hot sun, Mr. Roberts not having politeness enough to come up with her, & thus save her from the laugh of the company. I plagued Miss Kerr, Mr. Hewitt & Roberts throughout the evening about it, & had considerable sport. Mr. Marshall has also been very attentive to Miss Copeland, & also had considerable sport in plaguing her. I was considerable in her company, as she is a lady of very pleasing manners. I do not remember when I spent a more pleasant evening. About 11 o'clock had a very fine fruit supper, with ice cream, cobblers, punches, &c. After which returned to the ball room and danced until 12 o'clock. There were about 50 in the room and every one seemed delighted with the entertainment.

22 August 1847. Got up this morning about 6 o'clock, dressed, went down stairs & walked around until breakfast time. After which spent the time conversing with the ladies until about 1/2 past 9, when a party of us, among whom were Bonnell, Thibault, & Cope, went down to the creek, where we amused ourselves for some time in cutting our names on the side of the Spring House. Shortly after 5 o'clock started for Burlington in two wagons to take the Stevens for Philadelphia.

23 August 1847. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in and well. Met Mr. Dayton there, he remained but a few minutes. I spent a pleasant evening but left early on account of having a severe tooth ache. Mr. James E. Welch, father of J.C. Welch, called today. He was much affected at seeing me and could not speak for some moments. I pitied him to the bottom of my heart. He has truly met with a deep affliction.

24 August 1847. Saw Miss Shankland setting at the door, stopped and took a seat upon the steps with her. A Miss Martin was also there, and Miss Kate Mercer came a few minutes afterwards. She is quite a fine looking girl, but a real wild piece, very much like her sister Mary (now deceased) who I was formerly acquainted with. We sat on the steps for some time but it becoming quite cold retired to the house.

25 August 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening I called up to see Miss Lizzy Penn-Gaskell. Really she is a charming girl. I spent a delightful evening. I become more fond, the more I see of her, her manners and disposition are so sweet, I fear she can effectually storm the Citadel.

26 August 1847. Spent the evening in the Messrs. Felters' room, playing whist, singing songs, cracking jokes, and telling stories. We had two rounds of juleps and cobblers from the restaurant next door but one. We kept it up until about 1/2 past 11 or 12. Had considerable fun in joking Hewitt about the late affair at "Franklin Park" with Miss Kerr. He still seems to maintain his vain idea that Miss Kerr is in love with him, and that he did the thing "brown" at "Brown's Mills." I must really set him down as a fool, or one gifted with more self conceit than I ever met. He certainly behaves in a very ridiculous manner.

27 August 1847. In the evening about 8 o'clock met Mr. S. Bonnell at the Odd Fellow's Hall, by appointment, and then called up to see Miss Kate Smith, found her in looking remarkably pretty.

28 August 1847. It rained exceedingly hard at times, and I have no doubt it will be of immense benefit to the country as we are much in want of rain. Spent the evening in our room. Messrs. John Chambers (my room mate), Joseph P. Loughead & E.J. Maginnis were there.

29 August 1847. Went to St. Phillip's Church in the morning, sat in Dr. Irwin's pew. Mr. Neville gave us an excellent sermon. Walked home with Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her as usual pleasant, then returned home. At 1/2 past 4 Messrs. John Chambers, E.J. Maginnis & myself started on board the Steamer Trenton for Burlington. Then walked down the bank to St. Mary's Hall, to see Mr. Chambers' sister but found she had not returned from Church. Then walked up the bank to Wood Street & then up Wood Street where we met all the young ladies coming down. We continued on until they passed and then returned to the Hall, went in and saw Mr. Chambers' sister. It was the first time I had ever seen her, found her to be quite a pretty and interesting young lady. Returned to the wharf to start for the City where we arrived about 1/2 past 9, having been detained some time in stopping at "Buena Vista" the company's new wharf. Upon our arrival went up to the restaurant next door but one to Miss Crim's & got our supper.

31 August 1847. At 4 1/2 o'clock started for Burlington, where we arrived after the usual delay at Bristol. Were very much amused at a man on board selling patent erasive soap. His mode of selling and stories were very amusing. He was of the order of the far famed "Razor Strap Man." There was also some very good music on board.

On my arrival at Burlington called to see Mrs. & Miss Welch. They seem to be very much affected by their late bereavement. It certainly was a hard stroke to lose a son so young, and so full of promise. It is the first time I have seen them, since the death of James. After leaving Mrs. Welch's, walked up the street, where I met Mr. Buzby's wagon & in a short time afterward started for "Franklin Park" with the gentlemen I came up with. It really looks quite dreary, as nearly all the young company have left, and in fact most all the boarders will all be gone this week. Got supper in a short time, after which sat conversing for some time with my sister & Miss L. Kerr plaguing Miss Kerr about Mr. C. Hewitt. Afterwards played a game of whist. Went upstairs, arranged, locked & strapped Ma's baggage and then to bed.

SEPTEMBER

1 September 1847. Started down to the boat with Ma & sister, and Mrs. Reiford & Miss Tryon under my charge to take to the City. It has been acknowledged by all that the visit to the park this summer has been full of pleasure. The company were all very agreeable, and I can say for myself that the time spent by me at the park will long be remembered and as one of the green spots in my life pleasant to look back upon. About 8 o'clock (p.m) went down into the parlor.

Just as we were about leaving Mr. C. Hewitt came into my room. We joked him for a while about Miss Kerr. Mr. Hewitt still shows his "softness" much to the amusement of several of us. Spent a pleasant evening chatting with the ladies until about 1/2 past 9, when we adjourned to the Messrs. Felters' room where we were to have a little entertainment given by Mr. William D. Prout, previous to his leaving our City. We had a bottle of wine, a julep a piece, and a bottle of brandy. We drank the wine and juleps, but I hid the brandy, fearing evil consequences on the part of Mr. Prout, as he began to show evidence of being affected in the same manner as he was last winter. A small quantity of liquor makes him a perfect mad man. We had a very pleasant time singing songs, telling stories, &c.

2 September 1847. Stopped in at Mr. Dusos liquor store to see him a few minutes. He gave us a glass of brandy & water. After tea called up to see Miss Lizzy Penn-Gaskell. Found her in and as pleasant and agreeable as ever.

3 September 1847. Took a walk down to see Miss Elizabeth Mercer in Catherine Street below Front, but did not find her in. Saw her mother who stated she would return shortly. Went in and had a chat with her. In course of conversation she told me about some matters that I was somewhat astonished she would communicate. It was in relation to the devises made in her husband's will. She stated that her daughter Elizabeth would be 21 on the 8th Inst. when she would receive all her property into her own possession and various other matters in relation to it. Finding Miss Mercer did not return, I left.

4 September 1847. The opening days of September have exceeded in caloric discomfort even the fiercest efforts of July and August, and people are almost beginning to believe that they must have dropped a kalend from their almanacs, & that we are now actually just commencing the fiery ordeal of mid-summer. The atmosphere of day was oppressively warm, and makes me desire to leave the City again.

At the office all day, & at about 6 p.m. took a walk on Chestnut Street with William J. Felters. Found quite a number of the ladies on the promenade, who appear now to be returning from their "various" summer retreats.

In the evening called up to see Mr. Jacob Ellis(35) to inquire about cousin Sarah (his wife) who we understood is very unwell. Saw him and also Emma Erwin. Remained until about 9 o'clock and then called around to see Miss Mary Brown in 13th above Race. My sister and Mr. W.J. Felters had gone up before me to see Miss Louisa Kerr as well as Miss Brown. Mr. C. Hewitt was also there, and we expected to see some fun in teasing him, but as Miss Kerr would not play her part we had to give up the undertaking. A Mr. Clark and Mr. Kerr were there. Spent a pleasant evening and had considerable sport. Mr. Clark and Miss Kerr went across the street for sport and bought half a pound of cheese much to the amusement of the company as we could see their movements from the parlor window.

5 September 1847. At St. Phillip's Church in the morning Mr. Neville preached. Sat in Mr. Clarke's pew. W.J. & H.J. Felters, Prout, Chambers & myself went up into our room, took some brandy & water, and we sat conversing until about 4 o'clock. We were very much amused at the movements of a young girl dressing in a window opposite ours in 5th Street at the House of Mrs. Burky. After tea took a walk.

6 September 1847. This week has opened with splendor, and in the midst of an immense activity of all the elements of metropolitan life and activity. The glorious weather has enchanted everybody, and tempted the feet of thousands of pretty promenaders to their old haunts in Chestnut Street. Well may they resort there, for our merchants have displayed unwonted taste and liberality in preparing for the ardent of the fashionable season, and Chestnut Street under the creative influence of enterprise and taste, has become a bijou avenue, a panorama of beautiful sights, and a long bazaar of magnificent goods. Temptations for trade were certainly never before made so irresistible; and we are not surprised to learn that every branch of business feels the cheering impulse among the recent improvements in Chestnut Street. The whole city has noticed and admired the splendid establishment of Beebe & Costar, on the South side below 5th. The store and fixtures are truly elegant. Mr. Charles Oakford has also recently improved his hat store in a beautiful manner, & I think equal, if not superior in point of beauty and taste, to that of Beebe & Costar.

After supper met Mr. Bonnell according to engagement at Odd Fellows' Hall. He was accompanied by his friend Mr. Byrd from the West Indies. Called up to see Miss Kate Smith, found her in, also Miss L. Snyder. Spent a very pleasant evening.

Miss Kate Smith showed me a letter this evening from Miss Mary Anderson, in which she explained her reasons for not writing to me, and said she had destroyed my letter, and asking through Miss Smith a return of hers, which request I do not think I shall grant, as I am not satisfied in my own mind my letters are destroyed. I think I must hold her letters as mementos of the past.

7 September 1847. Called today to see Elizabeth Mercer found her in and as lively as ever.

8 September 1847. After supper remained about the parlor until about 9 o'clock part of the time listening to some very pretty songs by the Misses Andrus of Ithaca, New York, two very pretty and interesting young ladies now stopping at our house. I have not as yet had the pleasure of an introduction. A number of the ladies were in the parlor this evening as well as gentlemen. Mr. S. Bonnell, Jr. and C. Hewitt were spending the evening with my sister. About 9 o'clock we adjourned to the Messrs. Felters' room, they giving an entertainment in celebration of their having passed their examination, so as to be admitted to college.

9 September 1847. In the evening we had quite a lively time, the dining room was cleared of various tables, candles placed, and a gentleman on the violin procured, and we had a delightful dance. I made the acquaintance of both the Misses Kate & Caroline Andrus of Ithaca, N. Y. They are both very agreeable and pretty young ladies. The younger one is my favorite. She is full of life, and exceedingly pleasing in her manners. In fact I have taken a great fancy to her. She is a lady of rare charms. I danced with her four times, and enjoyed a greater part of the evening in her company. I really felt as if I should like to be exclusive with her. The ladies left the room about 11 o'clock when the party of gentlemen went into "next door but one" and took something to drink.

10 September 1847. Got up this morning at 6 o'clock, took a shower bath, then breakfast and then over to the office, where I remained until about 10 o'clock when I went over to the house again according to engagement to go to the "U.S. Mint"(36) with the Misses Kate and Caroline Andrus of Ithaca, N.Y. We (that is the Misses Andrus & myself, and W.F. Taylor and my sister) started a few minutes after 10, and had a very delightful walk up to the mint, and went through the various rooms. We saw the operation of melting, stamping &c., and also their steam engine in operation which is considered one of the greatest or finest pieces of mechanism in the world. After satisfying ourselves with a view of the various departments went up into the "Coin Chamber" in which they have coins from all parts, and all ages of the world.

In one case I noticed coins made before the time of our Savior, and another, the ancient Shekel spoken of so often in the Scriptures. After leaving the Mint visited "Old Independence Hall" and then went over to the office where I left the ladies until I could look for the granter to have them admitted into the library room, but could not find him. I regaled them with what I had, viz., some old muddled wine, and then went over to the house. Remained a few minutes and then left. Mr. Taylor and I then went up to the Walnut Street Theater to procure tickets for the evening, returned to the office.

About 1/4 after 4 Colonel Tucker called for me in a chaise with the Misses Andrus to accompany them to "Girard College," "Fairmount," &c. to which I gladly acceded. We first visited the college, and I escorted the ladies through it, though it made me feel unpleasant to have the Colonel remain behind on account of his lameness or inability to use his limbs. We walked through the various chambers, and on the roof. The ladies appeared to be delighted with the view from this elevated point.

After leaving the college called on Mrs. Cardwell in Poplar Street West of Broad, on Green Hill. Remained a short time and then drove out to Fairmount. I again had the pleasure of showing the ladies the various spots of interest about this far famed spot. They seemed to be enchanted with its beauty which was very gratifying to me. In the course of our ramble visited the "Reservoir" and in walking around I made a banter with Miss Caroline that she would not run down the steep bank with me, but much to my surprise she took me up, and both went down together. I expected to find a flight of stairs to return on, but after walking some distance could not find any, and was obliged to clamber up the steep embankment again, much to the amusement of her sister Kate. Miss Kate seemed to have a notion that our running away from her was intended and that I wished to have a private tete-a-tete with her sister, as I have been very attentive since we met. I must say that I have never seen any lady that I admire so much as Miss Caroline Andrus. I have really fallen in love with her, for her sweet disposition and manners. I can say with the utmost truth that I regret she is to depart so soon. Willingly would I do any thing to have her remain. I shall, and do now feel quite low spirited at the prospect of her departure.

On leaving "Fairmount" drove over the wire bridge, and down the other side to the permanent bridge and thence home just in time for tea. In the evening a party was made up to go to the Walnut Street Theater to see M'lle. Blaugy. It was composed of Mr. Andrus, his two daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Mackafee of Louisville, W.F. Taylor & my sister, and self. I waited upon my favorite Miss Caroline. The house was very much crowded, though not by a fashionable audience. The performance had commenced before we arrived, though as our seats were reserved it made no difference. The first piece performed was Mischief Making and those in which M'lle. Blangy and Mons' Bouxany appeared were La Chatte and L'Illusion Dan Peinter, both very good in their way, but I do not admire stage dancing with ladies.

11 September 1847. I was at the office the greater part of the day. This morning I presented to Miss Caroline Andrus a bouquet, which she accepted, and I received from her on a card the following lines which I shall treasure up as a sweet memento of the past: "My acknowledgments to Mr. E. for his beautiful present. The flowers may wither, but the remembrance of the gift will ever remain as a memorial of his kindness - C." How beautiful these lines, how I shall treasure them in the memory of the past. What would I give to own, and to know that the fair authoress, bore the same affection towards me, that I do towards her. "Yes I did love her - madly love." She was the sweetest best deceiver. But why do I call her a deceiver. Tis true she slighted me in a measure, but the breach was healed again and

"Oh! while this heart delirious took

Sweet poison from her thrilling eye

Thus would she pout, and lisp, and look

And I would hear, and gaze, and sigh!"

This evening we had a delightful dance in the dining room. I enjoyed the company of the only girl I ever really loved. Never did I know until I met this fair being what love really was. Our dancing continued until after 11, when the ladies retired to their rooms. Peace be to the slumbers of the "one I love." After the dance was over all went into the restaurant, next door but one, where we had something to drink. About 1/4 of 12 Mr. Chambers & myself went to our room, and Messrs. Maginnis & W.J. Felters accompanied us. We serenaded the ladies from our window until 1 o'clock and then went to bed.

12 September 1847.(37) It poured rain all day. In the afternoon and evening it came down in torrents. This morning after breakfast I went into the parlor. I saw the object of my love talking with my rival, Wheeler. I resolved at once to take her upon another tact. I had some few words of conversation, left her and commenced talking with her sister Kate, and in a short time afterwards left the room, and went to St. Paul's Church with Mr. Chambers, but feeling unwell left before it was out.

On my return to the parlor I found both the Misses Andrus sitting there. I took a seat near Miss Kate and addressed my conversation to her, though occasionally making a remark to the object of my love. It was a severe task but I had resolved upon it. Mr. Wheeler came in a short time afterwards, and for some reason she went to the front window. Mr. Wheeler followed, and from that time I had resolved to say nothing more to her. After dinner the ladies were again in the parlor, but I went to my room and took a nap.

About 3 o'clock Messrs. Chambers, Maginnis and I went to the parlor, found Wheeler talking to Caroline, and Freeman to Kate. We sat talking for some time when Mac came in and commenced talking with Miss Kate, and in a few minutes ran Freeman off. He went over and commenced talking with Miss Caroline, Wheeler on one side and Freeman on the other. I noticed that in a short time afterwards both ladies left the room, with a view, as I supposed (which I found afterwards to be correct), to avoid Messrs. Wheeler & Freeman. A few minutes afterwards the gentlemen left and the ladies again returned to the parlor. At that time Mac commenced talking with Kate, and not as I mentioned on the preceding page, before they left the room. Miss Caroline sat alone for about an hour, as I had resolved not to go near her.

Freeman and Wheeler returned in about an hour and commenced talking to her again, which continued until supper time. After supper Mac called me to him & told me that my actions towards Caroline had hurt her feelings and that she could not tell what was the matter with me. As I supposed she had left the parlor to rid herself of Wheeler, and expected me to go and talk to her on her return. He, at the same time, said that Kate had said her sister would like it made up in the evening and that we would take a seat together for that purpose. However, we concluded to go up to Colonel Tucker's room, pay him a visit, and avoid Wheeler & Freeman.

While in the Colonel's, room I had the lady of my choice to myself, and never do I remember spending a couple of hours more delightfully. It was real bliss, and never do I remember such a happy sensation as when her pure blue eye would fall upon mine. I cannot describe my feelings of today. They were full of love and revenge. I became so nervous that I could scarcely contain myself, never did I experience such sensations in my life. I have been completely unnerved. We left the Colonel's room about 1/2 past 9, went to the parlor as the ladies wished to bid some of their friends farewell, perhaps forever, but I hope not, as my heart has really gone with the fair Caroline.

Upon parting, the following lines of Moore were brought to my memory, which I will here dedicate to my fair Caroline with but a slight alteration.

To Caroline

Though fate, my girl, may bid us part,

Our souls it cannot, shall not, sever

The heart will seek its kindred heart

And cling to it as close as ever.

But must we, must we, part indeed?

Is all our dream of rapture over?

And does not Caroline's bosom bleed?

To leave so dear, so fond a lover?

Does she too mourn? Perhaps she may,

Perhaps she weeps our blesses fleeting

But why is Caroline's eye so gay?

If Caroline's heart like mine is beating?

I oft have loved the brilliant glow

Of rapture in her blue eye streaming

But can the bosom bleed with woe

While joy is in the glances beaming?

No, no! Yet love, I will not chide

Although your heart were fond of roving.

Nor that, nor all the world beside

Could keep your faithful boy from loving.

You'll soon be distant from his eye

And, with you, all that's worth possessing.

Oh! then it will be sweet to die,

When life has lost its only blessing

13 September 1847. A clear, cool and delightful day, and the City looks beautifully clear & fresh after having its face washed by a shower of forty eight hours in duration. Old Mother Earth hasn't taken so extensive a draught of water before, since the Temperance celebration.

Got up this morning at 1/2 past 6, my dreams of last night were constant of Caroline. It seemed if I was talking to her the whole night, so much was my mind excited by yesterday's proceedings. But alas! I found her false. She is not the girl I took her to be. She played a false part with me. She was betrothed to another, and led me to believe I was the favored one. How unkind, I feel it sensibly, my mind has been so agitated today, that it was almost impossible to attend to business. False one, through all this deception I love you yet.

Mock me no more with love's beguiling dreams,

A dream, I find, illusory as sweet

One smile of friendship, nay of cold esteem,

Is dearer far than passions bland deceit!

I've heard you oft eternal truth declare

Your heart was only mine, I once believed.

Ah! shall I say that all your vows were air?

And must I say, my hopes were all deceived?

Now then, no longer that our souls are twined

That all our joys are felt with mutual zeal

Caroline! 'tis pity, pity makes you kind;

You know I love, and you would seem to feel

But shall I still go revel in those arms

On this in which affection takes no part?

No, no! farewell! you gave me but your charms

When I fondly though you gave me your heart

It was my intention to have accompanied Miss Caroline on to New York this morning, but before retiring to bed I found she had been playing so false a part to me that I at once resolved not to go. Would that I had never seen her. It would have saved me many a severe pang. But she is gone now, I feel no ill will towards her, but hope she may prove as true to her betrothed as she as false to me.

We have had some happy hours together,

But joy must after change its wing;

And spring would be but gloomy weather,

If we had nothing else but spring.

Farewell, thus let us leave this bower of love,

Where I have loitered long in bliss;

And you may down that pathway move,

While I shall take my way through this.

But I will drop this subject, and on to events of the day, and even course of my interrupted journal.

I was at the office the greater part of the day, until about 6 p.m then took a walk to see Mr. Brinder (boot maker), then called to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke. Found her in and well. She had returned from Trenton today. Met Mr. James Dayton there. He remained but a few minutes after I came in.

14 September 1847. A great number on the promenade.

15 September 1847. About 1 p.m called upon Miss Louisa M. Clarke to invite her to accompany me to the "Horticultural Exhibition" this evening, but owing to an engagement this evening she could not go, however, if well, will accompany me tomorrow evening. Spent the evening at home with Ma in her room, talking of various subjects, among the most important of which was the affair of the Misses Andrus.

The news from Mexico of the last few days, though of a very confused character, is confirmed in all its essential features, by the later accounts, which indicate a series of battles, rather than a single battle. The fiercest that have been fought resulted in victories to the American arms, apparently the greatest and most marvelous that have been achieved. The City of Mexico is now at our mercy. Seven thousand American soldiers, penetrating into the Valley of Mexico, full of villages, and swarming with the densest population, rushing forward to attack, thirty two thousand Mexicans - Mexicans entrenched, too, behind the strongest fortifications - fighting with them day by day for a week, storming week after week, at least succeeding in carrying every position, and driving the routed multitudes with prodigious slaughter into the capital!

This seems a story altogether incredible, and yet we know it to be perfectly authentic. We may distrust the terrible statement of a "thousand" killed and wounded on our side, and "five thousand" on the other; but the long and dreary list of American officers who have fallen or been wounded will be taken as full confirmation of these deadly results. Great victories have been won; but great has been the price which has been paid for them. The great battle was fought at Churubusco, that battle in which the bayonets of seven thousand Americans prevailed over the cannon of thirty two thousand Mexicans fighting behind trenches and ramparts.

Churubusco & Contreas

Such are the titles of the battles fought by General Scott, so named from the principal fortifications erected by the enemy. Our entire loss in killed and wounded is short of 1100; that of the enemy is not well known. His loss in killed alone is believed to be fully equal to our entire loss, and it is estimated at least 3000 prisoners were taken. General Scott himself received a wound in the leg below the knee. We are led to hope the injury is but slight. The loss on our side has fallen most heavily on South Carolina and New York volunteers, the 6th Infantry and light battery. The South Carolina regiment was nearly cut to pieces losing 137 men out of 272 men with which it went into action. The Mexican accounts acknowledge the loss in killed, wounded & prisoners, of no less than 13 generals (among them their ex-President) and 45 pieces of cannon. The battle commenced on the 17th of August on which day our troops took possession of San Augustine and continued until the 20th.

It is impossible to read of these dreadful actions without mingled feelings of exultation and pain. The American cannot but be proud of the heroism of his countrymen; he cannot be insensible to the glory of his country's arms; but he still must feel some sentiment of commiseration for foes, to whom these victories carry wounds and death, and all the humiliation of defeat and desolation of despair.

Thrice unhappy Mexico! unhappy in peace, unhappy in war, unhappy in the inability of her children to contend with the hostile stranger, even on the thresholds of their own metropolis, and on the hearth of their families. A fate is upon them, and it seems to have been upon them from the first moment of their independence. For this they fought valiantly; but obtained it only to find the sweets of liberty were anarchy and civil war, and the hard rule of military usurpers, under whose violent instigations they have persisted in a war which threatens them with destruction. If any good can come out of the evil of carnage it will be the severe blow which the repeated American victories must inflict upon the credit and poor of the Mexican Generals. To us the good that may be expected, or that may be hoped, to grow out of the latest victories, is the peace that seems now promised.

16 September 1847. At the office the greater part of the day, and in the evening visited "Horticultural Exhibition" with Miss Louisa M. Clarke. It has been a long time since I have been out with her, but this evening she was more lively, and more like herself than I have found her for a long while. She is really a charming girl, and could I but gain her, I should be one of the happiest of men. I fear I have a rival unconquerable.

In visiting this fairy scene of beauty and enchantment, with the one whom you loved, I endeavored to bring away such memories of its loveliness, as would enable me to transfix some of my impressions upon paper, but I fear the attempt was in vain. The exquisite grace which fills the atmosphere of those splendid saloons with delight is too ethereal to be transferred or brought away. This, however, is the less to be regretted, as everybody has taken care to participate in the gorgeous festival, and thus unfitted himself for the enjoyment of any mere description, how graphic so ever it might be. Yet for the benefit of posterity, I must attempt to give something like an idea of this annual feast of Roses.

Imagine yourself, then, ascending with me the steps of the Chinese Museum and being ushered into an immense saloon, planted thickly with beautiful shrubbery, interspersed with colonnades, arches, spires, temples, vases, harps, monuments, and fantastic edifices and designs, all composed entirely of roses and flowers, and the whole arranged in such a manner as to produce the effect of a vegetable city - a street of green temples, kiosks, fountains, and palaces, spring up out of the ground, and scenting the air with the strange poignant perfume of leaves and flowers. Amid these fragrant vistas wander splendidly dressed ladies and troops of beautiful children, with a pretty thick sprinkling of grave, awkward figures in black coats and whiskers who are disconsolately trying to screw up their solemn faces into a smile befitting the occasion.

After sufficiently dancing and bewildering yourself amid these elfin bowers, treading about softly and reverently, as if you expected to start up a druid or a fairy from every shady wood, you ascend into the saloon of fruits, where Pomona has spread her choicest blandishments to steal away your lore and make you forget her younger sister Flora.

Here on every side, heaps of such grapes as an infant Bacchus would weep his eyes out after, & pyramids of peaches melting in their own tenderness, tempt the eye and excite the palate. Apricots like golden apples, pears blushing like a brunette's cheeks, and honey white as the thyme flowers of Hymettus, alternately exert their spell. Nor are wanting the more substantial charms of squashes without parallel, cabbages incalculable, and beets of most Brobdignagian dimensions. You know not which way to turn and at last completely overwhelmed with all you have seen, you will make your escape, & dream of feasts & flower gardens until next morning's sun recalls you to beefsteak and business.

17 September 1847. In the evening met at the Odd Fellows' Oyster saloon according to engagement Messrs. S. Bonnell, Jr. and Boyd. We then called up to see Miss Kate Smith. Spent a very pleasant evening. Played whist, told fortunes &c.

18 September 1847. After supper went up to the Arch Street with H.J. Felters to see Paisloe. There were three pieces performed, viz., Undine, or the Water Spirit and the Fires Friend, The Ladder of Love, and The Smugglers' Son. Did not think much of either.

19 September 1847. Cloudy and raw early in the morning, and soon commenced raining which continued throughout the day and evening. In fact we might say, we are now fairly astride the ridge pole of the Equinox, and see on either hand Day and Night of equal length - the one seeming but the meridian shadow of the other. The commotion in the elements which the establishment of this momentary equilibrium of light and shade always produces is already upon us, and promises a long and dreary continuance. Everything looks a little cheerless and uncomfortable just now, but it will be bright anon.

20 September 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening after tea went up into Ma's room, where I remained until near 8 o'clock. Miss Chambers was there. Then went upstairs dressed, went down to the post office to put a letter in for Miss Louisa Kirby, and then called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke. I found her in and well, looking remarkably pretty this evening. I think now it is almost time I should bring matters to a crisis with her. I must either know that I am to be refused, or that she is to be mine. I love her, and have loved her truly for the last year or 18 months, and my only aim now is that she may be mine. O happy thought, can it, or will it be true. I should be one of the happiest of the happy if she will but consent. My love for this lady is different from any other. To be sure I have thought I have loved others, but it was only momentary, it soon passed off, it left me when the object of my love left. But my feelings towards Louisa are of a different nature, they are full of love, and affection for her, they are unchangeable. It is true I have tried to wean my love from her, as I feared there was another who was her choice, but I found it impossible. I must know my fate soon. I pray that it may be favorable.

I left about 1/4 past 10 after spending a delightful evening in the company of the one whom I love.

21 September 1847. In the evening called up to see Miss Penn-Gaskell, found her in looking very pretty.

22 September 1847. Seldom do I remember so fine weather The moonlight nights are now delicious. They don't last long, and every one ought to be enjoyed, by every body. September moonlight is the golden foam of the passing year.

At about 1 p.m. Frank Taylor stopped in and persuaded me to go to Burlington this afternoon, having some matters to attend to there. Concluded to go. Went up to Mrs. Buckman's to get a couple of liquor cases belonging to us to have them sent to the City, and then called over to Mr. James Hunter Sterling to get our clock. Then called down at Mrs. Welch's, and got a picture belonging to us. Mr. and Mrs. Welch were very kind to me. They appear to be much more reconciled to the death of James than when I last saw them.

23 September 1847. After tea dressed to go to a party with sister, given by Charles Gibbons to his sister Rebecca, who was married yesterday week, the 15th Inst. Never did I spend a duller evening. We entered the room about 1/4 past and went up and spoke to the bride. She gave us a mere nod of recognition, and did not even introduce us to her husband. We then danced one set, no pleasure whatever in it. Everything was stiff & formal, no introductions, and nothing to make the evening agreeable.

After the first dance I went up into the dressing rooms and remained there 3/4 of an hour having fallen asleep. I then went down to the parlor again, remained a few minutes, returned to the dressing room where I spent the remainder of the evening, preferring it much to the parlors. We left at about 1/2 past 11. I did not see nor go into the supper tables. I do not wish to spend such an evening soon again. The Gibbons all appeared to be stiff and formal. Why? I know not. Their conduct has been very singular of late. We had an invitation to the wedding as well as the party, but I think they were both out of compliment, not that they wished us.

24 September 1847. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in and looking unusually well. She has changed the mode of wearing her hair since Monday last which has improved her appearance very much. Really I must soon bring matters to a close, I must soon know my fate. I have now been visiting the lady for near a year with serious intentions, and think it time to know my fate. If I should be refused, Oh how can I think of it. How unhappy shall I be, but I hope for the best.

25 September 1847. Spent the evening at home, part of the time in Ma's room reading and part of the time in the parlor.

27 September 1847. At St. Andrew's Church in the morning. After Church walked around by Miss L. M. Clarke's in Pine below 8th, saw her sitting at the window and I stopped a moment to ask her to go to Church with me in the evening, but found she was engaged to go with her cousin Samuel Anderson.

28 September 1847. The summer heats are over, the grass withers, the leaves fall. Soon will the face of nature will become bare, and the cheerless trees extend their naked branches. The eye will look in vain for comfort amid the desolation, all will be barren and sterile. But the compensating powers of nature are wonderful. As the oak falls, the acorn sprouts. So now whilst vegetation withers, whiskers commence their bloom. The face of man, so often reaped whilst August heats prompted the destruction of beard, now becomes dusky with starting hair. Cheeks, the roughness of which was kept down by the oily razor, now bristle wildly; throats, once smooth are fuzzy with incipient fur; chins once glossy, are now frightful with wiry pasturage, whereon such particular hair stands "out like quills upon the fretful porcupine." Friends, whose plazas were so bright and shining, now look out from dingy countenances which are wonderfully suggestive of the necessity of barbers. Gentlemen noted for their dandyism astonish beholders with dirty faces, and one is surprised that the spruce cox comb should have become so negligent. Almost every body looks half shaved, and suffers in good looks while the process of raising whiskers is carried on.

The varying change of countenance whilst the crop is being raised is interesting. A light undergrowth of doubtful import soon darkens into a thick chaparral, the intent of which is unmistakable. The shadowy outline assumes opaqueness, and the well-defined contour of the whisker looms up with fearful distinctness. Then may we mark the diversity of taste with which the hair nothings assume a local habitation and a name. Some covering the entire cheek sweep down with broad magnificence to the corner of the mouth, as mountains descend to the river brink, and thence rise up on the chin, as jutting rocks stand out on the water. Some start out boldly from the temples for a few inches, and there, losing their confidence, suddenly retreat back to the ear and dwindle off to nothingness. Some, with well defined base ascend pyramidically, leaving the throat unprotected, the chin bare to the blast. Others, with good commencement, fall down the looser part of the ear, where their career of usefulness is cut off. But if the shape of the whisker offers subject for meditation, how much more interesting is the color.

The black - rising up in subtle grandeur, like forests at midnight. The red, in sanguine beauty, like coral reefs from the waves. The white - like the frozen spray of Niagara in December. The black, sprinkled with gray - like snow upon the branches of the winter woods. The red, sprinkled with gray - as patches of ashes gathered upon the aspiring coal fire. Their condition, too, how different, some thick as the bristles on a scrubbing brush, others light as the down on a peach. It is really a sight to go out on the streets of our City and mark the young whiskers which fill the thoroughfare. Every man is raising them, and each in a state of forwardness according to the Sansom-like nature of the wearer. About election time they are generally in full bloom, and we have often lingered by the long line of voters, studying the characteristics of the new developments made upon the faces of those who sought the exercise of the right of suffrage. Indeed, it would almost seem that a pair of whiskers was thought an indispensable requisite of citizenship. We all recollect the story of the boy of 16, who based his right to vote on the fact that he shaved, and the manner in which, on election day, incipient whiskers burst forth from embroyage would almost lead us to believe that the idea of the "shaver" was based upon a proper foundation.

A few timid rays of sunshine made their appearance this afternoon, struggling through the thick masses of mulberry colored clouds, which unwillingly parted to give passage to the welcome visitants. They came unexpectedly, just as everybody had made up their mind for another week or so of leaden weather; and it is impossible to describe the joy their presence diffused over the City. Brokers who had been "bit" with Vicksburg and Morris, and were going sorrowfully home to a late dinner upon "fancy" cold meats, brightened up in a moment; and the dry goods people who of course don't like wet weather, started bolt upright upon their chairs and began estimating how much the sunny beam might be worth a yard. The very roofs of the houses took on a golden gleam of thankfulness, and the drenched cab horses raised their grateful noses from dreams of peace and provender.

Fifty thousand desolate shutters opened synonymously, with a cheerful noise as if the houses had extended their arms to embrace the tenant light. Ladydom left off moping, and flew gaily to the casement, looking out upon a vast prospective of shopping and promenade. The poor sick man, faring under the pressure of so much damp & gloomy weather, felt the warm beam enter and penetrate thrillingly through every half-filled vein, and along every feeble nerve. Meanwhile the sullen clouds retired slowly from the western sky, and the mighty sun, trampling them slowly beneath his burning feet, sank magnificently to rest, leaving the blue sky bathed in crimson, as if in the blood of a conquered storm.

The rain gauge in the Pennsylvania Hospital indicates that the amount of water that fell during Saturday and Sunday last was 3.025 inches. The amount for the month up to the 27th according to the same data was 8.023. This is almost unprecedented. The amount that fell during Saturday and Sunday is very near the general average for a month.

At the office through the day until about 4 p.m. then took a walk. Henry Felters accompanied me. Walked out to the railroad and Coats Street where we found quite a crowd gathered to witness the walking man calling himself Herr Reigniger on a single wire to the top of the hotel on the corner He made one attempt but did not succeed, when we left.

28 September 1847. About 1/2 past 6 p.m. called up to see Miss Kate Smith. At about 8 p.m. called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in and spent a very pleasant evening.

29 September 1847. At the office the greater part of the day. About 12 N. Lydia stopped for me, when we made a call upon Miss Louisa M. Clarke. It was her first visit. Found her in well and agreeable. Saw Mrs. Clarke and remained about 20 minutes. Then called down to make a party call upon Mrs. Charles Gibbons, found her in and well.

30 September 1847. About 1/4 of 8, went up to the Odd Fellows' Oyster saloon where I met S. Bonnell, Jr. according to engagement, and both called up to see Miss Kate Smith & L. Snider. Played whist &c. Left at about 1/4 of 11. In going home got caught in the rain and got very wet.

OCTOBER

1 October 1847. The announcement today in the papers that the peace negotiations with Mexico have been broken off, and hostilities recommenced with fearful energy, took almost every one by surprise. It was hoped and believed that peace would grow out of the conference that had taken place between the two parties, but the Mexicans have again broken their faith and merited thereby another severe castigation which they will assuredly receive. By the last accounts our troops were already in possession of two of the streets of the capital, and had driven the Mexican force toward the plaza. A desperate street fight would probably follow before the City was taken, as the Mexicans had taken advantage of the armistice to entrench themselves in the City and provide for hurling every kind of missile upon their foes. Lives will be sacrificed which might have been saved by entering the City with the retreating and panic-stricken Mexicans, after their late signal defeat outside the walls; but though many will fall, the result will undoubtedly be the taking of the Halls of Montezuma. What will follow we know not; but the policy of our government should be entirely different from what it has been. It must make up its mind that this is to be a war without any peace, until the Mexicans are made heartily sick of it. Our army should act like conquerors, and not like the conquered, pitifully begging for peace at every step. Make the Mexicans feel the weight of the war, and compensate ourselves for the expenses by taking and holding their territory, and ultimately adding it to the broad domains of the Union. The next intelligence from Mexico will be fraught with the greatest interest and importance. The crisis is come which is to decide whether Mexico shall any longer have a separate national existence.

After tea went up into Ma's room, sat there for about 1/2 an hour, then went to my room, dressed, and then called upon Miss Louisa M. Clarke. Did not find her in. Went in and sat conversing with Mrs. Clarke.

2 October 1847. H.J. Felters and I started out to take a walk. Walked out Chestnut Street to Broad, out Broad Street to the Monument Cemetery, then a walk through its grounds, from there continued out Broad Street to the Penn Township Hotel & thence via the Lamb Tavern to Laurel Hill and from there home. The whole distance around was about 10 or 12 miles. Spent the evening in Ma's room playing whist.

3 October 1847. Walked up to Grace Church this morning with Ma and Lydia and left them there to take possession for the first time to their new setting in Mrs. Scott's pew. I then went down to St. Phillip's Church. After Church walked home with Miss Louisa M. Clarke who I found as usual.

4 October 1847. The City has been for the last two days in a state of the most intense excitement on the subject of the startling news from Mexico, and no other topic has seemed to possess sufficient interest to withdraw for a moment public attention. Even the occurrence of the Sabbath did not serve to quench public anxiety to learn further and complete particulars of the thrilling scenes attendant upon the capture of Mexico; and Chestnut Street was all the afternoon lined with people all engaged in discussion of the grave aspect of affairs at the seat of war.

5 October 1847. About 2 o'clock went around to Mr. Yerkes' stable, and got a pair of horses and carriage, and then drove around to the house to get my sister and the Misses Farney and Mary Chambers to take them out riding. Drove by way of Broad Street and the Lamb Tavern to the Wissahickon Creek, then by the Wissahickon Road to Germantown, where we called upon Mrs. George W. Carpenter. Found her in and well. We returned to the City by way of Germantown Road and Broad St., getting home safe at about 1/2 past 6 after a very pleasant ride. Spent the evening at home with the exception of about half an hour occupied in going for Ma, who was at Roberts. Went in the parlour during the early part of the evening, then up in my room until 1/4 of 9, smoking with some of the gentlemen of the house, and the balance of the evening in Ma's room. The two Misses Chambers, Mr. Maginnis & W.J. Felters were there. Spent quite a pleasant time playing, singing, dancing, waltzing &c.

6 October 1847. After tea went up to the Odd Fellows' Oyster Saloon where I met Mr. S. Bonnell. Called up to the Misses Burton.

7 October 1847. Evening at home. Up in my room with Chambers, Loughead, Felters No. 1 & 2, & Maginnis until about 8 o'clock. We had considerable sport in carrying the "dead man out" exhibition of the "Kentucky grant" &c.

8 October 1847. Went up to the Odd Fellows' Oyster saloon, and met S. Bonnell Jr. according to appointment, & both called up for Miss Hannah Burton to accompany her up to Miss Kate Smith's according to engagement. Miss Susan Burton was also to have gone with us but was not well enough.

On Tuesday last I invited Miss L. M. Clarke, the lady that I love as I do life, to take a ride with me I thought as a test of her partiality for me. But I was unhesitatingly refused, and an excuse of the most trivial nature offered for her not going. Thus am I prevented from visiting her more, I am rejected, I am as it were forbidden from seeing her, I feel it sensibly, I love but am rejected, from this time forth I shall not enter her doors. O! unhappy reflection. Why should it ever come to pass. I thought better things. I thought I was the favored one, I thought soon to have her consent. But it has been ordered otherwise. Perhaps it is as well. I thought my cup of joy was full, but it has been dashed from me, perhaps never to be returned. O unhappy reflection. Fare you well Louisa. Peace and happiness be with you. I loved but am rejected. You are to be another's. I resign but still with love. I did think I would make no mention of this on the pages of my journal, but have thought otherwise, as this book would not be a journal unless every incident was mentioned upon it.

9 October 1847. Up with Mr. E.J. Maginnis in his room until about 20 m. of 9, then went down into Ma's room with him where I remained until about 10 1/2 with the exception of a few minutes occupied in going over to the Native American meeting in the State House Yard to look for S. Bonnell and Mr. Boyd, who had called for me according to engagement, and had been told by some of the servants that I was out, though I was waiting up stairs for them.

10 October 1847. After dinner started for a walk. Was much amused just after crossing the Market Street bridge at an arrest being made of some men who had been smoking cigars over the bridge. The old fellow about to arrest did entirely too much talking.

12 October 1847. The weather today was pleasant through the morning. In the afternoon it was cloudy which continued until about 10 1/2 o'clock, when we had quite a furious storm of wind, rain, thunder and lightning.

The election of today passed off very quietly. I never observed more order and decorum at the polls. The election throughout was conducted in the most orderly manner. Stopped in at Mooney's at the corner of 11th and George and got a whiskey punch, the 1st I have had this season, and the first of the season made by Mooney.

About 1/2 past 7 Mr. S. Bonnell Jr. called for me, and we took a walk out together to see the election night doings. In passing Boque & Faussett's, went in and procured ourselves each a large pair of black whiskers & moustache, which we wore during the evening, and our most intimate acquaintances could not recognize us. We went around to Mrs. Crim's, and none of the boarders recognized us. Mr. Bonnell went to my mother's room and asked in broken English whether Mrs. Erwin was in, that he had been directed there by the servant. They did not recognize him, though suspected. Upon my going home I told them that Bonnell & I were out together therefore it could not have been us, and finally persuaded them that it was not us. And now have the tables turned on them as both the Misses Chambers were in Ma's room & they all laughed out in Bonnell's face, and the eldest Miss Chambers followed him along the entry. We now plague them for laughing in the face of a strange gentleman & following him. We had great fun the whole evening, as numbers had remarks to make on our flowing whiskers. It was impossible to tell them from real.

13 October 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening about 1 /4 of 8 went up to the Odd Fellows' Oyster Saloon to meet S. Bonnell Jr. and Mr. Boyle according to engagement. I got there before them, but they shortly afterwards came in, Bonnell with his false whiskers. We immediately left the saloon but returned in a few minutes having put my whiskers on too. We had considerable fun, and two fellows who we had never seen before, would have us drink with them for the sake of our whiskers. Upon leaving called up at Miss Burton's, and intended going with our whiskers on, but their father came to the door which made me doff mine, but Bonnell went in with his and created considerable amusement. We had first sent our cards in with French names. Bonnell remained but a few minutes and then went around to Miss Roars' in 8th West Side above Green for Miss Kate Smith and Louisa Snyder. He remained some time, and I went up after him and met them just as they were coming out of the door. I went up and spoke and then Miss Snyder and I went up to Mr. Smith's to get their night key.

Upon our return we concluded to stop in at Miss Roars'. I was to be introduced into the parlor as a French gentleman by the name of Olevia. Upon the Servants coming to the door we had her tell Miss Roars to come to the door, and I was introduced to her, when she introduced me into the parlor. There were some 5 or 6 strange ladies, and some 4 or 5 strange gentlemen, also Mrs. Roars. I could scarcely suppress a laugh. Mrs. Roars ask me if I understood the game the ladies were playing. I answered in broken English that I did not, so that nothing more was said to me. It seemed a long while to sit there, but I kept on a straight face, and bid them good evening in broken English when I left. I could hardly contain myself until I got outside the door when I burst into a loud laugh. The ladies and gentlemen appeared to be much amused at my whiskers, as I could see them biting their lips to keep from laughing. I had never been in the house before.

We afterward called to see Miss Reeves. She at first addressed me as Mr. Erwin, but afterwards seemed to be doubtful and I think came to the conclusion she was mistaken, as I spoke in broken English to her. We remained but a few minutes and then returned to Miss Burton's where we spent a very pleasant evening, in chatting, cutting dream cake, &c. from the wedding cake of Mr. John McClury of Wilmington who married their eldest sister yesterday morning.

14 October 1847. At Mr. J.G. Armstrong's where I underwent the painful operation of having a back tooth taken out. He made 3 attempts before succeeding.

In the evening I concluded to call down to see Miss Clarke not withstanding my resolution made a few days since. I thought that perhaps my conjectures were unreasonable, and that it was right to give her an opportunity of giving an explanation if she thought proper. I am now much pleased that I went. When I first entered the room I found Mr. Dayton there, sitting with Miss Clarke. She appeared to be quite reserved, perhaps owing to my manners which were pretty much of the same nature. She gradually became more pleasant and talkative, & after Mr. Dayton left, which was about 9 o'clock, she became as usual lively, talkative & pleasant. In a short time she gave me a satisfactory reason why she did not go out riding with me, viz., that she was obliged to see some friends off to Baltimore, and could not possibly go, at the same time expressing regret that she could not accompany me. I am now greatly pleased that I went, as I have been unhappy ever since the occurrence. I do really love this lady and notwithstanding all my resolves to the contrary cannot keep from visiting her. I will resume my visits.

15 October 1847. An overcoat quite comfortable, which I wore for the first time this season. Up at 1/4 of 7 & took my usual bath. In the evening called up to see Miss Elizabeth Penn-Gaskell and spent a pleasant evening.

17 October 1847. A larger number on the usual Sunday afternoon promenade.

18 October 1847. In the evening called down to see Miss. L.M. Clarke, found her in and spent a pleasant evening.

19 October 1847. At the office until about 2 p.m. then started out to take a ride with Miss Ann Maginnis, sister of E.J. Maginnis of New York. Drove over Market Street Bridge and up as far as the wire bridge where I recrossed the Schuylkill. Drove by Fair Mount then to Girard College by way of Coats Street & Ridge Road. Went through, and on top of the College, and then drove out to the Wissahickon via Lamb Tavern, thence by the Wissahickon Road to Germantown, then up as far as Mr. Carpenter's residence. Then we returned to the City by the turnpike to Broad Street, thence home. In the evening Mr. Bonnell called for me. There was quite a large fire raging at the time in Franklin place. We went down there together, but not being able to see much, we parted to meet again at 10th

& Chestnut at 8 o'clock. From there went around to the "Franklin Institute" exhibition which opened today. The display of articles of various kinds were very large, but they have not yet completed their arrangements. The company was quite small and of rather the lower order.

20 October 1847. In the evening at home until about 8 o'clock then went up to the exhibition of the "Franklin Institute." There were a much larger number here than on the previous evening, though the company was not at all select.

21 October 1847. Took a walk on Chestnut Street with Frank Taylor. There were not many on the promenade. On our return home about dusk at 6th and Chestnut we noticed a couple of very genteel dressed ladies who acting rather strangely. We followed them as far as Front & Dock. They gave us every opportunity to join them but did not. Returned home to tea.

In the evening went to a small party of about 30 or 40 at Mr. N. Burough's with Ma and Lydia. Spent a delightful evening. Miss L.M. Clarke was there & spent the greater portion of the evening in her company, waited upon her to the supper room, &c. Danced & had quite a merry time. About 11 an elegant oyster & salad supper was served & enjoyed.

22 October 1847. At the office all day until about 5 p.m. when I went up to Mr. J.G. Armstrong's in 10th Street below Wallace to have a tooth extracted which had been aching me all day. Returned home about 1/2 past 6, after tea went up to the opera at the Walnut of Fra Diavolo and the burlesque called Olympic Revels. The House was well and fashionably filled, and the opera went off well. Noticed Miss L.M. Clarke in the boxes with Mr. Anderson.

24 October 1847. In the morning went to St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church with Mr. E.J. Maginnis and his sister. In the afternoon went up to Grace Church. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in and well, was to have accompanied her to Church but owing to the rain could not.

25 October 1847. About 2 p.m. started out to take a ride with Mr. E.J. Maginnis, his sister Ann, and cousin Miss Sarah Hoyt of New York. My sister accompanied us. First drove out to Fair Mount and took a walk over the grounds & upon the reservoirs, thence to Laurel hill where we spent about 3/4 of an hour viewing the beauties of the spot & thence home via Wissahickon Road, Germantown & Broad Street. The roads were very muddy, consequently the ride was not so pleasant as it would have been.

I drove all the way until we got into Broad Street below the Monument Cemetery, when I gave the reins to Mr. Maginnis, it being too dark for me to drive with safety owing to being near sighted. After tea went up to the Odd Fellows' oyster saloon where I met Mr. S. Bonnell Jr. and Mr. Joseph Boyle according to engagement. We each took a whiskey punch and then called up for the Misses Hannah & Susan Burton & waited upon them up to Miss Kate Smith's. We met there according to appointment Miss Mary Chambers and her brother John, & Mr. E.J. Maginnis & my sister. We took Miss Smith quite by surprise, as she did not expect any of us. There was also a Miss Bradford who lives next door.

26 October 1847. In the evening at a wedding party in West Philadelphia given by Morris L. Keen to his brother Joseph L. Keen who was married this day three weeks ago to Miss Elizabeth Watt, quite a fine looking and pretty girl. I entered the room shorty after 9 it was a perfect jam, you could scarcely move at all, and dancing was out of the question until late in the evening, when some of the company had left. There were 300 invitations out, and I suppose over 100 present.

27 October 1847.Ice made for the first time last night. Evening at home. Upon leaving the parlor went up into my mother's room where we had a game of whist, &c. Mr. Chambers came in about 9 o'clock. My sister and Mr. Maginnis arrived about 1/4 past 10, they having been to the "Franklin Institute Exhibition." Had considerable sport in carrying the "dead man in," "giant," &c.

28 October 1847. In the evening went up to the "Franklin Institute Exhibition."

29 October 1847. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke but did not find her in, went in, and conversed with her mother a short time.

30 October 1847. In the evening I called down with Mr. S. Bonnell, Jr. to see the Misses Stevenson. It was his first visit. We called for the purpose of playing off a little piece of fun. I was disguised as a 1st Lieutenant, with an immense pair of whiskers and moustache. Mr. Bonnell was dressed in his citizen dress. We introduced ourselves as two American officers just returned from Mexico, by letter of introduction (written by me) purporting to come from Washington from M. Smith, who is now in Mexico, and an intimate friend of mine, and also acquaintance of the Misses Stevenson. We saw both Becky and Jane, the mother and two younger sisters. We sat conversing for about an hour and a half without being discovered, in which time we related some marvelous adventures, of hair breadth escapes in Mexico, &c. They also conversed something about me, and though sitting close by them all, my disguise was so perfect they did not recognize me. We left without being discovered, and had a pressing invitation to call again.

After leaving the Misses Stevenson, called down to see Dick Christiani. He recognized me knowing I had the whiskers, but his mother did not. I was the subject of numerous remarks in passing along 2nd Street. We also stopped in at Mr. H. Bird's hat store. Mr. Bonnell asked the price of hats, &c, but Bird did not recognize me, and we passed out and went up towards home.

NOVEMBER

1 November 1847. In the evening at a small company with Mr. & Mrs. Maginnis, Mr. Loughead and my sister given by Mr. Meyer in 4th Street below Chestnut, West side. I was not acquainted with any of the company consequently very stiff, We had some fine playing on the piano & singing, but no dancing. There were about 20 there.

2 November 1847. Clear and delightful fall weather. At the office all day, and in the evening went up to the Circus with H.J. Felters to see the new piece called Ivanhoe which for pageantry and beauty of scenery was beautiful indeed. The house was crowded to excess.

3 November 1847. At the office all day, until about 1 p.m. Then went up to Mr. Edward Roberts for Ma and Lydia who had been spending the day there to have them come home by request of Mrs. Crim as she was to have a dance in the parlor this evening. They insisted upon my remaining to tea which I did. Left there about 1/2 past 7, went home & dressed, and entered the parlor about 1/4 of 9. The company was composed principally of the boarders though there were some few strangers. We had a fiddler and kept up the dancing until about 1 a.m. spending a delightful evening. I made the acquaintance of Miss Borden(38) this evening, one of our boarders, who has been here for some time though I had not become acquainted. She is quite an interesting young lady, and I am much pleased with her, though I must say she did not treat me very well regarding an engagement I had to dance with her. I suppose it was not intentional, as she afterwards made an apology.

Mrs. Charles Gibbons and Elizabeth Gibbons came to spend the evening with Ma & Lydia, but would not stay when they found we were to have the dance in the parlor.

4 November 1847. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke. Found her in and spent a very pleasant evening.

5 November 1847. In the evening called down to see the Misses Stevenson. Found Jane at home, also saw the mother. About 1/2 past 8 Rebecca came in. In the course of conversation, the two officers who called last Saturday evening were mentioned. They appeared to have no idea that I was one of them. They spoke of the large whiskers, moustache, war, &c. I joked them considerably about the officers but they appeared to be entirely innocent of any joke having been played upon them. Left about 1/2 past 9.

6 November 1847. From about 9 o'clock was sitting in the parlor talking to Miss Borden of Cincinnati, quite a pretty and interesting young lady. I sat conversing with her until about 1/4 of 11. Found she was acquainted with several of my acquaintances in Cincinnati, among whom were Miss Louisa Kirby, who she told me much to my astonishment had been married on the 6th of August last to Tom Piat. I do not know of anything that gave me more surprise. It was very much in opposition to her parent's wishes. I can hardly believe it.

7 November 1847. At Grace Church in the morning. After dinner started out to take a walk to Gray's ferry with H.J. Felters, but both feeling too lazy did not get further than Schuylkill 3rd and Lombard, when we returned as far as St. Luke's Church. I went in and Felters left me and went home. Instead of a sermon we had a letter read from the House of Bishops. After Church went home.

After tea I was in the parlor until about 8 o'clock. I was talking with Miss Borden until Mr. John Chambers, in a very ungentlemanly manner, came and thrust himself between Miss Borden and myself, whilst I was in the midst of relating something to her. Of course I yielded to the gentleman, and he conversed with her until tired. If the same matter should occur again he and I will have some difficulty. As it was the first offense of the kind I shall look over it.

8 November 1847. In the evening called over to see Miss Caroline Keen in West Philadelphia to make my party call, found her in and spent rather a pleasant evening.

9 November 1847. After tea went up to the "Odd Fellows' oyster saloon" to meet S. Bonnell according to engagement. He came about 8, when both called up to see Miss Kate Smith.

10 November 1847. In the evening at home in the parlor. Several of the ladies were there; we had quite a pleasant little dance.

11 November 1847. Spent the evening at home, part of the time in Ma's room, part in Mr. Felter's room & the balance in the parlor.

12 November 1847. At about 1/2 past 8 commenced raining, which continued through the night. In the evening called up to see the Misses Arethusa and Sarah E. Leeds, found them both in and well. Sarah E. was very agreeable, but Arethusa did not speak to me the whole evening being so much engaged with Mr. Jenks. Was obliged to walk home in the rain.

13 November 1847. In the evening called up to see the Roberts in 9th Street with Ma. Left at about 1/2 past 9 and went home. Found some of the boarders dancing in the parlor but I only went in for a minute or two.

14 November 1847. In the morning walked up to Grace Church with Ma and Lydia, left them there, and then went to St. Phillip's Church. Met S. Bonnell, Jr. at Church, after which he and I took a walk. About 3 o'clock Bonnell again called for me, and we started out to go to the Church at the corner of Schuylkill 3rd & Callowhill, but first thought we would go by Mr. Thomas Faris, to see whether we could see anything of Miss Copeland, as we heard she was in town staying there. Saw her sitting at the window, spoke, and passed on, but afterwards altered our mind, returned, and called upon her, a very agreeable visit.

15 November 1847. In the evening called up to see Miss Emma Mulford with sister. Found her in and well. Also saw a Miss Davis from the Eastern shore of Maryland who is now staying with her, found her to be very agreeable but not pretty.

16 November 1847. In the evening called down to see Miss Elizabeth Gibbons but she was not in. Then returned to the office, and was obliged to remain there until 1/2 past 10, on account of James P. Barr, who now occupies the office with me. He had come in, unknown to me, and got dead drunk on my wine which I keep behind the door. I finally had to send him home in a cab.

17 November 1847. Went down to the Broad Street Exchange where I had an engagement to meet Mr. Chambers again. From there went down to the Museum Building to try to get in "The Colombian Assembly" 2nd Ball, but our tickets would not admit us without ladies so we could not get in. Met at the door a gentleman I know very well but forget his name. We all 3 went around to an oyster cellar.

18 November 1847. In the evening dressed to go to a party given by Miss Eliza Atlee. There were about 30 there. I was acquainted with but very few, consequently it was very stiff for me. Was introduced to quite a pretty and interesting young lady by the name of Scott from Baltimore.

19 November 1847. In the evening went up to Miss Huston's at the corner of 11th and Girard to attend the first meeting of our "Circlet" for the season. We spent a very pleasant evening in chatting, but no dancing as they are Quakers.

20 November 1847. At the office the greater part of the day, and in the evening at home.

21 November 1847. After tea went into the parlor a short time, then went out in pursuit of Ma who had started to go to church but had not returned to tea. First I went to the Roberts in 9th Street. Went in and sat about 3/4 of an hour. Not finding her there went up to Jacob Ellis in Montgomery Street below 13th but found they had moved. Then went to Edward Roberts where I found her. Went in and spent the rest of the evening there.

22 November 1847. Evening foggy, cloudy and exceedingly damp. At the office all day, and in the evening at home. Miss Kate Smith and Miss Louisa Snyder, accompanied by Mr. S. Bonnell Jr. and Mr. Evans, came down to spend the evening with my sister & Miss Chambers. We gave them a dance & we spent quite a pleasant evening, a large number of the boarders were in the parlor, and nearly all the young ladies. We had for music a violin, having hired a black fellow to play.

23 November 1847. In the evening Mr. S. Bonnell, Jr. called for me and we made a call upon Miss Kate Smith. On our way home stopped in at the Odd Fellows' Oyster Saloon and got some oysters &c.

24 November 1847. The rain continued falling without intermission throughout the day and evening. At the office all day until about 3 1/2 p.m. feeling very unwell all day, with a severe headache. Upon going up into Ma's room laid down on the sofa until about 1/2 past 8, then went to bed and took some medicine, but was unable to keep it on my stomach. I also vomited in the early part of the evening. Ma sat up with me until about 1/2 past 1 o'clock, by which time I became much easier, having received much relief from a hot lemonade procured through the kindness of Mr. Joseph B. Loughead, which threw me into a perspiration and broke the fever.

25 November 1847. Today is set apart by nearly general agreement, and in accordance with the Governor's recommendation, as a day of Thanksgiving and praise to the Giver of all good, for the bounties we have been favored with during the season. A large majority of the States of the Union unite in its observance in this manner, and probably more than fifteen millions of people will acknowledge with grateful hearts the blessings they have received. Our nation more than any other in the world has reason to be thankful for the favors it enjoys. Our land has not been traversed by famine, the meager friend, which

Blows mildew from between his shriveled lips

And taints the golden ear.

But plenty, with measureless liberality, has poured ever flowing streams of wealth into the lap of patient industry. Pestilence, which has depopulated places in the Eastern World, has not visited, to any alarming extent, our own shores; and War, whose track is marked in fire and blood, fortunately desolates not our own cities though many hearts among us mourn those who have fallen in their country's battles. From these, the greater calamities which afflict the earth, we have been exempted; while from nations around us come the cries of anguish and despair, fearfully significant of present and future suffering.

Bright is the picture that our own land presents, and glorious the future that seems marked for it. Favored of Providence it prospers, and even in its young vigor exhibits the power and strength of mature manhood; while, in single contrast, the old world seems to be falling into decrepitude and ruin. Prosperous at home, in its business, and duly developing its immense resources, successful abroad beyond precedent, in new and untried undertakings, our country exhibits the greatness arising from free and enlightened principles of government, which our fathers, in the wisdom given by their Creator, had the virtue to adopt, and eminently shows the increase and majesty of a nation actuated, in all its doings, by a strict sense of justice to itself and the world.

Let us be thankful then, and rejoice with exceeding gladness, that our home has been cast here, where unjust privilege rides not rampant the sons of labor, and honest industry is not robbed of the rewards that a bountiful God bestows upon its toil. It is not self-glorification to speak thus. The sad spectacle abroad, and the thousands who flee to our shores for a refuge from starvation and disease, attest the truth of the contrast we have pictured, and should be a lesson of wisdom to the millions in this country who earn their living by the sweat of their brow.

Thanksgiving day was generally observed, the Churches were well filled in the morning, and the streets afterwards. Chestnut Street was a perfect jam in the afternoon. The places of public amusement were also well filled in the evening. The stores generally were all closed, and the streets wore the appearance of a Sunday, had it not been for the vast number of people congregated upon them, which led one to suppose almost that it was Christmas day.

I was not able to get up this morning until about 11 o'clock, when feeling rather better, dressed, and went over to the office, where I remained until about 1 o'clock, then went over to the house and sat until about 1/2 past 1, when dinner was ready. Was not able to eat any being too unwell.

26 November 1847. At the office all day, though very unwell from a severe headache. In the evening went to a party with Ma at Mrs. Edith Prichett's, though very much against my will, as I was so very unwell, though Ma would not go without me. I spent as pleasant an evening as could be expected. It was not so large a party as I expected to find. About 10 o'clock we had a very fine oyster supper, which I could not partake of.

27 November 1847. I feel much better today.

28 November 1847. Got up this morning about 9 o'clock not feeling very well. About 12 o'clock walked as far around as Barns Church. After dinner went in the parlor. Mr. Bonnell called for me at about 20 m. of 3 and he and I went up to St. Luke's Church. In the evening went up to St. Phillip's Church.

29 November 1847. Clear and exceeding cold all day. It is the first and coldest day we have had this season. Ice made all day. The night was also exceeding cold. Overcloaks, coats and good fires in great demand. At the office all day, and in the evening went up to a party given by the Misses Whitmer at the corner of Broad and Filbert Streets. There were about 80 to 100 there, a number of whom I was acquainted with. About 11 o'clock we had a delightful supper of oysters, chicken salad, champagne and every other kind of wine was full and plenty. The table was beautifully decorated with candy pyramids, &c. The parlors were but poorly lighted and quite cold, so that the ladies were all complaining.

30 November 1847. Clear and cold. The extreme cold today and yesterday, with the sudden change from the temperate weather that preceded it, has been a fruitful theme of conversation. At the County prison at sunrise, the thermometer stood at 14°, 18° below the freezing point. During the whole of last winter the same thermometer was that low only on 5 occasions. 9° above zero was the lowest point, and this occurred but once. A thermometer at some distance from the City and probably in a more exposed situation, stood this morning at 8° above zero. Considerable ice was formed in the mill dams attached to the manufactures in the vicinity of the City, and the effect of the extreme cold could be seen in the docks along the Delaware.

At the office all day. In the evening met S. Bonnell, Jr. at the "Veranda House" in Broad above Walnut at 8 o'clock and then called to see Miss Copeland of Brooklyn, but did not find her in, then called down to see the Misses Carter, found them both in, but Harriet was just going to the "Bazaar." Spent the evening quite pleasantly with Mary, though the parlors were a little too cold. Left at about 1/4 past 10, stopped at 8th and Walnut & got some oysters, when I left Sam.

DECEMBER

1 December 1847. In the evening about 1/4 of 8 met S. Bonnell, Jr. according to engagement at the Odd Fellows' Oyster saloon and then called up to see Miss Kate Smith. Found her in and well. Spent quite a pleasant evening & left at about 11 o'clock. Had to walk home in a heavy shower. Went into Ma's room before going to bed to eat some cake & wine.

2 December 1847. Rained hard nearly all day, and weather quite warm. The change from intense cold to a temperature resembling mid-summer, which has happened within the last two or three days, was perhaps never experienced before, even in this changeable climate. On Tuesday morning at daylight the thermometer suspended on the North front of the Exchange stood at 13° above zero, and yesterday morning at the same hour the thermometer indicated 59° above zero as the state of the temperature, a change of 46° in the short space of 48 hours. It is said Tuesday morning was the coldest weather we have had in the month of November for the last 47 years.

At the office the greater part of the day. In the evening went down, in company with my sister and E.J. Maginnis to spend the evening with Miss Louisa Kerr, from New York, now staying with her brother in law and sister Mr. & Mrs. Belrose. They live in the west side of Delaware 5th Street a few doors above Pine. We spent a very pleasant evening playing whist, &c. Met a Mr. Clarke there. We had quite a merry time in the latter part of the evening, having finished two bottles of champagne between us.

3 December 1847. In the evening went to the Misses Carter to attend the 2nd meeting of the Circlet. We spent a very pleasant evening in dancing, singing, playing on the piano, flute, chatting, &c.

4 December 1847. In the afternoon about 1/2 past 4, took a walk on Chestnut Street with H.J. Felters. Found a large number on the promenade. In the evening at home. In Ma's room until about 8 o'clock then went down into the parlor. Sat & chatted with Miss Storms & Miss Borden until about 9 o'clock, then returned to Ma's room. Found Miss Cooper there. In a few minutes some stewed oysters were brought in which I had ordered and which we enjoyed.

5 December 1847. Spent the evening in the parlor until about 1/4 past 9, talking with Miss Caroline Borden of Cincinnati, who is quite a pretty girl. I become more pleased with her the better I become acquainted.

6 December 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening after tea, went in to the parlor and had a very pleasant chat with Miss Borden and Miss Boker. About 8 o'clock called up to see Miss Eliza Atlee, found her in and well.

7 December 1847. In the evening accompanied my sister and Miss Caroline A. Borden of Cincinnati to the Walnut Street Theater to see Madame Bishop & Mr. Reeves in the opera of Linda Chamony. The opera was well performed to a very brilliant audience. Never do I remember seeing a fuller or more fashionable house. The parquet & boxes were filled with the fashion & beauty of the City & the 2nd & 3rd tiers were crowded to excess. I sat in the parquet for the first time this evening with the ladies.

8 December 1847. Clear and very mild weather more like Spring than December. At the office the greater part of the day, and in the evening called up with Mr. E.J. Maginnis at Mr. Thomas Hays in Spruce Street 3rd door below Broad North side. Ma & Lydia had been there to tea. Spent a very pleasant evening, playing whist, dancing &c.

Mr. & Mrs. Elliott's wedding party to their son Samuel was given this evening, but we did not go, Lydia and I not being on very good terms with the younger branch of the family.

9 December 1847. It is like May.

10 December 1847. Cloudy, rainy and very unpleasant all day. The weather still continues very mild, overcoats & cloaks are useless. Pedestrianism was a most unpleasant performance today. Rain, rain, slop, slop, throughout the entire day. The streets were in a most horrible condition.

At the office all day. After tea went into the parlor & had a chat with Miss C.A. Borden & Miss Clark, until about 1/2 past 7, then went upstairs, dressed, and returned to the parlor when Miss Clark sang Upon the banks of Guadalguiver from the opera of Linda of Chamouni. About 8 o'clock Storms and I left, and called up to the see the Misses Huston. Found them all in and well, also saw both of the brothers and another gentleman whose name I do not remember. This was our first evening call on the Misses Huston except on the occasions of the meeting of the Circlet. Spent a very pleasant evening.

11 December 1847. In the afternoon about 1/4 past 4 Mr. J. Dorsey Bald and myself, took a walk out to Fairmount thence over the wire bridge to Harding. After tea went into the parlor for a short time, and about 8 o'clock called up to Mr. Edward Roberts for Ma, who had been there to tea. Found them all at home. Had quite a talk about Miss Louisa M. Clarke.

13 December 1847. At the office until about 1 p.m. then went up to Schuylkill 8th & Race Streets and from there to N.W. corner of Broad & Filbert to make my party call on the Misses Whitmer. Saw the youngest sister, Susan. The other two were out.

In the evening I called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke. I have not been there for 5 weeks last Thursday thinking that perhaps by remaining away from her that my love might abate somewhat, as I fear I shall never be able to gain her. But with this visit all my former passions were renewed ten fold. She looked more winning than ever. I felt like proposing at once. But then I feared that I might be refused, or told that she was to be another's. I hope yet to gain her. I can love none other. A Mr. Gibbons came in about 3/4 of an hour after I was there, and Mr. Clarke about 9 o'clock. Mr. Gibbons left at about 1/2 past 9, and shortly afterwards Mrs. Clarke came in. She had been out spending the evening. She as usual was very pleasant and agreeable. Miss Louisa was strangely, though very becomingly, dressed this evening. She had on a red flour sack, trimmed with two rows of black velvet ribbon, they are now very fashionable, and added much to the appearance of her queen like figure.

14 December 1847. The general topic of conversation for the past week has been the unseasonable weather, which has born more resemblance to the 1st of April than December. Today at noon the thermometer at McAllister's door indicated 71° within 4° of summer heat. Present indications are to the effect that we are now experiencing a rainy season, resembling the winters in tropical climates, rather than one suited to the latitude in which we dwell. We had intervals of sunshine and rain throughout the day. In the afternoon a very heavy shower, and then a beautiful rainbow.

In the evening about 1/4 of 9 called in a cab for Miss Anna F. Roberts to wait upon her to Captain & Mrs. Puleski's party at the N. E. corner of Schuylkill 5th and Walnut Streets. It was not so magnificent an affair as I expected to find, yet everything was done in very handsome style. Miss Puleski, to whom I was introduced for the first time tonight, is rather a pretty looking lady. I had nothing to say to her. There were about 80 there, very few of whom I was acquainted. I was introduced to and danced with Miss Dingley this evening. She was quite agreeable, but not pretty. Miss Vogdes was there looking very pretty. I also danced with her. Had piano music for dancing, which was very tame. The supper was got up in very pretty style, though not so handsome as I have seen. No champagne.

15 December 1847. In the afternoon about 1/2 past 4 went up to Jefferson & Howard Streets accompanied by H.J. Felters to collect some ground rent of Jonathan Wood for Miss S.A. Crim. Returned to the office about 6 o'clock, remained a short time & then went over to tea. We had several cotillions in the parlor.

16 December 1847. Cloudy, raw cold and rainy throughout the day. About dark it commenced hailing and snowing which continued through the evening, blowing all the time a perfect hurricane. It was one of the most stormy nights we have had for a long while. The slush and snow was about an inch deep on the pavements, & the first snow of the season.

At the office all day, & in the evening went up to a family party given by Mr. & Mrs. A.S. Roberts to the bride, Mrs. Samuel Elliott, recently married. Sam Elliott himself was not there, having to be in Washington. The company was not very large, being composed principally of the connections of the family. About 11 o'clock we had a very delightful supper of oysters, chicken salad, champagne, ice cream, &c.

17 December 1847. In the evening about 12 o'clock had some snow and hail. Out on business the greater part of the morning. After dinner walked up to Vine above 11th with the Reverend James E. Welch to look at a portrait he is now about having painted of his dead son James. Did not think it good. In the evening after tea went over to a sale of fancy articles at 5th & Chestnut Streets. Remained there until 1/4 past 8, then went down to Miss Ellen Heinman's at 9th and Pine Streets to attend the 3rd meeting of the Circlet, the ladies and gentlemen were generally all present. We spent a very pleasant evening. Left at about 11 o'clock with Mr. H. Storms and went home.

Shortly after I got into bed Mr. Storms knocked at my door and told me he had been robbed of his overcoat, pants and the rest, and asked me whether I had lost anything. Upon getting up I found that I had lost my coat, pants, vest, shirt and handkerchief, which I had left upon the chair on leaving the room early in the evening. I immediately dressed, and we started to see if we could find any discoveries concerning them. I found my vest on the stairs leading to the roof, and in the bathroom below my spectacles & case with part of my fire proof key. Upon going downstairs found Mr. K. Adams just coming who joined us in our search. Went out and up to the Mayor's office & from there to the watch station in George Street above 8th where we saw Mr. Young, an officer, but found we could do nothing tonight. Returned home and made a search of the house, and questioned some of the servants. It must have been some of the servants, though we strongly suspect a man by the name of John, a waiter who has recently left the house.

19 December 1847. In the morning walked up to Grace Church. After Church walked home with Miss Louisa M. Clarke. She looked very pretty this morning, and was as agreeable and pleasant as ever.

20 December 1847. At about 4 p.m. H.J. Felters and myself started out to take a walk to attend to some little matters. First went up to 2nd and Green, then up Green to 11th, up 11th to Washington, up Washington Street to Ridge Road, and out the Ridge Road nearly to the 1st toll gate above Girard College, where we met Mr. Kuber the gentleman we were going to see. We then turned about & went down the Ridge Road to Broad Street, down Broad to Race, up Race to Schuylkill 4th to see a man by the name of Dryberger, & then back to the office.

In the evening went up to Odd Fellows' Oyster Saloon where I met S. Bonnell according to appointment & both called up at Miss Kate Smith's. Found both her and Miss Snyder, just ready to go around to Miss Sarah Elizabeth Leeds. Went in for a short time, and was introduced to Miss Angelina Smith of Reading, Pennsylvania, cousin to Kate. Shortly after went around to Leeds with Kate and Miss Snyder leaving Bonnell to entertain Miss Angeline. I was very much surprised this evening to hear that Miss Arethusa had been married to Mr. Jenks last August, but it did not come out until last Tuesday. I knew they were engaged, but did not expect they would be married before Spring. They were married before alderman Mitchell.

21 December 1847. At the office during the day, until about 5 p.m. then went out to Schuylkill 3rd and Wood accompanied by J. Dorsey Bald, to see Joseph Wood about some money due me, but did not find him in. From there went out to the Girard College and stopped at the Widow's opposite. Met Samuel Richards there. Took three whiskey punches, then left and walked in by 1/4 past 7. Went into the parlor for a short time where I found the ladies busily employed making decorations for the room tomorrow night on the occasion of the party.

I then called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, but unfortunately found her out, which I was very sorry for, as it seems a long while since I have seen her, though only a week.

Went home. Found Mr. Storms had John there, who we have suspected of stealing our clothes last Friday. We took him over to the Mayor's office, and then went up to where he is now staying at Mrs. Buck's in Schuylkill 6th above Arch, to search his clothes but could find nothing. Then returned home.

22 December 1847. In the evening at home, it being the occasion of the party given by the young gentlemen of the house, complimentary to the ladies. There were about 100 present, many of them strangers invited by the different ladies and gentlemen of the house. I was one of the committee of management of the evening, which was composed of Messrs. John H. Chambers, William J. Felters and E.J. Maginnis besides myself. The company all seemed to enjoy themselves, and it was universally acknowledged by all it was the pleasantest evening they had spent at any party this Winter. All seemed to be sociable and well pleased. Dancing was the order of the evening with both plain and Polka quadrilles, and a great deal of waltzing. Our music was a violin and harp. About 12 o'clock we had a supper in the usual style, with oysters fried & stewed, chicken salad, wine, ice cream, grapes, &c, &c. The dining room was prettily decorated as well as the parlors. The ladies of the house all looked very well. I waited on Miss Borden into the supper room. I become better pleased the more I become acquainted. The company generally left about 1/2 past 2 or 1/4 of 3, though the boarders kept up dancing until about 1/2 past 3, after which some of the gentlemen went into the dining room & had a cold cut of ham, a glass of wine and some bread & butter, &c.

23 December 1847. Clear, cold & pleasant all day, but a little blustering & dusky. Towards evening it clouded and about 1/2 past 7 commenced a tremendous snow storm which lasted about 2 hours. The snow was about 1 1/2 feet deep. At the office until about 1/2 of 12 o'clock, then called up for Miss Anna Roberts, according to engagement to make a party call upon Miss Wilhelmina Puleski. Found Anna waiting for me but after our walk found her [Miss Puleski] not at home, which I was very sorry for, as this was my first call. Called down to see Miss Louisa Clarke, but unfortunately found her out too, then called on Miss Ellen Quigley, she was also out. She had gone to a burying. After tea went over to a sale at the corner of 5th and Chestnut Streets, and made some few purchases for Christmas presents, and about 8 o'clock called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in and well and spent a very pleasant evening.

24 December 1847. Snow-capped roofs met the waking eye this morning, and old winter now seems to be full upon us. The walking was very bad owing to the snow thawing. About 1/2 past 4 went out to take a walk on Chestnut Street. It was crowded to excess with ladies & gentlemen, all very happy faces. The shop windows I never remember to have looked more beautiful, and the owners all seem to be reaping a rich harvest.

I met Miss Caroline A. Borden and Miss F. Storms, who I joined and had a pleasant little promenade. Miss Borden is certainly a charming lady. Her manners are so pleasant & innocent. After walking home with them returned to the office, remained there about 3/4 of an hour, and then went over to tea. In the evening E.J. Maginnis, Jno. Chambers & myself went over to the "American House" where we met at 8 o'clock according to appointment Messrs. A. Cattell and Cooper. We all sallied out together to see some sport of a Christmas Eve, and which we did really see before returning home. Returned home about 1/2 past 10, found the Misses Clark, Borden, Storms, Boker, Mary Chambers, Mrs. Moss & Mr. Carter in the parlor playing the game of the "Knight of the Whistle." We all laughed until we were almost dead at the different ladies being initiated. In fact I laughed from about 8 until 12 tonight.

25 December 1847. The festival day of Christendom, the day that commemorates an event the greatest and most beneficent known to time or eternity, again demands its pleasant oration. The heart of the better half of the world throbs, today, with a larger joy; age is young again and childhood is a crowned monarch. Who is old today? Grandsires and graybeards mingle upon this day of all the year, with the rollicking crows that rebel, with all tongues of Babel. In the parlor baby brows are crowned with empire, & baby hands rule, with rattles and penny trumpets for oracles. And who shall say them nay? There is, in the festival of Christmas a joy so universal, so childlike, so pure, it belongs so entirely to the heart & hearthstone that the wrinkles must be deep that it cannot soothe, the sorrow profound that it cannot teach forgetfulness. It is the festival of the family, the holiday of home, the "Merry Christmas" of which we dreamed when every dream was pure and bright. Every thought associated with the festival is holier from the recollections that connect it with childhood, the childhood of the Savior, the early and impressive lesson, one taught to many an aching parental heart, of "suffer little children to come unto me, and forbid them not." Yet even the chastening griefs of the past seem to cast no shadow upon Christmas day; we imagine, and not vainly, that in the purity of our own grateful rejoicings, those who have gone before us mingle unseen, and that there is a blessing over the joy that pauses for a moment to dedicate a tear to him whose chair is not filled, to the memory that is not all happy.

The event commemorated occurred in the midst of snows; every snow was, to the race, the pledge of higher hopes, and a surer, happier destiny; and to many, the domestic griefs remembered this day will be thought of with blessings to the better wisdom that renders even affliction profitable.

But the clangor of the tiny drums, and the bray of the penny trumpet, leave no leisure today for reflection. Each tottering boy is metamorphosed into a warrior; and amid the romping and clamorous crowd, where the grandsire is noisiest, while the grandam looks on with more of quiet happiness at her heart than the wealth of empires could purchase, there is no chance for the croaker. It is a holy joy, a noble and generous joy, an opening of the closed heart and a pouring forth of sympathies and kindnesses cherished purely and cherished long. Who cares for the noise? Let the penny trumpet bray, and the discordant drum rattle; we will not even think of the Mexican War today. The smiles dance, the happy song, the happier hymn and the joining of full hearts in thanksgiving - these are the joys worthy of the day, worthy of rich remembrance when other and darker days are around us. Let the laugh, then, be as happy and loud as if we, the old folks, did not hear it; and the play and the prank may even have a relish of wildness. Blessings upon the joys of Christmas.

But is this all? There are many silent households; many circles where no voice of rejoicing is heard; many firesides where the form of the cherished is not seen, and the voice that was music is stilled. Consolation to those who stand beside the vacant chair! But there are others - think of them - who have, even in this season of rejoicing, to seek hopelessly for the means of averting the sternest afflictions of poverty. Hundreds of thousands will be spent this day on toys that will be destroyed tomorrow; that which is expended in well-directed charity, binding up the bruised heart, succoring the helpless, or making a merry Christmas for the poor, will be invested beyond the reach of the future.

Snow commenced falling early this morning and continued with but slight intermission throughout the day and evening. Sleighs made their appearance before the day was over though I cannot say much for the sleighing - being the first of the season.

At the office in the morning until about 1/2 past 10, then went up to St. Phillip's Church looked in, and not seeing Miss L. M. Clarke there, went up to Grace Church and heard a good sermon by the Reverend Mr. Suddards. After Church returned home, and saw Ma & Lydia safely in the omnibus to go to Mr. Edward Roberts for dinner. Then went over to the office for about half an hour, returning in time for dinner. Dined at home, at the opposite end of the table from which I usually sit, with Mr. Maginnis. We had a sumptuous dinner and a bottle of wine which we enjoyed very much. After dinner went up in Ma's room, smoked a cigar with Mr. Maginnis, then down in the parlor. Had a little chat with the Misses Storms, Boker & Borden. Then set out to take a walk but finding it so unpleasant soon returned & sat conversing with the ladies again, until they went upstairs to make a visit on Colonel Tucker. I shortly after went up also to see the Colonel and remained until supper time.

In the evening about 8 o'clock Mr. Maginnis & I went up to Mr. Edward Roberts' to meet our usual Christmas family party. We spent a very pleasant evening in dancing, chatting &c. I had very agreeable chat with Miss Baily from Wilmington. We spent a very pleasant evening drinking egg nog, eating oysters, &c. & left at about 11.

26 December 1847. The merry jingle of the sleigh bells may be heard through the Streets. Though the snow descended in fleecy flakes during the whole of Christmas day, it is questionable whether it was not in fact a merrier Christmas than we've had for several years. The ladies could not leave their houses, it is true, and we missed their pretty faces and winning smiles from Chestnut Street, but looks were brighter and smiles were sweeter, where they are most valued at home. It is no wonder then that the streets were comparatively deserted, for husbands, sons, brothers & lovers deemed themselves happiest with their family circles for there all was gleesome and lively, a contrast more stirring in consequence of the chilling aspect of things without.

In the evening about 1/2 past 6 called around for Miss Louisa M. Clarke to accompany her to church, but the night being so cold she concluded not to go. Remained and spent the evening with her and Mr. & Mrs. Clarke very pleasantly. Left at about 20 m. past 9, & went home and up into Ma's parlor, where I found both Ma & Lydia & Mr. Maginnis. We cut the cake that Mr. Maginnis had presented to Ma, & had some wine, after which we smoked our cigars & then to bed.

27 December 1847. In the evening went up to a small company given by Miss Kate Smith and spent quite a pleasant evening.

28 December 1847. In the evening went up to Cousin's [Edward Roberts] in 9th Street for Ma, she had been there to tea. Met Mrs. George W. Carpenter (39) there.

29 December 1847. Clear and pleasant overhead, but the walking was very bad. Atmosphere quite mild. At the office all day. In the evening about 20 m. of 8 o'clock called up at Miss Kate Smith's to wait upon some of them, down to Miss Mary Ann Belangee's as she was to have a small company. I waited upon Miss Angelina Smith from Reading, and Miss Kate. We spent a very pleasant evening, the greater part of the time playing whist. Miss A. Smith and I played with my sister and Mr. R. Cooper as our opponents. We beat them three games in succession. Only the three played.

30 December 1847. Towards evening became exceedingly foggy, and at about 1/2 past 6 it was very dense, you could not see across the street. I went up this morning to the Baltimore cars to see Miss Angelina Smith of Reading off. She is going to Washington & Baltimore to be gone 5 or 6 weeks.

At the office all day, & in the evening about 8 o'clock Mr. E.J. Maginnis, my sister, and Ma and I went up to Mrs. Algernon S. Roberts in a chaise to attend Lizzie Roberts' party, given for the children. I spent a very pleasant evening, though I should have enjoyed myself more if the company had been older. About 11 o'clock we had a delightful supper of oysters, chicken salad, ice cream, champagne, &c., &c. There were 13 regrets, and 20 did not come on account of the death of Mr. John B. Jewell this morning.

31 December 1847. The City today was enveloped in a fog, as dense as was perhaps ever witnessed in London, and seemed to cast a gloom on those who were exposed to its dampness. Few of the steamboats on the Delaware river ventured to cross the River, and in the evening you could scarcely see a person across the Street. Never do I remember so dense a fog.

In the evening at home until about 10 o'clock the ladies of the house having got up a masquerade for their amusement. About 9 o'clock they made their appearance in the parlor. I will mention their characters. Miss Fanny Chambers was dressed in a riding habit, her sister Mary as a French flower girl. Miss C. A. Borden as a Novice, Miss Clark as a minstrel, Mrs. Moss as the matron of my sister, who was dressed as a Turkish lady. She (Mrs. Moss) had a long trail to her access, and Miss Boker appeared as her page, holding up her trail. She looked very pretty. Miss J.O. Farrell appeared as a Gypsy, Mrs. Downs as a Nun, Miss Storms as a dumb girl, Miss Michaelson as a school girl, and Mrs. Desso as Little red riding hood. We all had a very merry time dancing &c. The ladies all had on black silk masks, and did not remove them until late in the evening, when they had an egg nog drinking, &c. Miss Sally Ann Crim was dressed as a Quakeress. Mr. Storms and I were obliged to leave about 10, to attend the "Circlet" that met at the Misses Whitmer this evening. We found the company nearly all present and we had a very pleasant dance. Left at about 12 o'clock and returned home. Found the company all in the parlour, had several dances and kept it up until about 1/2 past 1. A party of gentlemen went into the dining room and had some egg nog, & sang songs until about 20 m. past 2. Then to bed.


Notes:

(1) William Kirk, brickmaker, yard Schuylkill 3rd and Walnut Streets; home 2 Colonnade Row. McElroy's Philadelphia Directory, 1847.

(2) Holy Trinity Church, known as "Old Swedes Church," 601 Church Street, Wilmington. It was built in 1698, consecrated in 1699. It was Lutheran Church until 1791 when it became Protestant Episcopal.

(3) William P. Smith, dry goods, 104 North 2nd Street; home 8th above Green Street. McElroy's Philadelphia Directory, 1847.

(4) William H. Carr, 6 Commerce Street; home 131 South 3rd Street. McElroy's Philadelphia Directory, 1847.

(5) Tableau vivant, living picture. A depiction of a scene presented by silent motionless costumed participants. Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 1983.

(6) The Wire Suspension Bridge crossed the Schuylkill River at the Falls at Fairmount at Bridge Street (now Spring Garden Street), was completed 1842, Charles Eilet architect. "The bridge was said to have been the first instance of wire being used in bridge building, at least in this country...and was one of the great curiosities of the time." Scarf and Westcott, pp. 559 & 584. Illustration, Vieira, M. Laffitte, West Philadelphia Illustrated, 1903, p. 30.

(7) Anthony Cuthburt Roberts (1826-1891).

(8) Samuel Carver, attorney at law, is listed at 9th and Filbert Streets. McElroy's Philadelphia Directory, 1847.

(9) The public was notified of fire by the tolling of the State House (Independence Hall) Bell: 1 stroke if the fire was in the North, 2 strokes if it were in the South, 3 in the East and 4 in the West. Albert E. Wills, historian of the Firemen's Hall Museum, 2nd and Quarry Streets, Philadelphia, PA. 19106. See also Firemen's Record, by J.A. Cassdey, Philadelphia 1892.

(10) General Winfield Scott (1786-1866), American army officer, commander in Mexican War. Webster's Biographical Dictionary.

(11) "Major General Zachary Taylor's victories were enthusiastically celebrated on April 19, 1847, with general illumination of the city and joyous crowds in the streets until after midnight." Philadelphia, A 300 Year History, Russell F. Weigley editor, W.W. Norton & Company, New York, 1982. p. 352.

(12) Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Roberts lived at what was then called Radnor Farm, and is today Faunamede, the home of Peter Godfrey on Darby Paoli Road, Villanova. This was one of the largest and finest houses (and famous) in Radnor Township. The Roberts' are buried in the small stone walled Burying ground on Darby-Paoli Road. Mrs. Roberts was Isaac Roberts' second wife and belonged to the ancient Brooke family of Radnor. FJD.

(13) Isaac Warner Roberts (1789-1859) son of Algernon Roberts and Tacy Warner Roberts.

(14) W.L. Atlee, M.D. is listed at 3 Colonnade Row. McElroy's Philadelphia Directory, 1847.

(15) R.M. Huston, M.D., 1 Girard. McElroy's Philadelphia Directory, 1847.

(16) Eaglesfield, the misspelling of Egglesfield, was the name given to the estate conveyed to Thomas Egglesfield Griffith in 1798 by the heirs of Isaac Warner. It was on the west bank of the Schuylkill River situated between Solitude, the estate of John Penn (now the Philadelphia Zoo) and Sweet Briar, about one mile above Fair Mount Waterworks near the present Girard Avenue bridge. It was successively the estate of Robert E. Griffith, Richard Rundle, John J. Borie, and was latter acquired by the Fairmount Park Commission. The mansion no longer exists. A History of the Schuylkill Fishing Company of the State in Schuylkill, published by the members, Philadelphia, 1889, p. 15.

Isaac Warner (c. 1737-1794) was J. Warner Erwin's great-grandfather, and the great great grandson of William Warner (1627-1706), the first settler on the plantation he named "Blockley" after Blockley Parish, Draycott, Worcestershire, England. While the Warners owned the property, it was called "Blockley" and from this name, the township in which it is located took its name. Unpublished letter of Joseph I Doran, 1900.

(17) Elizabeth Penn-Gaskell (1825-1866) who later married Samuel Ruff Skillern, M.D. FJD.

(18) Edith Willits Atlee (1823-1892), unmarried. FJD.

(19) George B. Wood, M.D., 419 Mulberry Street. McElroy's Philadelphia Directory, 1847. Mulberry Street, commonly called Arch Street, was officially named Arch Street in 1853.

(20) Tacy Roberts (1805-1847), daughter of Algernon Roberts (1751-1815) and Tacy Warner (1761-1828), was J. Warner Erwin's second cousin.

(21) James Knox Polk (1795-1849), President of the United States 1845-1849. Webster's Biographical Dictionary

(22) John K. Kane,(d1858) Judge of the United States District Court. Scarf and Westcott, p. 1545.

(23) Commodore Charles Stewart (1778-1869), "Old Ironsides," hero of Tripoli, captain of the frigate Constitution during the War of 1812, and commander of the Philadelphia Navy Yard 1837-1857. Scarf and Westcott, p. 748.

(24) William E. Burton is listed at 24 North 7th Street. McElroy's Philadelphia Directory, 1847.

(25) George Mifflin Dallas (1792-1864) U.S. Senator, U.S. Minister to Russia, and Vice President of the U.S. (1845-1849). Webster's Biographical Dictionary

(26) Tacy Roberts is buried at the Merion Friends Meeting, 615 Montgomery Avenue, Merion, PA 19066-1216. The grave is unmarked as was the custom at the time.

(27) Captain Paul Ambrose Oliver, USN, was a first cousin of Samuel Bonnell, Sr. FJD.

(28) James Knox Polk (1795-1849), eleventh president of the United States 1845-1849.

(29) James Buchanan (1791-1868), Secretary of State 1845-1849. Future president of the

United States 1857-1861.

(30) Daniel C. Lockwood, collector, Cherry West, Schuylkill 7th. McElroy's Philadelphia Directory, 1847.

(31) William Lehman Roberts (1829-1899).

(32) Edward Roberts (1832-1892).

(33) Probably jaundice.

(34) The 18th Century legend of the Jersey Devil, a mythical monster who originated in the Pine Barrens, or at Leeds Point, (now Atlantic City), was the offspring of a Mrs. Leeds, possibly of the same family. The Jersey Devil, by James F. McCoy and Ray Miller,Jr., The Middle Atlantic Press, Wilmington, 1989.

(35) Jacob Ellis, merchant is listed at: 39th Bank Street; home 6 Montgomery Street. McElroy's Philadelphia Directory, 1847 and 1848.

(36) The United States Mint, a Greek revival building by William Strickland (1787?-1854) on the N.W. corner of Chestnut and Juniper Streets, started operation in 1833. Philadelphia, A 300 Year History, Russell F. Weigley editor, W.W. Norton & Company, New York, 1982. p. 282.

(37) Joseph Warner Erwin was born on September 12, 1824. This was his 23rd birthday.

(38) Caroline Ann Borden (1830-1881), married J. Warner Erwin July 23, 1850.

(39) George W. Carpenter (1802-1860) a successful scientific druggist. Scharf and Westcott, p. 2273.