1850

JANUARY

1 January 1850. At this season, the mind naturally reverts to the past and recalls whatever of good or of evil has marked the year that has gone. The instinct is a happy one by which we are led to pause, as it were, at certain stages of life's journey, and to look back with a reflective eye to the scenes and incidents encountered upon the way. It is customary to regard the advent of each year as an occasion for social enjoyment; and accordingly many observe it as an occasion for season festivity. To the young who are looking forward to what lies before them, and who have little business with memory, it is a pleasant time; and as they enter each year Hope, like an angel, waits upon the threshold and promises to lead them through a fairy world. They go right willingly, and turn, not regretful, to look behind. But to many the hour brings but little pleasure, save in the reflection of happiness of others, and the recollection of earlier and light hearted years. There is a spirit in the time that takes us gently by the hand and leads us back over the once shining track of our younger days, and points to many a hope, and joy, and fair promises that have perished like the blooms of spring, hopes and joys that we know we shall find no more upon all the earth forever. For the seasons may renew the "lilies of the valley," but they can never bring back to our hearts the bliss and affections of youth. At times like this, we may from the lifeless leaves, catch some faint hint of the once surpassing sweetness of the flowers, but all that is left us besides is regretful retrospection. For many of us, therefore, the hour has something of melancholy. Yet he, who in a spirit of self-examination, reviews the past, may gather from its lessons a wholesome philosophy which must make him both wiser and happier in the future. Let us all then, today, make up our accounts with the year that has closed, and so listen to its admonitions that we may turn to our improvement the discipline of experience. In this manner we may extract blessings even from misfortunes, and learn how "sweet," indeed, "are the uses of adversity."

Today was clear and very cold, and the sleighs glided along right merrily throughout the day. At the office during the morning until 1/2 past 12 p.m., when Samuel Bonnell, Jr. called for me to make some calls with him. First called to see the Misses Carter, then called upon Miss Louisa Kerr. Then called upon Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Fay. Then called upon Miss Louisa Wood. Then went down to the office remained until 1/2 past 2, and went over to dinner at the house, but finding it a poor show, I went to Dandemonds and got an excellent one. Bonnell called for me again about 1/4 past 3. About 8 I went up to Mr. & Mrs. Ware's where I had been invited to spend the evening with the family which meets there on New Year's night.

2 January 1850. Evening at home except a small portion of it occupied in going to the Gymnasium. Mrs. West spent the afternoon and evening with Ma, and took tea. Spent the evening playing whist with Lydia, Mrs. Downs, and Mrs. West.

3 January 1850. At the office all day. About 6 p.m. started out to 8th above Willow Street to see a Mr. Garden about getting security for rent for Mrs. Lambert, then called out to see Mrs. Lambert at No. 5 Lyhand Street above Race. Saw her, and her daughter (who, bye the bye, is quite a fine looking girl), and partially engaged to let them have the house. Then went out to Carlisle Street above Brown Street to collect some ground rent. From there went to Kate Smith's and spent the evening pleasantly. Samuel Bonnell came in about 1/2 past 8. Kate presented Sam and me with a handsome black cake this evening.

4 January 1850. After tea went to the Gymnasium for a while. Called down to see Hannah Burton. Found her at home and well, she gave us some nice cake.

8 January 1850. In the evening had some snow. At the office all day. After tea went to the Gymnasium for about half an hour with Mr. Maginnis then returned home, changed my dress, and called down to see the Misses Carter. Left at about 10 o'clock & went home, stopping at 6th & Chestnut Streets to get some oysters.

10 January 1850. A clear delightful and spring like day. Got up this morning about 7, got an early breakfast, and then went up to the Depot to see my old and much esteemed friend Samuel Bonnell, Jr. off, as he leaves for New Orleans today to make it his residence. My feelings were sad indeed to part with one who has been my only and constant male companion for so long a time. I shall sincerely feel his loss for he has been a kind friend to me. But as it is his lot, I pray to God that he may be prosperous in his undertakings, and spared with health to be with us again. I shall be lonely, very lonely, without him, and I scarce know what I shall do, but I look forward to a time which I hope will soon be when I shall have a companion, from whom I shall not be separated until death.

I met at the Depot Tom Belangee and Red Cooper. After tea went up to Barnum's Museum to see the piece entitled the Drunkard. It has some very good parts, and an excellent moral. Parts of the acting very good, others miserable. The house was very much crowded.

11 January 1850. After tea went over to the Gymnasium for a while, and then up to Spring Garden above 12th Street. Went up to see Miss Kate Smith. Found her at home, also Mr. Vincent Smith. Miss Lizzie Davis arrived there today, but she did not seem disposed to come in the parlor. Kate requested me to go out in the dining room and bring her in, which appeared to me was only to have me leave the parlor, so as Kate could spend the evening with Mr. Smith for Lizzie would not be persuaded to come in, so we sat down and played a game of whist.

13 January 1850. About 6 p.m. commenced snowing and continued to fall with great violence through the night and I think we shall have sleighing in the morning. Got up this morning about 1/4 past 7, and went over to the bath house & took a warm bath, then a cold shower.

14 January 1850. The sleighs were out pretty much all day, though I do not think the sleighing was good. At the office all day and in the evening. Went around to the gymnasium for a while, then to 4th and Chestnut Streets. Got some oysters.

16 January 1850. At the office all day and in the evening until about 1/4 of 8 o'clock, then went around to the Gymnasium with Mr. Maginnis. Exercised until about 1/2 past 8. Then went home, dressed, and at about 1/2 past 9 went down to Mrs. Sayen's in Spruce Street below 8th, accompanied by E.J. Maginnis, to attend the wedding party of my old friend John H. Chambers, who was married this evening to Miss Josephine Sayen. The bride looked exceeding well, and was dressed with much taste. There were five bridesmaids, 4 groomsmen, and the party was a very handsome affair. The table was handsomely decorated by two large bouquets of natural flowers, and three candy pyramids, one large and two smaller ones. Wines, oysters, terrapins, & chicken salad were in great abundance. A number of the young men behaved in a very disreputable manner by drinking, shouting for liquor, & just after supper a very unfortunate affair occurred by the gas going out. This caused a crying spell to the bride, on account of the same thing having occurred when her sister was married to Mr. Blair, at which time some person remarked that a death would occur in the family within a year, which was verified by the loss of her father. I danced but once, and that was with Miss Mary Chambers who was one of the bridesmaids.

17 January 1850. At the office all day, also in the evening until about 1/2 past 8, writing to Carrie, then got some oysters and went home.

18 January 1850. After tea went over to the Gymnasium for about 3/4 of an hour then returned home. Changed my dress and called up to see Miss Kate Smith found her at home and well, and also saw Miss Lizzy Davis, who is staying with her, and Harry Smith, Louisa Snyder and Mrs. Smith. Spent the evening playing whist until about 1/4 of 10, when Harry and I went up to Ridge Road below Washington Street and got some fried oysters. We brought some home to the girls.

I was very much shocked as well as surprised this morning in looking over the paper to see the death of Miss Lizzie Belangee. It was but last Sunday, two weeks ago, that Sam Bonnell and I called upon her, when she was quite well, and little did we think when we parted, it would be the last time we should. But we must resign ourselves to the mysterious workings of Providence. Truly in the midst of life we are in death. She was taken sick yesterday one week ago, and died last night. Her disease was something like cholera at first but afterwards turned to typhoid fever. She was delirious from last Friday.

20 January 1850. In the morning went to Christ Church with Ma & Lydia. Bishop Southwick preached. After church walked home with Ma.

21 January 1850. We had some snow last night, but it was washed away by the rain of today.

22 January 1850. Miss Elizabeth Belangee was buried today at "Laurel Hill." I regretted I was unable to attend the funeral on account of business.

23 January 1850. In the evening about 1/4 of 8 o'clock called for Harry Storms, and we called together up to see Miss Kate Smith. Had a very pleasant chat with Lizzy Davis about old times.

24 January 1850. At the office all day, and in the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater to see the Ravel Family, who played in three pieces. The first was The Four Lovers or Harvest Home which was a very laughable pantomime. The last piece was the Green Monster, certainly one of the best and most beautiful pantomimes I ever witnessed. The tricks throughout were excellent and very funny, and many of them very difficult to be understood & how accomplished. In the course of the evening they had a new diversion in which was a number of beautiful dances, one of which, La Jota Arrogannaise, was very singular yet pretty. I was very much pleased by the whole performance. The evening entertainment was commenced by the farce of Box and Cox which was well played.

25 January 1850. In the evening went over to the party given by Mrs. Tyson Butcher in West Philadelphia with the Misses Harriet & Mary B. Carter. They live very nicely and plainly in a fine house on the Road or Street passing from Mantua Village to West Philadelphia. There were several brides there. Spent a pleasant evening though a very quiet one as we had no dancing, though some excellent singing.

26 January 1850. In the evening called for the Misses Carter according to engagement to go with them to spend the evening at Jay Cook's. Spent the evening playing whist, dancing, &c.

27 January 1850. At Christ Church in the morning with Ma, at St. Phillip's in the evening with her. Up at 7 1/4 a.m., went to bath & took a cold shower bath.

28 January 1850. In the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater with Lydia & Mr. Maginnis to see the Ravel family. They performed in two pieces, viz., the Green Monster, and the Milliners. The first piece I saw on Thursday evening last and the Milliners was very amusing. The rope dancing was also very fine.

30 January 1850. About 7 o'clock p.m. went up to the Walnut Street Theater to see the Ravels. I expected to see Harry Smith with Lizzie Davis & Anne Gorgas there, also Kate Smith. Found the three first named and Miss Louisa Snyder instead of Kate. Took a seat in the same box with them and spent quite a pleasant evening. The performances commenced with the farce of Cousin Cherry which was pretty good, and the Ravels played in two pieces, viz., the Green Monster and The Soldier For Love besides giving us a number of dances.

31 January 1850. At the office all day, after tea went to the gymnasium with Mr. Maginnis for about 3/4 of an hour, then returned home, changed my dress, and called over to see Mrs. West. Found her at home and well, then called up to see Miss Louisa Wood.

FEBRUARY

3 February 1850. Went to Christ Church in the morning with Ma. After dinner called around at the "Franklin House" for Harry Storms and we took a walk out to Fair Mount, thence over to Coats Street, and then to see Kate Smith but she was not in. Went in, however, and saw Miss Louisa Snyder, sat for about half an hour and then called down to see Miss Hannah Burton. Then went home. After tea called up for Ma, who had gone to see Mrs. Reiford at 6th & Walnut (she being sick) and went to St. Andrew's Church with her.

4 February 1850. At home to tea. Went over to the Gymnasium for a little while in the evening, balance of evening at home, made some nice whiskey punch & had a cozy evening.

5 February 1850. The coldest day we have had this year by far. Ice made throughout the day and night.

6 February 1850. At the office all day, and in the evening about 7 o'clock called up for Mr. Alva E. Laing at his house to go up to a meeting of the "Logan Saving and Building Association." Mr. Laing not being quite ready went in and waited awhile. We stopped on the road for a couple of gentlemen and then went up to the meeting. It was quite well attended, with something like 300 shares of stock subscribed. The constitution was read, and some action taken on it, but its final passage was deferred until Wednesday next. The object of the institution appears to me very good, and very fair provided they have the right kind of men at the head of it. If possible it is my desire to become the conveyancer for the institution. The meeting adjourned with a very good feeling existing. Left at about 1/4 past 10 & went home, stopping on the way home at Prossers to get some oysters.

7 February 1850. After tea went over to the gymnasium.

8 February 1850. After tea went to the Gymnasium for about half an hour, then called up to see Miss Kate Smith.

11 February 1850. After tea went to the Gymnasium until about 1/4 of 8, returned home, dressed, and called down to see the Misses Carter.

12 February 1850. At the office all day. In the evening about 1/2 past 8 went in company with Lydia and Maginnis to a small party given by Mrs. Kerr and daughter Louisa at their present residence in Pine Street above 9th. There were about 30 there. Spent a very pleasant evening, and had some fun in lively dancing with very good music: violin, violoncello, and bells. About 1/2 past 11 had a very fine supper of oysters, terrapins, chicken salad, creams, &c. with wines in abundance.

13 February 1850. In the evening Mr. Maginnis and I went up to a meeting of the "Logan Saving Fund and Building Association." We stopped for Mr. A.E. Laing on the way up and he accompanied us. The constitution was taken up and after some alterations and modifications passed. After considerable debate one of the sections was stricken out and an other substituted. Two other sections were also altered. After the passage of the constitution, the officers to be elected on next Wednesday were nominated. The meeting then adjourned to next Wednesday. We had quite an animated and interesting meeting. It was about 1/2 past 10 when we adjourned. Walked down with Mack and stopped at 4th & Chestnut Streets and got some oysters and ale.

14 February 1850. Poured rain during the morning and until about 1/2 past 2 p.m. after which it cleared off beautifully. At the office in the morning, and at about 1/4 of 1 p.m. took an omnibus and went up to Vine and Schuylkill 6th Streets to meet Mr. Thomas Laing, according to engagement to make a legal tender of $3500 in gold to Mr. Jacob U. Coladay for property at N.E. corner Vine and Schuylkill 6th Streets which Mr. Coladay had sold to Mr. Laing. Found Mr. Coladay at home but sick, presented him with a letter notifying him of Mr. Laing's readiness to perform his part of the contract, but Mr. Coladay refusing to comply so we left.

15 February 1850. In the evening called up to see Miss Kate Smith. Had some very nice egg nog (hot), the first time I ever tasted it hot.

16 February 1850. At the office all day and also in the evening until about 10 o'clock writing, after which went over and got a bath, warm, with cold shower afterward, and then to 4th & Chestnut Streets and got some oysters.

18 February 1850. In the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater with Lydia & Mr. Maginnis to see the Ravel family perform in Malzume or the Night Owl which I think is one of the best pantomimes I ever witnessed. The machinery did not work as well as expected, as this was the first night, and was rather stiff. The tricks generally were excellent. The rope dancing was also very fine. The farce of It is only My Aunt was very amusing and laughable.

20 February 1850. In the evening Mr. Maginnis and I walked up to Roberts in 9th Street with Ma and Lydia & left them there. We then went out to the meeting of "The Logan Building & Saving Association." There was quite a large meeting, the room was so much crowded that it was almost out of the question to move. The officers of meeting were voted for and elected this evening, my party being victorious.

21 February 1850. At the office all day, and in the evening called up to see Miss Louisa Wood. Was informed that she was home and accordingly went in, but after remaining a few minutes found the servant had made a mistake and that she was out. Then called up to see Kate Smith. She was in but just prepared to go to a party. Mr. Obertofer, the groomsman who waits upon her (one of Mr. Taber's) soon called and they left.

22 February 1850. After tea went over to the Gymnasium with Mr. Maginnis. About 1/2 past 9 we had some panned oysters and beer which were very nicely cooked by Mr. Maginnis.

23 February 1850. Went up to Schuylkill 4th & Cherry Streets to take some measure of the rooms at the house purchased by my mother; found Mrs. Taylor at home and as usual very polite.

24 February 1850. In the morning went to Christ Church with Ma. Dr. Dorr preached. Afternoon at home until about 1/2 past 3 when Mr. Maginnis, Lydia, and I called up to see Mrs. West at her new boarding house in Chestnut Street below Schuylkill 7th. Then called up to see Mr. Alva E. Laing & Mrs. Laing. Found them both at home and well. Met a Miss Kitty Shotwell there, quite an interesting, but not a very pretty, young lady. In the evening went to Grace Church with Ma. Mr. Luddards preached, got caught in the rain and had to walk home in it.

25 February 1850. In the evening called up to see the Misses Carters.

26 February 1850. At the office the greater part of the day, and after tea went around to the gymnasium for a short time, then returned home, dressed, and then called down for Miss Mary B. Carter according to appointment to wait upon her at a party given by Mr. & Mrs. Orr. Joshua Carter waited upon Miss Harriet Carter. There were about 50 or 60 there. Had quite a pleasant time dancing, &c. Had a very nice supper about 11 o'clock.

27 February 1850. At about 8 o'clock called up for Miss Kate Smith according to appointment to wait upon her to a party given by Mr. Dent and his wife, who reside in Washington Street above 9th North side. Spent rather a pleasant evening. Kate played nearly all evening for them to waltz and dance.

28 February 1850. At the office all day and in the evening until about 9 o'clock writing then went around to 4th & Chestnut Streets and got some oysters.

MARCH

2 March 1850. In the evening at about 7 o'clock went up town to attend to the collection of some rents, after which called up to see Miss Kate Smith. Sister went up to Trenton today with Miss Sally Ann Crim to remain until Monday.

3 March 1850. It commenced raining sometime last night and continued until towards 8 a.m. when it turned into a heavy snow, which continued throughout the day with intervals of rain. Not having any umbrella I remained in the house all day, but towards evening it cleared off so I went to St. Andrew's Church. Dr. Stevens preached one of his excellent sermons.

5 March 1850. At the office all day and in the evening home reading.

6 March 1850. Poured rain tremendous hard all day and during the evening. At the office the greater part of the day. In the evening about 7 o'clock went up to a meeting of the Logan Building and Loan association. There were a very few there and just a quorum of the Board of Directors. The question of the Treasurer's Bond, how the mortgages should be drawn, and some other matters were before the Board and voted upon.

7 March 1850. In the evening went up to Barnum's Museum to see the piece entitled Cinderella. It was tolerably well performed and some of the tricks were very good. The scenery was quite pretty and well gotten up.

8 March 1850. In the evening waited upon Miss Kate Smith to a party given by Miss Rohr in 8th Street above Green. Spent a very pleasant evening. There were quite a number of very pretty girls there. I was introduced to a Miss Randolph, quite a pretty girl but not very talkative.

10 March 1850. Got up at 6 1/2 a.m. went over to bath house and took a warm and then a cold shower bath, returned home to breakfast. In the morning went to Christ Church with Ma and Lydia.

11 March 1850. At the office all day and also in the evening until 10 o'clock writing.

13 March 1850. In the evening called down to see the Misses Carter but not finding them in, called upon Miss Louisa Kerr. Found invited company there so I did not go in. Then called down to see Mrs. William M. Clarke. Found her at home and spent the evening pleasantly chatting with her.

14 March 1850. Cloudy and rainy early in the morning, but soon cleared off pleasant and warm. In fact too warm for it made one feel languid and weak. At the office all day. Evening at home having a very severe headache, went to bed at about 9 o'clock.

15 March 1850. At the office the greater part of the day. Evening at home until about1/2 past 8, then called up to see Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Bonnell, Sr. Found them both at home and quite well. Showed them Sam's letter.

16 March 1850. At the office the greater part of the day. In the latter part of the afternoon out with Ma looking for furniture, selected dining table, 6 parlor chairs & 1 large arm chair at Menches in 2nd Street below Walnut. In the evening at home reading.

17 March 1850. In the morning at Christ Church, a missionary from "Minnesota" preached. Afternoon at home until about 1/2 past 4, when I called up to see Mrs. Charles Squires (late Miss Lizzy Ludlow) from New York.

18 March 1850. About 8 o'clock called up to see Miss Kate Smith. Spent a pleasant evening. Teased Kate about showing Sam Bonnell's letter, finally let her see it. Left at about 10 o'clock and went home. I learned with much pleasure today through Messrs. Roberts & Walton that my old friend Bonnell is to return to the City, they having received a telegraph dispatch to that effect. It really makes me feel quite gay, as I have indeed felt very lonesome since his departure, and then too I expected almost to part with him forever.

19 March 1850. In the morning had quite a snow storm. At the office in the morning until about 11 o'clock, then went over to a sale at 5th & Chestnut Streets where I remained until near 1. Brought two silver waiters and two pitchers. In the evening went down to a sale of Real Estate at the Exchange expecting to meet Edward Roberts there to buy a property for him, but as he did not come, I left at 8 o'clock, first having purchased a stockholders ticket to the Chestnut Street Theater for $2.50. After leaving the sale, having nothing particular to do, went up to the Chestnut Street Theater, saw parts of two pieces, viz., The Serious Family, which was quite amusing, and The Brothers of the Burning Belt.

20 March 1850. At about 8 o'clock left the office and went up to a meeting of the Building Association at the corner of Schuylkill 3rd and Callowhill Street. Remained there until about 9 o'clock. Stopped at Parkers and got some oysters, and at about 10 o'clock went into the Chestnut Street Theater to see the last two acts of the Brothers of the Burning Belt. The scenery, dresses, &c. are of the most beautiful and gorgeous character. The tableaux were very beautiful.

21 March 1850. At the office all day, and also in the evening until about 10 o'clock writing. Then went up to 6th and Chestnut Streets, got some oysters, and from there went into the Chestnut Street Theater for about an hour. Saw the last two acts of the Brothers of the Burning Belt. The house was quite full.

22 March 1850. Went down to the Chestnut Street Theater, went in, saw the latter part of the 1st act of Brothers of the Burning Belt & then went home by 1/4 of 10. Had some oysters which Mack(1) , Ma & Lydia were cooking.

23 March 1850. Cloudy and snowed hard nearly all day which melted nearly as fast as it fell. After tea went to the Chestnut Street Theater saw the first act of the Serious Family, left at about 1/2 of 8 and went up in an Omnibus to Schuylkill 3rd & Callowhill Streets to see Mr. Brodie to get my certificate of stock of Building Association. He not being in, went around to Mr. Brenner's to attend a meeting of the Board of the Logan, several matters were acted on in regard to loans.

24 March 1850. Got up this morning dressed and then went over to the Bath House, took a warm bath & then a cold shower.

25 March 1850. After tea went up to the Chestnut Street Theater for about an hour & a quarter to see the piece entitled Grist to the Mill.

27 March 1850. In the evening went up to the Chestnut Street Theater to see the Comedy of Leap Year which was a very fine piece and quite well played.

28 March 1850. The ground was quite covered with snow when I got up this morning. Went up to the Chestnut Street Theater for a few minutes, saw part of Brothers of the Burning Belt.

30 March 1850. In the afternoon over at Orr's Carpet store with Ma & Lydia selecting carpets. We selected our entry and parlor carpet & first flight of stairs. Returned to the office about 5 1/2, where I remained until 7 1/4, then went up to the Chestnut Street Theater and saw the play of William Tell which was very well performed.

31 March 1850. In the evening called up with Ma to see Mr. & Mrs. Edward Roberts. Found them at home & all well. Did not see Anna. Reason: courting in parlor with Mr. Browning.

APRIL

1 April 1850. In the evening about 1/4 of 8, went up to Mr. Samuel Bonnell's, 99 Vine Street, to say that I had received a letter from his son Sam from New Orleans. Went down to the office and wrote a letter to Sam Bonnell at Cincinnati.

2 April 1850. After tea went up to the Chestnut Street Theater to see Valcha or the Tyrant Queen, the piece was very well gotten up and played very well.

4 April 1850. In the evening called up to see Miss Kate Smith but did not find her in. Found Miss Louisa Snyder at home. Went in sat for about half an hour when she and I called down to see Mr. & Mrs. Fry in Washington Street above 9th where Kate was spending the evening. Found Mr. & Mrs. Fry at home, also 3 other persons there. Remained until about 1/2 past 9, and then went back to Miss Smith's again. Kate was very anxious to read Sam Bonnell's letter which I would not consent to as I did not wish her to know that he was coming home. I however read it to her word for word, but she did not believe it, as she has not the least idea of his return. She thought I was only composing as I went along to tease her. She will be mistaken, however, for I expect we shall have Sam with us in the course of 8 or 10 days, which I shall be heartily glad of, for without him I shall feel lost.

5 April 1850. Towards noon commenced raining, which continued until about 7 p.m. when it commenced snowing with great rapidity, and continued throughout the night making horrid bad walking. At the office all day and in the evening went up to the Chestnut Street Theater with Maginnis & Lydia notwithstanding such a bad night. The house was not very full, but they played very well. The pieces performed were Zindel and the Serious Family.

6 April 1850. Some snow in the morning. In the evening went up to the Chestnut Street Theater to see the new piece of Grubb Mudge & Co., which was not much. Returned home again about 1/2 past 8, where I remained until about 1/4 of 10 when I went around to the theater again to see a farce entitled The Launch of the Susquehannock which was also rather a poor affair. Before the last piece commenced I saw the last part of Valcha.

7 April 1850. Called up to see Miss Mary Ann Belangee, found her quite well & looking much better than I expected. This was the first time I had seen her since her sister's death. In the evening went to St. Andrew's Church with Ma, got a good seat, but some ladies thought proper to turn me out. No other seat being vacant I went home & returned for Ma.

8 April 1850. At the office all day, and in the evening until 10 o'clock busy writing. Left at 10 and went over to the Chestnut Street Theater for about half and hour and saw the last part of the last act of the Wizard of the Wave.

9 April 1850. Left at 10 and went over to the Chestnut Street Theater, saw last part of last act of The Wizard of the Wave and the farce of the Launch of the Susquehannock which was very amusing.

10 April 1850. In the evening went to the Chestnut Street Theater to see the Wizard of the Wave, which was rather a middling piece. Left before it was quite over.

12 April 1850. Went around to the Chestnut Street Theater and saw the last part of the Serious Family, the farce of Awful Sacrifices, and the play of the Mummy both of which were very good.

13 April 1850. Poured rain during the early part of the morning, but towards 10 a.m. cleared off, and for a while had it clear, though it was quite changeable through the day, sometimes rain, then snow & then clear, with a tremendous blustering & cold wind.

I got up this morning at 6 and went to the office as usual, returned to breakfast, and at 1/2 past 8 a.m. started for Wilmington, Delaware in the cars. We arrived at about 10. Stopped at Mr. Hedges, saw the old man, left my umbrella. Then called up to see Mr. Leonard E. Wales on some business. While there Mr. Edward Gibbons came in, also the gentleman who married Miss Elizabeth Baily a few days since. At about 1/4 past 11 Mr. Baily and I got a wagon and rode over to New Castle to make some examinations. I went to the offices with him but soon left, and went over to the hotel and got my dinner which was pretty good but rather plain. Upon my return to the office I found on my table a letter from Samuel Bonnell informing me he was in New York and would be home on tomorrow. After tea went up to see Mr. Bonnell's family to inform them of his return tomorrow, they all appeared to be much delighted.

14 April 1850. A tremendous gale throughout the day. In the morning went to Christ Church with Ma. Dr. Lyons preached. After church returned home and remained in until about 1/4 past 4, then went down to the New York boat and at 1/2 past 4 left for Trenton so as to meet and greet my old friend Sam. Had a very pleasant trip up and arrived in Trenton at about 1/4 past 6. Took a walk up into town and was hailed by Charles H. Murheid in passing one of the hotels. Went in and remained a short time and then rode down to the cars. They did not get along until late 1/2 past 7. I soon found Sam and we had quite a pleasant chat. He gave me late accounts of my Carrie who he had left last Monday which was very gratifying. We arrived in the City shortly after 9. I saw Sam safely in a cab, and then went up to Pellitiers and took supper with Mr. Murheid.

15 April 1850. In the evening called up with Samuel Bonnell to see Miss Hannah Burton, found her out. Sent for her and she was very much surprised to see Sam. I then went over with her to Mr. & Mrs. Holden's where I met Kate Smith. I did not tell Kate of Sam's arrival. When she returned with Hannah & me, Sam did not come in to the parlor for some time afterwards. Kate seemed to be almost dumb with surprise, as she scarcely spoke to Sam for some time. She had not the least idea of his being at Burton's. About 10 both of us walked up with Kate. Upon arriving at the door, Louisa Snyder let us in. She, too, was much surprised, as well as Mrs. Smith.

17 April 1850. In the evening at about 8 o'clock went up to the regular monthly meeting of the Logan Savings Association. 11 per cent on 10 shares and 19 per cent on 5 shares were bid this evening, last monthly meeting 15 per cent was bid.

18 April 1850. Ice could be seen in the gutters early in the morning. In the evening about 1/2 past 8, Ma, Lydia, Mr. Maginnis and I went up in an omnibus to a company given by Mr. & Mrs. James Stroud in their new house on the North side of Vine Street, the 1st house East of Schuylkill 5th Street. There were some 40 or 50 there. Had a very nice oyster supper at about 10 o'clock. At about 1/4 of 11 left, having to go to a small party given by Miss Kate Smith, there were some 10 or 30 there, two brides: Mrs. Evans & Mrs. Taber.

19 April 1850. Called up to see Miss Kate Smith, and then went down to Callowhill & Marshall Streets and got some oysters, then home with Sam for a short time. Then called up to see the Misses Carter, and went home, stopping at 7th and Walnut Streets to get some ice cream.

20 April 1850. After leaving Sam went down to the Chestnut Street Theater and saw part of Mazeppa.

21 April 1850. In the morning went to Christ Church with Ma and Lydia. After Church met Sam Bonnell and took a walk, finally stopped in at Miss Hannah Burton's where we found Kate Smith. I took tea there but Sam would not. After tea Sam left and I went down with Hannah and Kate to hear Mr. Wadsworth in the Arch Street Church above 10th. It was crowded to excess. I cannot say I admired his preaching.

22 April 1850. In the evening went to see the Comedy of Changes which was played for the 1st time this evening. It was performed at the Chestnut Street Theater. I was much pleased as there were many good points and bits in it, and the scenery and appointments were got up well and with much effect. All the actors were called out by immense applause, much satisfaction was evinced.

Mrs. Ware [nee Elizabeth Roberts] had a daughter (2nd) last night about 11 o'clock. It died this morning about 9, from premature birth.

23 April 1850. After tea went up to the Chestnut Street Theater and saw part of the Comedy of Changes, left at about 9 o'clock and went up for Ma at Mr. Edward Roberts. She had been there to tea.

24 April 1850. Went with Sam Bonnell to a small company given by the Misses Carter. Had a very pleasant evening & much fun in dancing, charades, &c.

25 April 1850. Went over to the Chestnut Street Theater and saw the last part of The Comedy of Changes and a dance. Then home.

27 April 1850. At the office all day and in the evening until 1/2 past 9, then went over to the bath house and took a warm bath & a shower, after which went into the Chestnut Street Theater and saw the 1st act of Pizano.

29 April 1850. At the office all day with the exception of about an hour and a half in the afternoon occupied in making purchases with Ma for housekeeping. After tea went around to the Chestnut Street Theater & saw the play of the Mechanic, a very good thing and very well played.

30 April 1850. Clear and delightful all day. April went out with a bland and genial smile, as if thoroughly satisfied with her doings in clothing the earth with verdure; and May comes in to enlarge her work and speed the promise of budding trees and flowers and shooting grass towards maturity. Everything looks young, fresh and glorious; and it must be a strange and hardened heart, which under the genial influence that now exists, feels no new and grateful emotions, or no impulsive spirit of thankfulness for the change from the dreariness of winter.

MAY

1 May 1850. A clear delightful and spring like day one well calculated for the first of May day sports. At the office the greater part of the day, in the latter part of the afternoon went out to the house at S.E. corner of Schuylkill 4th & Cherry Streets to see Mr. Taylor who is moving today. Did not feel well.

2 May 1850. In the evening went to the Chestnut Street Theater to see the new show piece of The Knight of the Lion Heart, which was a very beautiful spectacle and gotten up with much taste and full of interest. The farce of A Quiet Day was quite amusing and well played.

3 May 1850. At the office through the day until 1/2 past 5 p.m., then went up to the Schuylkill 4th Street house to see how the gas fitters were coming on with the gas fixtures.

4 May 1850. At the office all day, and in the evening Mr. Maginnis, Ma, Lydia and myself went to Barnum's Museum. We were much pleased with the performance of "Tom Thumb" who is one of the most perfect dwarfs I ever saw. The play of the Drunkard was well performed, but not very pleasing to Ma and Lydia.

5 May 1850. I never saw it rain harder. There was considerable thunder and lightning through the day.

6 May 1850. At the office the greater part of the day until about 3 1/2 p.m., then went up to the house in Schuylkill 4th Street with Ma. Found the gas fitters had not entirely completed the work. Returned to the office. In the evening called up with Sam Bonnell to see Kate Smith. Found her at home but not very well. Stopped down at Callowhill and Marshall Streets and got some oysters. Sam & I parted at 11th & Vine and I went down to the Chestnut Street Theater. Saw part of the comedy of the Quiet Day, and the Pantomime of Gold Digging by the "Carlo troop" which was a poor thing, though their gymnastics were good.

7 May 1850. Went up to Coats Street below 9th to see Mr. G.U. Larghe about $300 I had loaned him. Got in the 10th Street line of omnibuses and rode down as far as the Chestnut Street Theater. Saw the Carlos perform some astonishing feats, and the farce of the Phantom Breakfast.

8 May 1850. Went up to the Schuylkill 4th Street house, returned to the office, then went home, dressed, and then went down to a wedding party given by Mr. & Mrs. Carter to their daughter Mary B. Carter who was married this evening at 1/2 past 8 to Mr. Charles Dodge of Providence, Rhode Island. There were some 70 or 80 there and I spent a very pleasant evening. There was no dancing. About 11 p.m. had a very fine supper, the table was beautifully decorated with flowers.

9 May 1850. We commenced moving today into our new house. Ma & Lydia were engaged all day in receiving the furniture. Slept there for the first time.

10 May 1850. Walked down as far as 8th and Arch Streets with Sam, when we found a fire had occurred at Gilbert's this morning, doing considerable damage to the stock. I left Sam here & attended to several matters in regard to repairs for Gilbert &c. At the office through the day until 9 p.m., then went over to the Chestnut Street Theater for a few minutes and then up to Samuel Bonnell's house (99 Vine Street) according to appointment, and then started out for the house to sleep.

11 May 1850. Went up to the Schuylkill 4th Street house, found all matters right; took a bath & then to bed.

13 May 1850. Got up this morning at 6, took the market basket and in company with Sam Bonnell made my first tour to market which I flatter myself I succeeded in very well. Then went down to the office, took breakfast, and after attending to our final moving to the Schuylkill 4th Street house, returned to the office. Remained until 20 m. of 3, when I went up to the house to take my first dinner, which I enjoyed very much and did ample justice to. Thus are we once more in our own house. May God grant us many happy days together, and prosperity in our new undertaking. Mr. Maginnis took tea with us, being our first tea in the new house. Spent the evening in putting up glasses, pictures, &c. and at about 1/2 past 10 Ma and Lydia retired & Mack and I smoked a cigar together. Retired to bed at about 11 o'clock.

14 May 1850. Got up this morning at about 6, took a little walk with Mr. Maginnis and returned to breakfast at about 7, after which went down to the office doing my marketing on the way down.

15 May 1850. Got up at 5 1 /2 a.m., took breakfast and then went to market, sending my marketing home by Elizabeth. Then went down to 8th and Market Street & saw Mr. Storms who left for the West at 8 o'clock. In the evening went over to the Building Association.

16 May 1850. At 2 o'clock went up to Burlington in the Steamer Sun. I took Thomas C. Ashman with me and landed him at "College Wharf" so as to have Ma's mattress brought down. Upon arrival in Burlington went up to Mrs. Buckman's. Saw her & made arrangements to have our things taken down to the City, then went in search of Benny Jackson to remove them.

18 May 1850. About 1/4 past 6, Samuel Bonnell called for me and we went together up to the Academy of Fine Arts(2) , looked around at the painting and ladies.

19 May 1850. Went down Arch Street to meet Samuel Bonnell according to appointment, to dine. Returned together and at about 1 had dinner. Sam left again at about 1/4 past 2, having to go down and attend to his Sunday School class. After tea went to the Church of the Nativity. Bishop Potter was to preach & have confirmation, as usual I was turned out of my seat.

20 May 1850. Called down to see cousin Roberts in 9th Street to thank them for two very handsome china vases for the parlor mantel which they presented to me.

21 May 1850. Got up at 5, fixed up some oil cloth in bath house. At the office all day. Sam Bonnell went home with me to tea. Maginnis was also there. I went up with Sam before going and got some flowers & transplanted them in our garden. Evening called up to see Kate Smith.

22 May 1850. Got up this morning at 1/2 past 5, dressed and went to market, then got breakfast and went down to the office where I remained through the day. Mr. Maginnis took tea and remained all night.

23 May 1850. At about 1/2 past 6 went up with S. Bonnell to the Academy of Fine Arts remained a few minutes and then went up to tea.

25 May 1850. Got up at about 1/2 past 5 a.m. and went to market, after which went to the office, in and about through the day as it was being cleaned and everything was upside down.

26 May 1850. After dinner Mr. Maginnis and I took a walk out over Market Street Bridge, but found it so muddy we soon returned. They have torn all the roofing and outwork of the bridge off, preparatory to its being altered for the railroad.

27 May 1850. About 6 1/2 p.m. Sam Bonnell called for me and we went together to the Academy of Fine Arts, there was quite a large company of ladies there.

28 May 1850. About 1/4 of 6 went up to the Academy of Fine Arts with Sam Bonnell. The rooms were crowded with ladies.

31 May 1850. At the office during the greater part of the day. After tea went to 9th and Coats St. to see Mr. Wm. G. Jaeger about some money I had loaned him. After seeing him and on my way home, stopped in to see Kate Smith, found her at home and met a Miss Whitacre there, quite a pleasant girl.

JUNE

1 June 1850. Cloudy and quite cold all day and during the evening a fire would have been quite comfortable.

2 June 1850. Got up at 6 1/4 a.m. Took a bath and got breakfast after which Mr. Maginnis and I took a walk out and around Fairmount. Returned in time for Church. Went down to St. Mark's Church with Ma. Mr. S. Bonnell & Mr. Maginnis dined with me. In the afternoon Ma, Mr. Bonnell and myself went to the Church of the Atonement. Bishop Potter preached and had confirmation. 15 were confirmed. Called down to see Miss Hannah Burton, found her at home but not in very good spirits as her sister, Mrs. Ketchum, had been confined day before yesterday, and lost her babe today. Mr. Brady's wife had also been confined a day or two since.

3 June 1850. After tea went over to a meeting of the Board of Managers of the Logan Building Association in relation to a title of Robert J. Foulon.

4 June 1850. Took tea this evening with Sam Bonnell, after which called down to see Miss Harriet Carter, found her at home just having returned from a horse back ride. Went in and sat for a few minutes, but Miss Carter did not appear on account of making preparations to go to a company. We left and went up to the Academy of Fine Arts.

5 June 1850. In the evening went to the Walnut Street Theater to see Miss Davenport in the play of Love with which I was much pleased.

10 June 1850. Mr. Maginnis left today to be gone some time in the West on business, and to meet us in Cincinnati to act as my groomsman next month.

11 June 1850. Up to the Chestnut Street Theater to see the play of The Duke's Wager, which was a pretty good thing. There was also a pantomime played.

12 June 1850. In the evening about 9 o'clock went with Lydia to a small company given by Miss Amanda Israel. Had some very fine strawberries & cream. Was introduced to a Miss Maul, not a very pretty or agreeable girl.

13 June 1850. I got a terrier pup today, about 3 months old which I intend to raise.

14 June 1850. About 1/2 past 6 p.m. Sam Bonnell called for me and we went together up to the Academy. Met Ned Bedlock on the way and he accompanied us. In the evening went down with Ma to see Mrs. Edward Roberts, Lydia had been there to tea; found Mrs. R. at home and saw Eddy, Mary(3) and Addie. Mary went home with us and stayed all night.

17 June 1850. At the office the greater part of the day. Evening at home. Mrs. Leonard and her two children and Miss Hannah Biddle spent part of the evening with us.

18 June 1850. Got up at 5 1/4 a.m. took a bath & then went to Market.

19 June 1850. Got up at 5 1/4 a.m. took a shower & then to market.

20 June 1850. At the office all day until about 6 p.m., then went out to 9th & Master Street about an order for two tons of coal given me by Mr. G.W. Jaeger, which I found would not be accepted.

22 June 1850. Went over to Camden with Samuel Bonnell, Jr. on some business, after attending to which, called up to see Mrs. James B. Dayton. Not finding her at home, returned to the City.

23 June 1850. In the morning went to the Church of the Atonement, Dr. Goddard preached, after Church returned home. After dinner went over to Mr. Algernon Roberts. Found him at home also Mrs. Roberts & all the children.

25 June 1850. Up at 6 a.m. took a shower bath, then breakfast, and then to the office. On the way home stopped to see Mr. Sprague on some business. After tea called to see Philip M. Price about a drain to be made at llth and Spring Garden Sts., then called to see a Mr. Halter to pay him $1 due him. From there went to see Mr. Jaeger, but found he was in New York. Found Mr. Michael Storms there, he had been spending the evening.

28 June 1850. Through the evening we had a very heavy rain, accompanied by vivid lightning and heavy claps of thunder.

30 June 1850. About 1/2 past 8 went down to Mr. Armstrong, the dentist, & had two teeth taken out which worried me very much aching.

JULY

1 July 1850. Sam & I called down to see Miss Mary Belangee. Found her at home and well, but setting up in the chamber with her brother Tom who has been very ill with palpitation of the heart, in fact not expected to live.

2 July 1850. In the afternoon had a very heavy thunderstorm. I never heard more terrific thunder, nor saw more vivid lightning, it struck several places within a few squares of my office. At the office all day & until near 8 p.m., then went down to see Mr. Charles Robb a few minutes on business. Then up to the Chestnut Street Theater saw the first two acts of Isabella.

4 July 1850. At the office all day until 1/4 of 5 p.m., busy writing. Feeling much fatigued, and it being the anniversary of the birth of our Country's freedom, thought I would take a little excursion up the river as far as Burlington. Started in steamer Trenton at 5 & arrived there at 6 p.m. Had a severe fight on board among some Irishmen.

5 July 1850. Called at Mr. Edward Roberts for Ma & Lydia. They (the Roberts) all leave for Niagara, West Point, Boston &c. tomorrow.

6 July 1850. Stopped at 11th Street below Race for some ice cream.

9 July 1850. A clear and delightful day. Got up this morning shortly after 5, dressed, got breakfast. First took a shower bath, and made all preparations for our trip westward, on an errand which is to me a happy one, one that is to give me a wife.

We left our door in a chaise at about 1/4 past 8 for the New York boat. Stopped at the office on the way down. We were met at the boat by Messrs. Joseph P. Loughead, Franklin Taylor & Samuel Bonnell. We had a very pleasant trip to New York if we may except the dust, and arrived there after the usual stoppages incident to a trip on this rail road at about 2 o'clock. Had our baggage placed upon a chaise and conveyed with ourselves to the foot of Duane Street to start on board the New Haven for Buffalo, via the Erie Rail Road. After having our baggage checked, and as the boat was not to leave until 1/4 past 6 (it then being only about 2 1/2), walked up to Broadway, and got some dinner at one of the confectionery establishments. We made a very excellent meal upon coffee, bread and butter and cold ham.

I left Ma & Lydia at the establishment, and went down to Astor house to see if I could find the Roberts names registered there, but did not. I then returned for Ma & Lydia and we took a stroll up Broadway. I stopped in at the "Irvin House" and found the Roberts party registered there, but that they had gone up the river this morning.

At 1/4 past 6 started for Piermont on board the Steamer New Haven. We had a delightful trip up and arrived there about 8 o'clock. We had an excellent supper on the way up. At this place (Piermont) they have an immense pier running at least a mile into the Lake, which is the eastern terminus of the New York and Erie Rail Road. Here we took splendid cars for Jefferson at the foot of Seneca lake, a distant 281 miles by rail road from Piermont. This rail road I think is the finest I have ever traveled over, the track is 6 feet wide(4) , and affords a fine opportunity for wide rooms and convenient cars. The scenery (I am told) along the road is beautiful, a portion of which I saw and can speak of in the highest praise. We traveled along the banks of the Delaware for about 90 miles, but as it was dark we were unable to enjoy the fine scenery.

10 July 1850. We arrived at Jefferson at the foot of Seneca Lake. We here took the splendid steamer Ben Soda for Geneva at the head of Seneca Lake. We had a very fine breakfast on board. The trip up the lake was superb, the scenery on either side beautiful being a succession of hills gradually arising from the Lake, and apparently highly cultivated. Arrived at Geneva at about 12 o'clock, took an Omnibus and rode up to the "Franklin House" where we had a pretty good dinner.

At this place made the acquaintance of a very pleasant young couple, Mr. & Mrs. George N. Davis. We found them both very agreeable, and the lady young, pretty & exceedingly lively. On board the boat Ben Soda I think I saw the largest dog "about." He was of the St. Bernard breed and weighed 210 pounds. At about 10 minutes of 4, left Geneva for Buffalo in the cars, distant 126 miles. We found Mrs. Davis a very lively companion and good company. The ride in the cars was pleasant though dusty.

We heard with much regret at Geneva the death of General [John] Tyler(5) , the President of the United States. His loss will be deeply felt at this particular period. It seems that a strange fatality attends the Whig Presidents.

Arrived at Buffalo at about 9 o'clock. I was quite sorry to hear by telegraph of a very bad fire in Philadelphia(6) , some 400 houses burned and $4,000,000 of property destroyed.

Our intention was to have gone directly on to Sandusky City at 9 o'clock this evening, but as we had traveled all last night and yesterday, having accomplished over 500 miles of railroad travel and 70 miles of steam boating since yesterday at 9 a.m., or in 36 hours, we felt very much fatigued and concluded to lay over in Buffalo until tomorrow morning or night. I was also not pleased with the boat, the America, not considering her safe, and she does not always connect with the cars at Sandusky. Therefore upon our arrival at Buffalo took the "Phelps House" omnibus and soon were placed in the handsomely furnished parlor of that handsome establishment.

At about 10 had an excellent supper, and in a few minutes afterwards were shown to our chambers, which were large, well furnished and ventilated & in every respect comfortable.

11 July 1850. Got up this morning about 7 a.m. after a good night's rest, dressed and got breakfast. I then went down to look out for a boat, not being pleased with the Baltimore, concluded to lay over until tonight and go out in the Saratoga, apparently a fine boat. Secured our passage, and then returned to the hotel finding it rather warm walking. We had to part with our newly made acquaintance today, Mr. & Mrs. Davis, as they went to Niagara and we regret it much. After tea took a walk down to the creek, and went on board the steamer Saratoga, the boat we are to go out upon tonight. After leaving her went on board the St. Louis, the boat that I made my first trip upon the Lakes in. We returned to the hotel about 1/2 past 7, and at about 8 o'clock took the omnibus and rode down to the steamer Saratoga to start for Sandusky. She did not get off until about 10 o'clock, having been detained an hour and a half waiting for the mail train and baggage from the East.

12 July 1850. Pretty stiff breeze blowing, but as it came off land it did not have an opportunity of creating much of a sea. In the afternoon we had it quite mild and warm until about 5 p.m. when a heavy shower of rain came up, accompanied with a violent blow, thunder & lightning, which had a tendency to frighten the ladies...and more particularly a vender of life preservers who thought it a fitting opportunity, having all the passengers in the cabin and some rather frightened, to expatiate upon the utility of his life preservers. However all passed off safely and without accident.

Arrived at Sandusky City [Ohio] at about 1/2 past 6, and immediately went up to the cars as we expected them to leave in about half an hour. We were under the impression that we would not have time for tea, but would get it on the road. But in this we were disappointed which proved a serious inconvenience, having had to ride all night and not having had anything to eat since dinner time. On board the boat I met a Mr. John A. Morris of Louisville, Kentucky, who we found to be a very pleasant & affable companion. He accompanied us all the way to Cincinnati.

We got along very well after leaving Sandusky until about 12 o'clock at night. When we were about 1 mile South of Patterson, or about 70 miles from Sandusky, we ran over a cow, which turned the 1st car (freight) completely upside down, the baggage car over on its side, and the first passenger car down an embankment some 15 feet into the fence staving in the front, and making sad havoc with cars, rail, road, baggage, &c. Fortunately no one was hurt, except a poor fellow who had his arm injured in the Utica Road, and having been setting in the front part of the 1st passenger car, again had the arm bruised from the severe concussion. We were obliged to lay on the road until the morning about 7 o'clock when the train from Cincinnati came up and we went on as far as Kenton, a small town about 78 miles from Sandusky.

Here we got a pretty good breakfast, and remained until near 12 o'clock, when we took the train come from Sandusky, and started for Springfield. The route passed through Bellfontaine, 102 miles, West Liberty 110, & Urbana 120 miles from Cincinnati all very pretty places. At Springfield changed cars, and started for Cincinnati. Had a pleasant trip down, passing through Xenia & other places. Supped at Morrow and arrived at Cincinnati about 9 o'clock. As soon as we could get our baggage out, we started in an omnibus for Aunt Harrison's house, and after putting out several passengers, arrived at the house, but much to our surprise found no one there, all vacant. The occupants of the store adjoining told us they had moved to their old house on Race above 4th to which place we wended our way. But upon ringing the bell at the house, we were again surprised to hear they had broke up house keeping & all gone to Louisville. We went to the Burnet House, which is one of the most magnificent houses in the world. Much fatigued we soon retired to our rooms, which, though far up, were large & pleasant. We all felt very much worried at not being able to see Aunt & the family, but thought we would sleep on it & learn all in the morning.

14 July 1850. We got up at about 1/4 past 7, not much refreshed on account of the heat & mosquitoes, & went down to breakfast. We were much surprised to find Mr. Maginnis had arrived this morning, and was seated at the breakfast table when we went in, and he was much surprised to meet us too. After breakfast Mack [Maginnis] and I took a walk out, to make some enquiries about Aunt & family. First we called at their old residence on Race Street. We were directed by the lady of the house to call upon Mrs. Pendleton two doors below, which we did, and there learned that Aunt Harrison, through the persuasion of Mr. Rice(7) (her son in law), from fear of the cholera, had broken up house keeping, & gone to spend the summer with her friends in Louisville. Mrs. Pendleton looked about as usual.

After leaving Mrs. Pendleton's returned to the Hotel where we found Mr. West talking with Ma & Lydia in the parlor. He reported that they had sent for Mr. Borden yesterday, that they were expecting us and we must get a carriage and ride out immediately to Mr. Borden's place. We soon had matters arranged, and Ma, Lydia, Mr. Maginnis & myself soon started for Mr. Borden's. The ride was quite warm & fatiguing for the horses. We first met Mr. Borden, and went into the house.

Mrs. West then came down, and next my dear Carrie. O how glad I was to see her. She looked rather pale, and rather thinner than when I last saw her but quite well. O happy is the thought that soon she is to be my bride, and we shall be separated no longer. May God in his infinite mercy grant a happy union, and a happy life is my earnest prayer. It seems that I can hardly realize that I am so soon to be married, but what happy feelings arise when I think I shall have my dear Carrie always with me.

I spent the day primarily about the house with Carrie, and after tea or about 1/4 of 8, we started over to see Mr. & Mrs. Kirby, distant about 4 miles. Harry Borden took Ma, Lydia and Mr. Maginnis in Mr. Borden's two horse carriage, and I took Carrie over in the buggy. The ride was delightful but I found it rather difficult driving at night. It being about 1/2 past 9 when we arrived there. We found them all in bed, but they soon roused up, that is Mrs. Piat, Mr. Kirby and Clinton [Kirby].

15 July 1850. I spent the greater part of the day about the house with Carrie, and in the latter part of the afternoon took a walk down in the orchard with Carrie, and sat in the shade of some trees, where we passed some happy moments. There being an appearance of rain we returned to the house, and remained about until tea time.

Harry Borden went to town today for our trunks, and had a pretty hard time in bringing them out, the horse almost giving out in coming up the hill (from heat). Carrie & I fixed next Tuesday the 23rd Inst for our marriage, when we shall start for the East again, and I with my bride, I can hardly realize it.

When over at Mrs. Kirby's last evening we were all invited to come over to tea this evening, and that they would send the carriage, but on account of the rain we thought they would not come, and sat down to our supper as usual, but while at the table, Clinton Kirby came over with the carriage, and we soon rigged up one of Mr. Borden's carriages, and started for Kirby's, where we arrived after a pleasant ride at about 1/2 past 8 or 9. Saw all the family besides some three others, strangers to me. Shortly after our arrival were invited in to a sumptuous supper which I did not feel much appetite for, having eaten so heartily at Mr. Borden's, however I did my share.

16 July 1850. I spent the greater portion of the morning writing up my journal, and answering Mr. Bonnell's and Mrs. Storms' letters received this morning. I was also with Carrie a portion of the day, but as she felt unwell she was lying down the greater part of the morning. I was with Harry Borden part of the afternoon walking over the place, down to the anticipated fish pond, &c.

We all assembled on the porch after tea until about 9 o'clock, being very much entertained by Mr. West. They gradually, one after another, dropped off leaving Carrie and me the sole occupants of the porch, where we sat some time, enjoying the moonlight. When thinking it too damp, retired to the parlor, where we remained until near 11, & then to bed. Mr. Maginnis went over to Clifton this afternoon, accompanied by Lydia, to engage Bishop McIlvaine to perform the ceremony of our marriage. He saw him and made the necessary arrangement. He speaks of him as a very fine old man.

17 July 1850. Clear and exceedingly hot through the day until about 1/2 past 3 p.m. when we had a little shower. Got up at about 5 a.m., got breakfast, &c. after first having written for some time in my journal. At about 8 o'clock, Mr. & Mrs. West, Carrie and myself started for Cincinnati with one of Mr. Borden's carriages and two of his horses. Upon arrival drove to Mr. Spaders on South side of Eighth Street, a few doors west of Vine. We remained there a short time when I left, with umbrella, and started out to attend to some matters of business, leaving Carrie & Mrs. West to attend to shopping. We arranged to meet again at Mr. Spaders at about 1, and to dine with Mr. West at the "Waverly." I first went to the Burns House, but Mr. West and Carrie did not arrive until about 1/2 past 1, too late to dine at the Waverly, as they dine at 1. We however went up to the Hotel, and Mrs. West had kindly prepared a dinner for us which we partook of at about 3 o'clock. Drove out home by way of Vine Street Hill, which is a most beautiful view. Spent the evening writing some 18 or 20 invitations to the wedding.

18 July 1850. After breakfast Ma, Sammy Borden(8) and I drove over to College Hill to the post office to get some letters but found none. I got a paper, returned in a short time, and took Lydia and Carrie for a short drive down the road, then returned. I sat in the carriage reading to Carrie for some time, when we had a lunch of cake and milk punch. Shortly after which Carrie and I took a stroll down in the woods back of the house, and got a seat in the shade where we spent an hour very pleasantly. Returned to dinner about 1/2 past 1, after which I took a nap until 4, and then brought up this journal, after which went downstairs and sat talking to Carrie until tea time. In the evening Clinton Kirby was over and we had quite a pleasant little dance, the evening being so cool and pleasant.

19 July 1850. Got up this morning at about 6. After breakfast Harry Borden & I rode over to College Hill to get the horse shod. We walked from the blacksmith shop to the post office and from there I went over to the shoe maker store and got my shoes mended. Harry returned in about 1/2 an hour and we walked over to one of the student's rooms. Got some brandy and water, and from there went over to the College and into the room of the "Philomathean" Society of which Harry is a member. They now have their room tastefully hung in black in honor of the death of our late Chief Magistrate. We soon afterwards returned home, got some good punch (milk) and cake for lunch, was with Carrie a while, and then took a nap until dinner.

After dinner Mr. Borden had two of the horses put to the carriage and took Ma, Carrie and myself a riding. First went over to the Spring Glen Cemetery and rode through a greater part of the grounds which are tastefully laid out, and ornamented with many beautiful monuments. This cemetery contains about 200 acres, and is well adapted by nature for the purpose for which it is used. The land is of every variety, flat, undulating, hilly, wooded or bare, indeed I think it can be made in time one of the most beautiful Cemeteries in the United States, they certainly have the material for it.

After leaving the Cemetery took a delightful ride over Clifton Hills, from which there are some magnificent views. We passed Bishop McIlvaine's house, and many other pretty country seats. We returned home after having a delightful ride at about 1/4 of 7. Mr. Borden, Harry Borden, Mary Borden, Ma, Carrie and myself went over to College Hill to attend a debate at the College by some of the students, and hear some original essays delivered by them. The exercises were carried out with much credit to themselves. Lydia and Mr. Maginnis took a ride to Hamilton to day.

20 July 1850. Got up this morning about 6, dressed and took breakfast, after which, or about 8 o'clock, Mr. Maginnis and I drove into town with a buggy we had hired a day or two since. Stopped on the way at the "Mill Creek House" and got some good brandy. Went in by the dirt road by banks of the creek which is a much prettier way than by the turnpike. Drove to U.S. Hotel to register our names for the stage for this afternoon to go to College Hill, then drove to the "Burnet House" for a glass of brandy and water, then to the post office, and then up to the stable on Walnut Street just beyond the canal. Made arrangements for our carriages to go out to Mr. Borden's on Tuesday, then went up to the "Waverly House" where I registered my name and left my dust coat. Then went over to the Clerks office and got my license to be married to Carrie, after which called on Mr. Thomas Mitchell & Dr. Patterson who I did not find in. Also called on my cousin John P. Harrison who I found at home. Returned to the hotel "Waverly" at about 12, saw Mr. West and sat talking with him until 1 o'clock when we both took dinner, which, by the by, was a very good one. After dinner sat and talked with Dr. Patterson, who had come up to see me, for a short time then took a little nap sitting. Then called down at Mrs. Spaders again for the articles for Carrie. Saw her & three Aunts returning to the Hotel, and at about 4 o'clock Mr. Maginnis & I started in the stage for College Hill.

21 July 1850. About 9 o'clock Ma, Lydia, Mr. Maginnis & Harry Borden took the two horse carriage, and Carrie & I the buggy and went out to take a ride. The first named party took quite a long ride but Carrie and I drove about 3 miles down the Winter Road to a very beautiful woods where we stopped in the shade of some trees and sat for some time. Then drove on for some distance farther but found no suitable turnoff, so we came back to our old stand in the woods and sat there for some time longer and drove home by 1/2 past 1, in time for dinner. After dinner went up stairs and took a nap until about 1/2 past 4, then brought up my journal, washed, dressed & went down stairs. Got supper about 1/2 past 6, and spent the evening in the parlor with Carrie.

Clinton Kirby was over this evening but I did not see him. Mr. Borden was taken quite sick today with a diarrhea and sent for Dr. Williams twice. We had very heavy showers of rain at intervals during the evening, and considerable thunder and lightning. Mr. Borden appeared easier during the night, but Dr. Williams remained all night.

22 July 1850. I spent today about the place, part of the time in company with Carrie, partly sleeping, &c. Lydia and Mr. Maginnis went to the City this afternoon. Mr. Harry C. Storms, my groomsman, and Miss Mary Williams, Carrie's bridesmaid, arrived this afternoon. We spent the evening pleasantly dancing, playing on the piano, singing, &c. The only thing that mars our pleasure is the illness of Mr. Borden. He was taken with diarrhea on Sunday morning, and though his disease is checked, he still remains very weak. I fear that he will not be able to attend the wedding of his daughter Carrie and myself tomorrow, which will occasion much unhappiness of feeling among us.

Up at about 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

23 July 1850. Clear and delightful all day. Evening clear, beautiful and moonlight. Got up this morning at about 1/2 past 4, dressed myself in my wedding suit, to be united with my dear Carrie in holy wedlock. We all took breakfast at about 1/2 past 6 and started Harry Borden over to Clifton for Bishop McIlvaine. At about 9 o'clock, the company all having arrived, some 20 or 30 in number, we were married by the Bishop. Thus have I taken upon me the responsibility of wife, but I think that I have obtained one who will make life ever dear and sweet to me. Too dearly do I love her for me to ever have any unpleasant moments. Our greater source of regret was that Mr. Borden could not be present at the wedding, he attempted to get up and come down but was too weak to do so. It was very unfortunate as it marred our pleasure. My sister acted as 1st, Miss Mary Williams as 2nd and Carrie's sister Mary, as 3rd bridesmaid for Carrie. Mr. E.J. Maginnis as 1st, Harry C. Storms as 2nd and Harry Borden as 3rd groomsman to me. There were some 20 or 30 there, all members or near friends of the family.(9)

At about 11 a.m. we all started for the Waverly House in Cincinnati. We had a pleasant ride, and dined at 1 o'clock at the Waverly, by the invitation of Mr. & Mrs. West. They gave us an excellent dinner. Our party consisted of 14 persons. After dinner we went to the Sandusky cars to start for the East. A number of our company accompanied us down. Our company for the East consisted of Mr. & Mrs. West, Ma, Lydia and Mr. Maginnis and myself and Carrie. We started at about 1/2 past 2, passing through Xenia, Bloomington &c., and arriving at Springfield at about 9 p.m. where we got a miserable supper. The night was beautiful and moonlight and light as day. We traveled very comfortably all night and got along without acci-dent.

24 July 1850. Clear and delightful all day. We had a most delightful trip down the lake today having arrived in Sandusky City at about 7 o'clock. After our arrival went on board the Steamer Saratoga, paid our passage, secured our berths, and then went in search of breakfast. After some difficulty found a hotel, the "Townsend House," at which we got a "kind" of breakfast. We started from Sandusky at 8 a.m. for Buffalo, and as I before stated, had a most magnificent sail down the lake. The weather was cool and delightful & the lake as calm as could be. We arrived at Cleveland, Ohio at about 1/4 of 1, where we laid until about 2 o'clock. Our meals on board of the boat were miserable. In fact I could barely eat anything. We had a beautiful view of a sunset on the lake, and also of the moon rising. The night was beautifully moonlight. I was sitting out on the deck with Carrie until after 10 o'clock, enjoying the fresh cool air and the beauties of the night. After leaving Carrie, went down into the Saloon where I found Mr. West, Mr. Maginnis and two gentlemen who Mr. West introduced me to. Took a cobbler with them, and turned in at about 1/2 past 1 and slept very soundly all night, being very tired.

25 July 1850. Clear in the morning early and quite warm, but towards noon clouded over and we had several showers of rain. Evening clear beautiful and moonlight. We arrived at Buffalo at about 1/2 past 5 this morning. Took an omnibus and went up to the "Phelps House" to breakfast, after which took a walk out around the town, and at 9 o'clock started for Niagara Falls by rail road, distant 22 miles, where we arrived at about 1/2 past 10. Went up to Cataract House and succeeded in getting rooms after some difficulty, as the weather was rather rainy and unpleasant. I remained in my room the greater part of the day. Carrie and I took a walk down to the American Falls about 5 o'clock, and returned to the house at about 6. After tea Mr. Maginnis, Lydia, Carrie and I took a walk over on Goat Island, then to Hog back, and from there to Prospect tower. Returned to the hotel at about 1/4 of 9. Went to the parlor, where we had some waltzing and dancing. We met at the falls Mr. & Mrs. Don Piat, Miss Caroline Piat and Mr. & Mrs. Shoemaker recently married and on a wedding tour. We also met the late Miss Emma Parker, who has also been recently married, her sister Martha, and brother Tom. Retired with Carrie at about 11 o'clock.

26 July 1850. Cloudy, raw and cold all day with an occasional shower of rain, an overcoat quite comfortable. Directly after breakfast our party took a carriage and drove to the Suspension Bridge. Crossed & recrossed the same, then drove to the Whirlpool. Descended the precipice to the rocks beneath, then returned to the village, and crossed the bridge over to Goat Island. Rode around to the various points of interest and returned to the hotel in time for dinner. In the afternoon Carrie, Mr. Maginnis and myself crossed the ferry over to Canada, the rest of the party fearing to cross the river. We met a gentleman and lady from Pokeepsie going over in the boat and joined them in hiring a carriage and had the benefit of their guide. Drove to Lundy's Lane, went upon the tower, then to the burning spring. Then we went to what was once called table rock, but it fell some weeks ago, spoiling one of the most pleasant views of the falls. Returned to the ferry, recrossed, and returned to the hotel for tea. Spent the evening partially in the parlor of the hotel and partially on the back porch of the hotel gazing at the rapids as they hurried on in wild course towards the awful chasm beneath. Retired about 1/2 past 9.

27 July 1850. Cloudy all day and rather cool. Got up this morning at about 1/2 past 6 a.m. After breakfast Ma, Lydia Mr. Maginnis, Carrie and I started out for a ramble on Iris Island. We first went over to the back, then to Biddle's Stair Case, when Mr. Maginnis, Carrie and myself descended to the rocks beneath, Ma and Lydia preferring not to go. After considerable labor and clambering over the rocks we succeeded in gaining the rocks immediately adjoining the Horse Shoe Fall where we had a magnificent view of that great cataract and could well judge of its mightiness. While on the rocks a heavy shower came up and we were obliged to return to the staircase for shelter. Sent for an omnibus to convey us to the hotel, thus being disappointed in taking our intended visit Prospect Tower, &c.

There were a number of others there who joined us in the omnibus ride back to the Hotel. We then went to our room and Carrie and I took a brandy cobbler and at 1 o'clock went to dinner, but not to get much of one. With this visit to the Cataract House, I have not been pleased at all. There is not the attention shown that I have formerly found, in fact I have not had a decent dinner since my arrival at the house. Whether it is owing to the vast number of persons now at the Falls, or not, I cannot tell. There must be some 3 or 400 persons down to dinner every day.

After dinner, or at about 1/2 past two, left Niagara Falls for Lewistown in the cars. After proceeding some few miles by steam arrived at the junction and took a set of old rickety horse cars to Lewistown. The scenery along the railroad is very beautiful being in full view of a beautiful valley as you descend to Lewistown.

Arrived at Lewistown about 1/2 past 4 where we took the splendid Steamer Ontario on our route to Montreal. We changed our minds this morning to go to that place instead of Trenton Falls. The Ontario I consider one of the most beautiful and well conducted boats that I ever was on board. All is order and neatness. The furniture is neat and beautiful and the state rooms too are models of neatness and cleanliness. In a word, she is the best boat I ever was on board.

We entered Lake Ontario at about 1/2 past 4 p.m. passing Forts Niagara and George. Found it quite cold on the Lake, an overcoat quite comfortable. There was a gentle swell on the Lake though nothing to make it unpleasant for the ladies.

We arrived at Rochester at about 1/2 past 11 p.m. At this place ascended the Genesee River for about 7 miles. Mr. and Mrs. West parted from us at this point to go to Philadelphia by way of the Erie Rail Road.

28 July 1850. Cloudy and showering all day and exceedingly warm. We arrived at Oswego this morning at about 5 o'clock. According to the present arrangement of the line we are obliged to remain at this place until tomorrow morning at 8 o'clock. But as the accommodations of the boat are so fine, we have found it very pleasant, though rather warm.

Oswego is beautifully situated on Oswego River, a short distance from the Lake, and is a town of considerable importance. This morning we all went to the Episcopal Church (I am under the impression called Christ Church), heard a tolerable sermon, returned to the boat after church & got dinner. Took a nap until about 4, then got up, washed, took a cobbler and then brought up my journal. Took tea at the usual hour having first written a letter to Samuel Bonnell. After tea went up into town and placed two letters in the post office, one to Mr. Samuel Borden from Carrie & the other to Sam Bonnell. I then went up to the hotel, remained there a short time, and then returned to the boat. Went to bed about 1/2 past 9.

29 July 1850. We left Oswego this morning at 8 o'clock for Ogdensburg. Arrived at Sackets Harbor 4 miles from Oswego about 1/2 past 11, and at Kingston, Canada 40 miles from Sackets Harbor and 243 miles from Niagara at about 2 p.m. After leaving Kingston commenced passing the Thousand Islands, and arrived at Brockville, 52 miles from Kingston at 1/2 past 6, and at Ogdensburg at about 1/2 past 7, 307 miles from Niagara. We are to remain at this place all night, and take the British boat in the morning for Montreal. It being too damp to go on shore remained on board.

30 July 1850. Got up this morning at 1/2 past 4, dressed and went on board of the steamer British Queen and at 5 a.m. started for Montreal. Upon leaving Ogdensburg crossed the river to Prescott, a miserable little town, and then proceeded down the river crossing the first rapids about 7 miles below. We had a fine view of the rapids today. The Cedars are much the finest, in fact it is quite appalling at times. The Cascades rank next in magnificence. As I have written a full account of this river in my former journal it will be useless to employ the time here.

We arrived at Ladine 436 miles from Niagara at 1/2 past 2, took the cars here for Montreal, distance 9 miles, where we arrived at about 1/4 past 3, went immediately to the "Montreal House" where they gave us very fine rooms overlooking the St. Lawrence River. The table is tolerably good, the dinner was poor.

A few minutes after our arrival at the hotel, started out to take a stroll. First went to the great French Cathedral, went through the same and up into one of the towers from which you have a beautiful view of the City of Montreal and surrounding country. Upon our return to the foot of the tower, took a walk down Notre Dame Street stopping in several of the stores. Went as far as the ruins of Donegara's Hotel, burned some time since, at which house I stopped when last here. Returned by way of the Key, passing the magnificent market fronting the river and getting back to the hotel in time for tea. After it Mr. Maginnis and I took a walk down on the Key, and saw the Quebec boat start. Mr. & Mrs. H. M. McIlvaine went down in her this evening. They have traveled with us since Niagara. Spent the evening in the parlor part of the time.

31 July 1850. Clear and pleasant all day. Got up at about 7 a.m. and took breakfast at 8, after which Mr. Maginnis and I went down to look at the Quebec boat (Lord Sydenham) which we intend going down in this evening. About 9 started out in 2 cabs to see the sights of the place. First drove to Donegara's beautiful mansion and grounds, walked through the grounds, then drove to the Governor's late residence which he was obliged to vacate during the last Canada troubles. It is beautifully located, and had numerous beautiful and picturesque views. After leaving there drove the remainder of the distance around the Mount and back to Montreal. On the approach there is a beautiful view. Visited the Bishop's church, and the Black & Gray Nunneries. Returned to the Hotel about 1/2 past 1. In our ride saw the ruins of the Parliament Houses burned a short time since by a mob. After dinner remained about the hotel for a while when Mr. Maginnis and I took a walk up Notre Dame Street to see if we could purchase some cigars but found prices so high gave up the job and returned to the Hotel.

At 7 p.m. started on board the steamer Lord Sydenham for Quebec. She is rather a fast boat, but a miserable old, dirty and unpleasant one. She has so much motion it seems almost as if she would part. There were quite a large number of passengers on board, among whom we met the Parker bridal party. Slept pretty well considering the noise and motion of the boat.

AUGUST

1 August 1850. We arrived at Quebec this morning at about 1/2 past 6. Immediately drove up to the St. George's Hotel which we expected to find a good hotel, but to our disappointment we found it a miserable dirty house kept by Willard Russell. He formerly kept the Albion, a house I tried to avoid, and by misfortune got into the very house I wished to forgo. On account of the rain we were unable to take our ride to see the views of Quebec until late. Mr. Maginnis and I took a walk through the town and down to palace gate and the battery before breakfast. About 1/2 past 10 we started in a carriage for the Citadel, but just as we arrived there it commenced to sprinkle rain which made it quite unpleasant as it was accompanied by a tremendous heavy gale of wind. Upon leaving the Citadel returned to the Hotel, where we left Ma and Lydia, they fearing to go with us on account of the unpleasant appearance of the weather. We started for the falls of Montmorency and had a very pleasant ride, though attended with the usual begging on the part of the children on the road. We saw the Falls at a very favorable time as there was quite a large amount of water going over them, but the morning was quite unfavorable to walk about on account of the dampness of the ground and grass.

Returned to the hotel by about 2 and got an apology for a lunch, and then drove over to the Plains of Abraham and saw the new monument created to Wolfe. From there drove to the Bishop's, or French Cathedral, and then to the Hotel where we got a miserable dinner. In fact Willard Russell, the man who keeps the Hotel, ought to be drummed out of town, as he keeps the most miserable house, and makes the most exorbitant charges that I ever met with. After dinner took a carriage and drove down to the old steamer Lord Sydenham and at 5 started for Montreal again. The scenery after leaving Quebec is very beautiful for some distance. Had an excellent supper on board the boat.

2 August 1850. Clear and pleasant all day and quite warm. Arrived in Montreal this morning at about 7 o'clock, went up to the "Montreal House" and got a very good breakfast, and at 10 a.m. started on board the Steamer Iron Duke for Laprarie, dis-tant 9 miles, where we arrived at about 10. We here took cars over a very good rail road and arrived at St. Johns, a distance 15 miles, at about 1/4 of 12. At this place took the steamer Burlington for Burlington, Vermont. Passed Plattsburgh and other places mentioned in former journal and arrived in Burlington, Vermont at about 7 p.m. Burlington, what I could see of it, is quite a pretty place. At this place took the cars and at about 1/2 past 7 p.m. started for Bellows Falls, Vermont, distant 120 miles. The country and scenery through which we passed was beautiful. The rail road is in good order and we travel with great speed, except on account of a dense fog, which arose in the midst of the Green mountains, we had to run very slow.

At about 12 o'clock had to leave the cars and take open wagons and ride for about half a mile around a bridge which has been washed away. We found it exceedingly disagreeable as the wagons were very wet from the fog, the horses fractious, and the ride rough. However we all arrived safe and took the cars, and arrived at Bellows Falls, Vermont, 120 miles from Burlington, at about 3 a.m. Were obliged to walk up to the Hotel Gages where we got very nice rooms and went to bed. We passed Mount Holly this evening, one of the Green Mountains. The rail road, by grade, is about 10 feet to the mile. This mountain is 1300 feet above the level of the river.

3 August 1850. Clear and quite warm all day with the exception of about half an hour in the middle of the day when we had some little rain. Got up this morning at 1/4 past 7, dressed and took a walk out around Bellows Falls. The scenery about the place is very beautiful, being surrounded on all sides by lofty mountains. It is situated on the Connecticut River, where it makes a very beautiful fall, and passes through a narrow compass. We got a poor breakfast, and at 9 o'clock a.m. took the cars for Walpole, distant 4 miles where we took stage for Brattleboro, Vermont, distant 20 miles. The ride was tedious though through a most beautiful country, the scenery being principally mountain. Some of the views of the Connecticut river were beautiful in the extreme.

Arrived at Brattleboro at about 20 m. past 1. It is a very beautiful place situated on the Connecticut River and has a very fine house called the "Vermont," recently opened. Took dinner here and at 3 p.m. left on the cars for New York via Greenfield, 24 miles, Springfield 60 miles, Hartford 86 miles, and New Haven, 122 miles from Brattleboro. The ride along the Connecticut River is beautiful, and the scenery magnificent. Arrived at Springfield at about 5, having traveled 60 miles in less than 2 hours, including stoppages. Arrived at New Haven at about 7, and at New York about 11, being 222 miles from Walpole, having traveled that distance since 9 o'clock this morning. Took a carriage and put up at the Irving House. Bed about 11 1/2 p.m.

4 August 1850. Clear and warm all day, and during the evening rather cooler. Got up this morning at about 8 o'clock, took a bath, dressed and breakfasted about 10. Remained in my room the greater part of the morning, dined at 1/2 past 2, and left the table at 4. Had a magnificent dinner. John Tyler and his lady dined at the table. At the hotel all the afternoon and evening with the exception of a few minutes in the afternoon when we started out to take a walk on Broadway but found it so unpleasant soon returned. Spent the evening in the parlor of the Hotel with Mr. & Mrs. Shoemaker, Mrs. Don Piatt, Miss Caroline Piatt, Mr. & Mrs. West, Mr. & Mrs. Thomas, Mr. Maginnis, two of his brothers, and another gentleman who came in late in the evening. Miss Upjohn, Carrie's aunt, was also with us early in the evening. Retired to bed at about 1/2 past 11.

5 August 1850. Cloudy and rained a little through the morning, in fact had the appearance of having a heavy rain, but towards noon cleared off very warm. After breakfast this morning Mr. Maginnis and I went down to the Exchange to see Mr. Stewart to make some inquiry about Mr. Bonnell as I had received a card from him this morning, but were unable to see him. Also went to the post office, Mack attended to some business, then we returned to the hotel. Mr. Maginnis, Ma, Lydia, Carrie and I took a carriage & rode into the upper part of New York to see the beautiful residences. Also went through Grace Church, a magnificent structure. We saw many beautiful residences and churches, returned to the hotel about 1/2 past 11, intending going to Greenwood Cemetery, but it had so much the appearance of rain that we gave up the idea of going. Dined at 2, after which I went over to an anatomical museum, in which there were many fine specimens. At 5 p.m. started for Philadelphia where we arrived at about 1/2 past 9. Took a carriage up home, and found Flora & Elizabeth in bed, much to our disappointment, as we expected to have had a fine supper prepared. But on account of their not having received my letter they were not prepared so that we all went supperless to bed, and very hungry. Bed at 11 1/2.

6 August 1850. Clear and very warm all day. Got up at about 6, and took a shower, then breakfast and then down to the wash woman & then to the office. Remained there the greater part of the day. In the evening went to see Mr. & Mrs. G.W. Jaeger on some business, also saw Mr. Parkinson there. We all left together, and Mr. Jaeger walked to 11th & Washington Streets with me. I stopped about 5 minutes at Smiths and saw Miss Louisa Snyder & Amelia, then went home. Mr. & Mrs. Edward Roberts were spending the evening there. Bed at about 11 p.m.

7 August 1850. Clear and very warm all day, until towards evening, when it clouded over and we had a heavy shower of rain with considerable of blow accompanied with thunder and lightning which cooled the air considerably. At the office nearly all day and in the evening at home. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and went to market. Bed at about 11 p.m.

8 August 1850. In the evening at home. Mr. & Mrs. Laing spent the evening with us.

9 August 1850. Clear and very pleasant through the day until about 6 p.m. when it clouded over and at about 1/2 past 6 had a tremendous shower of rain, accompanied with a very heavy blow and vivid lightning and heavy claps of thunder. At the office during the morning, and after dinner went up with Carrie in 7th Street below Coats to look at a piano which her Aunt intends purchasing for her. We were both much pleased with the instrument. After leaving took an omnibus down as far as the "American Hotel" where I left Carrie and went over to the office. Carrie called for me at the office and we started to go home, but just as we got to Chestnut Street it poured rain and we took refuge in Mr. Pepper's store, and waited until after 7 o'clock, when the storm ceased and we got an omnibus and went home. Evening at home.

10 August 1850. It rained quite hard early in the morning. Got up at 6 a.m. and went to market. At the office the greater part of the day, and in the evening at home until about 1/2 past 9, when Ma, Lydia, Mr. Maginnis, and Carrie & I went around to Tammy Laings to get some ice cream.

11 August 1850. In the morning went to the Church of the Atonement with Carrie, Ma, Lydia & Mr. Maginnis. A stranger preached. Afternoon at home napping. After tea Mr. Maginnis & Lydia, Carrie & I took a walk down to see Mrs. West at the "Blight House." Found her in and well.

12 August 1850. Lydia & Carrie stopped for me at dinner time and I walked up home with them.

13 August 1850. In course of the evening & night had several very heavy showers of rain, accompanied by vivid lightning and heavy thunder.

14 August 1850. Evening at home. Mr. S. Bonnell, Mr. Harry C. Storms & Edward C. Borden spent the evening with us.

15 August 1850. Up at 6 a.m. and took my usual shower bath. In the evening at home.

16 August 1850. Evening at home. Mrs. West took tea and spent the evening with us until about 9. Mr. West came in after tea. Mr. & Mrs. Lewis E. Ware also spent the evening with us and left at 1/2 past 10. After they left Carrie and I placed the cards in the envelopes which are to be sent out.

17 August 1850. This morning it was quite like a Fall day, quite cold, & had to keep the windows down. I wrote a letter to my brother-in-law, Harry M. Borden, to day. Spent the evening at home, preparing the cards to be sent to our friends.

18 August 1850. A clear cold and magnificent day. Never do I remember a more delightful day and evening. The weather appears to be assuming the appearance of Fall. In the morning Mr. S. Bonnell, Jr. called up and accompanied Ma, Lydia, Mr. Maginnis, Carrie and I to St. Mark's Church. Heard a very good sermon. Messrs. Maginnis and Bonnell returned to have dinner with me, in fact Maginnis has been staying at my house since his return from the West. After dinner, or about 3 o'clock, Sam and I started out to take a walk and see some of our friends. First called up at Kate Smith's but found her still out of town, saw her father & sister Amelia and Miss Snyder. Miss Hannah Burton came in while we were there. Then called down to see Miss Cornelia Gorgas.

19 August 1850. In the evening at home until about 1/2 past 8, then went to Buttonwood & Charles Street to collect some rents, then to Coats below 9th to see Mr. Jaeger about a piano.

20 August 1850. Got up this morning at 6, went to market, returned, got breakfast & then to the office where I remained the greater part of the day. Evening at home, if I except a half an hour occupied in going to see Mr. S. Bonnell and Mr. John C. Brenner on business.

21 August 1850. Evening at home if I except about 1/2 an hour occupied in going around to the Building Association.

24 August 1850. Up at 1/2 of 6 a.m. and went to market. At the office during the day until 2 1/2 p.m. then went to dinner. Remained home until about 1/2 past 5 to see some persons who were to call upon me about a piano. At about 1/2 past 5 Carrie and I took a walk out Schuylkill 4th Street, near Girard College.

25 August 1850. Poured rain in torrents and blew a perfect gale from an early hour this morning until about 2 p.m. when it commenced breaking away and finally cleared off beautifully.

26 August 1850. I was at the office the greater part of the day and in the evening at home.

27 August 1850. About 1/2 past 5 p.m. I took a walk up to 5th and Cherry Streets to make a purchase of some spoons and forks.

28 August 1850. In the evening at a meeting of the Logan Building Association convened for the purpose of altering the constitution. There were two constitutions submitted. Ours was voted upon Article by Article and approved. But when we came to take the final vote, we lost, as we had to have 2/3 of the number of shares represented present. We were 18 short. Did not leave the meeting until near 11 & then went home.

30 August 1850. At the office all day, and in the evening Carrie and I went to Coates below 9th to see Mr. Jaeger and Mr. Martin about a piano. Went in and waited about an hour, but saw neither of them, returned home. At about 5 m. past 10, on the way, stopped in 11th Street above Arch and got some ice cream.

31 August 1850. Carrie stopped down at the office in the latter part of the afternoon and I walked home with her. Spent the evening at home.

SEPTEMBER

1 September 1850. I went to Church in the morning with Ma, and occupied our pew "No. 82, Church of the Atonement" for the first time. A stranger preached, and he went through the service in a different manner from anything I had ever seen or heard before, that is, he left out the whole of the morning prayers, and commenced by singing the psalm usually in the 2nd part of the morning service.

2 September 1850. Poured rain in torrents all day, which I fear will occasion much damage and great freshet. I never saw rain so hard for so long a time.

3 September 1850. After dinner, or at about 1/2 past 4, Sam Bonnell called at our house, and Ma, Lydia, Sam, Carrie & myself started out for Fairmount to see the great damage occasioned by the freshet. Just as we got to Fairmount we met Bonnell's two sisters Sallie(10) & Cornelia who joined us. We walked over the wire bridge and up as far as the locks. The flood has abated very much since early this morning. At that time the water was over 10 feet on the dam, in fact it could scarcely be seen at all. The wheel houses at Fairmount were full up to the tops of their wheels, and the water covered the walk on the outside of them. The locks on the West side of the river were all submerged, and the tow path entirely washed away. The river was higher that it has ever been known before. Houses were flooded at Schuylkill Front Street. Many of the dams gave way which was the cause, in a measure, of the great body of water coming down. The fires at the gas works were all put out, and tonight the whole city was in perfect darkness, on account of not being able to manufacture.

4 September 1850. Clear and delightful weather all day and during the evening. Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and went to market. In the evening at "Logan Hall," Vine Street North side West of Schuylkill 5th, to attend a meeting of the Logan Building & Saving Fund Association for the purpose of voting upon a new constitution. The parties became very warm, and some sharp things were said. We finally succeeded in passing our constitution by a 2/3rds vote. The other party disputed the right of some two or 3 of our side to vote, but we overruled them and succeeded in passing our constitution by the "skin of our teeth." We did not leave the hall until 1/4 past 11. Mr. Maginnis went home with me to sleep. Found Carrie & Lydia sitting up for us, which we hardly expected.

6 September 1850. At the office all day, and in the evening Mr. Maginnis, Lydia, Ma, Carrie, & I went down to the Musical Fund Hall to see the New Orleans Serenaders. We were much pleased with their singing and music.

9 September 1850. At the office all day, and in the evening about 7 p.m. Carrie came down to the office by engagement, and we went up to Barnum's Museum together to see Miss Alexena Fisher play Dot in the Cricket of the Hearth. A family of Chinese also appeared on the stage, sang and played on several instruments in their peculiar way. It was anything but pleasant to the ear or like music. The family consisted of two men, two children & two ladies, one of whom was said to be of a high family. Her feet were only about 2 inches long. The afterpiece was Sudden Thoughts, played very well. The house was quite full; out at about 10 o'clock. We stopped on the way home at Jeres in Chestnut opposite Masonic Hall and got some ice cream & coffee, &c.

12 September 1850. About 1/4 past 6 Carrie & Lydia stopped in and we walked down to the Exchange, got into an Omnibus & went home. Dr. Goddard, our pastor, made us a call this evening. He only remained about half an hour and left at 1/2 past 8. I then went to 9th & Coats Streets to see Mr. Jaeger and Mr. Martin but found them both out of town. On my way home I stopped in for a few minutes to see Kate Smith. Found her at home and well. Met Sam Bonnell. Today is my 26th birthday.

15 September 1850. In the morning went to the Church of the Atonement with Carrie & rest of the family. Mr. Bonnell called for me at about 1/2 past 2, and at about 3 started out to take a walk. We first crossed over the Market Street Bridge, which is now in course of alteration and rebuilding for the Pennsylvania Rail Road Co. We then continued up the new rail road which will be ready to run cars in a few days. It is built to avoid the inclined plane, and for the Pennsylvania Rail Road. The depot just back of Hardings is now in the course of erection and is a spacious affair. In crossing one of the bridges my dog "Prince" fell between the sleepers a distance of some 25 feet to the road beneath. He jumped up, shook himself, and ran off like if nothing had happened. We continued our walk up to a road which crossed over to the Schuylkill river and came out just below the Columbia Bridge. We crossed at the bridge and walked down the rail road on the other side to home.

18 September 1850. In the evening I went around to the Building Association in company with Mr. Maginnis to pay my dues. After which the meeting acted upon the By Laws and after some discussion passed them. There were some sharp remarks made by some of the members.

19 September 1850. At the office during the morning and at about 1 p.m. Mr. A.D. Cash(11) and I drove out to Mr. J. Francis Fisher's place by invitation to attend the celebration of his raising a residence.(12) We had a very fast pair of horses and drove the distance of 11 miles in one hour from 4th & Walnut Street. Upon our arrival Mr. Fisher met us very cordially and showed us around the place, the situation of which is beautiful. The house, which is now just roofed, is of magnificent proportion, and much architectural beauty is displayed both in itself, and the outbuildings. The cost of it, I am told, will reach some $35,000 or $40,000 exclusive of the land and laying out the same. Mr. Fisher has some 150 acres. There were quite a large number of gentlemen present, besides the mechanics employed in the erection of the buildings. We also had very fine music. At about 3 o'clock the procession was formed, when the flag was hoisted on top of the tower amid the cheer of the guests. We marched around the house preceded by the music, and two roast pigs were carried on hand barrows. We entered the house, each one cheering as he entered, where we found a table set out, well filled and substantially calculated to gratify one's appetite after so long a fast and ride. Champagne and other wines were not forgotten & freely drunk, and many toasts were made. Mr. J. F. Fisher made a short address, as well as several others including some of the mechanics.

20 September 1850. In the evening went to the annual exhibition of the Horticultural Society with Carrie. This being the 3rd night, the flowers looked rather faded. Many of the designs were very handsome. The scene was enlivened by a fine band of music.

22 September 1850. In the morning went to the Church of the Atonement. In the evening Carrie and I went down to St. Luke's Church.

24 September 1850. We got our new piano(13) yesterday, and are very much pleased with it.

25 September 1850. At about 7 p.m. Carrie, Lydia and Mr. Maginnis met at my office according to engagement to go up to the Walnut Street Theater to see George W. Boker, Esq.'s new play of The Betrothal. This was its first appearance and was received with much applause and good feeling. The characters were all well sustained and full of interest throughout, in fact I considered it a piece of considerable merit. The house was crowded to excess. Mr. Boker was called out after the Piece and appeared to be much agitated.

26 September 1850. In the afternoon I attended the funeral of Mrs. Barton Jenks (late Arethusa Leeds) and her infant child. By request of the family, Messrs. S. Bonnell, Jr., Jerry VanSciver, and a Mr. Mitchell and myself acted as pall bearers. Thus have three of us been called upon to perform this sad duty a second time in a family which has been sorely afflicted. About 16 months ago we attended the funeral of her sister Liz, and now too we have to mourn her loss. Previous to her marriage I spent many happy hours in her society, I have known her from a child, and have always esteemed her as one of my kindest friends, as she was one full of kindness to all. I hope she has been borne to a happier land, where all trouble ceases. She died on the morning of the 24th at 5 o'clock, and her child the evening before.

OCTOBER

2 October 1850. At the office all day. Evening at home. Retired to my room quite early with a sad heart.

3 October 1850. We had our stove in the dining room put up yesterday and found it quite comfortable. At the office all day, and in the evening sat in the parlor a while. Carrie played the piano for me.

7 October 1850. At the office all day until about 20 minutes past 6 p.m. then went over to 6th & Walnut Streets to take tea at Mrs. Smiths boarding house with Carrie and Mrs. West. Carrie had been spending the day with her Aunt and Mr. and Miss McMicken from Cincinnati.

8 October 1850. The election passed off very quietly, so far as I have heard, in the city proper. They voted today for the first time at the different ward houses, it being the first general election held from the State House. I did not vote.

9 October 1850. Mr. and Miss Lizzie McMicken from Cincinnati and Mrs. West spent the afternoon & evening and took tea with us. They left at about 10. Miss McMicken is quite a pleasant and agreeable young lady though not pretty. She plays and sings very well.

10 October 1850. At the office all day, and in the evening until about 9 p.m. busy writing. Then went down to 4th and Chestnut Streets, got some oysters, ale and then home.

11 October 1850. At the office through the day. Carrie came down at about 1/2 past 5 and went up in the omnibus with me. Evening at home busy writing until near 12.

13 October 1850. Ma was quite sick this evening.

15 October 1850. At the office all day. Evening at the Franklin Institute exhibition alone. 1st evening opened. Returned home at about 1/4 of 10.

16 October 1850. At the office all day, and in the evening at home writing, with the exception of about 3/4 of an hour occupied in going over to the Building Association to pay my monthly dues. I have been exceedingly busy lately, and for some weeks so that I have scarcely had a moment to myself.

17 October 1850. In the evening Carrie, Ma, Lydia, Mr. Maginnis, Mrs. Ludlow and myself went down to the Franklin Institute exhibition, which is got up in very beautiful style. Mrs. Ludlow took tea and spent part of the afternoon at our house.

The City is in great excitement today, in consequence of the first appearance of Jenny Lind(14) in our City today. The proceeds of the concert will be between $11000 and $12000. The first ticket sold for $628, to Root(15) the Daguerreotypist.

20 October 1850. At Church of Atonement in the morning and evening with Carrie. A missionary from coast of Africa preached in the morning, and Mr. Goddard in the evening. Afternoon at home until about 5 p.m. when Carrie, Mr. Maginnis, Lydia & I took a walk and got caught in the rain before our return.

22 October 1850. Carrie and I went down to spend the evening with Miss Juliet Groff. Had some fine singing & playing by Miss Juliet & Anne.

24 October 1850. At the office all day, and in the evening at home. Part of the time employed in making a dog box for my dog Prince.

25 October 1850. Our servant girl of about 15 years of age, named Elizabeth Harlan, left us today without leave, in fact run off no one knows where.

28 October 1850. At the office all day, evening at home, part the time in my room but with very unpleasant feelings. Rest of the evening in the parlor with Carrie. She played on the piano for me. We got a new girl named Biddy today in place of Elizabeth. Mrs. West took dinner with us. Mr. Maginnis returned from New York this evening.

29 October 1850. At the office all day, and in the evening at home in my room the greater part of the time with very unpleasant feelings again.

NOVEMBER

1 November 1850. In the evening Carrie and I called down to see Roberts in 9th Street. Saw Cousin Lydia.

2 November 1850. At the office during the morning and in the afternoon until about 4 p.m. when S. Bonnell, Jr. and myself went over to Camden, he to look after a coal boat. We parted in Camden, and I went over by the Callowhill Street ferry wishing to stop in 2nd above Race to make some enquiry about going to Doylestown on Monday.

3 November 1850. At Church of Atonement in the morning and afternoon with Carrie. Mr. Bonnell sat in our pew in the morning and walked home with us but would not stay to dinner. After Church in the afternoon Carrie and I walked out to the Market Street Bridge which they are just about completing. The alteration is for the Pennsylvania Rail Road.

4 November 1850. At the office during the morning, and at 2 p.m. started for Doylestown in the stage for the purpose of making some examinations in regard to a title. Arrived there at about 20 minutes past 6, after rather a pleasant ride, the distance is about 25 miles. Stopped at the "Citizens Hotel," an ordinary country house, and at about 1/4 of 7 took supper all alone, the ordinary supper being over. Sat reading the papers until about 8 1/2.

5 November 1850. Got up this morning at about 6 1/4 o'clock, and at about 7 1/2 took breakfast, after which went over to the recorders and registers office and made what examination I required, and then returned to the hotel. Read the morning papers from Philadelphia, got a light dinner and at 12 started for Philadelphia in the stage, where I arrived at about 1/2 past 4.

7 November 1850. At the office during the morning until about 1/2 past 12 when Carrie, Lydia and Mr. Maginnis met at my office according to appointments. All went down to call upon Mr. and Mrs. A. Sydney Roberts, Jr. They were married this morning, and are to leave this afternoon for New York. Sidney married Miss Elizabeth Carstairs,(16) quite a pretty and a very interesting young lady. May they have a long life and much happiness is my earnest prayer.

There was quite an excitement around the door occasioned by the children of the public schools in the neighborhood, and a number of other persons congregated for the purpose of seeing those that called. The house was in Lombard Street above 2nd N. side.

9 November 1850. Clear and quite cold all day. Got up this morning at 1/2 past 5, dressed and went to market, then returned, got breakfast, and then went over to Market Street Bridge. At 8 o'clock started for Downingtown over the new rail road to avoid the inclined plane. Arrived there at about 1/2 past 9, where I took a stage for New Holland, Lancaster County, distant 22 miles. We passed over a very pretty county, over the Welsh mountain & through Waynesboro & Beartown. We stopped at a place about 6 miles from Downingtown at about 1/2 past 2 or 3 and got a most miserable dinner. At the "Bleu Ball" stopped to have the mail assorted, which was done by a very pretty girl, and, I learned, well educated. She will certainly make someone a good wife. She used her pen with great facility and appeared to be a very smart girl. At New Holland put up at "Roberts Hotel," a pretty good house. Shortly after my arrival I called to see Mr. & Mrs. William Hiester, whom I wished to see on business in relation to a title, but he could give me no information. After leaving his house, I took a walk through the town and was much pleased by the general appearance of comfort and cleanliness throughout all the inhabitants.

10 November 1850. Quite cold last night, and considerable ice was made, the 1st I have noticed this year. Got up at about 1/4 past 6, took breakfast at about 7, and, at about 8, started, in company with two of the Messrs. Roberts (brothers of Anthony Roberts) for Kinser's, a station on the Columbia Rail Road, distant about 9 miles from New Holland, and about 16 miles from Lancaster. The cars arrived at about 1/2 past 10, and I started for Harrisburg. I arrived at about 1/2 past 1, after a very pleasant ride, passing through Lancaster, Mount Joy, Elizabethtown, &c. Stopped at "Herrs Hotel," a pretty good house. After dinner got into conversation with a Mr. Wilmot from New York state. We took a walk about the city, and out as far as the new State Asylum for the Insane, which is now nearly completed. It is a beautiful building, and very handsomely located on high ground. In the evening attended Presbyterian Church.

11 November 1850. Went up to the Land office to make some examinations in regard to a title at Schuylkill 6th & Market (N.E.). After getting through with my examinations Mr. Wilmot and I took a walk through the Capital grounds, and then down along the banks of the Susquehanna. Took a view of the bridges, and then paid a visit to the prison. I went in and saw one of the prisoners. After leaving the prison went up to the Capital again, and up in the cupola from which you have a beautiful view of the surrounding country. We also went into the Senate and Assembly Chambers. Wilmot afterwards left me and I met a gentleman from Philadelphia, solicitor of Kensington. We took a walk into the Arsenal, where I saw a gun captured from the Mexicans at Cero Gordo by the American Army and presented to the State of Pennsylvania by General Patterson. The gun was of brass and a very large one, I suppose 32 lb. We afterwards took a walk down to the gas works now in course of erection, and to some other points of interest, then returned to the hotel.

After dinner took a walk over to Porter's iron works and at 5 p.m. started for Philadelphia in the cars where we arrived at about 1/2 past 11. Went home, found Carrie and Ma and Lydia all well, they had a nice oyster supper prepared for me. Bed at about 1/4 past 12.

12 November 1850. In the evening about 9 o'clock went to the levee of Miss Hannah Ann Myers who was married to Mr. James Heiskell this evening. She had a very large party. I suppose there must have been 300 or 400 there. The parlors and entry were so much crowded that it was almost impossible to move. About 10 o'clock we had a magnificent supper. The table was ornamented in beautiful style with natural flowers, pyramids &c. but the rooms were so much crowded that I did not attempt to get anything for myself except some boned turkey & champagne. I succeeded in getting Carrie some oysters and salad. Mr. Maginnis & Lydia & Carrie accompanied me to the leeve. I also received cards for Miss Cornelia Gorgas' levee, who was married to Mr. Fraley this morning, but as the weather was so unpleasant Carrie and I concluded not to go.

17 November 1850. At Church of Atonement both in the morning and evening with Carrie & Ma. Mr. Goddard preached both times. Samuel Bonnell, Jr. took dinner with me, and at about 1/2 past 3, started out to take walk. Went over Market Street Bridge (which is now nearly completed for the rail road) and walked up into West Philadelphia as far as Walnut and Till Streets. Noticed quite a number of new and handsome cottages.

19 November 1850. In the evening Mr. Maginnis, Lydia, Carrie and I went around to Logan Hall to hear a Greek lecture, or hear a history of Greece with an account of the manners and customs of the Turks. He was dressed in full costume of a Grecian warrior and was very interesting in his lecture. There were very few there, only about 40 or 50. To day was Carrie's 20th birthday. May she have many more years is my earnest prayer.

20 November 1850. In early part of the evening over at Building Association.

21 November 1850. At the office all day and in the evening at home writing until about 1/2 past 10, when we had an oyster supper & then to bed.

23 November 1850. At the office all day and in the evening at home, part of the time reading, and balance in the parlor with Carrie who was playing on the piano for me.

24 November 1850. About 3 p.m. Sam Bonnell called for me, and we went out to take a walk. First walked up to see Miss Kate Smith, but did not find her at home, saw Amelia. Then called down at N.W. corner of Delaware 6th & Spring Garden Streets to see the bride & groom: Mr. and Mrs. Fraley, but did not find them at home. Then called around at Mr. Brady's, found them there.

25 November 1850. In the evening went to the Walnut Street Theater with Carrie to see Sir William Don as Animadale Sleek in the Serious Family, and as Mr. Pellicoddy in Poor Pellicoddy. I did not like him as well in the former character as others nor in the latter as well as Chapman, in fact I think him a very poor performer for a "star." I think Chapman far superior to him. The farce of a Specter Bridegroom was rather a poor affair.

26 November 1850. In the evening Carrie, Ma, Lydia, Maginnis & myself went around to a party given by Miss Lizzy Roberts to her brother Sydney & his wife recently married. There were quite a large number there, had fine music, and a splendid supper, the decoration of the table was superb, being principally of natural flowers.

DECEMBER

5 December 1850. At the office all day and in the evening at home reading.

6 December 1850. At the office all day until about 7 p.m. then went down to a sale at Wolbert & Co., in Carpenter's Court. Bought a silver plated tea set, a cake basket, a bronze hound, and two paper weights, bronzed, of "Diana & the Panther." Left the sale about 1/4 past 9, got some oysters at 4th and Chestnut Street and then went up home in the omnibus, found them all up.

8 December 1850. The coldest day we have had all winter. At Church of the Atonement both in the morning and afternoon with Carrie. Mr. Goddard preached in the morning and Mr. Howe in the afternoon. They changed our pew from 82 to 96 today.

9 December 1850. Ice made quite freely last night.

10 December 1850. At the office all day and in the evening went to the Circus with Carrie to see Madame Caroline Leo.

11 December 1850. In the evening Carrie and I called up to see Miss Kate Smith, found her at home and met Mr. William Libert there, spent rather a pleasant evening.

12 December 1850. Today was observed by state authority as a Day of Thanksgiving. I was at Church of Atonement in the morning. Mr. Goddard gave us a very beautiful and appropriate sermon. After Church went home where I remained until about 1/2 past 4, when Sam Bonnell, Jr. and I took a walk down town as far as Carpenters Hall to see some fancy goods to be sold this evening.

13 December 1850. Clear and quite cold all day, the coldest day we have had this winter. At the office the greater part of the day. About 20 m. past 1 went around to Baily & Co. with Carrie and her Aunt, Mrs. West, to look at castors. Mrs. West made Carrie a present of a very handsome set, as a Christmas present.

14 December 1850. In the latter part of the afternoon called down to see Mrs. Oliver at N.W. corner of 3rd & Carpenter about $30 stolen by her son from me about 15 months since. Did not find her at home. About 6 p.m. Samuel Bonnell called for me, and we went over to Newtons and got our supper, then up to 6th and Arch to attend a lecture but found none came off, then went down to C.J. Wolberts & Co. sale, bought several articles. Sam bought two pretty blue cornucopia flower vases which he made a present to Carrie. He also made me a present of a bronze match holder.

15 December 1850. Samuel Bonnell called up in the afternoon, and we took a walk up as far as Girard College, then to 11th Street above Wallace and stopped in to see Hannah Burton, found her at home and well.

16 December 1850. Evening at home writing. About 10 p.m. made some good whiskey punch.

17 December 1850. Called over at Mrs. Smith's boarding house at 6th & Walnut Streets for Ma and Carrie, who had stopped to see Mrs. West. Went up home in the omnibus.

18 December 1850. At the office all morning, and in the afternoon, after dinner, went out to make some calls with Carrie. First called upon Mrs. Heiskell (late Hannah Ann Myers). After leaving there called up to see Mrs. Wooliston (late Miss Eliza Atlee). After leaving Mrs. Wooliston, called to see Miss Hannah Burton. Then called down to see Mrs. Fraley (late Miss Cornelia Gorgas). In the evening went around to the Building Association where I remained until about 1/4 past 9. There was an election for auditors, and a nomination of officers for election next month.

19 December 1850. About 9 o'clock Carrie and I went down into the parlor for a while for her to play on the piano for me. Ma, Lydia and Mr. Maginnis went to a party given by Miss Kate Monell this evening. Carrie and I were invited but did not go on account of Carrie being sick this morning and we did not think it prudent for her to go.

20 December 1850. In the evening went down to the fair at the Museum Building for the Church of the Crucifixion with Carrie. Met Mrs. Algernon Roberts and Mrs. Edith Prichett there, both of whom bought some small presents in the way of infant clothes for the one whom Carrie and I expect about May.

22 December 1850. This is the first snow we have had this season.

23 December 1850. Cloudy, snowy and very unpleasant all day, and blew a perfect hurricane. In the evening about 1/2 past 7, went over to Mr. Benjamin Bonnell's to settle a matter of business with him and Mr. Vanblunk. After getting through went into the dining room and had a very nice glass of hot gin and a cigar.

24 December 1850. The coldest day we have had this winter, and ice made freely throughout the day. At the office all day, and in the evening at home. We all brought down our presents and made them to each other including Flora & Biddy, the servants. Mr. Maginnis was also with us, and he made Carrie and me a very beautiful present, an engraving handsomely framed of the Trial of the Effie Dean. After passing the presents around had some fine egg nog, with which we finished the evening.

25 December 1850. Rather cloudy all day. In the afternoon had a sprinkling of snow which covered the ground. In the morning went to the Church of the Atonement with Carrie & Ma. A stranger preached quite a dry sermon. Mr. Maginnis spent the night and day with us. Lydia was taken quite unwell today so that she was not able to go to Church and eat her Christmas dinner which I regretted very much. Mr. & Mrs. West, and Samuel Bonnell, Jr. took dinner with us. In the latter part of the afternoon Mr. Maginnis, Sam Bonnell & myself took a walk down as far as 5th & Chestnut Streets. As usual on Christmas day was crowded to excess.

28 December 1850. At the office all day until about 1/2 past 4 then went home feeling very unwell, remained home during the evening & went to bed at about 9 and took a dose of oil.

29 December 1850. Got up this morning about 12 o'clock, feeling much better than yesterday, remained in the house all day and during the evening.

30 December 1850. At the office all day, and in the evening at home writing until about 1/2 past 11, then Carrie and I made some very nice whiskey punch.

31 December 1850. Cloudy and quite cold. About 11 a.m. commenced snowing which continued to fall rapidly until about dark, when it ceased and cleared off, leaving the ground covered to the depth of about an inch and a half. A few sleighs tempted out. At the office the greater part of the day. In the evening went around to a small company given by Mr. & Mrs. Mitchell (accompanied by Carrie) in Summer Street North side, the 1st house East of Church of Atonement.


Notes:

(1) Edward J. Maginnis

(2) Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, organized in 1805, located on Chestnut Street between 11th and 12th Streets until 1870 when it moved to the present location of Broad and Cherry Streets. Scarf and Westcott, p.1070.

(3) Mary Warner Roberts (b.1835), daughter of Edward Roberts and Mary Elizabeth Redford Roberts.

(4) The 4' 8" gauge for rail road track was not standard in the United States until the end of the 19th century. Frank A. Weer.

(5) John Tyler 1790-1862, 10th President of the United States 1841-1845. Erwin must have

received false news.

(6) A fire destroying 367 houses between Front and Vine Streets occurred on 9 July 1850

caused by the explosion of compressed hay in a store occupied by Gordon & Berger at 39 North Water Street. History of Philadelphia, Scarf and Westcott, p. 165.

(7) Eliphalit L. Rice (1817-1858)

(8) Samuel Charles Borden who latter married Emma Prichett.

(9) From: Public Ledger, Philadelphia, 30 July 1850: Married. At Longwood, the residence of Samuel Borden, Esq., near Cincinnati, on the 23rd July, by the Rt. Rev. Bishop McIlvaine, J. Warner Erwin, of Philad., to Miss Caroline A. Borden, daughter of Samuel Borden, of Hamilton Co., Ohio.

(10) Sallie Sherred Bonnell (1829-1913), later became the wife of Henry Howard Houston (see

DAB). Cornelia Bonnell (1828-1904) never married. FJD.

(11) Andrew Doz Cash. FJD

(12) Alverthorpe, Jenkintown. Later the residence of Lessing Rosenwald. FJD.

(13) The piano was invented by the Italian Bartolommeno Cristofori (1655-1731) about 1711. In the mid 19th century pianos had 72 keys, 6 octaves. The current 88 key piano, 7 1/3 octaves, was introduced about 1860.

(14) Johanna Maria, known as Jenny Lind (1820-1887), Swedish soprano singer, engaged in

America by P.T. Barnum 1850-1852. Webster's Biographical Dictionary

(15) Marcus Aurelius Root.

(16) Algernon Sydney Roberts, Jr. married Sarah "Sally" Carstairs on November 7, 1950 (JWJ, p.457). J. Warner Erwin mistakenly calls her Elizabeth although he referred to her as Sally at her engagement on 27 December 1849.