1843

JANUARY

1 January 1843. I am now about to commence on thy pages, the events which are to transpire in the ensuing year. Who can tell what may occur, in the short space of the coming year, who can tell what will be recorded in thy pages, ah, no one. Look back upon what has transpired in the year just closed, of those who were with us then, how many have done with all the hopes of the living. We look around for those whom we were wont to see, some hoary honored heads are gone, some who have long been with us, as dear friends and relatives are here no more. Some in the midst of life bearing "the heat and burden of the day" are gone, some too with whom life was in its morning are gone and all their earthly hopes are buried. So it will be in the year now advancing along that deep obscure plan of the future. The voice of the departed year resounds with solemn echoes, "Prepare, for we know not what this year may bring forth."

The revolving seasons have again brought round the day, and it is now buried in oblivion, on which "glad tidings" were proclaimed to man. Universal Christendom hailed the day, which is to it the memorial of its redemption. Angels first sang the song of praise and thanksgiving, and countless myriads of the human race have caught the glad refrain. That day has been set apart from time immemorial as the one on which joy should reign alone.

Friends and relatives meet to share each other's happiness. The brow of age is smoothed, the gay laugh of happy childhood rings upon the ear, and the heart-spoken wish of a "Merry Christmas" is a thousand times repeated. While all is sunshine and happiness with those upon whom Providence has showered its kind gifts, let them not forget that there are many to whom Christmas brings few joys. Whilst around their well-filled boards or glowing hearths they listen with ready ear to the patter of their children, or watch with parental care their many gambols, let them remember the secret agencies which in many a room of this proud city are issuing from hearts bowed to the very dust by penury and disease. Whilst they are reveling in every luxury that wealth can procure, let them not forget in how many abodes of want crying children ask in vain for food and fuel. Let them remember that He whose natal day they celebrate has commanded them to be ready to distribute to those that need.

The birth day of the religion of charity is the most appropriate season for its blessed exercises. In commemorating the greatest of events, that which made all men brothers, who can fail to remember that

"Affliction's sons are brothers in distress;

A brother to relieve how exquisite the bliss."

After the festivities of the day of social intercourse are over, after the luxurious sons and daughters of idleness have had their full joy, e'er their pleasure wearied heads seek the pillow, they should respond to the evocation of the poet, and "in charitable thought intent" dream of good deeds to do on the morrow.

"O ye, who sunk in beds of down

Feel not a want but what yourselves create,

Think for a moment in his wretched fate

Whom friends and fortune quite disown.

Ill-satisfied keen nature's clam'rous call

Strech'd on his straw, he lays himself to sleep.

While thro'the ragged roof and chinkey wall

Chill o'er his slumber piles the drifty heap."

It is at all times an unpleasant duty to record the departure from the world of one with whom we have been acquainted. The duty becomes doubly painful when the one taken from "time to eternity" has been an intimate friend, a bosom companion; one that has known our joys and sorrows, has been with us in our reveries; one that has helped to build our airy castles, has participated in the high visions of our dazzling dreams, has heard the crash of the former whenever they came in contact with the reality, has witnessed the rapid flight of the latter, as their owner, meeting naught but care on every side, advanced along the rugged paths of the world, finding briars where he expected to crush beneath his feet only the violet and the lily, thorns where he thought to gather flowers, enemies instead of friends, sorrow in the face of joy, and trouble where pleasure should have been. With the sad feelings created by the loss of such a friend, I have to record the death of one, well known, and beloved by all of us.

The practice of writing eulogiums and panegyrics upon the departed may be beneficial when kept within proper limits, when the conscience of the living is not violated to make saints of the dead; yet it too frequently happens that some kind friend, knowing the character of the deceased while living was not such as to descend to posterity, attempts by a laudatory obituary to obliterate the past and give the attributes of an angel to one who, had the hangman not been deprived of his due, would have died upon a gallows. Therefore that I may

"Nothing extenuate, nor set down ought in malice"

that I may keep clear of undue praise, and without being subject to unjust censure, I shall merely state that last night at the twelfth chime of the State House bell,(1) the year Anno Domini One thousand eight hundred and forty two departed from this mundane sphere, to the undiscovered country "from whose bourn no traveler returns," dark oblivion, Death.

I attended Grace Church(2) this morning. Mr. Suddards delivered an eloquent and affecting sermon, reviewing the many events that have transpired in the year past, and also the deaths of some who have been connected with our congregation. Miss Margaret Hedges and David Weatherly dined with us, and after dinner Weatherly and I went down to the office, I to write to Henry Borden(3) , and he for reading. Remained there until about 1/4 of 4 when we went down to Miss Craycroft's, spent the rest of the afternoon.

In the evening attended the new Presbyterian Church(4) at the S.E. corner of Broad and Olive Streets, Penn Square. It was dedicated to the service of Almighty God last evening with the usual religious ceremonies, and was open today for the first time. The Reverend Henry A. Boardman(5) preached, and delivered an impressive and well written sermon. The novel, impressive and beautiful style of architecture which characterizes this edifice has attracted the notice and enlisted the admiration of many of our Citizens, who have already classed it as one of the chief ornaments of the City. The edifice was designed by and erected under the care of Napoleon LeBrun,(6) A.D. Caldwell being the contractor.

The whole was constructed in the remarkable short space of seven months. The principal facade on Broad consists of a Corinthian portico resting on a rustic basement, and is approached by a steep flight of 13 steps (granite). The columns are so disposed as to surround a part of the massive foundation intended for the steeple. The interior is furnished in an elegant and chaste style, the architecture being in strict harmony with the exterior. The pulpit presents an imposing appearance. It rests upon a basement of 4 feet in height supporting a screen of 4 columns with a rich entablature extending to the ceiling.

This day is clear, cold, and pleasant, just such a one as the fair sex wish for to make a promenade, although they cannot indulge in one, on account of its being the Sabbath, the day on which all mankind, and every other living object ought to rest. But I am sorry to say, in a measure it is not so, for upon the streets and upon the corners may be seen groups of idle young men, loitering, swearing, and perhaps insulting all good folks on their way to church. And then again as you pass the tavern you hear loud voices, singing and reveling. Could all these things be dispensed with it would be a great blessing on our country, our dearly loved country, "the land of the free, and the home of the brave" - America. Wind fresh and bracing from the W. by S.W. Thermometer 8 a.m. 25, at 1/4 past 32, at 10 p.m. 30. After returning home from church this evening remained up reading until 1/4 past 10 o'clock p.m. Got up at 1/4 past Seven a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

2 January 1843. Chestnut Street in the afternoon was crowded with the beauties of the City, each countenance lit up with a smile, as if in praise to a beautiful and balmy afternoon, which had been given or, I may say, purposely cleared off to afford them an opportunity of promenading. At the office part of the morning for I could not resist the temptation of paying a visit to one or two of the fair ones. In the afternoon about 4 o'clock took a stroll up Chestnut Street. It presented almost an unbroken line of human beings from the Delaware to Broad Street, all ages and all sexes were there, struggling and jostling their way through the mass of human beings that well nigh blocked this thoroughfare of fashion.

3 January 1843. In the afternoon Mr. Burr and myself took a little recreation by indulging in that healthful exercise of skating on the Schuylkill above the dam. The skating was fine, but the wind being strong, could not make much headway up the river; towards the latter part of the afternoon it subsided.

4 January 1843. Jack Frost seems to be in earnest and we may anticipate a plentiful harvest of ice. The Delaware is full of ice, and the navigation much impeded. The Schuylkill is closed both above and below the dam, with fine skating above. The ice cutters are busily employed, cutting and stowing away that commodity which is to be so great a luxury in the ensuing summer, and of which we were deprived last.

Evening went down with David Weatherly to attend a party to which we had been invited through two notes which had been left at our house last evening. We had some suspicions of the validity of them, but we thought it would not cost us much trouble to dress, &c. We would take a stroll down that way and if there should prove to be a party, we would pass perhaps a very pleasant evening. But upon arriving at the door we were almost certain of its being a hoax, for upon its opening nothing but Miss Craycroft met our eye, sewing, instead of, as we expected, the gay and laughing girls, the music, dancing, singing, &c. We however walked in as if we had been paying some other calls, threw our cloaks off, nothing daunted, and sat down as if nothing out of the way was going on. Presently Miss Fannie Craycroft presented herself, and after the usual salutations, &c., she enquired of us whether we knew she was to have a party. We of course denied knowing anything of it, although it was as much as either of us could do to keep from laughing, and after a little cross-questioning, we allayed all suspicions and from the conversation we had, it appears that we were not the only ones that were duped by the false invitations, for Miss E. Mercer(7) and also the Misses Coates' had received them, and Miss Mercer had gone so far as to prepare a dress for the occasion.

5 January 1843. The Delaware was filled with heavy floating ice which is driven in the Jersey Channel, and also in the Pennsylvania channel from Kensington down to Spruce Street; but from the latter named point down some distance below the Navy Yard, it was standing during the afternoon. Towards the latter part of the afternoon a large flow of ice separated from the rest, with a number of skaters upon it, then floated up as far as Chestnut Street. For a time they were in great peril, but the ice being driven in toward shore, and also some other loose floating cakes, all landed in safety, after having a pleasant, though dangerous, ride of about 3 squares, much to their fright and to the amusement of the crowd along the wharves.

6 January 1843. Evening attended a Lecture at the Mercantile Library Company(8) with Miss Mary Cuthbert and Lydia.(9) The Reverend Doctor Davis lectured on his subject, "The Ancient Egyptians," which he discussed in a very instructive and entertaining manner. He treated briefly the religious polity and the arts and sciences of the Egyptians, showing what progress that ancient people had made in the modes of civilized life. The Lecture was entertaining and instructive, a great many interesting facts being told in connection with their palaces, tombs, &c. which enlisted the attention of the large and fashionable audience who were in attendance.

7 January 1843. Was as warm as a day in May. There was an occasional light sprinkle of rain at different periods of the morning, one of which came just as the good folk had got clearly on their "homeward track" from Grace Church, and then such a running, jostling, and pushing I never did see to save the pretty bonnets and artificial flowers that decked the heads of the fair ones. The only thing that I have to regret was not having a hundred umbrellas, for it's my opinion I could have done efficient service with them, and perhaps made many a fair friend and had many a sweet smile bestowed upon me from those sweet creatures, heaven's sweetest gifts, the ladies, bless them.

9 January 1843. The weather is a strange thing, nothing affords a more fruitful theme for chit-chat and prophecy than the weather. The most curious speculations, however, are usually to be found at the commencement of each winter, as to the character of the coming season. The auguries are derived from as many sources as there are prophets. One judges from the flight of birds, another from the care taken by amphibious animals to provide shelter for themselves, another from the character of the closing season, and another from the clearing up of autumn and early winter storms. These are, however, all liable to error, but there is one method which is indisputable, and which will afford an unerring test, and that is the heart bone of the goose - if that is clear, or but slightly clouded, the winter will be warm, if the reverse, the winter will be cold. One caution they say, however, is to be observed. You are to be sure that your goose is a young one, of the same year, and above all it must be a Jersey goose.

11 January 1843. At the office all day. Evening at home(10) reading in "Buonaparte's expedition into Russia." Ma,(11) Pa(12) & Grandma(13) were up at Mr. Elliott's to tea, and also spent the evening.

12 January 1843. My much admired and highly esteemed beauty, Miss Edith Baily, was married last evening to a Mr. (?) from New York. It was rather unexpected to her, for it was not to have happened until the 17th, but on account of some misunderstanding, he came on, together with his groomsmen and several friends, and of course it could not be delayed.

There was a considerable riot(14) up town last night among the weavers. The sheriff(15) went up with a posse of about 200 men but was beaten off. The Sheriff, I believe, was much injured by being struck with a heavy club, and also by several bricks. His posse behaved very cowardly and deserted him, leaving him to the mercy of an enraged mob. It is only a wonder that he got off with so little bodily injury. There is several military companies ordered to hold themselves in readiness to march to the scene of disturbance at a moment's warning this evening, and I believe a company of horsemen has gone up to station themselves upon the Ground.

14 January 1843. I took a walk up as far as 11th Street, but found it too unpleasant to walk long, although the fair faces with smiling countenances that I met at every step almost made me continue my walk, but thinking the Athenaeum(16) would be far more comfortable I stepped in there and safely ensconced myself in one of the large arm chairs, picked up the "Post," and soon lost all thoughts of the ladies outside.

16 January 1843. In the evening David Weatherly, Jr. called for me for the purpose of going down to the office to peruse Blackstone,(17) but night being so beautiful and the moon so brilliant, we could not resist the temptation of taking a stroll to see the ladies.

17 January 1843. Evening attended a lecture delivered before the "American Institute" by the Reverend H.W. Bellows.(18) The subject was "The capacity for Indefinite Education, the distinguishing attribute of man." It was an original and exceedingly beautiful and eloquent discourse. The idea of the title was first illustrated and enforced. The necessity, right and true dignity of intellectual culture, the unfolding of the faculties, the extension of the ability to observe and reason and to discover truth were successively exposed, and urged upon the consideration of the audience. A distinction was then lucidly drawn between mere learning, the knowledge of books or languages, and actual wisdom, the wakening of the mind to a sense and the use of its investigating powers. Various other topics were unfolded in the course of the lecture and especially the intimate connection between human liberty and genuine education. A series of practical suggestions closed the address. This lecture was in every respect sound in principle and luminous in exposition, and gave further evidence of the very high talents which Mr. Bellows has exhibited in his former discourses to Philadelphia audiences.

18 January 1843. In the evening after waiting upon Grandma down to Mrs. Reiford 's, who is boarding at the S.E. corner of Walnut and 6th Streets, went up to Menagerie where we met William Bird. After satisfying our curiosity by taking several strolls around to see the animals we took our station on some steps a little elevated above the rest to see the performance. It consisted of Herr Dresbach being attacked by a leopard and having a tussle with him; he finally became victorious which showed what perfect command he had over his animals. He also was drawn by a large lioness harnessed to a chariot, and afterwards by a large tiger. He went through a number of other feats, showing the docility of his animals. There was some little alarm caused towards the latter part of the performance by a leopard, which they were exhibiting on the back of the elephant, becoming restive. They, however, succeeded in securing him after a little tussle and some roaring by the elephant, but not without a great scampering of the audience.

19 January 1843. At the office all day, evening at home reading Blackstone. Ma, Grandma, & Lydia were up at Mr. Sewell's this evening, I believe there was a company there for the purpose of sewing carpet rags.

24 January 1843. In the evening about 6 o'clock our neighborhood was thrown into quite a hassle by the cry of fire. Upon going to the door found rather a dense smoke was issuing from the house situated at the S.E. corner of 3rd and Chestnut Streets. Being too much engaged to go out I cannot speak for the damage done, although I believe it to be considerable, owing to the great quantity of water thrown upon the premises, although not much by the fire.

In the evening took a walk down for the purpose of having a tete-a-tete with my friend William Hanley, but on entering I was told there was several young ladies up in the Parlor and was invited to go up, which I of course accepted. After conversing for a while, dancing was introduced, which soon wore off that reserve which generally characterizes a fast introduction, and we were soon tripping it on the light fantastic toe as one of the Misses Danali's discoursed beautiful music on the piano.

26 January 1843. I went up with Ma to make a call on Mr. and Mrs. Chameaux at 160 Marshall Street. Evening at home reading until about 8 o'clock when Pa came in and commenced overhauling some jewelry, which of course put an end to it. He kindly made me a present this evening of several articles, which I will here name: a large gold seal ring with claret colored stone, a pearl handled boot knife, two pen knives, one a pearl and the other a buck handle, and also a small set containing 6 pieces of conveyancer tools.

FEBRUARY

3 February 1843. Rather a cool and uncomfortable day, and the keenness of the air caused the noses of the outdoor people to assume a bluish tint. Pedestrians moved along the narrow thoroughfares at almost railroad speed, the wood dealers anticipated a rise in fuel, the hot muffin man had the contents of his basket enfolded in double wrappers, the bright-eyed belles sported their tippets and muffs, and dandies and loafers were especially careful to keep on the sunny side of the street.

6 February 1843. The streets are in a pretty fair sleighing condition, and the belles accompanied by their beaus are making fine use of them, and the sidewalks are in prime order for breaking bones.

7 February 1843. The present month seems determined that the well established character of winter shall not suffer by inconstant behavior, so accordingly we are visited with weather calculated to enhance the profits of dealers in flannels and fuel. On Sunday we had a very decent example of a driving sleet storm, which made locomotion quite unpleasant and caused thin congregations at most of the churches. Yesterday and today we had strong breezes from the N.W., bringing with them quite a suffocation of cold from the frozen regions, and causing a demand for overcoats, well filled grates, and hot coffee. The sleet of Sunday still remains.

The Delaware was, last evening at 5 o'clock, clear of ice. This morning at 11 o'clock, it was frozen tight at several points from shore to shore and throughout the day was full of ice. Remarkably seasonal weather! It puts the "oldest inhabitant" in mind of the days of his boyhood. I noticed today in the Philadelphia Gazette,(19) an account of "one of the oldest inhabitants," who stopped in their office to say that just 132 years ago, i.e. on the 6th of February 1713, he remembered just such a night as the last, and then added with a sigh, "Ah, we had no ice boats in those days to destroy the enjoyment the river offers us."

Although hereabouts the snow has been no "great shakes," yet the cold has been enough to shake the stoutest frame when exposed to its influence. In every direction around our City, however, the snow has fallen to a great depth. I learn from the papers that at Harrisburg the snow fell to the depth of 15 or 18 inches, and that in the county surrounding that place it was deeper. On the railroad between this City and Lancaster,(20) the snow in some places drifted to a depth of 2 or 3 feet, and cars were unable to force their way through. The line from the West has been more fortunate, and though it did not reach here on Monday evening, came through in good season today. In the vicinity of Reading, the fall of snow was heavy, and the drifts in some places impeded travel. Six locomotives were constantly running up and down, together with a number of teams and snow ploughs, which kept the track pretty clear, but not sufficiently to enable a train to depart without being clogged. The mails from the East are all behind time; the mails which left New York yesterday at 9 A.M. and 5 P.M., and that which left this morning at 9 have not one of them arrived.

In the evening went down to see Hanley, remained there but a short time, and then strolled down to Miss Elizabeth Mercer's. She not being in, went around to the Misses Coates' where I met two ladies whose names I do not remember. During the course of conversation, I was a little astonished to hear of the elopement of Miss Sarah Mercer yesterday morning. It appears she went down to her sister's early yesterday morning for the purpose of spending the day, but did not remain there long. She has not returned home since, and was last seen in Chestnut Street yesterday afternoon walking with a Mr. Heberton who they have since arrested. They are in contemplation of arresting five others, who are cognizant to the elopement. A few minutes previous to my leaving the Misses C's, we were informed that she was found in a state of mental derangement in the house in the neighborhood of 12th and Pine Streets. What caused this derangement, I cannot tell, although I have my own private thoughts on the subject which I do not think confident to place on the pages of my journal. But, I suppose more of this anon, which perhaps may be near and on the pages of this book, although I cannot say it will add much to the interest of it. But as the world goes and it must be placed among the often strange things that have been recorded before. So enough for the present....

10 February 1843. The abduction or elopement case of Miss Mercer which I mentioned on the pages of this book on Tuesday last has terminated in a horrible tragedy. It appears that Hutchinson Heberton, the person who it was reported (nothing proved) had abducted the young lady, fell by the hand of her brother this evening about 6 1/2 o'clock. It is said he (her brother) has been watching Heberton for the last few days, and I believe presented him with a challenge which he promptly refused; and this evening as Heberton was about leaving the City by way of Camden, and seated in a closed carriage on board of the boat, Mercer in a hellish, fiendish and cowardly manner fired at him from behind a coal box, four times, with one of the patent six barreled revolving pistols. Two of the balls took effect, the first just under the left shoulder blade, and the second entered at the body and the third and 4th entered the door of the carriage. He was carried into a tavern near at hand and expired almost immediately. I cannot find words enough to express my thoughts of this cowardly, hellish, fiendish, and dastardly act committed on a man that has had nothing yet proved upon him. I hope that justice may have its due and he may be punished.

11 February 1843. In the evening I accompanied Lydia to Mdme Hazard's(21) cotillion party to which place we were admitted by tickets procured through the kindness of Miss Adriana BrincklZ. On entering the room, and for sometime afterward, I was under the impression that it would be rather a dry affair for me, for I had been told visitors were not permitted to dance. I, however, was determined to dance, if I could possibly get permission, which I did after having a little confab with Mr. Hazard.

17 February 1843. I went up town to see the funeral of the gallant sailor, Commodore Isaac Hull.(22) His remains were deposited in a vault in Christ Church,(23) to be removed hereafter to Laurel Hill.(24) The windows of the houses and stores in the streets in different parts of the City were chiefly closed, and a long line of military and citizens followed his body to its resting place. The tomb now contains all of his mortal remains, but his name will continue to bloom green and fresh in the tree of glory long after those who now mourn his departure shall have gone to give an account of their deeds. The body of the deceased was laid in the coffin attired in blue pantaloons, buff undress military vest, and undress military coat, with wrapper and blue cloth coat, stockings and slippers.

The military were in strong force, and formed a very striking feature in the pageant. Upon the coffin were laid the uniform coat, epaulets, and sword of the deceased, whilst the stars of the country waved over his head. The flags of the shipping were displayed at half mast. The solemn tolling of the bells from the steeple of the State House and several of the churches added to the solemnity of the scene. The population of the City seemed to have emptied itself in the streets through which the procession passed, the other portions of it being almost entirely deserted. I rarely remember having seen greater demonstrations of popular feeling, than that called forth by the solemn occasion of this day.

21 February 1843. There met this evening at the Roberts' Inn(25) on 9th Street, their select club, if so I may call it, for that is the appellation they have given it. It is rather a strange affair, and I cannot make out what it is. It may be a select party of some half dozen families who have formed into a club (mark the name) to give parties around, to the exclusion of all their most intimate friends, which I must say exhibits them in rather a mean, a debasing light. They (the girls in 9th Street) have behaved rather strangely for some time back, for what reason I cannot comprehend. They, some few weeks since, gave an eggnog drinking party to which all their most intimate friends had an invitation with the exception of our family, and Miss Elizabeth Roberts. I did not think so much of this as it was rather old company. But this club, ha, ha, ha, I cannot keep from laughing, makes it worse than ever. It is composed principally of young company, and I excluded. I who have been acquainted and on the most friendly terms with the family since the youngest days of my childhood. I who have on every occasion it was in my power escorted and took Sarah to concerts and places of amusement, have waited upon her when she has gone out of an evening, called for her when required, and I am excluded from this club! What is the meaning of it? It is a difficult task to tell. I cannot think of it without laughing, a club, what of? Ladies I suppose, for I do not know of any gentlemen that belongs to this so-called association, but enough for the present. I hope they may enjoy themselves at their respective clubs (ha,ha,ha, only think of the name for a private association of ladies and gentlemen). But one thing I know, if I enter the doors of their houses again very soon, it will be one of the strangest things that has happened for many a long day -- enough said.

22 February 1843. Today is the One hundred and eleventh anniversary of the birth of Washington, and was celebrated by a portion of the military parading through the Streets, although they were in an exceedingly bad condition on account of its having commenced snowing about 12 Noon and continued falling through the remainder of the day. The pavements and streets being damp made it very slushy. The birth day of Washington should always be kept alive in the memory of Americans, and the virtues of the Father of his Country be perpetuated. The event which this day marks should be dear to every citizen of the republic, and the rejoicing should be general, that in the time of peril such a man was found, who through good and evil report, ever had his country's honor and his country's prosperity nearest to his heart, and so directed his actions and his energies as to advance her interests. And in order to keep alive the feelings of regard for our country's institutions we should remember the actions of those who contributed to make her what she is.

23 February 1843. Ma, Pa, Grandma and Lydia went around this evening to a company, party, club, or whatever you might call it at the Roberts. They, I believe, enjoyed themselves much. I had an invitation, but in accordance with the resolve made a few days since, at the time of the other club, did not go, for I did not think Sarah treated me at all like she should have, after I have bestowed so much attention upon her.

24 February 1843. At the office all day, and about 6 o'clock went up to Mrs. Stroud's in 5th Street opposite Parrish Street, having an invitation together with the rest of our family to supper. The delicacies were high heaped upon the table, and it actually groaned under the weight. Finished supper about 1/4 of 9, and then returned to the parlor where, upon being introduced to the Misses Zell's and Miss Mackey, the evening began to pass very pleasantly. Checkers, Backgammon, and Chess were introduced, and I had several very pleasant games of the former with one of the Misses Zell, when soon that reserve, which characterized the former part of the evening, wore off with us all and it was with reluctance that I took my hat and cloak to leave, although I believe the greater part of the company made their exit when we did.

25 February 1843. I went up this morning about ten o'clock with Mr. Bird to see one of the greatest curiosities of the age, it, or he, being nothing more or less than a dwarf(26) commonly called "Tom Thumb" - who is 11 years old, but 22 inches high and weighs 15 pounds. He is without exception the greatest curiosity that has or ever will be exhibited in this city. He appeared to be very lively, active, and playful, bestowing on every new visitor, if it were a lady, a kiss, and if a gentleman a hearty shake of the hand. He was dressed in a blue coat with metal buttons la John Bull,(27) red vest, light breeches with buckles at the knees, with fair top boots, presenting an appearance of a real old English gentleman.

26 February 1843. In the afternoon after church, Hanley, Dr. Dickey and myself took a walk down to the wharf. The river was, and had been throughout the day, clear of ice, in consequence of which a large number of vessels came up to the city among which were the barque Swan from New Orleans and the Ship Susquehanna from Liverpool. The wharves now present quite a lively appearance, being lined with vessels, whose masts form quite a forest. I have since learned that towards evening, large quantities of ice came floating down with the tide, from which I infer that the warm weather has broken up the River where it has been frozen tight for the last week. We may expect the River to be full of floating ice tomorrow which will again give the ferry boats hard work. The Schuylkill River, I believe, still remains closed above the dam, judging from a small paragraph in the Chronicle which stated there was a number of persons skating on it yesterday.

28 February 1843. February has slipped away in much quicker time than her old sisters, but has left many mementos of her visit. She has been rather an inconsistent jade, assuming at times the demeanor of a prude, frowning with coldness and giving icy looks to those whom she chanced to meet in the street, and wearing blandishing smiles, wooing many a gay, gallant and blooming belle from the fireside. To many she has been bitter in her prosecutions, tripping up their heels, pinching their noses until they become blue, and disturbing their slumbers by the mournful music brought from the frozen regions of the north. She has made many a child of poverty shiver in his shoes, put sleighs and skaters' legs in motion, tried her hand in the formation of icicles, and astonished our Citizens with Millerism and meteors, earthquakes and Court Martials. Her entrance upon society was loudly puffed by Old Boreas, and her exit was made in the midst of a fall of snow, and few will mourn her departure.

MARCH

3 March 1843. The Schuylkill River is again filled with ice and I would not be surprised if it would close again if this weather continues.

At the office all day, and in the evening took a walk down to see Miss Elizabeth Mercer to allay the monotony of the last week. Met Miss Lydia Coates there, and remained for about an hour, when all three of us went around to Miss Coates', and spent the rest of the evening very pleasantly, with several little games for amusement which were introduced. Met Miss Emma Simmons and Mr. Hubbard at Miss Coates'.

4 March 1843. I took a stroll up and down between the hours of 4 and 5 and my heart fairly leaped with joy, to have an opportunity of witnessing so many fair faces, each one lit up with a rich sweet smile, while their cheeks were slightly tinged with red, which looked like that beautiful flower the rose, of a spring morn, when the sun is just peeping above the horizon and throwing her gentle radiance over its fair face.

At the office the principal part of the day and in the evening was at the office preparing a draft of a Lease for Pa until about half past 9 when I went up home.

5 March 1843. At Grace Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Suddards preached in the morning and Mr. N.S. Harris(28) in the afternoon, and in the evening attended the Unitarian Church(29) at the N.E. corner of 10th and Locust Street. Mr. Furness(30) preached. At all these Churches I accompanied Miss Margaret Gibbons and Lydia. Miss Gibbons took dinner and tea with us and I escorted her down to her brother, Charles Gibbons, after Church.

6 March 1843. Clear and cold all day and very pleasant over head and under foot, but the wind blew a perfect hurricane from the N.W. throughout the day and evening, dashing the awnings and sign boards to pieces, handling the dresses of the fair ones rudely, blowing the men's cloaks from off them, and last but-not-least blinding every person that was so unlucky as to be in the streets with dust that it dashed about, with little consideration of whether it was acceptable or not.

7 March 1843. Today was clear and cold with a strong wind from the N.W. which again gave us a plentiful sprinkling of dust. At the office all day and in the evening accompanied Lydia to a concert at the Museum Saloon given in celebration of the 3rd Anniversary of the National Literary Institute. Upon entering the room and just before we were about taking our seats, I met Mr. Hallowell, a friend of mine, who introduced me to a Miss Morrell, a lady brought by him, whom he was obliged to leave in my charge, as he was necessitated to return to the store until about 1/2 past 8. She was very pretty and with the slight conversation I had with her, found she was intelligent and interesting which added materially to the pleasure of the evening.

The concert passed off very pleasantly until Charles West Thomson, Esq.(31) commenced delivering his beautiful poem, when some part of the audience in the back part of the room became dissatisfied on account, I suppose, of not being able to hear, and commenced stamping, clapping and hissing, which prevented him from going on for a while, which placed him in rather an unenviable position. After quiet was restored, Mr. T. stated to the audience that he had come there to deliver his poem entirely in opposition to his own feeling, and would desist if the audience wished it. When numerous cries of go on, go on, were heard, he again proceeded for a while, when the audience again commenced disturbing him and he retired away.

There were several fights after this and we left at the commencement of the 3rd part, heartily glad to get off safe. I think this will be the last time I ever will take a lady to a 12-1/2 cent concert if this is the manner they conduct themselves, which is a disgrace to all respectable society and a high insult to the society who gave the concert.

9 March 1843. At the office all day and in the evening accompanied Lydia to a party given for Miss Elizabeth Elliott in West Penn Square. My apprehensions previous to going were that I would not enjoy myself much, on account of the disparity of the ages of Miss Elliott(32) and her company and myself, but I am glad to have it to record that I was agreeably disappointed and enjoyed myself as much, if not more than I have at any party this winter.

Dancing was introduced in a short time after the company made its appearance in the parlor, which is one of the most pleasant amusements that can well be offered to make an evening pass off pleasantly. It wears off that reserve which is generally manifested by both sexes upon first entering the room, while it adds elasticity and vigor to the body, making rose-like tint appearances on the cheeks of the fair ones, which gives them the appearances of fresh roses, just plucked in the soft rosy blush of the morn, casting their fair leaves on the beau who claims their hand in the dance.

Among the prettiest of the ladies there, I may class Miss Wallace, Miss Witman, Miss Blackwood, and one other whose name I cannot remember. These fair creatures lit up the room as it were by magic, with smiles, which came from their exquisitely formed mouths and piercing eyes which inspired all the poor fellows that were in reach of their charms with jealousy and love. At about 11 o'clock had a most sumptuous supper, with all the delicacies that could be obtained.

There was no liquors of any kind used, and I believe it has gone entirely out of fashion for I have found them at but two parties this winter, when it used to be had at every one, and appeared to be an article which could not be done without. So much for the Temperance Society and the reformation which they are making. After the supper we had another cotillion and then the Virginia reel, which ended this pleasant evening entertainment, and I have no doubt that no one who was there but enjoyed themselves to their heart's content, especially if fond of dancing, which was the principal amusement.

11 March 1843. At the office during the morning, and in the afternoon was there until about 1/2 past 3 when I went up to Pa's office in Arch Street below 5th, to assist him in arranging some articles which he had been removing there, until 5 when I took a stroll up Chestnut Street and was really astonished to see the vast variety of beauty and fashion that were promenading there. It seemed that the City had emptied itself of the fair ones into this great thoroughfare of fashion, and it was with difficulty you could pass at times. However, they seemed to get along amicably and I dare say each one returned home with freshened spirits, highly elated with the pleasant Saturday afternoon promenade.

12 March 1843. I was at Grace Church in the morning with Lydia and heard an eloquent and well delivered sermon from a Mr. Jones. In the afternoon was at St. Philip's Church(33) with Mr. Hanley, but left at the commencement of the sermon for the reason we found that the Rev. N.S. Harris was going to deliver the same sermon he delivered at our Church last Sunday, and I was not desirous of hearing it over again.

13 March 1843. At the office all day, and in the evening at home reading until half past 8 when Pa and I went down to his new office in Arch below 5th, which he opened today, to arrange some little matters, remained there until about 10 o'clock.

14 March 1843. Verily it seems that March does not intend giving up winter so tactfully as she generally does. She grapples with it like a drowning man at a straw, she casts her thrilling blasts to the very heart of the poor pedestrian, and blows a perfect hurricane from the icy regions of the North into the faces of those in the Streets.

Took a stroll down to Hanley's at 7th and Lombard. Remained a short time, and then went down to Miss E. Mercer's. Found her out, as usual, and from there continued my walk to Miss Coates where I met Miss M. and also found the 3 Misses Ces in. After sitting for a while Mr. Haskins came in, and we spent the rest of the evening pleasantly, enjoying several very hearty laughs at a game we were playing called "Consequences."

15 March 1843. At the office all day and in the evening went up to Grace Church where I met James Stewart. We both went in and took a seat together in a pew and heard a beautiful, eloquent and interesting discourse from Mr. Neville. After church, took a walk down to Pa's office, where we went in and sat for about an hour in a pleasant tete-a-tete.

16 March 1843. Cloudy throughout the morning with every appearance of snow, and we were not disappointed, for about 10 o'clock it commenced and such a storm we have not experienced for many years. The snow came down you might almost say in one thick sheet while a tremendous strong wind from the N.E. dashed it from the housetops in every possible direction, blinding every person that was on the streets, and causing them to run into each other like ships in a storm. It was impossible to carry an umbrella and when not having this protection the snow almost cut the face off of you, as it was hurled like small shot from a gun.

Evening out for about an hour when I went around to hear an oration delivered by David Paul Brown(34) in the Hall of the University(35) but it was postponed on account of the inclemency of the weather. Got back about 8 o'clock and remained in the rest of the evening heartily glad to get out of the storm.

17 March 1843. Sleighs were whizzing through the streets in all directions, their inmates evidently delighted and disposed to be pleased with the rapid motion. A few sham fights with snow balls for weapons were got up by amateurs, and many a worthy person practiced attitudes on the pavement that were not taught him by a dancing master. Capsizes were frequent, and sundry work in the shape of contusions and bruises were out for a few druggists.

At the office all day and in the evening went up to Grace Church and heard a sermon delivered by the Reverend Stephen Tyng.(36) After Church walked down to Pa's office with Tim Stewart and sat there for about an hour talking.

18 March 1843. In the evening was at a lecture delivered by the Reverend Mr. Neville on the subject of preparing for Confirmation at St. Philip's Church. James Stewart was in the Lecture Room.

19 March 1843. At Mr. Neville's Church in the morning with Stewart. Bishop Onderdonk(37) delivered the sermon and the Rite of confirmation was administered to 54 afterward.

Previous to my going to church in the evening I called for Miss Mary Hebron to accompany me but she could not on account of having to attend to her lessons. I met Miss Ellen Wilcox there, and was introduced. I have, I may say, known her for the last three years but could not speak on account of not being introduced, but now it is over. I hope our acquaintance may prove something more than mere speaking.

20 March 1843. At the office all day and in the evening, accompanied by Miss Margaret Gibbons, attended an oration delivered by David Paul Brown, before the Philomathean Society in the Hall of the University. He commenced his address by a rather lengthy prelude, though eloquent and well delivered, but the flattery of the audience was not much relished. Towards the latter end of the prelude he introduced the subject of his oration, which was "Speech and Eloquence." He handled his subject with great fluency, and delighted his hearers with numerous bursts of eloquence. His discourse was varied, making many quotations from Shakespeare, his favorite author, and many extenuated comparisons to illustrate the numerous arguments brought forth in support of his assertions. He said not merely speaking was eloquence, but painting, not the mere daub, but that which fairly speaks from the canvas. Sculpture, action, and even dancing were eloquence, although making a rather long leap from the head to the heels. He continued his remarks for about 1 1/4 hours, and delighted the audience with numerous other beautiful sentiments, written in his pleasant style, showing the indices of a mind of high intellectual character.

21 March 1843. At the office all day and in the evening went to a little party or company, given by Richard Christiani(38) and Miss Rosina Christiani at their house in 5th Street, Number 89, below Walnut. Dancing, Cards, Checkers, &c. were the order of the evening, all of which contributed to the pleasure of the evening, not forgetting the beautiful singing of the Misses Christiani and Grigg. I was introduced to a Miss May Nutly with whom I was much blessed as she was both pretty and intelligent. Had quite a tete-a-tete with her in the latter part of the evening, or I might more properly say early in the morning. At the witching hour of 12 a.m. I had also the pleasure of dancing.

22 March 1843. The evening afforded us a fine view of the comet,(39) which has been visible for the last 2 or 3 weeks. In evening called for Mr. Dickey according to a previous engagement, for the purpose of his accompanying me in making a call on the Misses Darragh's, I feeling a delicacy on my part in calling alone, not having a very intimate acquaintance with them, and never having been in the house but once. We only found one of the sisters in, Miss Mary Ann [Darragh], who entertained us very pleasantly, with a good stock of conversation, and also several of her beautiful pieces on the piano, which combined made the evening pass off quick and pleasant. Elizabeth and Anna (40) Roberts spent the evening and took tea with Lydia.

26 March 1843. After church walked home with Miss Emma Maxwell who resides in Arch below 9th Street, South side. I was introduced to her by Lydia this morning, who also accompanied me while escorting her home. Miss M., in the short conversation with her, I found to be pleasing in her manner, intelligent and pretty, which combined rendered her very agreeable.

In the afternoon, after church accompanied Miss Mary Nutly home, while my friend Richard Christiani waited upon a friend who was with her, to the same place. Went in and sat until near 6 o'clock. During the course of conversation made an engagement to call up there again after supper with Miss Rosina Christiani, for the purpose of attending St. Timothy's Church. As Miss Nulty stated, Mr. Milner intended calling for her, and we might all go together, which of course would make the walk much pleasanter, as it was rather long, being in Spring Garden Street below 12th.

According to engagement, after leaving Dick, hurried home, got supper and forthwith went down to Miss Christiani's. Waited a short time until she got ready, and immediately proceeded up to Miss Nulty's, where we found the beautiful and innocent little creature (by the by I have taken a great fancy to her) waiting for us. Mr. Milner had not come and she expressed a desire to go without him for what ever reason I did not know. However I waited a little while and in a short time he arrived, when, after sundry fixings of the ladies, we started. We had hardly gotten half a square when we were taken all aback by her step brother, Courtland Howell, overtaking us in great haste and by at once saying, "Mary, do you remember the engagement you made with me for this evening, it cannot be broken and you must return." She, poor girl, did not know what to say. I pitied her to the bottom of my heart. She wished to go I know, but I suppose was obliged to return, which she did hesitatingly but not willingly. Afterwards, Mr. Milner said that he thought it was done to spite him, on account of Howell not being on very good terms with him. But I do not think it was a gentlemanly act of Howell's under any circumstances to act in this way because it not only hurt the feelings of Milner, but made his sister feel very unpleasant, and also Miss Christiani and myself. It was offering an insult to all three of us.

27 March 1843. At about 1 o'clock commenced snowing, which continued with occasional intermission until towards dark, when it commenced raining, snowing and hailing exceedingly hard, and continued through the whole evening.

The firemen had a beautiful procession today, which was in every respect marked with beauty and grandeur. There was seen throughout the line numberless banners, all of which were beautiful. Several had been presented early this morning by the ladies of the different districts to the Companies stationed in their vicinity.

The engines and hose carriages were principally new, which together with many of them being drawn by horses and led and rode by Negroes dressed in the costume of the Turk, made the procession grand in every particular when it first started. But when the snow came in it caused a number to leave the ranks taking many of the most beautiful banners with them for fear of injury, which lessened the beauty and interest of the procession considerably. During the morning the whole population of the city, composing men, women and children, appeared to be emptied into Arch Street. It was a perfect sea of heads from Broad Street down to 4th - all eager to catch a glance of the great pageant - for more of the particulars of the procession see the Public Ledger, Vol. 15 No 3. It was 1 hour and twenty minutes passing.

28 March 1843. Serious apprehensions were had this morning that there would be a great freshet in the Schuylkill, as the waters were running over the wharves and still rising, and the works at Fairmount(41) were obliged to stop. No doubt we may hear of great damage being done the state Improvements and along the whole line of the Susquehanna from the head waters to the mouth.

30 March 1843. I was prevented from taking a stroll this afternoon on account of being very much engaged in making copies of two deeds to be read at Mercer's trial tomorrow, from James Duke of York and Albany and Earl of Ulster to William Penn, one for the Town of New Castle and the circuit of twelve miles around, and the other for the Counties of Kent and Sussex in Delaware. Both Deeds dated August 24th, 1682.

31 March 1843. In the evening at home engaged in playing whist(42) with Lydia, Miss Margaret Gibbons, and Miss Louisa Wood.

APRIL

1 April 1843. Today is all fools day, a rather ancient appellation. I cannot tell how it came but so it is, and many a fool and much fun was had with the ruinous notes that fly to and fro through the post office and by many other various ways. Many the person today has received a note through the post office who, together with the family, have had a merry laugh over, although at his expense in two ways, that is of the pocket and his feelings. But it is a day set apart for fooling, and therefore any little fun that is made on this day must be taken in good part, and while they laugh at us, we join with them, and then for our turn with others. I have made several April fools today, and have been fooled myself in several instances. In one, I received a letter through the post office, and in another was sent down to Mrs. Charles Gibbons by Miss Margaret Gibbons to get her gloves, which made an April fool of both Mrs. Gibbons and myself. But as I said before my fun came afterwards, for Mrs. G. wrote a letter up to Miss G. and after I got home we all had a regular laugh of about half an hour at the fools we made of each other adding, to be sure, a few more happy moments to our existence and at no serious expense to anyone. I was very much amused and laughed heartily after I went home this evening at Miss Gibbons and Lydia throwing packages out on the pavement to the unconscious passersby. They would come along, give a very grave look at the package and perhaps a kick when they would pick it up, pocket it and go off with much pleasure as if they had found something very valuable.

In the evening at home playing whist with Miss Gibbons, Miss Baker and Lydia. Miss Baker is a young lady who has lately come to board next door to our house, and is an acquaintance of Lydia's.

2 April 1843. In the morning attended Baptist Church(43) in Sansom Street with Margaret Gibbons and Lydia. After the services were over the Rite of baptism was administered to 25 persons by the Reverend Mr. Burroughs.(44) It was a solemn and impressive scene, well calculated to bring one's mind to spiritual things, and to a knowledge of Christ and his sufferings.

In the afternoon attended Grace Church with Margaret, Lydia, and Ma. We came near having quite a scene enacted in our pew just as the sermon had closed, in which Miss G. would have performed the most conspicuous part. She has not enjoyed good health for some time back, and when she becomes a little warm, immediately gets sick, and if not speedily removed will faint, which was the case this afternoon. She fortunately got me to go out with her in time, and just as she got outside of the door, at once sat down on the steps, her strength having entirely failed her. In the evening was down at Trinity Church(45) with Margaret.

3 April 1843. Clear, warm and pleasant throughout the day, and one suitable for a promenade on Chestnut Street which was embraced by the ladies, and innumerable quantities of them were seen, each tripping along gaily dressed in the height of fashion as if hard times had never been heard of. But so it is and so it will ever be, as long as time lasts and nothing will change this strange notion of fashion; let it be ever so ridiculous or handsome, the dress will be worn by all who intend appearing on the streets or in private.

4 April 1843. About dark it came on heavily to snow. In the evening at home reading, it being too unpleasant to go out, and keeping Ma company, who is confined to her bed, sick. Pa left for Baltimore today and expects to return on Friday or Saturday next.

5 April 1843. The snow of today has been the 22nd of this season, surely enough for any rational person.

In the evening called down for Miss Rosina Christiani & her brother to accompany me to a wedding party given by Miss Grigg (Sarah) for Mr. and Mrs. Godfrey. We left their house about 1/4 of 8 and after sundry dodging and jumping over of mud puddles &c. arrived there, although a little the worse off for mud. Surely our boots did not look quite so clean as we wished but there was no help for it, so we entered the room. The first thing that attracted my attention was the bride and groom who were seated together on a sofa, she dressed in white with numerous folds of lace hanging and festooned about her person, which added considerably to her personal appearance.

The next person that attracted my attention, if I can say next, for my eyes fell upon her almost as soon as I entered, was a Mrs. Reynolds, certainly the greatest prodigy I have met in company this winter. She was a perfect prude, loquacious, and as to whether agreeable, I cannot tell, for I had no desire to gain an introduction to her. She was as homely as Adonis was handsome, and tripped about like a young girl of 16, much to the amusement of all setting about the room. It was much regretted that Mr. Grigg would not permit cotillions, so that we might laugh and criticize upon her dancing, as she was perfectly original in all her movements and ways. I dare say she would have exhibited some novel ideas of the way of dancing. Her dress was perfectly ridiculous for a woman of her age (I suppose about 40 and with several children), it being a light striped silk or satin, I could not tell which, made up in the most fantastical way imaginable, with strange looking puffed up short sleeves. It makes me now laugh to think of her waist drawn up to the smallest possible shape, giving her the appearance of an old wasp. Her movements were so strange, I would have liked to have done the ungentlemanly act of laughing in her face, and would have been forced to it if she had addressed me. All her good and bad qualities, eccentricities, originalities, &c. combined, made her one of the most ridiculous creatures I have come across or met in company for a long time.

The amusements of the evening were principally tete-a-tetes, singing, playing and promenading, but would have been much pleasanter had we had a dance occasionally through the evening. But as Mr. Grigg is a clergyman I think it was perfectly right he refused letting us dance, as it would have been a subject of remark and would not have been consistent with his profession.

We parted at about 1/4 of 1 a.m.

6 April 1843. I am glad to find that this "Mercer Tragedy" has ended in the way it has, viz., that Mercer has been acquitted by a jury of 12 impartial and uninterested men, before the Court of Oyer and Terminer of Gloucester County, New Jersey. I have altered my mind materially, since I first heard of this revolting case, and read the evidence as reported in the papers, which shows that Heberton was a perfect brute and richly deserves what he got, as he not only decoyed Mercer's sister from her relatives and her home, but actually forced her, by presenting a pistol, to consent to his hellish plans. It was one of the most revolting and heart-rending cases that has ever been brought up before a court. It is difficult to conceive with what keenness of anguish her poor heart-stricken parents must feel this disgrace, as it will forever blast the fair name of this family, and forever prevent them from associating with the same circle they have heretofore.

8 April 1843. About 1/2 past 9 a.m. went down on board the steamer Rainbow(46) for Wilmington. This boat is built more like one of our club boats, and is reported to be the fastest boat on the River, but this is not my opinion for I have made quicker trips by far.

We left Philadelphia at 10 minutes past 10 a.m. and passed the Fort(47) at 20 minutes of 11, arrived at Chester at 17 minutes past 11, at Marcus Hook at 25 minutes of 12, and at Wilmington at 25 minutes of 1 p.m.

We would have made the trip much sooner, but just after entering the coach, met with an accident which detained us some time. It was caused by the breaking of a connecting rod which works the air pump.

After my arrival in Wilmington, I went up to see Henry Borden. Remained with him a short time and made an engagement to meet him at half past 2. I then went up to Dr. Gibbons, where after making the customary salutations and having a chat, sat up and took dinner. After dinner, sat chatting with the family until about 2 o'clock, when agreeably to the appointment, called down for Henry Borden. We both took a walk down the rail road as far as the old church.(48) Looked through the graveyard, and then up to town again where we made a call on Mrs. Reynolds and Mr. Hedges. After leaving Mr. Hedges, walked around to a restaurant and got our tea, sat for a while. Then went around to Mr. Williamson,(49) the Mayor of Wilmington, for the purpose of seeing his daughters, but had the bad luck of finding them out. After leaving the house and upon proceeding up Market Street, we overtook them and after Henry gave me an introduction, we continued our walk as far as a Mrs. Jones. Went in and remained there a short time and met Miss Thompson. Upon leaving, accompanied them home and spent the evening. Found them both pretty and pleasing in their manners. I was much pleased with the way I spent my evening. Left 1/2 past 9 and after taking a short stroll around, went home with Henry.

11 April 1843. This was my first visit at Miss Martin's. We enjoyed ourselves exceedingly by dancing &c. until half past 11 o'clock, which I think is entirely too late to stay for two reasons, viz., that it does not look well, and returning home at twelve o'clock is not altogether the right thing. I am now resolved to leave hereafter at about 10 when visiting in this section of the city.

13 April 1843. Cloudy throughout the morning, and about 2 p.m. commenced raining. The rain was cordially welcomed on account of the dryness of the ground and the dust on the streets. Every little puff of the winds almost blinded the pedestrian on the street, and made him look more like a flour merchant than a gentleman promenading for pleasure.

14 April 1843. Today is Good Friday, the one on which our Savior was crucified and suffered on Mount Calvary. It is one well adapted to reflection on our future state, and upon Him who died that we might be saved. The Episcopal Churches were all open. The courts were all closed in honor of the day, which I hope will be remembered as long as this world lasts, and be commemorated in the manner suitable for one that so deservedly requires it.

At the office all day, and in the evening at Grace Church, and heard a very plain and sensible sermon preached by Bishop Onderdonk. The text was taken from the 4th Chapter of Job, the 17th verse. After the sermon was concluded, he delivered a short address to those who were to be confirmed, entreating them to remain firm to the cause which they had so nobly espoused, and never to waver nor be led off by the giddy caprices of the world. When finally they should be called to that eternal city, where peace and happiness forever reign, they should yield up their souls to Him who gave them without trepidation or fear. The Rite of confirmation was administered to 26 men and 53 women.

My thoughts during the whole of the ceremony were, I might say, composed in one, and that one was that I might shortly be classed among the number of the members of the church that I was then in, for I think that there is nothing that becomes a young man so much as embracing religion in early life, or in the morning of his days. It strengthens him in his weaknesses and troubles, it is his counselor. It is never backward in administering balm and quietness to his drooping spirits when dealt with by the rough hand of disappointment with the vexations of this world. Many of my companions have taken up the good cause, and are now entreating me to join them. They take every interest in me, as regards my spiritual welfare, and I hope this endeavor will not be in vain. I have been trying for a long time to bring my mind to a sense of religion, and ere many more months roll around I hope I may conquer.

15 April 1843. In the evening I was home writing a couple of agreements for Mr. Charles Elliott, Sr.

16 April 1843. Got up this morning at 10 minutes past six and went immediately to work at the Agreements I had commenced last night, although writing on Sunday did not altogether agree with my respect for the Sabbath, but the excuse I have to offer is that Mr. E. said he must have them by Monday morning, and there was no help for it. Finished about half past 9. I went upstairs, dressed, and then up to Mr. Suddards's church.

17 April 1843. In the evening about 8 o'clock called upon Mrs. Amanda White from Fredericksburg, Virginia. She is stopping at Mr. Kinsey's, Chestnut below 2nd Street. I was very much pleased in calling, for it not only afforded me the pleasure of seeing Mrs. White, but meeting the two Misses Bricks, who I have been waiting to meet for some time. They are old acquaintances of mine - I used to visit them when my friend Chester White was in the city. But since he left, our intimacy has dropped. Last winter I met them at a party, where I had a formal introduction, which only ended in a recognition of each other on the street. But now that I have made the first visit, I am in hopes I may be able to continue them, for I consider them both interesting and pretty, and would like to class them among my female acquaintances, a large circle of which adds greatly to the chastity of a man's character.

19 April 1843. The horse chestnuts at the corner of 8th and Chestnut Street have opened their buds in sort of defiance to the N.E. storms. The old weather-beaten tree makes a bold appearance, and even the little one at its side, as if conscious of its relationship, puts out its leaflets in a sort of jaunty pride that seems to say "We are not accustomed to be behindhand." Even the lilac at the S.W. side of the horse chestnut has clambered up to the top of the wall.

21 April 1843. Clear, warm and delightful and the ladies appeared as if they were going to take possession of Chestnut Street to the utter exclusion of any of the male sex. I can scarcely remember when so much beauty and fashion was out. Surely judging from the atmosphere of today, Spring, the much sung season, the period of health and hope and joyousness, has returned. Herbs and fruits and flowers are timidly relaxing their fibers, and modestly opening their heads to the warm advances of an April sun. The bird's gay carol, fraught with love and gladness, charms the ear of the lovers of Nature, teaching him contentment and philosophy. Even the denizens of the City, though less fortunate than their country neighbors, can enjoy the pleasant influence of returning summer. Though the strip of sky which meets their vision is bounded by brick walls, and its brightness somewhat obscured by the smoke and mist which always hang over their congregated habitations, yet it also is blue and beautiful, and chequered with many a floating cloud sailing gracefully along as if bound upon some pleasant mission.

We have our merry songsters in the town also, who chirp and twitter as heartily as if they were skimming lightly on their native heaths. They too should teach us a lesson of wisdom, should enforce the dictum of the poet, that "all places that the eye of heaven visits are to the wise man ports and happy havens." The wind today was changeable, I believe in almost all parts of the compass.

22 April 1843. In the afternoon until about 1/4 of 4, Bird and I took a walk down as far as the Navy Yard,(50) looked around the new frigate Princeton(51) which they are now building. In the evening went up to Prayer meeting with Ma, which was held in the school room at our church.

I will conclude today's sketch by a few remarks on "tomorrow." The most pointed prophecy of Mr. Miller(52) has reference to the 23rd of April, 1843, as that of the final consummation of all earthly things. Tomorrow, then, according to him, will close the probation of men, and the sun that shall rise upon us in the morning shall not go down. How few believe this prophecy? Not half so many, certainly, as will tomorrow, with the final end of all that concerns them on earth. Lightly as one may be disposed to treat these vain expositions of the mysterious utterances of the divine oracle, it cannot be denied that they have been productive of great evil, by disturbing the weak and credulous, and in inviting them away from that confidence in the promise of seed time and harvest, which is at once an invitation to, and a reward of, piety. We live in an age of credulity. True to the precocity of the time, one excitement is scarcely allowed to gain extensive influence before another is called up and put into profitless operation. And the excitement that is made to depend upon belief in the exposition of Scriptural promise, is the more dangerous, because the disappointment will be likely to lead to a distrust of the oracles, rather than of their expounder. The reaction from excessive credulity may result in the opposite extreme of doubts and skepticism, or of negligence at least, the last, perhaps, the most dangerous of all. Those who depend upon the teaching of the prophet of destruction will perhaps look with the gloomy bodings on the dawn of the Sabbath. Their confidence in reservation has failed, and their faith in the fulfillment of prophecy will be lost. But those who learn of Providence, without rash inquiries, will find in all that is good for them and others, in all that makes for their good and the good of mankind, "that tomorrow shall be as this day, and much more abundant."

23 April 1843. During the rain and in the afternoon we had several flashes of lightning, followed by thunder, which was the first this season and, I have no doubt, gave to the followers of Miller some more faith in prophecy, but as it is, the day has passed off without the world burning up.

26 April 1843. The trees in front of our door and, in fact, a number of others on Arch Street, are out in small leaf, which now begins to bring to our mind that spring is really upon us, although she has been rather dilatory in coming. But now she has made some advances, and I hope will not be retarded, for the prospects for fruit at present is most gratifying and we shall probably have an abundance of all kinds in our markets the coming summer if we are not visited by another cold spell of winter. For several years past, fruit, particularly apples, has in a great measure failed, and in the country where it is almost considered one of the necessaries of life, it has been a severe problem.

27 April 1843. In the evening called down for Miss Christiani to accompany her to a small company to be given by Miss Ella. The amusements of the evening were singing, playing and dancing. Some of the younger ones tried to be introduced to that childish game of "Copenhagen," but, I was glad to find, without success.

30 April 1843. At about 12 Noon it commenced raining. I can with truth say that many a fair lip pouted this morning on getting up and seeing the state of the weather. Many a lady was disappointed in not being able to put on her new spring bonnet, &c. These were the ones who perhaps had hurried to the poor milliner to complete what they might wear and make a fine show in church.

MAY

"I come! I come! from the flowery South,

With the voice of songs and the shout of mirth;

I have wandered far, I have wandered long,

The Valleys and the Hills of the South among;

On woodland and glen, on mountain and moor,

I have smiled, as I smiled in days of yore;

In emerald green I have decked them forth,

And I turn again to my home in the North."

1 May 1843. Today was well suited for a May day; it was clear, warm and pleasant, although a fleeting cloud would occasionally obscure the disk of the sun as it passed, bound perhaps on some pleasant mission through the vast expanse that is continually spread to our view. I remember in my schooling days how anxiously I looked forward to the first of May, weeks, nay months, before I had in contemplation where I would go, & so it is, I suppose, with the school boy and girl of the present day. They all look forward with pleasure to its arrival, and I dare say, though the ground was wet and few plants were out to greet the eye or regale the nose with their sweet perfume, they were pleased.

The Squares were all open today, and many a romp will be there during the ensuing summer, many a gay young heart made glad by the pleasant gambols they will have, and remembered when they have their children to greet them in their older and more quiet and sedate days.

2 May 1843. At the office all day, in the evening called up to see Miss Elizabeth Ella. She not being in, called up to see the Misses Leeds, where I found Miss Ella. They informed me they were just going around to Miss Bradford's (No. 135 N. 11th Street(53) ) and invited me to accompany them, which I of course, with pleasure acceded to. I cannot say that I spent a very pleasant evening at Miss Bradford's on account of the ladies getting into one of those strange kinds of moods to which they are so often prone. That is, short cutting conversation, laughing, whispering, &c., which combined made me at times feel very unpleasant, as I was a stranger, and my first visit to the house. I being the only gentleman in the room among six ladies, it rendered me at times ridiculous, especially when conversation, such as it was, would drop for a while. Feeling no desire to renew it, it was with some degree of pleasure that I took up my hat to leave. To take any of the ladies singly, they are very agreeable and pleasant, but the girls are strange things sometimes, and are hard to be understood, which was the case this evening, and I suppose I must forgive them as nothing was meant but fun.

3 May 1843. Jacob Ridgway,(54) the richest man of this City or State (being worth about $6,000,000) was buried today. There was about forty carriages at his funeral, all full.

4 May 1843. Pa and Ma went up to Burlington this afternoon for the purpose of seeing Sarah Ellis(55) about taking board. I did not want to leave Grandma at home alone as late as 12 o'clock.

6 May 1843. Took a stroll up Chestnut Street to see the beauty and fashion that was there congregated. On our return we walked around through Washington Square, where we were attracted by the groups of children. Some trundled their hoops, others darted by skipping with their ropes, and others pursued each other in the noisy amusement of the chase. We mourned that our City was not studded in every corner with like spots, where health could be reinvigorated and the tender frames, weakened by the close confinement of a crowded neighborhood, be strengthened and renewed. The few places which we have of this kind are public blessings, and the multiplication of them, if it were possible, much to be desired. As I fear it is not, it would be well for the Citizens to make the best use of those we have by permitting their children to chase away their idle hours in these, our best substitutes for the Country.

9 May 1843. In evening about 8 o'clock Benjamin S. Russell called for me and we both went up to see Charles West Thomson, Esq. I have been acquainted with this gentleman all my life, though not intimately, and this was my first visit. He is a gentleman of about 45 and a bachelor, but his associates are young men ranging between the ages of 15 and 25. He appears to have a great attachment for all of them as they visit his house regularly. In many cases he has been principally instrumental in bringing their minds to a knowledge and belief in the Savior by sympathy and kind conversations, which is one of the principal traits in his character. He was finally rewarded for his labors and his untiring mercies by inspiring them to embrace religion and join the Church. My visit was principally on this subject, on which we had some conversation, and from which I judged, that if there ever was a man calculated to win a person over, he was the very one. His conversation was so mild and entreating it brought my mind to that state which showed me that embracing religion when young is one of the most pleasant things a person can do. It is conducive to happiness, always affording comfort when troubled, and finally when you are about to depart from this world, it administers balm to your soul, quieting all fears in the knowledge that you will soon be gathered among the angels in heaven, and there will be rejoicing at your coming.

I met at Mr. Thomson's my old friend Thomas Gillespie who has lately embraced religion and given up the vain follies of the world. He, I remember, a few months since, was as wild a young fellow as would be found anywhere, but I believe has been reclaimed principally through the instrumentality of Mr. Thomson.

12 May 1843. At the office through the day until about 1/4 of 4 p.m. when Pa and myself went over to Camden for the purpose of making some arrangements in regard to moving up to Burlington.

I went up to see the Misses Leeds. On every visit I make I become more fond of these ladies, and am almost persuaded to think that if I do not keep my visits "few and far between" I will become too much attached to leave off, they are just such as please my fancy. I hardly know which pleases me most, and would like to find one to share with me the lot of this world.

13 May 1843. Walked up Chestnut as far as 12th and then down. There was a great quantity of beauty and fashion there congregated, which inspired a poor fellow with love and jealousy as he took his stroll unaccompanied by one of those fair creatures which he was constantly meeting and admiring.

14 May 1843. At Grace Church in the morning. Accompanied Miss Ellen Wilcox home. In the afternoon, after having taken a nap of about half an hour, called down to Christiani. We took a walk up around through Washington Square, but did not find much to attract, went up Sixth Street as far as Franklin Square, and passed through, finding, as in Washington Square, nothing but rowdies.

Went over to St. Philip's Church, and heard a very beautiful sermon delivered by Mr. Neville. After church Christiani went home with me and took tea, when we took a walk up Arch Street as far as 13th, down 13th to Walnut, tipping our hats to Miss Nulty on the road, and out Walnut to Schuylkill, and then in again as far as Washington Square, where we parted. Walnut St. from Broad out to Schuylkill of a Sunday afternoon is a very fashionable promenade, and it was for this purpose and of seeing the ladies that we took this long walk. In the evening accompanied Lydia up to Miss Adriana BrincklZ's and we then went around to Grace Church.

15 May 1843. It was warm enough today to suit the taste of the most fastidious. White pants were plenty, and thin coats and summer hats were in great demand. We had no fire in the grate for the first time this season.

16 May 1843. In the afternoon about 2 o'clock Ma and myself started on board the steamer Trenton(56) for Burlington for the purpose of transacting some business in regard to cleansing the house previous to our moving, which it is now our intention of doing. We arrived in Burlington about 1/4 past 3 after a very pleasant trip, and with quite a number of passengers. On our arrival went up to Mr. Ellis's, where we remained for about an hour, when Mrs. Ellis, Ma and myself went around to look at the house which it is our intention to occupy. I was much pleased with it as the situation, to all appearances, is delightful and there appears to be every convenience connected with it.

After satisfying our curiosity at the house, took a walk up Broad Street, a considerable distance. Then we returned to Mrs. Ellis's. At about 6, Pa and Mr. Ellis came up from the City, when, in a short time we took supper, after which I took a stroll down on the banks. This walk is most delightful, as you have the waters of the Delaware rolling at your feet in noble grandeur, with the numerous vessels loitering in the calm, while every now and then a boat shoots out from the bank, flying across the water like a thing of life. In the distance is the beautiful town of Bristol, with its spires and white houses, giving the whole scene a rich and delightful appearance, well calculated to give the observer a rich treat in the way of rural scenery.

After my walk to the bank returned to Mr. Ellis' when we all started out for the purpose of finding some persons with whom we might conclude the arrangements of cleansing the house, &c.

18 May 1843. Mrs. White left this City for Fredericksburg yesterday. I think it is very doubtful whether she will ever reach there alive, as she is very much affected with the dropsy and scarcely able to walk.

We were obliged to have fire made up again in the office today.

20 May 1843. Bird and myself took a walk down to the Navy Yard and took a look through the frigate Raritan, a vessel that has been on the stocks for a number of years, and which it is intended to be launched in a short time. She is a noble craft, and one, judging from appearances, well calculated to stand a pretty severe engagement. The Princeton, a steam vessel, is fast approaching completion.

I left Chestnut Street rather earlier than usual for the purpose of preparing my dress a little, previous to my going to Mr. Cross's(57) complimentary concert in the evening. The concert was fashionably attended, but was not near so full as I expected.

21 May 1843. Met at Miss Coates, Messrs. Way, Jones, Woodward, and that mean, contemptible and debased fool Dave Weatherly. I did not speak, but treated him with the same contempt that I would the commonest cur that runs the street. I think that he would be a fit subject for the dog catchers, as there is many a dog far more valuable than he that is killed. He left a short time after I came in.

22 May 1843. This afternoon between the hours of 5 and 6 took a walk over to the Washington Square where all the Sunday school children were walking. They were divided into their respective schools, and headed by a tastefully decorated banner, with some appropriate device written upon it in celebration of their anniversary. It was a pleasing sight, to see so many gathered in celebration of so good a cause, and to hear the merry peals of laughter which rang through the air, when some gayer than the rest would pass. Then again some would come along singing hymns, in praise of the blessings that were daily afforded them.

I forgot to note previously that we have had strawberries in our market since last Thursday, the 18th inst.

24 May 1843. Called upon Miss Knowland. She is not pretty but very pleasant in her manners, which, of course, removes the dislike a person naturally takes to one that is homely. I met Miss Rosina Christiani there, and in some 15 or 20 minutes after our appearance into the parlor "whist" was introduced. Had several games which made the evening pass quickly and pleasantly. After becoming tired of "whist" had several games of "Old Maid."

26 May 1843. In the evening went down to Bell's Auction Rooms at the N.E. corner of 7th and Market Streets with Pa.

28 May 1843. In passing Shanklands in Queen Street saw Miss Sarah G. Mercer sitting at their window; it is the first time I have seen her since her abduction and seduction.

29 May 1843. A raw, damp, disagreeable and rainy day, one well calculated to give a person the glooms. It was astonishing to see how white pants and summer hats disappeared. Indeed to look out upon the Streets you might, with little trouble, imagine it was a day in November rather than one in May. Overcoats and cloaks were quite plenty and I for my part wore one all day. We again had fire in the office, and I can say without hazarding much as regards truth, it was very acceptable, and one would be more fully convinced to see the people coming and rubbing their hands and running to the fire, at the same time saying how cold it is, the fire feels quite comfortable. In going through the market this morning I noticed a quantity of cherries and strawberries; they did not look very tempting. In the evening at home talking over matters and things concerning our move to Burlington, which it is our intention of doing this week.

In going up from the office this afternoon about 2 o'clock my attention was drawn by an immense mass of smoke occasioned by the burning of some sheds and mahogany in the yard attached to the steam saw mill of Mr. McFadden,(58) in Sterling Alley, between Cherry and Race and 3rd and 4th Streets.

30 May 1843. In the afternoon went up to Burlington on the Steamer Trenton for the purpose of attending to some matting that belonged to us. About 9 o'clock Mr. Ellis and I walked down to the cars, and in a short time we started. The cars arrived about 20 m. past 9, and at 25 m. past 9 we started and arrived at Camden precisely 25 m. past 10 and in the City at 25 m. of 11.

31 May 1843. This morning was the commencement of our moving, and such a time we had turning out old things never did I witness. I shall be heartily glad when it is over. Aunt Eliza Erwin was here, and kindly volunteered her services, and packed the whole of our glassware and china aided by Grandma. I do not think ever I worked as hard as I have today. Oh dear me, how my sides and back ache but it will be worse tomorrow for I have to take the most of the bedstead down. This afternoon Pa and myself went up with the goods on board of the boat to Burlington, and arrived there about 1/4 past 3, when we had them taken up to the house and then went to work arranging. At about 7 went over to Mr. Ellis who had kindly invited us over to tea, and who has behaved in a very friendly manner since we have been coming up whenever we were in the town.

JUNE

When the brooks have voice

Like a seraph fair

And the songs of birds

Fill the balmy air

When the wild flowers bloom

In the wood and dell

And we feel as if lost

In a magic spell

'Tis June, bright June!

1 June 1843. We went into moving in grand style today. All the parlor and most of the upstairs furniture was taken though the morning, though with a great deal of trouble. The first two loads got to the landing just as the New York passengers were passing. At 2 o'clock we, that is Pa, Lydia, Aunt Eliza Erwin,(59) Emma Erwin(60) and myself left in the Steamer Trenton for Burlington. Arrived there about 1/4 past 3, just as our furniture arrived by the railroad. We went forthwith to work aided by several colored men, and moved it from the cars (which were left in front of the door) into the house. After having them moved went to work and put up the bedsteads which we accomplished by the time supper was ready. We took supper at Mr. Ellis's, after which we remained sitting and talking until near 9 o'clock when we went over to the house and went to bed, it being the first night we ever slept in the house.

2 June 1843. Clear and very cool, and I believe a little ice made early this morning in the country, according to the statements in the papers. Got up this morning about 1/2 past 5, and in a short time went over to Mr. Ellis's to breakfast, after which went down to the boat and started for the city, where we arrived about 1/4 past 9, after a very cool passage. It was astonishing to see the passengers with their cloaks and overcoats, all hanging around the stove as if in midwinter, on the second day of summer. On our arrival in the City, went up to the house, and I went forthwith to work in carrying and taking down the bedsteads, &c. After the cars were loaded, &c., had to prepare for going up to the boat again, at 2. Left Grandma, Pa, Flora and Lib at the house when I started up for the boat. Pa intends coming up at 5, and Flora and Lib will have to remain in the house, which I think will be rather tough, as there is neither bed nor anything to eat there. How they will make out I know not.

Left the City at 2 o'clock for Burlington. There were a great many passengers on board, and we arrived safely about 1/4 past 3. I went forthwith up to the house to attend to the cars when they came in and to have the furniture carried into the house. They arrived in a few minutes. We, that is 4 black men and myself, after a good deal of tugging and hauling, made out to get them in, when I again had to go to work at arranging the things and putting up the bedsteads until about 7 o'clock. Then we went over to Mr. Ellis's to tea, after which came over to the house and soon went to bed, which was about 9 p.m.

3 June 1843. Pa and I started for the city this morning at 8 o'clock in the boat, a quarter of an hour later than usual, because the Bolivar(61) coming before, could not gain the wharf, which together with a tremendous strong wind, obliged her to back about 1/4 of a mile up the river, and then run down and round to. There were a great many passengers on board, and we did not get down until quarter of ten on account of the heavy wind and the swells it occasioned, which would constantly dash into the cabin windows.

On my arrival in the city went up to the house and had the rest of the things put into the furniture car and sent down to the railroad, when, after doing several little matters, we all left for the boat, that is Grandma, Flora, Lib and myself. On our arrival in Burlington we, along with a great number of other passengers (as it was an excursion afternoon, and there were about 400 on board), had to land in the midst of the rainstorm.

4 June 1843. This morning I went to the Episcopal Church (St. Mary's)(62) and heard an address delivered by Bishop Doane.(63)

I took a nap until about 1/4 past 3, when Pa and myself took a walk down to the banks for some distance and then up to the church. After the usual prayers for the afternoon, the Bishop examined a class about Pentecost and Whitsunday, and on several other subjects connected with the Bible. After church went home. Mr. Ellis and his son accompanied us, came in and sat for awhile, and then left, when we took supper. After supper, Lydia and myself took a walk up Broad Street as far as the bridge and then returned home for a few minutes, when we took another little stroll down Broad Street. When we came back to the house, I left Lydia and then went around to Mr. Ellis's where I remained for about half an hour. When I left, I strolled down to the River, and up as far as Broad Street, and up Broad as far as the Methodist(64) and Baptist(65) churches. I took a peep in both and returned home. Found Pa, Ma & Lydia had gone around to Mr. Ellis's. Went around there, remained about 15 minutes, and then all came home.

5 June 1843. Surely summer is now really upon us. It is almost hot enough to roast the poor pedestrian on the streets, and to fry a beefsteak on an anchor, as I have been told they do down south. Whew, it is so hot I hardly can write. The ladies in the street look rather red in the face, which at any other time might be indicative of drinking too hard. What I am about to say is the ladies look like they have been drinking. But no matter, it does not hide their charms, their pretty looks, &c. Those coquettish little sun shades do a great deal in that way; but where am I wandering to, I know not where for I am almost melted into my boots. I am sorry I have not got my thermometer agoing.

Got up this morning at half past four, dressed and went down in the yard to make a commencement in the way of Gardening. After trying for some time, and skinning my hands considerably, found I could make no headway and will have to hire a man to make a commencement as it has had nothing done to it for several years, and is very much overgrown with grass.

Got breakfast about 6 o'clock, and after doing a number of little matters about the house, Pa and myself went down to the boat and started from Burlington for the City at 1/4 of eight and arrived there at 25 m. past 9.

There were a number of lady passengers on board, and some very pretty ones. Today we commence our regular trips to and from the City in a day, and from the impression now formed, I think it will be delightful as long as summer lasts and perhaps through the winter. They, no doubt, will be very conducive to health as the river air is generally considered very beneficial, and the variety of persons you will be brought into contact with will render it at all times pleasant and agreeable.

At the office through the day, that is, from 1/2 past 9 a.m. until 1/4 of 5 p.m., when I went down to Walnut Street (accompanied by Pa, who met me at the office door as I left) for the purpose of taking passage for home. Left Walnut Street Wharf and Camden at 17 minutes past 5, arrived at Burlington at 10 minutes past 6 precisely, making the trip, 20 miles, in 7 minutes less than an hour.

Went over to the boys' boarding school(66) nearly opposite to hand a letter to Algernon Roberts(67) who is at school there. Got to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

6 June 1843. Got up this morning at 1/4 of 5 and sat down to read but was soon called by Ma to put up some blinds and do other little matters, which occupied my attention until breakfast time, and in fact until the time of starting for the city.

After supper this evening took a stroll down as far as the River where I lit my cigar and then walked slowly along the bank as far as Bishop Doane's,(68) where I remained for about 15 minutes enjoying the beauties of the scenery.

7 June 1843. Got up this morning at 1/4 of 5 and went to work putting down stair rods, which is not very pleasant work.

8 June 1843. At the office as usual. Pa stopped in about 1 o'clock and told me I would be obliged to go up to the boat at 2 o'clock to attend to the receiving of our parlor and other glasses(69) which he had sent up by the Rail Road Line. Accordingly at 2 I left the City in the Steamer for Burlington.

There was a little incident that occurred this afternoon which might have resulted in the death of the person who figured so conspicuously in it. It was caused by a man who rows out from one of the stations on the river to take passengers from the boat. He ran his boat forward of our boat's wheels which at once forced it under them. He would have been swamped at once, or drowned, or killed by the wheels, if they had not immediately been stopped. He however, succeeded in short time in getting from under the wheels unhurt, but was much frightened and trembled in every limb. It caused great excitement for a few minutes, and there was a general rush to the side of the boat which made it all the worse for him under the wheel as it kept him from shoving out. We arrived safe and without any other incident.

I went immediately up home and found the cars had just arrived, had the glasses taken out and carried into the house. They were, to our great pleasure, unbroken, and not injured in the least. After the bustle of taking in the glasses, &c., I went to work at a deed which Pa wished me to write for him, and by supper time had it completed with the exception of the receipt and acknowledgement.

After supper all of us went to work and put up the parlor and other glasses besides sundry pictures and a pair of blinds. We succeeded admirably in putting up the large parlor glasses much better than we expected. Emma Erwin spent the evening, and stayed all night with us.

9 June 1843. Clear and extremely warm, decidedly the warmest day we have had this season, every pedestrian looks like he was going to melt into his boots and the ladies all looked half dead with heat in their clothing. Panama hats, and ice water were in great demand.

The acting President(70) of the United States, with his son Robert, passed through the City today. They had a large military escort and passed through a number of the principal streets. There was very little enthusiasm shown, there being no cheering or any mark of honor paid to the man himself, but it was to the office that it was shown. In personal appearance he is not very fine and his face is extremely homely, as his nose (to use a common expression) is knocked to the N.E. He intends remaining in the City through tomorrow to receive the calls from his fellow citizens.

Left this afternoon as usual in the cars for Burlington, though I was afraid all the passengers would be left, as the engine started off without the train, it having become detached by some accident. After proceeding about a mile on the road the engineer found he did not have the train! He returned and we went off in fine style.

After supper went down to Mitchell's and hired a boat, and then went out to the Island where I took a swim. I enjoyed it exceedingly, as the water was in a very fine state. The row was the first of the season, so I had to work rather hard for I have had no practice for several years & of an evening like this it is not what it is cracked up to be.(71)

10 June 1843. Left this evening as usual in the boat from the Walnut Street wharf for Burlington. After passing through the canal in the Jersey channel, an amusing and laughable scene occurred, which afforded mirth for the whole of the passengers. It was occasioned by a heavy swell which struck the boat on her starboard bow, which threw a complete shower of water over some dozen passengers setting on that part of the boat. Some fared rather worse than the rest, as they were completely drenched, looking as if they had been thrown overboard and pulled out again. It occasioned a general burst of laughter throughout the boat at the ducked fellows' expense.

Another incident occurred in going up on the cars, about two or three miles from VanCouver's Creek. The engine ran over a cow or calf, I could not tell which. It did not cause any detention as the "cowcatcher" as they call it, that runs before the engine, soon threw it off. But it presented a horrid spectacle as it lay on its back, with it legs all broken, and the bones protruding through the flesh.

11 June 1843. Went to St. Mary's church this morning with Lydia and Sarah Roberts. Bishop Doane delivered an address to a man who, by the ceremony of this morning, was made a deacon.

The services were very long and I became very tired before they were ended. It came on to rain while we were in Church, and continued when it was out, which made it rather unpleasant for us, as we had no umbrellas. Pa soon came and provided us, so we got home with but a slight sprinkling.

In the evening at home until about 1/2 past 9, when I accompanied Emma Erwin and Mrs. Elizabeth Hendricks home. They had stopped in a short time previously on their return from church.

Bishop Doane made his first call upon us yesterday, accompanied by Mrs. Dr. Ellis.(72) He, I believe, is very agreeable.

12 June 1843. Got up this morning about 5, dressed and went down stairs for the purpose of arranging some flowers to bring to town, after which got breakfast and at about half past 7 went down to the boat accompanied by Sarah Roberts, Pa and Lydia.

At the office as usual through the day and at 5 p.m. when we left for Burlington. We met the train that conveyed the Acting President from Princeton where he has been since Saturday last. We had to back for about a mile to permit it to go through. I do not think this should have been, as it not only delayed the mail, but passengers who were anxious to get into New York at an early hour, when this return train was in no hurry and had nothing of importance to carry, the only occupants of the car being a band of musicians.

Ma, Pa and Lydia went to make the first call on our next door neighbors,(73) Mr. and Mrs. Sterling.(74) Grandma and myself remained at home.

13 June 1843. It had the appearance of rain at several periods through the day, but managed to hold up much to the pleasure of many persons, on account of the launch, of which I will speak hereafter.

Went down to the boat, as usual, for the purpose of going to town. There was an immense number of passengers on board this morning, principally men, though there was a goodly number of ladies, a great many of whom I suppose were going down to see the launch.

At the office until half past 1 p.m. when I left for the purpose of going down to see the launch of the frigate Raritan.(75) Upon getting into 2nd Street I joined with the tide of human beings that all appeared to have but one point to which they were bound. Old and young, rich and poor, gay and sorrowful, all appeared to join heart and hand in the pleasure of seeing one more of our noble craft launched into her destined element, to be a proud monument in distant lands of our naval defense, and to protect our commerce in distant waters.

Upon gaining the Navy Yard, found thousands of persons there before me, of all ages and sexes all with countenances lit up with smiles, and appearing glad that they were permitted to see the great launch. After jostling through the crowd for a while I obtained a situation, though a very unpleasant, warm and crowded one. But now for a peep around, at the numerous odd things among the people that are going on. Now there is a laugh by the multitude, what can it be? After looking around my eyes are attracted to the cause of it. It is a boy "skinning" it up a single rope onto the shears, much to the discomfiture of his shins I expect, and affording much mirth to people around. Again, there goes another fellow "crab fashion" up a pole onto the shears. He hugs the pole like he loved it, and the multitude shouts, he gains the top nearly. But he is obliged to retreat, the position being rather uneasy and his strength having failed, much to the amusement of the spectators. And so they amused themselves until 1/4 of 3, when visible preparations were made for the launch, indicated by the drawing in of numerous legs that were hanging over the stern of the frigate.

At 11 m. of 3 p.m. she moved, and a breathless silence ensued. When she glided gracefully into her destined element, the whole multitude shouted their cheers as if in one voice, welcoming her as she glided into the bosom of the Delaware. This mighty shout was followed by the discharge of a Nautical Salute from a steam vessel (the Union) and one from the Navy Yard which almost deafened me, as the guns were fired in quick succession.

The river previous to the launch presented an animated and beautiful appearance. The whole surface was covered with vessels from the smallest row boat up to the largest steamer, all seeming anxious to get an eligible situation. There were a great number of steamboats laying off the Navy Yard, all loaded down to the waters edge with human beings, some perhaps containing upwards of 6 or 700 persons. Among the number were the Ohio,(76) Robert Morris, Trenton, Kent, Virginia, John Smith, Bolivar and a number of ferry boats whose names I do not remember. Immediately after the launch the great multitudes began to move off, I among them.

On my way down passed Thomas Mercer's, and saw Sarah Mercer, the victim of Heberton, standing at the door. She looked very pretty and smiling, and as if nothing had ever happened.

14 June 1843. After leaving the office in the evening went down to Christiani's where I remained with him until about 8 o'clock. We left to go up to the Misses Leeds', according to an engagement for the purpose of accompanying them to a wedding party. Arrived at the Misses Leeds' about half past 8, and upon being introduced into the parlor, found Miss Grigg who was waiting to accompany us. The Misses Leeds' soon made their appearance dressed tastefully in white, and really looking most beautiful. In a few minutes we left the house to go to a party which was given at the house of Mr. (?), nearly opposite, for the reception of the calls of the bride and groom, Mrs. and Mr. Fuller. (Mr. Pliny B. Fuller is of New York and was married to Miss Louise S. Shugart of this city today, the 14th inst.)

Upon entering the room we were introduced to the bride and groom, and after giving the usual salutations I began to look around me, at the beauty that was seated around the room. The first object that attracted my attention in regard to beauty was the bride. Her rich dark ringlets hung gracefully on her neck. They contrasted strongly with the whiteness of her almost alabaster neck, while the fire from her dark piercing eye seemed to light up the countenance of each one, judging from the smiles that constantly fell upon her from the numerous guests that were introduced. Her form was faultless and she had much grace in her movements, which was materially aided by the beauty of her dress which hung with exquisite elegance around her fair form, while from her head hung a rich fall of lace, which added much to her appearance.

One of her bridesmaids was very pretty, resembling the bride very much. There were several very pretty girls there, among them Miss Hamer and the Misses Carpenteres, though the latter were rather coarse beauties. But seriously speaking I think Christiani and I bore off the palm in regard to beauty with the two Misses Leeds, as I think they were the finest looking and prettiest ladies in the room.

Left about 11 p.m. when we accompanied our ladies home. We strolled leisurely down to 5th and Spruce to Dick's store, where I shall lodge for tonight.

15 June 1843. Got up this morning about 6 o'clock, read the Ledger.(77) About 1/4 past 7 went with Christiani to his residence to take breakfast. He kindly invited me, lodging with him, last night. These will place me under obligations to him, which I am now anxious to reciprocate. Christiani has, since his return from the West, invariably treated me with much respect, and more like a friend than all my relations. He has invited me to lodge with him and take my meals whenever I am in town, which none of my relations have, as yet, done. But what more can I expect of them as they are generally selfish, and attending to their own comforts. They will come and stay with you, and make a convenience, and not even give you an invite to their house, or, if it is given, it is done in such a manner that you can at once see that you are not wanted. Give me one faithful friend, and I would not give him for all my relations among the Roberts put together for kind treatment and favors. But, I am going too far on this subject and it will be quite as pleasant for me to drop it, as it is not altogether right to write about the faults of our relations in a journal that may hereafter be seen, perhaps, by them.

The ride up this afternoon was very unpleasant on account of its being exceedingly dusty. It came into the cars in such quantity that I could scarcely breath. When I got out, I could scarcely distinguish the color of my coat, as it was completely covered with dust.

After supper this evening took a stroll down on the banks with Lydia, and there met the Misses Nesbit. On our return, Emma Erwin joined us, and we walked up home. At about 8 o'clock accompanied Ma and Lydia to Dr. Ellis's, it being our first call. Found the Dr. and Mrs. Ellis very pleasant. In a short time after we were there, Mrs. Nesbit and her two daughters came in. We were introduced, and I found them very agreeable, and judging from their appearance on meeting them on the banks, very pretty.

16 June 1843. Left Burlington this morning as usual, with Ma and Grandma and Lydia. A great many passengers were on board, but their pleasure was materially dampened by the heavy shower of rain that came on when we were about halfway down to the City. Previous to the rain it began to blow rather hard which caused a swell in the river, and when the boat was rounding to, made her rock very much, which produced sickness with many of the ladies for a few minutes. But it was over soon as we came to, much to their comfort, as it is not a very pleasing sensation. I had a little touch of it at sea last summer.

At the office as usual through the day, but did not feel much like doing any business. I was very unwell, having a bad headache, cold and little touch of fever, which made me feel glad when the hour of five arrived that I might go home, although I hardly felt able to go.

After taking supper I laid down on the sofa being too unwell to sit up, and fell asleep until about 9 o'clock when Mrs. Nesbit and her daughter called. It was their first visit. They remained but a very short time, not more than twenty five minutes. I accompanied them home, and then returned, my head being very bad after the exertion of talking and accompanying them home.

17 June 1843. Left Burlington as usual this morning. Grandma went down, and also Lib, who is to go out to the Almshouse(78) today, to remain until the birth of her child.

I was only at the office from half past 9 until 2, when I left on account of not feeling very well. There was some 3 or 400 passengers on board this afternoon, as there is an excursion trip, which returns at about half past 5.

Mrs. Reiford came up, I believe to look for board, but upon her coming up to our house with Anna Ploughman, Ma persuaded her and Anna Roberts to stay until Monday. At about 1/4 past 5 walked down with Anna Ploughman as far as the wharf but the boat not having come, continued our walk along the banks as far as Bishop Doane's residence. When we returned, the boat was near at hand, and soon arrived. After seeing her on board, and getting my journal, which I had left on board when I came up this afternoon, I went up home.

18 June 1843. After church went home, took dinner and then a nap of about half an hour, when I went down to the boat for the purpose of coming down to the city.

Nothing occurred worthy of note until we stopped at Bridesburg to put off some passengers in a small boat. I was sitting on the larboard side of the boat, pretty well aft, talking to Nelson Burr (who I met in Burlington and came down with me) when the engine was stopped as usual, so that the boat might come to. Suddenly I heard a crash, and saw the people rush to the starboard side of the boat, and I among them. Upon looking over the side I saw the small boat turned bottom upwards floating up the river, and a man's hat after it. The owner of it, as the boat went over, fortunately caught on the steps and there hung like a good fellow. This saved him from drowning until they could get a rope around his body, which they soon accomplished and brought him on board safe although without quite as dry a shirt as when he came out to meet the Steamer. It appears that this accident happened by his letting his boat's broadside strike the steps of the steamer while coming to, and while she was still under headway, which at once threw her over.

20 June 1843. The ladies were out in great numbers promenading on Chestnut Street. Though it was rather warm, they generally take it coolly, and walk so slowly they do not generally experience the power of the sun upon them, as do the poor fellows who have to hurry about to transact their various affairs of business.

After passing the Fish-House(79) noticed a large party of ladies and gentlemen, all seeming, with the view I had of them, to be enjoying themselves. As we passed they gave us a hearty cheer, as if wishing us happiness and safety on our onward course. There is scarcely a day that we pass this delightful spot that there isn't a large party of gentlemen, or of ladies and gentlemen, always seeming to enjoy themselves to the fullest extent.

It was so cold this evening I had to sit with the windows down. All of our family went to the City today, Flora included, and returned, except Grandma.

21 June 1843. Left Burlington this morning and arrived at the City about 20 minutes past 9 but we were not able to land until 10 or 15 minutes afterwards on account of the U.S. steamer frigate Union making a trip up the river which, with several other vessels, were in our way. The progress of the steamer was not as fast as I expected. She presented a very pretty appearance, and, I believe, leaves for Norfolk today.

At the office from the time I arrived in the City until half past 6, when I took a stroll up Chestnut Street as far as 10th and then down around through Independence and Washington Squares, to see the ladies that were promenading.

22 June 1843. Got up about 1/2 past 6, dressed, and came down into the store, remained there a few minutes, then took a walk around into Washington Square. Found no ladies there, and after taking a little stroll around Independence Square, returned to the store, where I remained until 8 o'clock. Then I went up with Christiani and took breakfast with him.

At home in the evening until about 1/4 past 8 when I took a stroll up Broad Street as far as the railroad bridge, whence I found a number of young fellows enjoying themselves in the healthful and pleasing exercise of swimming. Remained there for about half an hour. My only regret was that I could not participate on account of having a very bad cold which would, I suppose, have made it worse. Mrs. Reiford came up yesterday and has taken boarding at the Temperance House(80) at the corner of Main(81) and Broad Streets. I believe she intends spending the summer here in Burlington.

23 June 1843. We were obliged, in going over this afternoon, to run down around the lower end of the bar, the tide being so low we could not venture through the canal, which detained us considerably.

After supper took a walk down on the bank for the purpose of obtaining Mr. Israel's(82) boat, but the tide having left her high and dry, gave up my intentions, it requiring too much exertion to work her off this warm evening.

24 June 1843. Surely it is warm enough to melt a fellow today. It is clear and hot, the thermometer at 2 o'clock, on the south side of Chestnut Street, stood at 96¡, almost hot enough to melt all the pedestrians on the streets and completely exterminate the City.

Left Burlington this morning usual, but by myself, Pa not being able to come down on account of having a severe attack of the influenza, which is now the prevailing epidemic. This afternoon the boat made an excursion trip, and of course there was a good number of passengers on board, principally ladies. It is hard for me to tell what pleasure may be found in these trips by ladies, for they are all packed away as it were in a closely confined boat. The thermometer must range at 100¡, among the squawking of dozens of children, seeming as if each was trying to out vie the other in the loudness of its crying organs. There is no room to move about, nor even to see what is going on, or the beautiful scenery that we pass on the river. I think if I were a lady I would employ my time in a much pleasanter way than taking a Saturday afternoon excursion on one of these boats. I suppose I ought not to say anything, because if they did not go, the boat would not be supported, and sundry other mishaps might take place. Let those that like them enjoy themselves.

Dick Christiani accompanied me up this afternoon. We arrived in Burlington about 1/4 of 4, when he and I went up to our house. Remained there a short time, and then took a stroll down along the banks as far as Bishop Doane's and then returned home. Upon passing the girls' boarding school(83) noticed fine display of beauty, as the principal part of the young ladies were out at the door. But what considerably amused us, and made Dick and myself almost crack our sides a laughing, was to see an old beggar fellow with one of the legs of his pants rolled up as far as he could get it, showing it to the ladies, it having a large sore on it, and soliciting charity.

Upon returning home took some lemonade, &c. I went out to the bank and sat down until the boat came. Dick went on board and we left for the City. In the evening at home writing a deed from Samuel H. Erwin(84) to Eliza Erwin. Got up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

25 June 1843. Got up this morning at 6 o'clock, came down- stairs and finished the deed that I commenced last evening and prepared a draft for another, which occupied my time until half past 10. I went upstairs, dressed and then walked down as far as the church, where I remained in waiting until it was out, when I accompanied Ma and Lydia home.

After dinner laid down on sofa where I fell asleep and did not wake until about 4 o'clock, when I got up and walked down as far as the church with Mrs. Reiford. Did not go in, and returned home, but afterwards concluded to go. Heard a very good sermon delivered by the Bishop, and after Church accompanied Mrs. Reiford home.

26 June 1843. About 8 o'clock Ma, Lydia and myself went over to pay our first visit to Mrs. Nesbit and daughters. On our first going in met no person but Mrs. Nesbit and I began to think we were doomed not to spend a very lively evening, and I would be cut out of my wish to be introduced to the Misses Nesbit. But in about 10 minutes I was agreeably disappointed by the appearance of three of her daughters, who are all very pretty, especially the younger one, who attracted my attention considerably. After chatting for a while it was proposed to take a walk out in the garden, which I gladly acceded to. We all started, and after strolling around for a while, came across the swing, where each of the ladies took a turn in this amusement. When we returned slowly to the house, and were just about seating ourselves to have a chat, Ma, much to my displeasure, said she wished to go which of course cut off all further pleasure of their company this evening. I hope it will not end here, as the Misses Nesbit, one and all, particularly please my fancy. They all appear to be pretty, accomplished and well educated young ladies. The younger is particularly attractive in regard to beauty and pleases my taste in that respect precisely.

27 June 1843. Clear through the morning but in latter part of the afternoon clouded over and through the evening it had the appearance of rain though we were not favored with it, as the farmers desire. The county is now suffering very much for rain, as there has not been any, of any account, for some time.

Left for Burlington this evening at 5 p.m. as usual. Arrived there about 1/4 past 6 when we had supper, after which I sat down and read for a while, when I concluded to take a little exercise in rowing. Went down to the banks for that purpose, but the tide being very low, and the boats lying some distance from the water, concluded not to go, as there would be some difficulty in getting the boat off.

28 June 1843. In going up in the cars this evening there were several young fellows that were pretty well "fuddled." It caused a great deal of amusement to some of the passengers, and a great deal of trouble to others. Two of these fellows appeared to be considerably anxious to stand on the outside of the cars, which would have placed their lives in great danger as they were not at all able to stand alone. They would have likely been hitched off the car. At one time I thought there would be a fight, as one of these characters seemed determined to go on the outside of the car, while a passenger sitting by the door was determined not to let him out. They, however, settled it amicably and he returned to his seat. The last I saw of them was just as the cars were leaving Burlington, when the agent was trying to get them in the cars. How he succeeded I know not as I then left.

Mrs. Mary Roberts(85) and her baby(86) came up this afternoon and intends remaining a day or so. In the evening, after Mrs. Roberts, Ma and Lydia went down on the banks, I took a stroll down and borrowed Mr. Israel's boat, who has kindly offered the use of it to me at any time I wish it. After getting it off I rowed down as far as the Bishop's Wharf where I met Ma, Lydia and Mrs. Roberts. In a few minutes the Misses Clara and Elizabeth Nesbit came up. After a little persuasion I prevailed upon Lydia and Miss Elizabeth Nesbit to get in, then I rowed up to the upper end of the bank, and took the other Miss N. in. We rowed down a considerable distance below the Bishop's, and then returned. It was pretty dark, and near to 9 o'clock. After landing the ladies, rowed down to where I got the boat, but the tide having got so low I had to pull around to end of Mr. Israel's wharf and leave the boat there, and then climb up the wharf, which occupied some time, and prevented me from walking up with the Miss N's.

29 June 1843. I noticed one of the largest men I ever saw in my life in the cars this evening. He occupied, when sitting down, two seats. He must of been seven feet high and could not have weighed less than 350 pounds. Coming into the car he had to come edgewise through the door.

This evening went down on the banks and continued my walk as far as the Bishop's where I met the three Misses Nesbit, Miss Mitchell and Lydia. Joined them and walked up home. I was much surprised at the Misses Nesbit as was also Lydia. They did not introduce us to Miss Mitchell, whether by neglect or intention I cannot say.

30 June 1843. After supper went down to the banks, and got Mr. Israel's boat in turn to take a row, as I had made an engagement to take the Misses Nesbit and Lydia last evening. I had got the boat off, and had rowed about a little, and had backed up to the stairs, when they made their appearance. Much to my surprise, Lydia told me that a note had come to the house to inform me I could not have the boat as Mr. Israel wished to use it. It made me feel very unpleasant as two of the Misses Nesbit were standing by. To make the best of it I went up to Mr. Israel and offered him the boat, which he would not accept telling me that it was too late and as I had the boat to go ahead which I did. We had a very pleasant row, getting back about 9 o'clock. It was Miss Helen and Elizabeth that went with us and one of her smaller brothers. After putting the boat away went home and remained in the rest of the evening, feeling considerably worried at taking the boat. Got up 5 1/2 and to bed at 10 1/4.

JULY

1 July 1843. Clear and extremely warm all day with the wind from the S.W. The thermometer was at 7 a.m. 76¡, at 2 p.m. 88¡, at 7 p.m. 86¡. At Mr. McAllister's on the shady side of Chestnut Street near 2nd at 1 1/2 p.m. 107¡. I left the house as usual this morning for the purpose of going to the City, but when Pa and myself were on the way down we were informed that the boat had changed her hour to 1/4 past 7, instead of 1/4 of 8 as heretofore, and were therefore left. Pa concluded to go down in the Bolivar. Thinking that I would be rather late before she got down, and not having much to do in the City, remained up. Took a walk a short distance out of town, and then returned as far as the bridge on the creek in the upper end of the town, where there was a man fishing. Having a line in my pocket, thought I would try my luck for a short time. The fishing was very good, but I became tired, because the sun was very hot. I continued my walk up the creek and enjoyed very delightful swim of about half an hour when I returned home and took a nap until dinner time.

Cecilia Erwin came up with Pa this afternoon and intends staying until Monday. Pa also brought up with him this afternoon Joseph Stratton, a little colored boy, who is to remain with us if he likes the place.

2 July 1843. In the morning went into Quaker meeting(87) , heard a sermon delivered by an old French Quaker,(88) about one word in ten of which I could understand.

4 July 1843. Cool, clear and very pleasant throughout the whole of the day, with the wind from the S.W.

Today is the 67th anniversary of American Independence, and it will be observed with the usual celebrations and festivities besides innumerable private parties, and individual commemorations. It is necessary to remind ourselves of the great occasion which calls forth such general demonstrations of joy, and whose anniversary is always so heartily and patriotically greeted. The event is familiar to the mind of every school boy, and its history is the earliest lesson which is taught him. While he continues to have such lessons instilled in him, there will never be a time when the event that established the independence of this country will cease to be remembered, or the great principles of civil and religious liberty upon which the government of the country is founded will cease to be respected.

The annual celebration of the illustrious act which separated us from the mother country conduces to the preservation of such principles, and keeps alive the sacred flame of patriotism. So long as the heart of an American beats with an impulse of feeling, so long will he remember with grateful recollections the deeds of his fathers, so long will he endeavor to emulate their example, and so long will he take pride in transmitting unimpaired to future generations the proud heritage of freedom which he has received. Let our observance of the day then be such as will try to establish a brotherhood of feeling throughout this vast republic. As we enjoy together the blessings of one country and of one government, let us seek to establish a common union of respect and affection among the citizens of this diversified land, which will unite us in one people, having but one interest, the perpetuation of our free institutions throughout all time.

Today was a spent by me very pleasantly. I got up about 1/4 past 6 a.m., when, after taking breakfast, William H. Hanley and myself went up to the office where we remained until about 1/2 past 8, then we walked slowly down to Walnut Street wharf for the purpose of going up to Burlington. When we got down to the wharf found the boat had not yet come down, remained lounging there until she came. In the interim saw the Rainbow and also the Balloon(89) start for Wilmington both loaded in such a manner that I would not like to have trusted myself on them.

The Boat arrived about 9 o'clock (the time she was advertised to leave). Went on board and got started about 1/2 past 9. There was about 500 passengers on board, and to enliven them there was a band of music to perform on the way up. Met on board Edward Jones, McKinley, and George Way. Arrived at Burlington about 11 o'clock when we posted off among the great concourse that left at this place. We, that is, Jones, McKinley, Way, Hanley, and myself, concluded to take a stroll up the Street, which we did until we came to Broad Street, and then came to a stand. It was then proposed to take a swim, which was acceded to by all parties, and off we started. I led the way up to the place of bathing on the creek, when there was another halt and argument about going in, but we finally concluded all to go in with the exception of Hanley who had a bad cold. Had a delightful swim of about 20 minutes. When we came out, we dressed and went into town as far as Broad and High Streets where Hanley and I left the rest of the party to meet again at 2 o'clock, they to go to the Hotel for dinner and Hanley and myself on the same mission to our house.

After dinner went down according to appointment and met the rest of the company. We all strolled up to the Burlington Garden, looked into the nine pin alley, and then took some refreshments. Afterwards we cut about for a while having considerable fun and then wended our way along the banks. Upon passing the boarding school we feasted our eyes on a number of beautiful girls, among the great concourse of boarding school misses that were out at the door of the hall. By this time we began to feel rather tired and by mutual consent took a seat on the banks where we lounged until near 5 o'clock. Then we strolled up again to the steamboat landing, and in a short time the New Philadelphia(90) came up from the City. Jones, Way and McKinley got on board and left for Bristol. Hanley and myself remained behind. After their leaving went in search of a boat to hire for the evening. We succeeded, and then went home to tea. After tea Hanley and myself got the boat and rowed down along the banks across the River, &c., where we landed for the purpose of witnessing the display of some fire works that were set off on Mrs. Chester's place. They presented a handsome appearance, and were witnessed by a great number of persons that were collected on the bank. After this display was over we took our boat and rowed out to a party of ladies and gentlemen that were singing when we rowed up to the place we had hired the boat. The evening was delightful, it being moonlight and of the right temperature for rowing. Our pleasure was a little ruffled by coming near being run down by a schooner, but "a long pull and a strong pull" shot us out of the way. Got to bed about 1/4 past 10 p.m.

5 July 1843. In the evening out on the River rowing until near 9 o'clock. When I came home, got a cigar and went over to the hotel, to wait until the cars came in. They were about 1/4 an hour later than usual. A New York Fire Company came which detained the train on account of being so unusually long. Met the Misses Nesbit at the corner listening to the music from the cars. Had a chat and walked home with them.

6 July 1843. After supper went down to Mr. Israel's to see if I could obtain his boat for this evening, which I did. Then I went up and told Lydia, who went around to the Misses Nesbit for them. Then returned to the River and got the boat off with some difficulty and just in time to be in readiness for the ladies. Only two of the Misses Nesbit came down, namely Ellen and Elizabeth. Clara being unwell could not come.

In going up this afternoon and also yesterday, I noticed the farmers were all busy cutting their wheat and rye, and in fact, going pretty strong for harvesting.

8 July 1843. At the office until 2 p.m. when I left with Pa for Burlington again. The boat was literally crowded with men, women and children, all seeming anxious to participate in the excursion. I, for my part, cannot tell what pleasure can be found in going up the river in a crowded boat surrounded by crying children, with the thermometer ranging at about 100. But, so it is and I suppose they think they realize some pleasure with a little pure air for their children, which is considered conducive to health.

Went up to see the cars come in, which were to bring the New York firemen. They did not arrive until near 7 o'clock, 3/4 of an hour after their time. I was very much amused at these firemen when the cars stopped, as they all rushed into the public house at the corner to get a drink, but it was a temperance house. They all came rushing out like a parcel of sheep, and looking very much like these animals, having been made perfect fools of. I spent the greater part of the evening sitting on the steps gazing at the moon and talking to Lydia and Mrs. Sterling.

9 July 1843. In the morning went to church with Ma and Lydia, and occupied the pew we rented for the first time today. Bishop Doane preached a rather longer sermon than pleases my taste. In fact the whole service was longer than what I have been used to, it being from 1/2 past 10 until 10 minutes of 1. After church went home, took a hearty dinner, laid down on the sofa, and slept until about 20 minutes of 4, when I went to church. Bishop Doane preached, and again made the service very long, it being from 4 until 10 minutes of 6.

10 July 1843. Left Burlington this morning as usual and arrived at the wharf about 1/4 of 9, but were not able to land until nearly 10 minutes past, on account of a schooner that got in our way. We very nearly ran against the Steamer Rainbow,(91) and obliged her to push off before her time. That caused her to run into the ship Shenandoah, which tore away her aft flag staff, and also the railings around the after part of the promenade deck. Our boat escaped without injury.

11 July 1843. Arrived home at 1/2 past 5, and sat down to write a few lines to Algernon Harrison.(92) Was soon called by Pa to go try to find his gold spectacles which he had left in the Cabin of the boat. I got down to the boat just as she was coming to, leaped aboard and requested the captain to hold on a few minutes. He politely said he would. I ran down to the cabin, where I found the glasses on the floor, much to my pleasure.

13 July 1843. We had a little excitement in Burlington this morning, occasioned by a fire breaking out in the store of Jones and Dutton on the Main Street. They succeeded in getting it out without much damage to the building, though not without a great deal of damage to the goods. It is supposed to have originated in a desk the night previous, and was burning the whole night, though it did not break out until morning.

14 July 1843. I was up at the Recorder's Office(93) the greater part of this morning searching a title, first one I ever attempted. In the afternoon at the office until 5 when I left to go down to the boat to start for Burlington. There were quite a number of passengers who went up in the cars this afternoon. I noticed in going up the farmers, generally speaking, have their grain in, and the country looks much better since the rain.

15 July 1843. Cloudy throughout the day with the wind from the S.E. About 3 o'clock the clouds became much more dense and it commenced blowing very hard, which was succeeded by a heavy shower of rain lasting about three quarters of an hour. The wind, which lasted throughout the rain, did much damage to the awnings in the City and to shipping along the wharves. It capsized a schooner up the River, which immediately sunk.

20 July 1843. After supper walked around to Mr. Woolman's with Rebecca Gibbons and Lydia where, according to previous engagement, we were to meet for the purpose of starting on a little boating excursion over to Bristol. Upon stopping at Mr. W's found all ready but waiting for Emma Erwin. She came in about 15 minutes. After taking our seats we found we numbered 11, that is 7 ladies, 3 gentlemen and the man to row the party. There were: the 2 Misses Woolman, the 2 Misses Knight, Miss Emma Erwin, Miss Rebecca Gibbons, Lydia, and Messrs. Wright and Woolman and myself.

We arrived at Bristol about 1/4 of 8, landed and took a stroll through town. When we returned to the boat we rowed over again and then down along the banks and up again. When we landed it was near to 10 o'clock. On our way across the river we had several songs from the Ladies and we were favored by hearing several beautiful airs played by a person on a bugle in the neighborhood of where our boat was sailing.

23 July 1843. After Church went home, took dinner, and then laid down on the sofa until near 3 o'clock when I went around for Hugh Nesbit to take a walk. We walked about a mile out the Mount Holly Road and then over into a woods where we strolled through them and then finally got out onto the Mount Holly Road again. We returned to the Nesbit's house where we went into the yard and commenced an attack on the pears which were ripe. They have an abundant supply; two or three trees are full.

After remaining there for about an hour and a half, went around to the Church for the purpose of seeing the people come out but were rather late, then returned home and got tea. After tea took a walk down on the banks with Nesbit where we met a young man by the name of Lippincott, who Nesbit introduced me to. In a short time we met Nesbit's younger brother and Ken, took up our station on a log, and had a chat of about an hour.

25 July 1843. Left the wharf at 10 m. past 4 and arrived in Burlington about 1/4 of 6. There were about 300 passengers on board, and the boat was accompanied by a band, which enlivened the party by a number of very pretty pieces of music. Percival Roberts(94) went up with me this afternoon. After landing, Percival and I went to obtain a boat, as it was our intention to take a row this evening. We soon succeeded in engaging one, then went home for tea, after which went down and got the boat. We rowed around on the banks and took Rebecca Gibbons, little Addie Roberts(95) and Lydia in. Then we went a considerable distance down the river and returned, landing the girls at about 1/2 past 8. We rowed around to the ferry boat slip, being attracted there by a person reciting Shakespeare, and remained listening to him for nearly half an hour, or until the tide had come up sufficiently to take the boat in. After landing went up home and after eating some baloney went to bed.

Scarcely had we got comfortably fixed, when we heard the cry of fire. I immediately jumped up, and upon looking out the window saw a great light, which at once convinced me it must be pretty bad. Percival and I hurried on our clothes, and went in search of it. The flames proceeded from a large carpenter shop, on the west side of the Main Street a couple of Squares above Broad Street. When we got there the building was wrapt in one immense sheet of fire, and the heat was so intense that it was difficult to remain within a hundred yards of it. There was serious apprehension about a number of frame buildings in the vicinity, particularly one that was within twenty yards of it. They succeeded, however, in saving the surrounding buildings, but the carpenter shop is a total loss. Neither the house nor the materials contained in it were insured. Before we left it had fallen and was pretty nearly out. The quiet City of Burlington seemed to be rather disturbed by the occurrence for they all seemed to turn out. Men, women and children were all congregated at the fire, but the greater part of them did not seem to care to help.

26 July 1843. After supper went down and got Moyer's boat, but had great difficulty in getting her off as she was aground. Did not remain out long for I wished to put the boat in before dark, as the tide was very low. This evening was the first time I had Moyer's boat, and is the commencement of the week that I have hired it from him.

28 July 1843. Clear and exceedingly hot all day, with the wind from the S.W. Thermometer at 1/4 of 7 a.m. 74¡, at 9 a.m. 86¡, at 1 p.m. 89¡, at McAllister's at 1 p.m. 98¡.

Got up this morning at 1/4 past 4, got Moyer's boat and started for Bristol. I had to pull against the tide but got over there in about 20 minutes. It was delightful as it was before the sun was up, and all nature seemed as if wrapped in quiet slumber. On and on, some bird would utter its sweet notes as if in praise of the glorious sun which was just emerging from the distant hills. As it rose it caused the ripples of the river to sparkle like so many diamonds. It was beautiful, and I felt rejoiced that I had gotten up from my bed to gaze upon the beauties around me.

I left Bristol about 10 minutes past 5, and got over to Burlington in 10 minutes. I made my boat fast and went up home, redressed and took breakfast, for which I had a good appetite after the morning's exertions. Left Burlington as usual for the City.

30 July 1843. After a nap, I got up, put on my coat, &c., and went over to Mrs. Nesbit's. After a few minutes conversation with the young ladies, they went up to prepare for Church. Hugh and I went out into the Garden, and fell to work at the pears. Remained there lounging about until about 5 o'clock when it commenced raining and we went into the house. In a few minutes took our umbrellas and went over to the Church to take the ladies home.

31 July 1843. After supper took little Charlie Ellis(96) & Charlie Burr over to the Island in the boat and went for a swim. After-wards came home, went into Mrs. Sterling's and had a dance.

AUGUST

2 August 1843. After supper went down and got my boat and rowed around to the opposite bank where I let my boat lay, while I watched the progress of the sun as it sank below the horizon. The scene was really superb. After watching about 15 minutes, Lydia and the two Misses Mitchell came down, she having invited them in the afternoon. After getting them safely in and seated, pushed off, and rowed several times up and down the bank. Remained on the water until about 1/2 past 8, when a heavy cloud obscured the sight of the moon, which had been shining in all her grandeur, and we concluded to land.

There was one little incident which marred my pleasure, as well as the ladies, and that was their dresses getting wet from water that came through the boat after we started. I am in hopes they will not take cold of the wetting. After taking the boat to its moorings, went up home where I remained for a while. Then I went down to see the excursion boat, New Philadelphia, come up. But after waiting until about 1/4 past 10 went up home with the conclusion that she would not be up.

3 August 1843. In coming down the river this morning met the tow boat towing the Steamer New Philadelphia up to Bordentown. She had broken her shaft at 5 mile point, while coming up with the excursion passengers, which was the cause she did not arrive at Burlington as expected. It must have been a sore disappointment to Mitchell the Confectioner, as he had provided a large quantity of ice cream, cakes, &c., for the passengers. Since they did not arrive, was rather a dead loss.

Was at the office until 4 p.m., when I left for Burlington in an extra train of cars, provided in the stead of the New Philadelphia. Arrived in one hour and five minutes from the time we left Walnut Street ferry wharf, including a stoppage of 5 minutes at Camden, 5 minutes at the Rancocas, and a detention in having to run slow on account of meeting a locomotive which had to run backwards until she came to a turn-out.

After supper went down and got my boat, rowed around to the banks and took Lydia and Emma Erwin in. Then rowed down a considerable distance, being in company of Theodore Mitchell(97) the greater part of the time, who had his two sisters and two younger brothers in a boat with him. Upon returning to the bank the girls were a little frightened by the boat tossing a great deal in the swell of the steamer Trenton which went down to the City to take the New York Bay passengers down. After the steamer passed, Mitchell and I, thinking the night was so beautiful, concluded to go over to Bristol, which we accomplished in a short time as the tide was running up. Upon arriving there landed, took a walk up through the town and returned to our boats, and then started for Burlington. Found it rather more difficult going back on account of going against the tide. Arrived at the banks again about 1/4 past 9, landed the ladies, and then put our boats away. I went home, changed my dress a little, called for Mitchell and we both went up to the creek and took a bath. The water was rather cool. Afterwards went home.

4 August 1843. After supper went down, got my boat and took Mr. Ellis, his son Charles and daughter May(98) and Charles Burr out with me. We were back by quarter past 8. I went home, remained there a few minutes, and then accompanied Lydia around to see Miss Wetherill. She is rather a strange kind of girl, though pleasant and lively. Met there Miss Kidd and Mrs. Mitchell.

5 August 1843. Today was very unpleasant. It commenced raining(99) about 7 or 8 o'clock this morning and continued almost without intermission throughout the day and in the evening until about 9 o'clock. In Philadelphia from 7 until after 9 p.m. the storm raged tremendously, tearing off the roofs of houses, uprooting 30 trees, tearing down awnings, &c., while the rain which poured in perfect torrents deluged everything. The streets were two or three feet deep in water, and the cellars in different parts of the City were filled. The basement stores at the N.W. corner of 4th and Market Streets suffered materially, being filled with water which damaged all the goods. A number of the bridges in the vicinity of the City were carried away. Much damage was done and lives lost when small houses on the banks of neighboring creeks were carried away. The storm is supposed to be far more destructive than the one of July 1, 1842. In Burlington we had none of these disastrous effects, nothing more than a tremendous hard rain.

6 August 1843. After taking dinner (which I enjoy of a Sunday, having no regular one through the week), took a nap.

After Church walked home with Miss Caroline and Miss Virginia Mitchell. They are both very pretty and fine ladies. While taking tea, Nesbit stopped around for me and we took a stroll down on the banks. Met Mitchell down there. The night was very fine and moonlit. Nesbit and I concluded to get the boat and go over to Bristol. Mitchell did not wish to go. The boat was aground but we got her off with little difficulty, and rowed over. After being there a while, and looking around, the steamer Trenton came up much to the joy of the persons of Bristol and Burlington, as she was supposed to have been lost in the storm of yesterday.

When we were about to start for Burlington, Mr. Kinsey of the Hotel introduced a Dr. Pierce of Philadelphia to us, and asked the favor of carrying him across, as he wished to go down in the cars. We did, and in time.

7 August 1843. Went up to the office and remained there until the time of leaving in the afternoon, with the exception of about an hour occupied in going up to see Pa at his office at 301 Arch Street. He has had it open a week today in that place.

Stopped in to see Mr. Wright, had a chat with him and remained there until 9 o'clock when they shut up the store. He and I went down to the boat, found she was then afloat. We both got in, pushed off, and went down the river for about a mile and a quarter. We came up again as far as the town wharf and rowed about waiting for the excursion boat Bolivar to come up. She came in sight about 1/2 past 10. We put the boat up, and came around to see her land her passengers, a very rowdy set. The men appeared to be generally half drunk, and the ladies gave not much pretentions to respectability. The band came ashore and played a few pieces. They returned to the boat then and in a few minutes when the bell rang the passengers went on board. They left about 1/2 past 11.

9 August 1843. Rained through the day and towards evening cleared off beautifully. After supper went down to get my boat out and take a row. But, after making several unsuccessful attempts to get her off the mud, and after falling off the dock twice, once backwards and once on my feet, I gave it up. I was pretty well covered with mud, about the posterior anyhow. Afterwards went home, changed my dress and went over with Lydia to Miss Nesbit's and spent the evening.

10 August 1843. Left Burlington this morning in a train of cars provided to convey the passengers to the City, on account of the Trenton having to go down to bring the excursion passengers up from town. Left Burlington at 20 m. of 8 and arrived at Camden at about 1/4 of 9, where we took the ferry to cross to the City. But, when we got halfway through the canal, she got aground and we were detained about half an hour. We got off by means of a number of the passengers getting into another boat which came to our assistance so as to lighten her.

At the office through the day and until about 7 p.m. when I went over, got my coffee, and then took a walk down to see the Misses Coates. Found Sarah in. Remained chatting with her until about 1/2 past 9, when she proposed to go around to Miss Craycroft's for her sister Lydia, which I acceded to.

About 1/4 past 11, sauntered up to the corner of Catherine and 2nd Streets where I promised to meet Mr. William H. Bird at half past 11, to go home with him and sleep.

11 August 1843. Got up this morning about 1/4 past 7, dressed and went down stairs. In a short time had family worship which was conducted by the Reverend Mr. Aaron, who made a very beautiful and affecting prayer. After this was over took breakfast.

Left this evening at 5 for Burlington. After supper went down to get the boat but found the oars had been taken away from their usual place. No one knew anything of them. Suspecting something wrong, went up to see Mr. Moyer. The first question he put to me was: Had I not left his boat unlocked? I told him I had not. It appears that he found her in the possession of a number of boys paddling about in the dock. How they got her loose I cannot tell. After having a few words of explanation he told me where to find the oars, and I then got the boat, rowed about a little. Returned and took Miss Susan Coates and Mr. Miller in, and rowed down as far as the

Bishop's and then came back. It was too damp to remain on the water. After seeing Miss Coates home, went up Main Street as far as the Post Office where I met Mr. James Sterling. Took a stroll about town, and then down along the bank as far as the Bishop's. Remained talking for about 1/2 an hour, and then we went up to the wharf to wait for the excursion boat, the Bolivar, to come up. She arrived about 11, and brought up another rowdy party. They had several fights &c. &c.

12 August 1843. I went to the Navy Yard to see the Raritan previous to her departure for Norfolk, and the Steamer Princeton before she is launched. I could not get on board the Raritan as she is anchored out in the stream. But I went through the Princeton and found her to be a very beautiful vessel, and as far as I could judge, nearly ready for launching. At present it is my intention to be launched on board of her, as Captain Ingles has kindly said he would put me on her.

After supper went down with Nesbit to get my boat to go over to swim. Found, to my surprise, that they had hired her out. I was very much displeased and think if they try that game over again will give the boat up altogether. Finding we could not get this boat, went up and hired VanSciver's little white skiff, and rowed out to the Island, took a bath, and rowed over to Bristol afterwards.

14 August 1843. Left Burlington this morning as usual and arrived in the City about 9 o'clock. We had an unusual number of passengers on board, about 500, the principal part of which were ladies.

When I got up this morning felt very unwell but thought coming to the City might make me feel better. Shortly after arriving in the City was taken with vomiting which rendered me fit for not doing anything through the rest of the day.

15 August 1843. Not feeling entirely recovered from the attack of yesterday, and the medicine I took not having finished its operation, I concluded to stay up today so that I might take a little recreation. At about 9 o'clock a.m. I was feeling much better so I got my fishing line and went down to London Bridge to fish. Did not succeed in catching any and returned home, but started out again in a few minutes and went up to the Railroad Bridge to try fishing there. Met with the same result. Edward, Ken and Michael Nesbit were with me on my last tramp.

Returned home about 12 N, got dinner, and took a nap until 1/4 past 3 p.m., when little Mike Nesbit and Ken called for me to go down to the river to fish. After trying for an hour or more gave it up as a bad job. While on wharf, Harvey Stuart came down on me rather unexpectedly, he having come up from the City to spend the afternoon. Strolled about with him until the Bolivar left, which was about 1/4 of 6.

Went home, got tea, after which went down and got my boat, and took her around the wharves waiting for Nesbit. He did not come down, so I rowed very leisurely down along the bank as far as "sunset tree" where I was hailed by a number of ladies setting on the bench around the trees. I immediately pulled in thinking I was going to have a fine party with the ladies, but to the astonishment of both sides, I found the ladies were laboring under a mistake, and had called me thinking it was another person. They made every apology, and I told them it made no difference, &c., and so we parted.

16 August 1843. Accompanied by Kenneth Jewell for home. We were detained in Camden about half an hour on account of some of the brakes becoming so tight that the wheels would not move.

17 August 1843. After breakfast this morning I took my gun, Ken accompanying me, and went out to see what execution I could do among the reed birds. I had noticed a great number of them in the neighborhood of where I was fishing the other day. But I found there was a gunner there before me who had frightened them pretty much away. With my gun being out of repair, I soon gave up the idea of shooting. I therefore left for home about 9 o'clock, though not without killing some 10 or a dozen birds.

Today was a great and gay one for the quiet City of Burlington. It was the day on which the farmers and people of the surrounding county celebrate their annual Harvest Home. Early in the morning the people began to pour in from all quarters, some in stages, some in wagons, others on foot, or by the steamboats, all appearing, to judge from the countenances and holiday attire, to have something in their minds calculated to please. At about 12 N a procession was formed of carriages, horsemen, and people on foot, headed by the Mount Holly Band and one from Philadelphia. They proceeded to the place appointed for the meeting, which is delightfully situated in a pleasant piece of woods about half or three quarters of a mile from the town, commonly known as "Kinsey's Woods."

The exercises were commenced by rather a hard looking customer using very bad English and looking as if it had not been long since he had put away several "brandy rovers." He sang several songs, which were repeated at intervals by a number of other singers through the afternoon. There were several fine addresses delivered, and some fine music. I did not know the names of the speakers, except one and that was Dr. Henry Gibbons, formerly of Philadelphia.

About half past 1 p.m. they had a dinner served at the rate of 25 cents apiece. Judging from a glance at the table it was very poor, but 2 or 300 hungry Jersey men made everything fly before them when they got fairly down to it. When they left, not much was to be seen on the table although the fare was very coarse. It was such as I would not care about sitting down to when I could get the dinner I sit down to at home. There must have been 3 or 4000 people on the Ground, and perhaps 500 horses and vehicles in the vicinity. They left about 5 p.m., forming a procession and marching in, in the order they came out. All seemed to be pleased with the celebration. It passed off quietly, being on the temperance principle, contrasting greatly with the way they formerly celebrated their Harvest Homes, when drinking, fighting, &c., was the order of the day. So much for temperance reform.

After dinner went out to the Ground again and remained there until the company left for town. Met the Misses Coates and their company and took a stroll with them out to the mill where we all got weighed, my weight being 128 pounds, 7 pounds less than formerly. After returning home from the meeting went down to see the New Philadelphia come up and also see Ken off. He went down in the Trenton.

19 August 1843. At the office through the morning and in the afternoon until 1/2 past 3 when I left accompanied by Dick Christiani for the Steamer Trenton. Dick intends remaining until Monday.

While waiting for the boat to start, I witnessed rather a horrid sight. It was seeing a black man who had drowned on the night previous. The first I saw of him was one leg sticking up from the water. Some of the porters were grappling for him and had gotten a rope around the leg. The scene was revolting in the extreme. His limbs were drawn up, especially his arms which appeared as if he had been holding on to something, as they were raised above his head. His face appeared to be much disfigured or torn, I suppose, by the grappling irons.

Went home and got supper, then came down, got the boat and went out to the Island. While we were over there Mitchell, his younger brothers and Nesbit came in separate boats. Mitchell took his boat, with myself in it, out into deep water, where we enjoyed ourselves much more than in shallow.

21 August 1843. In the evening at home employed in taking down our old parlor blinds and putting up new ones which we got today.

22 August 1843. There were numerous conjectures prior to our leaving Burlington this morning concerning the steamer Bolivar as she had not made her appearance. Upon arriving near the City found that she was sunk and lying on the upper end of Smith's Island. It appears that as she was "rounding to" for the purpose of landing her passengers last evening, she was run into by the steamboat Kingston. The planks on her larboard bow were so mangled that it was found necessary to run her on the bar, in order to prevent her sinking in deep water. If they had not done so, no doubt it would have proved fatal to a number, if not all of her passengers, about 200 in number. They were, of course, exceedingly terrified, but no person was injured, a fact which may be attributed to the great presence of mind of Captain Whilldin, Jr. The passengers were all taken off by ferry boats from Camden.

23 August 1843. Noticed coming down this morning that they had succeeded in raising the Bolivar and had towed her up to a shipyard in Kensington for repairs, which it is supposed will be completed in a day or two.

24 August 1843. After supper, I took my gun, and went down by "London bridge" for the purpose of shooting some reed birds. But, as it was rather late, succeeded in killing but two, neither of which I could find.

25 August 1843. About half past 7 left the store, and walked up to Dick Christiani's house on Walnut above 8th. His sister then accompanied me to the Missees Leeds. Got there about 1/4 past 8. Found them both in, smiling and looking as pretty as ever. Remained there until about 11, passing a delightful evening, as the Misses Leeds are very agreeable and pleasing in their manners. I must say though, if they did not flatter so much, which is always disagreeable to me, their company would be much pleasanter.

27 August 1843. After breakfast Stewart and I took a walk down to the River to see the New Philadelphia come in. Then walked down along the banks as far as "sunset tree" where we remained until near church time, when we came up home. In a short time went down to church with Ma, Pa and Lydia. Mr. Germain preached, but it was hard to tell what he was preaching about. It was one of the most insipid sermons I have heard for a long time. The congregation appeared to be generally paying no attention, or else they were napping.

After church walked home with Miss Helen Nesbit, and then went home myself and got dinner. After dinner Stewart and myself went out to get a horse and vehicle for the purpose of taking a ride out to Mount Holly, but could not succeed in obtaining one as they were all hired out. We then gave up the idea and went down on the banks and remained there until church time. Went up to church. Mr. Lyons preached. After church went up to see if we could get a horse, as we thought we would go out to Mount Holly after supper, but were again unsuccessful. After supper took a walk on the banks, and returned to the house about 8, and spent the rest of the evening sitting on the steps and talking.

29 August 1843. Left Burlington this morning as usual, and arrived in the City about 20 m. past 9, half an hour later than we should have been down, as the tide was not in our favor. The delay was caused by one of the buckets of the larboard wheel becoming loose, and we had to stop the boat for about half an hour. The accident happened opposite "Risden's" [Ferry]. The whole of the family came down this morning, including Flora and L.

After supper took my gun and walked down Broad Street to see if I could shoot some birds, but was unsuccessful. It was rather late in the evening, so I returned home, put my gun away and then took a stroll down along by the River, enjoying a fine Cigar which Stewart gave me a few nights since.

30 August 1843. After supper went up stairs and dressed myself. Ma had informed me we were all invited to Mrs. Sterling's this evening, as Miss Ellis from Freehold and Dr. and Mrs. Ellis were to be there. We were prevented from going in until near quarter past 8 on account of Mrs. Reiford coming here. We repeatedly told her we were invited to spend the evening with Mrs. S. but she persisted in staying until we all got out of patience and left her with Pa. It was much more courtesy than she deserved after what had been told her.

This evening was the first time I ever met Miss Ellis. She is very agreeable and rather pretty, though not very loquacious. We had about 10 o'clock a very fine assortment of the fruits of the season set before us on a table to which I did ample justice.

31 August 1843. Went home and got an early tea so that we might go out boating before dark. I went down to get the boat immediately after supper, but found her half full of water which caused much labor before I could get it out. When it was out, it left the boat in such a damp condition that she was not fit for the ladies. I however took Louisa Wood and Lydia out for a short time. Miss Ellis from Freehold was to have accompanied us, but she was too unwell, having been taken sick since last evening.

SEPTEMBER

1 September 1843. The heat today was very oppressive, as much so as any day through the past summer, with the exception of the memorable hot Sunday. Towards evening it got much cooler and by 8 p.m. it was so cool found it necessary to shut the windows. With this day commenced another season. The summer has rolled away with its many pleasures, and we have entered again on the Fall months, and now have our faces turned towards winter, cold, stern winter.

The past summer has been one of pleasure to many. Never have the watering places been so densely thronged. Cape Island was crowded through the whole of the season with visitors all anxious to gain a little recreation apart from the hot atmosphere of our City. The proprietors of the various hotels must have reaped a rich harvest. Many persons who were there were obliged at night to ride some three, four or five miles to sleep while others were stowed away in close sleeping apartments that we thought at home unfit for use. But so the fashionable world goes and they that go into this world must put up with it. I for my part have enjoyed the summer months very much by taking my daily trips up and down from Burlington, bringing new faces to my notice which at once renders the trip pleasant, without speaking of the fine air, scenery, &c., to be enjoyed.

I have postponed the time of taking my summer recreation until now thinking that waiting for cool weather would be far preferable for being in the country than in the hot months of July and August when it is too hot to gun, fish, or any other amusement. I shall leave the office today to be absent some two or three weeks and anticipate great pleasure in gunning, fishing, boating, &c., during the time.

At home during the whole of this evening. Mr. Jacob Thomas came to see us this afternoon and will remain until morning. Mr. Jacob Ellis and his wife spent the evening with us.

Got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

2 September 1843. Clear and extremely warm all day with the wind from the S.W. Left Burlington this morning as usual and arrived in the City about 9 o'clock. Went up to the office, finished a deed. Remained there until 2 p.m. Then I left in the boat for Burlington. Arrived at 1/4 of 4. Went home, changed my dress, prepared some articles to bring to town with me, got something to eat and then returned to the wharf to wait for the steamer to return. At 6 o'clock she came down and I went on board. The number of passengers was very few, but the trip down was decidedly the pleasantest I have had this season. It was at that hour in the evening when all nature seems hushed, as if retiring into slumber, to be awakened by the influence of the glorious luminary, when he breaks, as it were, from his dewy sleep far down below the distant horizon. The moon too added her gentle influence to our pleasure, by silvering the gentle waters of the Delaware, as we glided gracefully through its placid bosom.

Arrived at the wharf about 20 minutes of 8, passing the Bolivar opposite Bridesburg, she having started 55 minutes before us.

Upon my arrival, I immediately went down to William Hanley, with whom I had promised to stay until Monday. Got tea, and then went out with him in search of a fishing line. After tramping about for a considerable time, gave up the idea of getting one until Monday, as he could not get the kind to suit him. Then continued our walk down 2nd Street as far as Queen. I wished to go down to the Misses Coates, but he would not go as he suffered some insult some time ago. I went down for about half an hour while he waited for me.

3 September 1843. Clear and exceedingly warm all day, so warm that it made it very unpleasant to go outside the house. In the latter part of the afternoon clouded over, and thundered and lightninged a little but did not rain in the City proper, though I believe they had some in the southern suburbs.

Got up at 7 a.m. and after breakfast went up with Bill to the other store and remained there until about half past 9. Then left and went up to Grace Church to hear Mr. Suddards. He delivered a very fine sermon. Text from the 7th Chapter of St. Matthew, the 1st and 2nd verses. After Church went down to the store again, where I remained with Bill until it was time to go down to dinner. After dinner laid down and took a nap until about 3 o'clock. Then we went up to St. Luke's Church,(100) and heard Mr. Spear.(101) After church went home by way of Chestnut Street. Stopped at the office a few minutes, then went down and got supper. In the evening went down to Miss Craycroft's with Hanley. Met Miss Sally Martin, and Messrs. Way, Lewis, Ares, Woodward and Wilson there.

4 September 1843. Went out with Bill for the purpose of purchasing a fishing line. We went up to Pa's office where we remained about an hour and a half, then strolled down to Walnut Street wharf, but finding it so exceedingly warm concluded we would go home. Remained there until about half past 10. Spent the day until dinner ready in reading. After dinner went upstairs to take a nap, but did not get out of our room until 6, having slept until 5. It was our intention to go up to Burlington at 2, but Mrs. Hanley and the girls prevailed upon us to stay, as they would give a small company this evening. It is now with pleasure that I have it to record, that I acceded to their persuasions, as I was introduced to three very pretty young ladies, two of which were particularly fascinating. Their names were Miss Buchey,(102) Miss Randall and Miss Levering, the two latter of which were the ones with which I was so much pleased. I would give a description of the charms of these two young ladies, but a description of their beauties would far supersede the powers of my pen and the limits of these sketches of everyday affairs. About 10 o'clock sat down to a table filled with all the choice fruits of the season, which were attended to in due style by the guests. They began to leave about half past 10, and I accompanied Miss Levering home.

5 September 1843. Hanley and myself went down to the Walnut Street wharf and took passage on board the New Philadelphia for Burlington. The number of passengers was few, but the trip up was delightful. Arrived in Burlington at 1/2 past 8, went up home, changed our dress, and then went down to the river and got our boat. Rowed out to the bar and fished until 1/4 past 12 p.m. (then having about 2 1/2 dozen), then went home and got dinner, after which laid down and took a short nap. At about 1/2 past 2, went out again on the bar to fish but could catch nothing, which made us give up the idea of trying any more that afternoon. We concluded to row over to the island and rest in the shade. After becoming rested, undressed, put our clothes in the boat, and then rowed out into deep water, anchored the boat and enjoyed a fine swim. Came home about 5 p.m., dressed and then got supper.

In the evening took a stroll to see the New Philadelphia start for the City. She had come up in the afternoon on an excursion. After she started strolled about town for a while, the evening becoming clear and moonlit.

6 September 1843. Got our boat and rowed out on the bar to fish but did not catch anything until near 1/2 past 10, when they began to bite quite fast. We fished from that time until 1/4 past 12 p.m. (taking 3 1/2 dozen) when it came on to rain and we were obliged to put in, though it stopped by the time we arrived at Burlington. The river was very rough this morning, caused by a very strong wind blowing, though it was much more pleasant than fishing yesterday, as it was cool and pleasant. After dinner took a nap until about 1/4 of 3, when I took my gun, and Hanley and myself went down the railroad to see if I could shoot anything. Made out poorly and returned about 5 o'clock p.m.

7 September 1843. Commenced raining this morning about 6 o'clock and continued without intermission until about 4 p.m. when it abated.

Notwithstanding the rain, left Burlington for the City this morning, accompanied by William Hanley, for the purpose of being launched on board the United States steamer Princeton.(103) Arrived in the City about 1/4 of 9, walked down with Hanley as far as his residence, left him there. Then went up to Pa's office for the purpose of informing them that he would not be down, as he had gone to Trenton on business. Remained there until 1/4 past 10, when I went down to Hanley's again, and remained there until about 12 N, when we left for the Navy Yard, Mrs. Hanley having first, through her kindness, prepared for us a dinner.

Upon our arrival at the Navy Yard went into the ship house, and took an outside view of this beautiful vessel. She has been built under the directions of Captain Stockton,(104) a gentleman as distinguished for his naval science as for his liberality. It is said to be a beautiful piece of workmanship, and well adapted to the object for which she is designed. Her armament will consist of six 42 lb. cannonades, and two twelve inch wrought iron guns(105) (Captain Stockton's invention), each capable of throwing balls weighing 214 pounds.

After satisfying ourselves with an outside view, went on board, where we were entertained up to the hour of the launch by some very fine music, discoursed by a band procured for the occasion. At about 1 p.m. the gun was fired which was a signal for the boats in the river to clear the way, and at about 1/4 past 1 p.m. the vessel slid swiftly and gracefully into the water, amid the shouts of the observers, the playing of martial music, and the roar of cannon from the battery on shore. There were on board of her about 200, including a number of officers of the Navy, and a German band.

The rain seemed to have held up, to give us the worst as she went off, for scarcely had we left the ship house ere it poured in torrents while it blew a heavy gale from the N.E. which rendered an umbrella of little or no avail. In a few minutes I was wet to the skin. It was laughable to see how people made for the hatches to gain shelter, though completely drenched before they could get below.

The appearance of the Princeton as she sits in the water is beautiful beyond the power of description. When fully rigged and her armament on board, she will present as formidable, persuasive, and imposing an aspect as well could be desired. There were several steamers out in the River, but with very few persons on board. There were no other vessels or small boats in the stream, all owing to the bad state of the weather. The number of persons congregated around the Navy Yard was very small.

About 15 minutes after she was launched the steamer States Rights came alongside and took us off, though not without getting another ducking before we got on shore, as we had to make our way through the port holes of the vessel on to her wheelhouse and then jump on to the deck of the boat. Upon her leaving the Princeton had a number of cheers exchanged between those on board of the frigate and our boat for Captain Stockton and others.(106) Landed at the Navy Yard and then made the best of our way up to Walnut Street wharf just in time to get on board of the Trenton which we feared we would not be able to do. The trip up was very unpleasant as it rained constantly, and blew very hard. We were obliged to keep to the cabin.

8 September 1843. This morning Hanley and I prepared ourselves for a regular fish down at Dunk's Ferry,(107) by preparing a dinner, &c., to take with us. We left Burlington fully prepared about half past 7, and arrived at the fishing grounds in about an hour. We immediately put the lines out and the fish commenced biting. From that time until 12 N, we took them in as fast as we could put our lines down. A few minutes after 12, went on shore and ate our dinner with great relish, as fishing has a great tendency to give good appetites. After finishing our meal went out on the fishing ground again, and caught them much faster than in the morning, taking sometimes 4 and 5 at a pull. About 1/2 past 2 p.m. they began to quit biting so we concluded we would go home, as we could have the flood tide most of the way up. Arrived home about 4 o'clock. This was the greatest day's fishing I ever had. We caught between us 19 dozen or 114 apiece, all very fine large perch. I caught 1 rock about 8 or 10 inches long, and an eel 18 inches long. We were bothered by catching about 7 eels that tangled our lines and broke the hooks off.

9 September 1843. This morning after breakfast went down to the wharf with my friend William H. Hanley to see him off, though not with much pleasure, as it was my desire he should remain another week. But his attention was required at the store at home, and he was obliged to go. After the boat had started, went up home, changed my dress, got my gun, and came down to the River. I took my boat out for the purpose of trying my luck at shooting. I found great difficulty in rowing my boat, as the wind blew very hard, which caused the River to be very rough. However I succeeded in getting over to the island, though not without shipping some of the swells that came in every direction.

After reaching the island rowed up along the shore, or reeds, for a considerable distance. But finding no birds concluded I would try for a while on the island, but with little better success. There was not a bird to be seen, I suppose on account of the high state of the wind. I succeeded, however, on my return to the boat, in shooting a very large snipe, which was the sum total of my morning's gunning. Got home about 12 N, though not without a severe pull for it, as I had both wind and tide against me.

In the afternoon was out among the reeds on the island for about an hour, but without any success, as the wind was still high.

10 September 1843. So cold today that a fire would have been quite comfortable, though we were unable to have one, not having any coal. After breakfast dressed for the day, and then sat down and wrote my journal, after which commenced a letter to William H. Bird. At half past 10 went down to St. Mary's Church.

11 September 1843.. Mr. James H. Sterling and myself started out this morning, and also Joe our colored boy, on a fishing excursion to Dunk's Ferry. We expected to have good luck as we were so well favored last Friday, but I cannot record that our expectations were realized. We only caught about four dozen, after being out all day. I suppose we must lay our ill luck to the high state of the wind, which blew a perfect gale throughout the day, raising a very heavy swell.

Arrived home again about 6, when we were all invited to Mrs. Sterling's to partake of a fine supper, at which the fish were to be served. I can say we did ample justice to it. About 1/4 past 8 a messenger came in from Dr. Ellis's to partake of some ice cream with them, so in a few minutes we were there and had the ice cream served. In a short time went to dancing and enjoyed ourselves the rest of the evening.

12 September 1843.(108) After breakfast this morning went down with Pa and Ma to the wharf to see them off. After they had started, went down and wiped my boat out, as I wished to take some ladies out rowing with me this morning. Afterward went home and in a few minutes called upon Miss Ellis to see what time it would be convenient for her to go on our proposed boating excursion. After leaving Miss Ellis was obliged to go and put my boat out at the end of the wharf to prevent her being aground at the time I wished to use her, as I did not altogether fancy taking off my shoes and stockings to push her off the mud this cold morning. After getting through with this job, went up home and commenced writing a deed for Pa, which he wished me to complete today. Wrote at it until 1/4 past 10, and then went down and got my boat, and brought her around on the bank and waited until the ladies came down which was near 11 o'clock.

My party was composed of Miss Ellis, Miss Clara Nesbit and Lydia. After all were seated, it was proposed by one of the ladies, I believe Miss Nesbit, that we should go to Bristol, as she had never been there. I of course acceded to the proposition, and rowed over there. We had some little difficulty landing, and not without some fright to the ladies, though there was no danger. Upon landing took a walk through the principal streets, and returned to the boat about 12 N. Upon our arriving at Burlington I rowed down along the bank as far as Mrs. Chester's place. On our return, ran onto a wharf log, which occupied some time, and occasioned some difficulty to myself and fright to the ladies before we could get off. I however succeeded in landing my valuable cargo safely, and with the thanks of the ladies for the pleasure they had experienced, we parted, I being under the necessity of taking the boat to the moorings though I can say it would have been a great source of pleasure to have accompanied the ladies up home. Upon putting my boat away went up home and commenced writing at my deed again, which I completed at 1/2 past 2 p.m. After this hour took my gun and then strolled down to the rail road, and around by Mrs. Chester's cottage, to see if I could shoot something, but had to return without anything.

14 September 1843. Today is Ma's 43rd birthday,(109) and in celebration of it, a small company came to supper. The company was composed of Mr. and Mrs. Sterling, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Ellis, Mrs. Dr. Ellis, Miss Elizabeth Ellis from Freehold, and Mrs. Reiford to supper, and Mr. James Sterling after supper. We spent the evening very pleasantly in dancing, in fact it was principally occupied in this amusement, which I think is far the most pleasant one that can be had to pass of an evening.

16 September 1843. After breakfast cleaned my gun and then went down and got my boat for the purpose of trying my luck at gunning. I rowed along the edge of the reeds, and pushed through them until I got down to the mouth of Shamany Creek, about two and a half miles from Burlington. I did not succeed in getting any birds, as I labored under the disadvantage of not having any person to pole for me. Got back to Burlington about half past 12, having sailed up against the tide the greater part of the way with an oar, and several pieces of board stuck up in the bow of the boat as a sail. I had great difficulty in pushing through the reeds and was heartily glad when I got out of them.

17 September 1843. I was employed this morning until 12 o'clock writing an endorsed deed which had to be done in time for Pa to take to the city with him in the morning. About 12 o'clock walked down to the church and saw the people out and then came home.

18 September 1843. Mr. James Hunter Sterling and myself left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock on a fishing excursion to Dunk's Ferry. We were obliged to row against tide, and the fog on the river was so dense that we could not distinguish the other shore. It reminded me of the ocean.

After arriving at the Ferry fished until about 1/2 past 12 p.m., when we went on shore and had our dinner, setting our table on the top of a large hogshead, which answered every purpose of the center table of the parlor. After finishing our repast went out again and fished until about 1/4 of 2. When a sloop came along, we thought we would have a fine opportunity of having a tow, and so made fast to her. Her progress was very slow, not as fast as we could row. However, we kept hold until we had cleaned our fish, or so many as we wanted. Then being nearly opposite the lower end of the banks, we let go and rowed the rest of the distance.

I expect this day's fishing will be my last for a year to come, as I have concluded to go down tomorrow, which will commence my regular daily trips to the City and to business. I now feel anxious to get to, as one soon becomes tired of the idle life. We caught today 7 dozen fish. In the evening at home reading the papers, and lolling about on the steps.

19 September 1843. I commenced my regular daily trips to the City again today, having had my summer enjoyments, and becoming tired of an idle life. It is a strange matter how soon one becomes anxious to get to business, after living an idle life for some few weeks, and while at business watching every opportunity to get from it.

20 September 1843. Went up to the office and remained there until 1/2 past 10, when I went up to Pa's office to see him. While there he asked me the favor of getting two sets of leases out, which detained me from the office until 12 N.

21 September 1843. There was quite a large number of ladies on board this morning, among whom were the Misses Virginia and Caroline Mitchell and Miss Kidd, with whom I had a little chat upon the passage down. Upon our arrival at the wharf had the pleasure of escorting them ashore and of accompanying them as far as their father's store in Chestnut Street above Front. They came down for the purpose of attending the Horticultural Exhibition which is now open. At 5 p.m. left for Burlington. In the evening went around to see Jim Sterling,(110) and at about 8 o'clock we went out together and took a little stroll about town, taking some ice cream at Mitchell's by way of variety.

22 September 1843. Got back to the office a little before 2, but soon left again, and went up and bought myself a tweed coat. Then went around to Pa's office. Remained there about half an hour, and then went down to the Horticultural Exhibition, Mr. Elliott having presented me with a ticket.

The display of flowers, fruits and vegetables is very beautiful, I think more tastefully arranged than on any other exhibition. There are a number of summer houses, arbors, and miniature cottages, all of which are beautiful in the extreme, and well calculated to please the fair ones who have an opportunity of seating themselves on several of these fancy retreats. There is one arbor, or summer house, in the center of the room that is particularly attractive and must of caused great labor to complete. The fountain also adds materially to the beauty of the scene as it throws forth its crystal jets, while throughout the room its effects are felt by the cool and delightful atmosphere. The number of visitors present when I first went in was very few, but before I left the room was crowded with many fair faces all seeming anxious to catch a glance at the various fruits, &c., displayed.

23 September 1843. At 2 o'clock I went on an errand about some hats at Schuylkill, 3rd and Callowhill Streets. I was pretty well tired by the time I got back to the office as the walk was very warm. Left the office at 1/4 past 4, and went to the Walnut Street ferry and crossed, thinking it would afford me an opportunity to see the Indian race before the cars started for Burlington. The Indians came out about half past four in two small boats (not canoes) and started the race, but it was managed in miserable style. Numberless boats interrupted their progress, and the Indians did not appear to exert themselves in the least. Several common rowboats beat them. There was a great many spectators on the wharves, while the river was crowded with all kinds of sail and row boats.

24 September 1843. Went to St. Mary's Church this morning and heard Mr. Lyons preach. We occupied the new pew we were provided with for the first time today. After church walked home with Miss Helen Nesbit.

25 September 1843. I was on board the barque Anna Reynolds for a few minutes this afternoon. She is the vessel I went to Boston on in the summer of 1842. Of all the crew that was on board of her then, there remains but one, and he is the steward. The captain has sold his share of the vessel and gone to keeping store in Boston.

28 September 1843. There was a very heavy frost this morning, the first of the season. So cold I was obliged to wear my cloak down this morning and up in the evening. The trip down was very cold, and made the passengers stick pretty close to the cabin, where there was a good fire.

30 September 1843. About 3 p.m. I left and went up to Pa's office for the purpose of getting my new hat that had been left there for me. Remained there fifteen or twenty minutes and then went down and got my boots. From there went to the office again. After supper went around to see James Sterling, took a stroll with him and returned to his store. Remained talking for a while when Theodore Mitchell came along and we all walked as far as the River, and then up to the "Temperance House" where we heard some good music.

OCTOBER

"Has it come, the time to fade?

And with a murmuring sigh

The maple, in his motley robe

Was the first to make reply

And the queenly dahlias drooped

Upon their thrones of state,

For the frost king with his baneful kiss

Had well forestalled their fate."

4 October 1843. At the office through the day and until about 6 p.m. when I left and went up to the Franklin House and got my supper. Afterwards returned as far as the office, where I met Dick Christiani, and he and I took a stroll together, and then went down to his house where I met Miss Mary Nutly and his sister. Miss N. looked remarkably pretty and fascinating this evening, and was very pleasant and pleasing in her manners, which made me like her far more than usual. Her step-brother Courtland Howell came in about half past 8, and was soon followed by my old acquaintance John Weeks, who has been living in Mobile for the last two years. I had not seen him for the last three or four years. He is much improved in his appearance, and I should not have known him if I had not been introduced. Passed the evening very pleasantly in playing cards, playing, singing, &c.

6 October 1843. Went over to Mr. Haven's to see him concerning a fishing excursion which we intend taking tomorrow, but he was not in.

7 October 1843. I got up this morning at 1/4 of 6, dressed and went down and put the boat off at the end of the wharf, to prevent her from being aground if we wished to use her. It is our intention to go a-fishing, but had small hopes of going as it was raining hard. However, thought it might clear before the boat started, and would be on the safe side.

Left Burlington as usual this morning, no change being visible in the weather, and arrived in the City by 25 minutes past 9. Went up to the office and remained there until 1/4 of 2 p.m., when I left and went down on board of the Trenton for Burlington. Left at 2 p.m. and arrived there by 12 past 3. Upon passing the wharf, where I had put the boat this morning, noticed that she had been swamped, and upon landing I went immediately to work to bail the boat out and put her in the place she belonged. It was no small job, but after a little perseverance accomplished my object, after which went up to see Mr. Haven about the key of the boat.

8 October 1843. The rain came down this morning as incessantly as I ever saw it; it seemed almost to come down by buckets full. In the afternoon about 3 p.m. it ceased raining, and by 6 p.m. was as clear as could be, and throughout the evening clear and moonlit.

At St. Mary's Church this morning. Bishop Doane preached and a minister was ordained. Immediately afterward the Bishop desired a meeting of the vestry on Tuesday next, that he might offer his resignation as rector of St. Mary's Church. This announcement caused a great sensation among a certain number of the ladies, and they gave vent to their feelings by frequent sobs, though for my part it makes but little difference whether he remains or not, as I do not altogether like his preaching or eccentric ways.

After church went home and took dinner, and by the time I had finished had made up my mind, which I had changed a dozen times on account of the inclemency of the weather, to go to the City to see my friend Dick Christiani off in the morning. I do not think I should have gone in all the rain. But as it was I was glad I had gone, as I met with the above happy result in the change of the weather.

Went up to Christiani but he not being in, remained talking with his sister about half an hour, when he made his appearance. In a few minutes he made a proposition to take a walk as far as Chambers Church. Remained there a few minutes, when we concluded to pay a lady a visit in Wood Street below 13th. I do not remember her name, but her beauty I do not forget. After leaving continued our walk up as far as the Misses Leeds. The daughters looked as pretty as usual, though there was a reserve manifested, both by them and their mother which we did not altogether like, and which has not characterized their conduct heretofore, which has been rather the reverse. Perhaps it was more imagination with the girls than anything else, though with the mother I do not think it was so. There have been some unpleasant feelings between Mrs. Leeds, Christiani, Ella and Nulty lately, upon which may be based this cold treatment. I do not think it is altogether right it should be visited on us, as we neither knew nor had anything to do with it.

9 October 1843. Got up this morning at 1/4 of 5, and after dressing and breakfasting went out with Dick to attend to some little matters previous to his starting. Returned to the house about 1/4 past 6, and at half past left again for the boat. At 7 o'clock he started in the Ohio(111) for Baltimore via Wilmington. It is his intention to go to Natchez and be absent two years. The parting between his mother and sister and himself was hard, though to better his circumstances he has concluded to go, being able to get much higher salary than could be procured here in this City. Since his sojourn in this City he has been very attentive and kind to me, particularly since my residence in Burlington, and this kindness will always be felt by me. His company will be missed greatly, as he was my most intimate friend and associate for the last year, and now I feel a great reluctance in parting, but I hope this change may be for the better, and that he may return in health and considerably bettered by the change.

After seeing Dick off tended to some little affairs and then went down to see Hanley. After remaining there a short time he gave me an invitation to remain in town with him this evening to attend a little company he was to have this evening. I gladly accepted his invitation as he informed me that several young ladies are to be there who are particular favorites of mine.

Walked down with Bill as far as the lower store where we parted, and I went up to the office by way of 2nd Street. On my way up met Miss A. Stewart, whom I have not seen for a long while. Went down to Hanley's to supper. Miss Buchey was there to tea, but all of the rest of the company came afterwards. Their names were the Misses Levering, Buchey, Randall, Rue, Msdms. Buchey and Pointe,(112) and Messrs. Levering, Randall, Mirken, Milliken and Weatherly. The young ladies looked particularly charming, and it was a difficult matter to make a selection in regard to beauty between the Misses Levering, Randall and Buchey, though I think the former was a little the prettiest, but as I said before it was hard to decide.

We had several cotillions and the Virginia Reel, in which we enjoyed ourselves exceedingly, particularly as the ladies were such great favorites. They had also several games, which I must say, I did not relish much as they were entirely too childish, and ought to be done away with, and left to those 4 and 5 years of age. As it was, speaking for myself, I spent a very pleasant evening, and could not have enjoyed myself more. They began to leave about 1/2 past 11. I had the pleasure of accompanying Miss Randall home, found her very agreeable and pleasant, much more than I expected. I had for company home Milliken and Hanley.

10 October 1843. Clear and very pleasant through the day and evening. I do not think we ever had a more delightful day for an election,(113) the voters turned out in full force, and everything seemed to go on amicably.

Went down to Mr. Hanley's to supper. Just as I was sitting down to supper Miss Randall came in, but she wished to be off again immediately as it was near dark. We persuaded her to stay to tea, and after which I had the pleasure of accompanying her home, which afforded me no small pleasure as she is both pretty and pleasing in her manners. Upon arriving at her residence bade her good evening and left, though not without a pressing invitation to come in.

Went down to Hanley's at 7th and Lombard Streets where I met Samuel Milliken. We waited for some time for Mr. Hanley, but becoming tired, Sam and I concluded we would go down after him. Found there some little company, namely, Mr. & Mrs. Moss and Miss Jane Clark. Remained but a few minutes and went up Lombard Street and met Bill coming down. We then took a stroll down 2nd Street to the Southwark election Grounds, finding all quiet down there. On Walnut we got to playing a little. Sam took my cap and ran off with it. I had the great pleasure of walking from 7th and Washington Square to 2nd and Chestnut without a hat. I succeeded in getting another one at the office.

In the evening out with Jim Sterling. We called on Messrs. Hall and Woolman and others to make arrangements to go up to Springfield to see some ladies tomorrow evening.

12 October 1843. This morning there was a very dense fog; you could not discern objects a very short distance in front of you. I got ready to go to the City and went down to the wharf for the purpose of going but as the boat did not get down until near 9 o'clock on account of the fog, I concluded not to go down, as I intended coming up at 2 again for the purpose of going on our proposed trip to Springfield. After the boat started I went home and got some fishing line and some worms, got Moyer's boat and went out on the bar to try my luck at fishing. Made out very poorly as I was not so much favored as to get a bite.

After rowing around for a while I returned home and commenced dressing. Sterling and myself intended starting on our trip at 2 p.m. Was dressed by dinner time, and after dining went around for Sterling. We then went up to Pool's and got our horse and vehicle. Left Burlington at 1/4 past 2 p.m. and drove out to Mount Holly by 3 o'clock. The ride was very pleasant, though riding through the sun in an uncovered vehicle it was rather warm.

Upon our arrival in Mount Holly put our horse up at a tavern, and then went out to take a stroll through the town. This was my first visit. We first went out to the cemetery, which is very beautifully situated on the side of the mount from which this beautiful little town takes its name. The arrangement of the cemetery is very neat, resembling in a manner, that is the naming of the paths and the situation of the place, Mount Auburn in the neighborhood of Boston. In the center of this cemetery is a large monument, or obelisk, with some carved gilded work resembling the burning torch on the top. This adds greatly to the beauty of the place. I think in the course of a few years, when some amusements are erected, it will be a far more beautiful place than it now is, though at present it is beautiful.

After leaving the cemetery took a walk around to Mr. Dunn's beautiful residence.(114) I think there is more taste displayed in the erection of this mansion than I have seen for a long while. I would give an extended account of this beautiful place, but my time will not permit it.

We left Mount Holly about 1/4 of 5, and rode over to our place of destination (Grassdale, Springfield, Mr. Earl's place) in about 3/4 of an hour, the distance being about 9 miles. In going over this road we go through a small place called Jobestown, of no great importance, containing about 6 or 8 houses. Upon our arrival at Greendale I was introduced to two of the Misses Earl who were in the parlor at the time of our arrival, viz., Miss Lynda and Miss Hetty. In about 15 minutes after our arrival, our friends Mr. Hall and Mr. Cartoit, arrived. They had started about 4 p.m. and came directly.

We took tea shortly thereafter, at which time I was introduced to Miss Hetty Burling, a fine, noble looking young lady with whom I was much pleased. After supper we all adjourned to the parlor and in a few minutes it was proposed to dance. We all heartily acceded to do so, but there was one object in the way: one lady was wanted because one of the Misses Earl had a very bad tooth ache, which made her unable to come down. However, to remedy all deficiencies, one lady volunteered to become the partner of two gentlemen, which made all matters straight and we got along delightfully. We danced for about 3/4 of an hour, all appearing to enjoy themselves to their heart's content. When we became a little tired, whist was proposed. I took a hand in it, and took Miss Burling for my partner. When we beat them, I gave up my place to Mr. Hall, fearing I might lose my good name as we had 13 to their 5.

While they were still playing the other sister came down, Miss Cornelia Earl, her toothache having become eased. I had quite a chat with her, and found her very pleasant and agreeable. In fact, speaking of the three Misses Earl and Miss Burling, I never came across more sociable and pleasing young ladies in my life. It appeared to me that I had not been there more than an hour when I felt as much at home as if I had known them for a month. A few minutes after Miss Cornelia came down we had another cotillion, which passed off much better than the previous one, as we had the full complement of ladies, and could enter with more spirit into the amusement. This cotillion continued for about 3/4 of an hour, when we sat down and had a sociable chat, until a game entitled "Adjective" was proposed, which was joined in by all the company.

At the witching hour of 12 p.m. we had our horse put to, and began preparations to start to ride our thirteen miles to Burlington, by putting on cloaks, &c., as it had become very cold. After bidding the ladies all farewell we started, it then being 1/4 past 12. The night was magnificent and moonlit, and we arrived home by 5 minutes past 2 a.m. I do not think I ever spent a more pleasant evening in my life. They, one and all, were so agreeable and sociable, so unlike most persons on a first introduction. I was very much pleased with Miss Hetty Earl, as she was very pretty, and to all appearances amicable.

13 October 1843. Lib came back yesterday from the Alms House.

15 October 1843. At St. Mary's Church in the morning. Bishop Doane preached, the ladies having persuaded him not to resign, as he announced last Sunday. After dinner Pa and I started to take a walk of three miles out of town on the Philadelphia road, to look at a farm belonging to Colonel Tucker, which he has put in Pa's hands to dispose of. We found it with very little difficulty, but in going home took another road, which led us through a woods, and we began to despair of finding Burlington, but with due perseverance found it.

17 October 1843. Went up to the office where I remained until about 1/4 of 5 p.m., when I went down to the ferry to see if it was Pa's intention of going up this evening, for if so, I wished to remain in town for the night. Found that he was going up, and then went back to the office where I remained until about 6 o'clock when I went down with Bird to tea, he having kindly invited me to go with him and spend the night. After supper took a stroll up Chestnut and in passing the National Theater,(115) saw that Forrest(116) was going to play Metamora this evening. Thought we would like to see it and went in, as it is one of his best pieces. The first thing that attracted my notice, and astonished me greatly, was to see Dr. Ellis (who has not been in the City for two years) and his wife in the first tier of boxes. I could not believe my own eyes, until I saw them come out after the play was over. There was an excellent house, and Forrest played extremely well.

18 October 1843. In going up this afternoon, I met my old friend Chester B. White from Fredericksburg, whom I have not seen for four years. He was on his way to New York to purchase goods as he has just opened a store in Fredericksburg.

Our black boy, Joe Stratton, left today. He has been with us since July 1st last.

20 October 1843. Clear and very pleasant, rather cool in the morning but as the day advanced, it became quite warm. There was a heavy white frost on the fields this morning, which resembled at a distance a slight fall of snow. Left Burlington as usual; when we were about halfway down, we had quite an incident to occur which I may here relate, among the various others recorded in this book. I had been sitting in the cabin, talking to Mr. Contonil (?) for some time, when I thought I would walk upon deck and take a little of the fresh air, as the morning was delightful. My attention was first attracted by a crowd just forward of the ladies' saloon. Upon repairing to the spot, I found that there was a beautiful young girl, to all appearances not over 19 or 20, in the agonies of a nervous fit. When I reached the spot, she had nearly recovered, and besought the people to disperse, as she had just arrived at a state of consciousness. They of course acceded to her wish, when she soon recovered.

Strolled up to Pa's office where I shall remain for the night, being my first trial to sleep on the sofa.

21 October 1843. I got up this morning feeling much refreshed and after having as good a night's sleep as if I had been at home. Dressed and went down to Naugle's Franklin House, where I got a good breakfast, more than I wanted, for 12 1/2 cents. After eating, sat down and read the paper, and then went down to the office.

Upon going home, found my friend Chester B. White, who I did not expect until this evening. After the usual salutations, he, Hugh Nesbit and I went down to the River, got a Boat and rowed over to Bristol. Ches never had been through the town before, so upon our arrival we took a stroll through the place.

25 October 1843. There was ice made in our yard in Burlington, and also ice in the City yesterday morning, being the first of the season in these parts.

26 October 1843. It was cold, damp and unpleasant coming down, and the deck was cleared from people. We had a specimen of practical Abolition on board this morning at the breakfast table. The sight was enough to raise the anger of any person. To see a white man, sitting at the head of table on board a public boat, with five Negroes sitting with him, and he paying every attention to them, by chatting, handing the dishes, &c. I think if it had been on board a southern boat he would have been thrown over board, which would have served him right for trying to equalize the whites and blacks in this way. But as it was, the passengers let it pass, taking but little notice of him or his dark associates.

27 October 1843. Upon my arrival in the City went up to the office and remained there until about 2 p.m., when I went up to the exhibition of the "Franklin Institute."(117) Looked about for half an hour, and then returned to the office, where I remained until 1/2 past 6 (saving 15 m. occupied in getting my tea). Jim Sterling, from Burlington, called and we strolled up to the Franklin Institute, I having made an engagement this morning to go with him. The displays of articles this season are very large and beautiful, and if one were to examine everything exhibited, would occupy weeks to accomplish. We took a hasty survey of the rooms, and then took up a station where we remained for about an hour, examining the prettiest part of the American manufacture, the ladies. There were a great many, and a fine display, and it would be hard to judge which were the prettiest specimens.

NOVEMBER

1 November 1843. There was considerable ice made last night. I noticed it on the pavements, and Mr. Sterling told me it made the thickness of 2 inches in his yard in a tin basin.

4 November 1843. We did not meet the New Philadelphia as usual this morning, and various surmises were made about what had happened, but we were not relieved of our suspense until we arrived at the upper end of the city where we found her lying at anchor, having broken some part of her machinery. The passengers and baggage had been taken off by a ferry boat and taken to Camden, where they were transferred by Railroad to New York.

6 November 1843. It was so cold I noticed ice in the margin of the river this morning in going down. We were visited on Saturday evening last, about 9 o'clock, with a small sprinkling of snow, the first this season. I kept upon deck all the way down. I think it is much more beneficial to health to remain on deck and breathe the cold bracing atmosphere, than to shut yourself in the cabin below, where there is perhaps 50 or 100 people breathing the same air and with a hot fire in their midst. It is my intention to keep on the deck all this winter, and hope by spring to come out thoroughly hardened to the cold, and much more healthy.

Upon our arrival at the wharf Pa introduced me to Miss Annabella Griffitts, to escort her on shore as he had to wait upon both her mother and Mrs. Sarah Ellis. I was much pleased with this introduction, as I had been wishing it for some time,

and it did me great pleasure to wait upon her, nothing would have given me more pleasure.

Left the office at 1/4 of 5, went down to the ferry boat, and met Miss Wallace and Miss Griffitts again. Pa took Miss Wallace and I Miss Griffitts under our charge. After taking our seats I had an opportunity of judging what kind of lady Miss G. is. We had a seat in one corner of the cars to ourselves, and I found her to be very pleasant and agreeable. She conversed freely, and was not at all reserved in her manners, which made the time pass quickly and agreeably. She is pretty and full of life and animation, and a lady that one soon becomes acquainted with, at least I found it so.

7 November 1843. Today, to all appearances, is what you might call a regular winter one. Through the morning it was cold, raw and unpleasant, and at about 1/2 past 12 N. commenced snowing and continued in good earnest until about 1/2 past 4 p.m. The snow did not lie in the City until the latter part of the afternoon, and then only on the south side of the way. Went home where I remained the rest of the evening reading my Notes on Blackstone's Commentaries.

10 November 1843. Left Burlington this morning as usual and arrived in the City about 1/4 past 9, then went up to see Mr. Charles Ellet(118) at the Mount Vernon House on some business. Did not find him in, but saw his wife whom I have not seen for more than two years. She did not know me at all. After leaving her went up to Mr. Thomas's store, to take a package for Grandma to be sent out to Cincinnati. Then went down to the office where I remained until 6 p.m., expecting to have a Sheriffs' Deed to write for Mr. Elliott. But, as the writ was not brought, could not go on with it. After getting my tea came back to the office and wrote an Assignment of Mortgage by 1/4 of 8. Then went down to Miss Elizabeth Mercer's. She not being in, went down to [the] Misses Coates'. Found them all in, and met Messrs. Esherick, Crothers and Hurst there. Left about 1/4 past 10.

11 November 1843. Took a stroll down to the River to see what it looked like, as it was blowing a perfect hurricane. Found a tremendous heavy swell in the River, and the tide up over Mr. Molina's coal wharf, while it was even with the town wharf, and every minute a swell would make a clear sweep over it. It blew so hard that the ferry boat could make no headway, and was not able to come to the slip, having to land her passengers at the wharf. Upon coming home found Miss Amnabella Griffitts setting in the parlor. It was her first visit; had a little chat with her, and a few minutes after accompanied her home, it being after dark. Evening at home writing Samuel Salter's will.

12 November 1843. After Church went home, got dinner and then went to the wharf to wait for the New Philadelphia to come down. I wished to go to the City in her, and take the will I had written last evening, as I had apprehension that the man would not live until Monday.

I went immediately in pursuit of the executor who, after some difficulty, I found and delivered the Will to him. I was at Grace Church during the latter part of the sermon which was solemn and impressive in the extreme; there were two corpses in the church, and it was a funeral sermon.

After Church went down to see the Executor of the will again.

14 November 1843. Got up to Miss Buchey's about 8 o'clock and stayed until 1/4 of 12. I was very much disappointed this evening and spent it not very pleasantly. I had an invitation for more than a week, and expected they were going to have a party. There were 5 or 6 there. I do not think I will be caught in such a scrape again.

17 November 1843. Left Burlington this morning as usual, but in a short time the fog became so dense that they were obliged to slacken the headway of the boat considerably so she could stop in a short time if they got into shallow water. It is well they did, for we came down on the Bolivar who had lost her way in the fog in the neighborhood of Dunk's Ferry and was heading across the river. When we came down she changed her course, and followed close in our wake most of the way down, while we had all the trouble of heaving the lead, &c.

The New Philadelphia did not venture to start to come up, as the fog was much more dense in the neighborhood of the City than above.

18 November 1843. Left Burlington this morning as usual with every prospect of having a quick passage down as the fog was light, and appeared to be clearing off. But, by the time we arrived at Dunk's Ferry, it became very thick. We could not see the length of the boat ahead, but by heaving the lead and going very slowly, managed to get safely down as far as Risden's Ferry. After numerous efforts we succeeded in coming to the wharf, having concluded to lay there until the fog cleared up a little as it was considered unsafe to run any farther. Remained at the wharf about 20 minutes. Most of the passen-gers went on shore, but at the tap of the bell they came on board again, the fog having cleared considerably.

In a few minutes we were under full headway, but had scarcely proceeded a mile when we came into as dense a mass of fog as ever. In a few minutes the bell was rung for engineer to stop the engine as we were coming hard onto a canal boat which was laying broadside to our bow. If the boat had not been stopped immediately it would have sunk her. As it was, she ran a very narrow chance.

19 November 1843. Left Burlington this morning about 1/4 past nine for Springfield to see the Misses Earl, accompanying Jim Sterling. Arrived up at the Springfield Meetinghouse at about 11. Concluded to go in as we expected to find some of the Earls there, and also a number of the other Springfield ladies from around the County as Lucretia Mott,(119) a distinguished preacher, was to be there. I forgot to mention that Frank Woolman went up with us though in a different vehicle. Upon entering the Meetinghouse found it very full, and to all appearances not another seat to be found. But an old Quaker from the gallery called to us that if we stepped that way we would find seats, and accordingly accepted his proposal, Sterling taking the lead, Woolman following, and I after him. Upon reaching the gallery, Sterling mounted in the second seat among the old Quakers, and Woolman upon the first. I was more lucky and got a seat among the congregation, though on the first seat. I could scarcely suppress a laugh when I saw Sterling and Woolman perched up among these old Quakers, and it caused quite a sensation among his lady acquaintances in the Meeting, as it caused them all some difficulty to abstain from laughing, while poor Sterling had almost to bite his lips off to keep himself in right order where he was exposed to the gaze of the whole congregation. But the best part of the joke was to come afterwards. When it was time for Meeting to break, the old Friend sitting next to Sterling turned around and shook hands with him, as natural as you please, which was the breaking of the Meeting. After Meeting was over we had a hearty laugh over it, taking it as good a joke as had been practiced for a long time.

The sermon delivered by Mrs. Mott was about an hour and a half in duration and very good, though I did not like the way she spoke of the denominations and their creeds. It had a little touch of everything in it, among which were Slavery, Theology of the present day, Capital Punishment, &c.

After our invitation, went over to the Miss Earl's, where I met Miss Hetty Earl and Miss Burling and Mr. Hall, who has been up since yesterday. Miss H. Earl looked remarkably pretty today.

23 November 1843. Went up to the office until 1/4 of 2, when I left and went down to the boat for the purpose of going up to Springfield with Jim Sterling to attend a party given by the Misses Earl. After sitting and chatting for a while we were invited into supper. It was a very fine one and we did ample justice to it. I was very much amused at Mr. Wood at the way he went into the supper, and the different remarks he made. He created much fun throughout the evening with his odd ways, doing, remarks, &c., and was the butt of the whole lady part of the company.

After supper amused ourselves in dancing, playing cards, eating, drinking, &c. until about 1/4 past 1 a.m. when the company began to think about wending their way to their different homes after having spent a most delightful evening. The ladies were all lively and sociable, none of that reserve being manifested which is to be found so much among the City ladies in general. I cannot attempt to give a description of all of the ladies, though I will try and give my opinion in regard to the looks, beauty, &c. of some of them.

I did not admire Miss Mary Black much at first, but as I gradually became more acquainted, the more did she increase in looks in my estimation, and before bidding her good evening thought her quite pretty. She is a very prettily framed girl, and one likely to attract, particularly at first sight. Miss Mary Shreve is rather pretty, but her complexion being so dark it shades her pretty face, though she is so lively, animated and pleasing in her manners. All her imperfections in regard to beauty are soon lost, and you soon become very much pleased, as was the case with myself. Miss Chambers was very pretty and improved the more you saw her. I was not introduced and therefore had not an opportunity of judging whether agreeable or not. She moved with grace in a cotillion, and was a lady well calculated to attract in a room. Miss Burling and Miss Hetty Earl looked remarkably well, particularly Miss Earl. She has a fine eye, pretty face, beautiful form, and a way of talking that would win the esteem of any young man. I think it is now time to desist making any further criticisms of the ladies, as it is not altogether the right thing to be writing about them in their absence.

About 1/2 past 1 a.m. Sterling and I left for Burlington, though not without apprehensions of our safe arrival, as we were favored with a blind horse, though a very fast one, he being the only horse we could hire. Jim drove and after a pretty heavy tug for it, arrived safely at Burlington about 1/2 past 3. Drove around to the stables and put the horse up. We had the great pleasure of doing it in the midst of a shower of rain, which commenced about an hour before. After putting the horse up we went home, and upon sundry rattlings of the door, ringings of the bell, &c., succeeded in getting in. Grandma came down to perform the favor, Pa and Ma both being in the City.

24 November 1843. Left Burlington this morning as usual, though not feeling much like going down, having had only about 2 hours and a half sleep. I however took a nap on board of the boat and felt a little refreshed after it.

26 November 1843. In the afternoon walked home with Miss Helen Nesbit, went in and remained about half an hour, discussing Animal Magnetism.(120)

27 November 1843. Left Burlington this morning as usual. I met on board Mr. Chamlon Smith, who introduced me to Miss Martha Morris, a most beautiful lady of about 17, and one who I have been wanting an introduction to for some time. I sat down and had quite a chat, and found her remarkably agreeable and loquacious. The smile which played around her beautifully formed mouth was winning in the extreme, and led one to think he was in love at once, without making any exertion to bring himself into so tender a situation.

Stephen Kingston came to the office to commence his study of the business this morning. Evening at home until about 1/4 of 8, when I went around to see Jim Sterling. Remained there a few minutes, when he shut up the Store, and he came around home with me. We had a game of whist and checkers, and he left about 10.

28 November 1843. Wended my way up to see the Misses Leeds, found them in, together with their father and mother. Spent a very pleasant evening, and left about 10 clock. The Miss L's looked remarkably pretty and fascinating this evening, and Mrs. Leeds was very pleasant, a great deal more so than she was the last time I paid a visit there accompanied by Dick Christiani. On that occasion she acted very cool, on account, I suppose, of some difficulty between her, Mrs. Christiani and some others.

DECEMBER

1 December 1843. Snow capped roofs and a misty atmosphere met the waking eye this morning, and almost made one wish that it were proper to lie in bed all day. Thoughts of sloppy pavements and wet feet are always associated with these early snow storms, which bring all the inconveniences of snow with none of its pleasures, for they never afford any sleighing.

Left Burlington this morning as usual in the midst of the snow storm but arrived in the City safe and without detention. Left for Burlington at 5 p.m. as usual, and arrived there about 20m. past 6. I expected we would be detained on account of the snow on the track but as good luck would have it we were not.

2 December 1843. Clear and very pleasant over head, but under foot very unpleasant. I do not remember ever seeing the streets in so bad a condition. From 2nd Street down to the River in Walnut Street it appears to be one sea of mud, some three or four inches deep, and in fact throughout the City, you scarcely could get along without getting over shoe top in slush and mud.

Burlington was in as bad a condition, and to speak the truth the crossings were worse.

6 December 1843. Had on board the boat this morning a raving maniac. He was a dreadful sight to behold, & even to be near as he was whooping or howling all the time.

In the evening about 7 o'clock went up to the Assembly buildings for the purpose of attending Mr. Wales' first cotillion party of the season, having become a subscriber. The parties bid fair to be far superior to any previous season, as he has engaged the large ball room and Frank Johnson's Band. The number of subscribers are large. The display of beauty was large too, and the ladies sociable for the first party. I must record that I was agreeably disappointed with the company present as it was both large and select. I made out exceedingly well in regard to obtaining partners, having been lucky enough to obtain them for every set danced, and pretty ones too, several being new acquaintances this evening. I do not regret in the least subscribing, and expect to realize much pleasure in participating in these Wednesday evening parties before the season is over.

7 December 1843. Through the morning we had in succession rain, hail and snow and at about 12 N it commenced snowing in real earnest, which continued without intermission until about 1/2 past 5 p.m. when it commenced breaking away, the wind having drifted from N.E. to N.W. By 7 p.m. It was a clear, and as magnificent a moonlight night as I ever saw. Thermometer at 7 1/2 a.m. and 9 a.m. 32¡, at 2 p.m. 33¡, at 6 p.m. 32¡. There were a number of sleighs out in the City today, and the sleighing in the neighborhood of Burlington was splendid.

8 December 1843. Noticed a great quantity of floating ice in the neighborhood of Burlington, but none in the lower part of the River. It was the first of the season. There was a great deal more ice up near Bordentown, so much that the New Philadelphia did not come down after going up in the morning.

10 December 1843. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and in the afternoon. Mr. Germain preached both times; as usual his sermons were very uninteresting.

The cars did not get up from the City this evening until 7 1/2 o'clock, having broken down below Rancocas.

11 December 1843. Evening at home reading the Mysteries of Paris.(121)

13 December 1843. The boat was obliged to break her way through the ice the whole distance from Bordentown down to Bridesburg. The river was closed last night between those two places. It is from a quarter to three quarters of an inch thick. I have noticed considerable ice in the river the last three days, and I think tonight will close the river so tight that we shall not be able to go to the City in the boat tomorrow. There was little or no ice in front of the City today.

14 December 1843. Went down to the wharf this morning for the purpose of going in the boat to the City, but found the River full of large masses of floating ice which at once led me to suppose that the boat would not be down. My suppositions were soon realized when I heard the sound of the car bell, which caused me forthwith to proceed in that direction. When arriving at the place of starting of the cars found a train in readiness to convey the passengers to the City. I was very much amused to see the passengers running up Main Street to the cars with anxious faces, and with fear of being left. Among them were Mrs. Haden, Miss Chester, and Mrs. Bishop who appeared to be very much overcome. There were also two of the young ladies from the school, Miss Lucy Whitmer and Miss Tod. The former Miss I thought would have fainted when she got in the cars as she appeared to be very much exhausted. Upon gaining her seat she fell back in a very graceful attitude, but after using a few restoratives she soon regained her strength, and was well again. Employed my time in going down in reading the Mysteries of Paris.

16 December 1843. A rainy, damp and very unpleasant day, though I must say I was glad to see it, as such weather will soon make way with the ice in the river, which has prevented the boat from running the past few days. Did not leave Burlington until about 20 m. of 9, on account of the cars not arriving until very late. Had to stop a number of times on the way down, and arrived in the City about 1/2 past 10, a pretty hour to go to business.

In crossing over to Camden this afternoon we experienced great difficulty, as it was so foggy you could not see ten feet ahead of the boat. We came very near to running onto the island and also the wharf on the opposite side.

18 December 1843. Left Burlington this morning about 20 m. of 9 in the cars and arrived in the City by half past 10. There is very little ice in the River today, and I understood the boat would have come down had it not been for the very heavy fog which prevailed throughout the morning.

19 December 1843. In going down this morning found little or no ice in the River, but the boat has been laid up for the season and will not come out again.

20 December 1843. In the evening went to Mr. Wale's cotillion party. It was the second of the season and I spent the evening delightfully.

21 December 1843. On account of today being set aside by Governor Porter(122) as a day of general thanksgiving, our office was closed, and in general the stores throughout the City were closed, and in fact the day resembled Christmas more than anything else. I was at St. Luke's Church in the morning. At about 3 o'clock went down for Hanley and he and I took a stroll in Chestnut Street. There was a good number of persons promenading.

23 December 1843. The rain of today caused great disappointment to many of the good citizens and fair ladies of our city as well as to the numerous shop keepers, as it would have been observed as a general day for promenade and purchasing articles for presents, had it been clear. Notwithstanding the unpleasantness of the day, there were a great number of persons out in the afternoon, and I suppose in the evening, though I had not an opportunity of judging as I was in Burlington during the evening.

25 December 1843. Foggy early in the morning, and through the remainder of the day cloudy with the appearance of rain at times. Wind S.W.

Today is Christmas, the nativity of the Divine Founder of the Christian Religion, a season of general hilarity and festivity, at which most persons come in for a share of good wishes, good turkeys and those innumerable testimonials of friendship and regard - "Christmas presents." Today was celebrated as usual throughout the City. The Churches, generally speaking, were all open, and I believe, well attended. All the places of amusement, both in the afternoon and evening were a perfect "jam" and the proprietors must have received a rich harvest. Chestnut Street throughout the day was crowded from one end to the other, but a great deal more so in the afternoon. It was hard labor to make your way at all through the dense mass of human beings that thronged this fashionable thoroughfare. In the neighborhood of 6th Street, on both sides of the way, it was impossible to make any headway at all. The people, men, women and children, were pushed into one mass and to penetrate them was impossible. Every few minutes there was a general rush which would cause a number of the females to be pushed off of the pavement and into the street which was some two or three inches deep in mud. This game was carried on throughout the afternoon much to the annoyance of all respectable females and disgrace and shame of the young men who participated and in a great measure caused the obstruction.

I made two ineffectual attempts to go below 6th Street and was finally obliged to take the center of the Street which was exceedingly muddy and of course unpleasant. The number of young men to be seen intoxicated about the Streets was very large, Temperance societies to the contrary. Why it was so it is impossible to tell, as it is in these times a rather rare thing to see persons intoxicated about the Streets, even on holidays. The children, as usual, appeared to be enjoying themselves about the City, and were truly delighted to take a view of "old Kris Kringle" being drawn by six reindeer in a sleigh loaded with toys in front of the "menagery." This object attracted thousands of children as well as older persons to catch a glimpse of the imaginary personage which is in the minds of so many of the young folks at this particular season, this season of hilarity, joy and pleasure in which all seem to participate.

26 December 1843. Cloudy all day and at about half past 5 commenced raining which continued all the evening. There is no ice whatever in the River nor has there been for the last week.

28 December 1843. Went down to Bill Hanley's having an engagement with him to go to Madam Hazard's Cotillion Party. I enjoyed myself very much at the party, though the evening was bad and the number, comparatively speaking with the other party, small. I danced five out of the seven sets danced, stayed at Hanley's for the night.

29 December 1843. At the office all day until about 1/4 past 4, when I took a stroll up Chestnut Street. There were great numbers out, all seeming pleased with the pleasure of the promenade.

Returned to the office about 5 where I remained, with the exception of about 15 m. occupied in getting my supper, until 7 o'clock, when I went down to Hanley's to attend a little party to which I had been invited. I did not enjoy myself in the least this evening on account of not having been introduced to any of the ladies, nor an offer until a late hour in the evening, when being a little angry at the neglect, would not accept it at all. There were two very pretty ladies there whom I noticed particularly. They were Miss Caddie Phillips and Miss Jane Clark. The former especially attracted my attention as she was remarkably pretty and was well calculated to win your favor. Accompanied Miss Clark home, to whom I had an introduction a short time before the breaking up of the party though I was unwilling to accept it for the reasons above stated.

31 December 1843. After Church in the afternoon Hugh Nesbit and I walked out to Silver Lakes to see if they were frozen but to our astonishment found they were not.

Today closes that circle of time denominated 1843, now passed away to join its one thousand eight hundred and forty two predecessors which in its character it closely resembles. Altogether we do not see that the world has changed much within the last year in its character either for better or for worse. It has been a good and bad year with the usual amount of vice and virtue, honesty and dishonesty, intelligence and ignorance, extravagance and parsimony, industry and idleness. There has been poverty for those who would not take care of themselves, and even for some who have made laudable exertions to do so; affluence to others who had acquired the knowledge of that philosophical maxim, the importance of taking care of number one.(123) There have been rewards bestowed without deserving, suffering without crime, merit despised till it had grown bright enough to out dazzle its condemner, virtue has been kicked into a corner, and vice thrust its most imprudent face into the most public assemblies; justice has not grown more impartial, nor goodness commended itself as an example to others.

Those who were rogues at the beginning of the year seem to have remained so till its close, with a few additions to their number from some who grew tired of possessing too much of the merit of honesty. Those who were really good in their hearts have maintained their excellence, and will probably continue good as long as they live, if temptation does not prove too strong for them. The bad we have few hopes for, they will probably continue in their perversity until the penitentiary or the gallows, if they are poor and have no friends, or, if they are wealthy and influential, until the mild climate of Texas or the softer influence of a European sky effects a regeneration in their moral character, and makes them very respectable persons. Such is the world now, such it ever has been, and such there is reason to believe it ever will remain, and the fact suggests the consoling idea of the year has gone, indeed, and if it were only time that has fled, there would be little to mourn.

But with time has passed away much that we all reckoned delightful, much that is not to be renewed with the blossoms of spring, much that will not meet the eye again, until that shall be closed in a sleep that knows no waking upon the joys or sorrows of this life. These are occasions for sadness, but only of sadness. In a few years the eldest of us learn that we have more to meet beyond the grave than we have to enjoy this side of its enclosures. And so when a few more are gone, we sigh to join them; and death that seems to snatch us rudely from this life is only a Providence transplanting us to a home that has no vicissitudes, to joys that beget no tears, to transports that have no death. We must leave this moralizing subject, and while we stand looking into the grave of the year, ready to fill it up, let us only drop a tear on departed time, for that portion which we have misspent, and take tonight as a sort of isthmus between the continents of years, to resolve to be better, and to do better in the ensuing year of 1844.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Notes:

(1) The State House Bell, now known as the Liberty Bell, was used for signals and celebrations until July 4, 1852 when it was moved from the tower to the central hall so that the public could view it. The same year the name of the State House was first officially called Independence Hall, but the name State House was generally used by the public until the end of the century. The Liberty Bell was moved from Independence Hall to a glass pavilion at 5th and Market Streets on January 1, 1976 and again on October 9, 2003 to the nearby Liberty Bell Center. Cultural Landscape Report Independence Mall, 1994.

(2) Grace Protestant Episcopal Church, S.E. Corner 12th and Cherry Streets. Cornerstone laid 1833. History of Philadelphia 1609-1884, by J. Thomas Scharf and Thompson Westcott, L.H. Everts & Co., Philadelphia, 1884, p. 1352. (hereafter cited as Scharf & Westcott). The building was torn down in 1926, and the church merged to become Grace Church and The Incarnation at Edgmont and Venango Streets, Philadelphia. F. Lee Richards, Episcopal Church Historian (hereafter cited as FLR).

(3) Henry M. Borden, M.D. (1817-1856), of Wilmington, J. Warner Erwin's first cousin was the son of Francis Borden and Letitia (Erwin) Borden who was the sister of Henry Erwin, J. Warner Erwin's father.

(4) Central Presbyterian Church, Broad Street above Fairmount, 1833. Scarf and Westcott, p. 1298. It is now (1994) the Greater Exodus Baptist Church, 704 North Broad Street.

(5) The Reverend Henry Augustus Boardman (1808-1880), pastor Tenth Presbyterian Church, corner 10th and Walnut Streets, 1833-1876. ibid., p. 1294.

(6) Napoleon Le Brun (1821-1901), the architect who designed many outstanding Philadelphia buildings including The Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul 1846-1864, The Musical Fund Hall 1847, and The Academy of Music 1855-56. Philadelphia, A 300 Year History, Russell F. Weigley editor, W.W. Norton & Company, New York, 1982. pp. 312, 345, 383.

(7) Elizabeth G. Mercer and her sister Sarah G. Mercer appear to be the daughters of John Mercer. His directory listing is: 1st wharf above Catherine Street; home, 36 Catherine Street. George P. Mercer, corder, is listed at the same commercial address. McElroy's Philadelphia Directory, 1847.

(8) The Mercantile Library, was founded in 1821. Shipping merchant Thomas P. Cope served as its second president 1823-1855. The premises were in Chestnut Streets above 5th Street, but a new building was erected in 1844-45 at the S.E. corner of 5th and Library Streets. Scarf and Westcott, p. 1211.

(9) Lydia Warner Erwin (1827-1864), Warner Erwin's sister, who married Edward J. Maginnis in 1853.

(10) The Erwin house is listed at 301 Mulberry Street in McElory's Philadelphia Directory, 1840. "In 1853 Mulberry Street's name was officially changed to Arch Street, the name it was commonly called because of a stone bridge or arch cut through a hill in 1690 to open it to the Delaware River. The Arch was torn down in 1721. Philadelphia Street Names, by Robert I. Alotta, Bonus Books, Chicago, 1990. pp. 10-11.

(11) Rebecca Ashton Warner Erwin (Mrs. Henry Erwin), 1800-1881.

(12) Henry Erwin (1794-1845), Real Estate broker, watchmaker and silversmith. His place of business is listed at 167 Chestnut Street in McElroy's Philadelphia Directory of 1840

(13) Sarah Powell Warner (Mrs. Joseph Coulton Warner) 1771-1845.

(14) The Weaver's Riot of January 11 and 12 at Front and Brown Streets in the Kensington section of Philadelphia was a wage dispute between factory workers and home hand loom operators. Scarf and Westcott, p. 661.

(15) The Sheriff of Philadelphia in 1843 was Morton McMichael, who from 1866-1869 was mayor of the city. ibid., p. 1738.

(16) The Athenaeum, of Philadelphia, a private proprietary library founded in 1841, was at this time still in rented quarters in the hall of the American Philosophical Society adjacent to Independence Hall, and thus across 5th Street from the Mercantile Library. It built its own building on Washington Square in 1847. (FJD). Henry Erwin was a subscriber from 1830 to 1844.

(17) Commentaries on the Laws of England by Sir William Blackstone (1723-1780), best known history of the doctrines of English Law, exceeding influential on jurisprudence in the United States. Webster's Biographical Dictionary.

(18) Henry Whitney Bellows (1814-1882), American Unitarian clergyman. Founder and President, United States Sanitary Commission, which cared for the sick and wounded during the Civil War. Active in the cause of civil-service reform. Webster's Biographical Dictionary.

(19) The Philadelphia and Commercial Intellengencer was published from 1794 to 1845. It is unlikely that "Oldest Inhabitant" was a regular feature.

(20) The Philadelphia and Columbia Railroad, completed to Lancaster and opened in April 1834. Scarf and Westcott, p. 2176.

(21) Madame Hazard, teacher of dancing, 180 Spruce Street. FJD.

(22) Isaac Hull (1773-1843) American Naval officer, served in the war with Tripoli; in command of the Constitution ("Old Ironsides") in its defeat against the British frigate Guerri?re in 1812. Webster's Biographical Dictionary.

(23) Christ Church, 2nd Street above Market, established 1695, is the oldest Protestant Episcopal Church in Philadelphia. The new church was finished in 1754. The Philadelphia Inquirer Regional Almanac 1994, p. 57.

(24) Laurel Hill Cemetery, establish in 1836 on the East bank of the Schuylkill River in Penn Township, soon became the chief cemetery of the city because of its rural charms and picturesque scenery. Scharf and Westcott, p. 2359. Its entrance is now at 3822 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia.

(25) Robert's Inn is a sarcastic reference to the house of Warner Erwin's well connected first cousin Lydia Roberts (1783-1862), at 123 North 9th Street. FJD.

(26) Charles Sherwood Stratton (1838-1883) known as General Tom Thumb, American midget, joined P.T. Barnum's organization in 1842; exhibited in America, England and Europe. Webster's Biographical Dictionary.

(27) John Bull. A character supposed to typify the English nation from the satire by John Arbuthnot (1667-1735). Webster's Biographical Dictionary

(28) The Reverend Nathaniel Sayre Harris was rector of St. Timothy's Episcopal Church in Spring Garden Street, opened in 1842; its name was changed to the Church of the Nativity in 1845. J. Wesley Twelves, A History of the Diocese of Pennsylvania...1784-1968, Philadelphia, 1969, (hereafter cited as Twelves), p. 155.

(29) Octagonal Unitarian Church on the northeast corner of Tenth and Locust Streets built in 1813, Robert Mills architect. Wainwright, Nicholas B. and Wolf, Edwin 2nd, Philadelphia, A 300 - Year History, W.W. Norton Co., NY 1982, p. 252. The building no longer exists.

(30) William Henry Furness (1802-1896). An American Unitarian clergyman and abolitionist; pastor of Unitarian church in Philadelphia (1825-1875). Webster's Biographical Dictionary.

(31) Charles West Thompson, (1798-1879), school master, writer and finally priest of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Philadelphia and York, PA.Scharf and Westcott, p. 1143. Samuel Fitch Hotchkin, Country Clergy of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1890, pp. 298-299.

(32) Elizabeth Elliott, probably the daughter of Isaac Elliott, conveyancer, whose house was on West Penn Square. FJD.

(33) St. Philip's Protestant Episcopal Church, consecrated 1841, was then in its first location, Vine Street below 8th. The first rector was the Reverend Edward Neville. FJD. The church moved to Spring Garden east of Broad Street, merged with Trinity Church, then called St. Philips Trinity Church, now St. Mary's Church, Hamilton Village, West Philadelphia. The original building was sold in 1937. FLR.

(34) David Paul Brown (1795-1872), noted criminal lawyer, orator and dramatist, for whom see Dictionary of American Biography (hereafter cited as DBA), Vol. III, p. 111. See also Scharf and Westcott, pp. 651, 1549-1550.

(35) The University of Pennsylvania was located on the west side of 9th Street between Chestnut and Market Streets, in building that occupied a full block. It was originally built by the state to be the residence of the President of the United States and was purchased by the University in 1800. Philadelphia, A 300-Year History, by Russell E. Weigley, et al, W.W. Norton & Company, Philadelphia 1982, p. 224. The University moved to West Philadelphia in 1872. FJD.

(36) Stephen Higgison Tyng (1880-1885), clergyman in Philadelphia 1829-1845 (St. Paul's Protestant Episcopal Church) and New York 1845-1878. Renowned as a preacher, leader in the low church party in the Protestant Episcopal denomination. Webster's Biographical Dictionary. He was the first rector of the Church of the Epiphany, N.W. corner 15th and Chestnut Streets. For Tyng see DAB, Vol. IXX, p. 101.

(37) The Right Reverend Henry Ustick Onderdonk (1789-1858), second Protestant Bishop of Pennsylvania. Scarf and Westcott, p. 1336. DAB, Vol. XIV, p. 40.

(38) Richard and Rosa were probably the children of the only Cristiani who is listed in the city directories, Richard Cristiani, druggist. Warner Erwin, however, spelled their surname Christiani. FJD.

(39) "The brilliant comet of 1843, which in two hours made a turn of 180¡ near the sun's surface, the tail remaining directed away from the sun." A History of Astronomy, by A. Pannekoek. George Allen & Unwin, Ltd. London, p. 424. The comet was unnamed.

(40) Frances Anna Roberts (1827-1899), daughter of Edward Roberts and Mary Elizabeth Redford, who latter married Edward Browning on January 22, 1851. JWJ.

(41) Fairmount Water Works and dam completed in 1822. Scarf and Westcott, p. 605.

(42) Whist, a card game for four people similar to bridge. Webster's Biographical Dictionary.

(43) Fifth Baptist Church on Sansom Street between 8th and 9th Streets, organized 1824 in the building originally designed by John Mills for the First Church of the Domestic Mission Society. Scharf and Westcott, pp. 1309-1310. The building no longer exists.

(44) This may be the Reverend J.L. Burrows. FJD.

(45) Trinity Protestant Episcopal Church Southwark, on the south side of Catherine Street above 2nd, consecrated 1822. Scharf and Westcott, p. 1351. The church closed in 1908, moved to 16th and Cayuga Streets, merged with Zion Church, which also closed. FLR. The building on Catherine Street no longer exists, the grave stones and remains were moved to Mt. Moriah Cemetery at 62nd Street and Kingessing Avenue, Philadelphia.

(46) The Rainbow, an experimental vessel designed for speed, was built and owned by Robert L. Stevens for passenger use on the Hudson River, in 1841. It had a narrow beam compared to length and was powered by inclined condensing steam engines that drove dual water wheels 24' in diameter. After some years she was sent to Philadelphia where she served on the Delaware River. History of American Steam Navigation by John H. Morrison, Stephen Daye Press, New York, 1958 (reprint of the 1903 edition), (hereafter cited as Steam Navigation), pp. 64-66. The steamboat fare to Wilmington was 25¢.

(47) Fort Mifflin, built in pre-Revolutionary War times on the west bank of the Delaware River below the mouth of the Schuylkill for the protection of Philadelphia from attack by water. It was the scene of a siege in 1777, used during the war of 1812, the Civil War for a prison, and as a magazine for the Philadelphia Naval Base during the Spanish-American war of 1898. Bulletin Almanac, 1972, p. 381.

(48) Old Swedes Lutheran Church founded 1683, now Holy Trinity Episcopal Church at 6th and Church Streets, Wilmington, DE.

(49) Nicholas Gilpin Williamson (1777-1843), second Mayor of Wilmington 1834-1843.

(50) The Philadelphia Navy Yard, founded in 1801, was on Front Street at the foot of Federal and Wharton Streets until 1876 when it moved to League Island where the Schuylkill and the Delaware Rivers meet.

(51) For U.S. frigate Princeton, see entry of 7 September 1843.

(52) William Miller (1782-1845). American sectarian leader who predicted that Christ was to return to earth in 1843 and 1844. His followers, known as Millerites or Adventists, prepared for the Christ's second coming by neglecting worldly pursuits, donning ascension robes, and gathering at appointed times on hilltops, in cemeteries and so on. Webster's Biographical Dictionary.

(53) Cornelius I. Bradford, accountant, is listed at this address in city directories. FJD.

(54) Jacob Ridgway (1768-1843), grocer, shipping merchant, and land investor. Scharf and Westcott, p. 1187.

(55) Sarah Ellis (Mrs. Jacob), the daughter of Warner Erwin's uncle Charles Erwin and Eliza Spooner Erwin.

(56) The steam ship Trenton, built at the R. L. Stevens yard in Hoboken, N.J in 1824, commuted between Philadelphia and Trenton to the early 1850's. Steam Navigation, pp. 171 & 185.

(57) This was Benjamin Cross, a well-known teacher of piano, organist and composer. FJD.

(58) William McFadden, whose mahogany sawmill was at 5¸ Sterling Alley.

(59) Eliza Spooner Erwin, widow of Warner Erwin's uncle Charles Erwin (1791-1827).

(60) Emily (Emma) Wood Erwin, Warner Erwin's first cousin, was the daughter of Charles Erwin and Eliza Spooner Erwin. She was later married to John M. Burnes.

(61) Side wheel steamboats were common on the Delaware River in the 1840's with commercial trips north to Burlington, Bristol and Burlington and south to Wilmington and Cape May. Some of the steamships of the time were the Balloon, Bolivar, New Philadelphia, Rainbow, Shenandoah, States Rights and Trenton. A typical advertisement read:

"12¸¢ for Burlington and Bristol. The steamboat Sun, Capt. W. Whillden, will take the place of the Bolivar until further notice and will leave Chesnut (sic) Wharf every afternoon (Sundays excepted) at 2 o'clock. Returning leaves Burlington & Bristol 7¸ o'clock A.M. Fare 12¸ cents. Breakfast and Dinner on Board. All freight and marketing taken at unusual low rates". Public Ledger, Philadelphia, January 17, 1843, p 1.

(62) St. Mary's Church, West Broad Street, Burlington. Founded 1703, it is the first Episcopal Church in New Jersey. Brochure, City of Burlington, 1994.

(63) George Washington Doane (1799-1859), Protestant Episcopal Bishop of New Jersey from 1832 to 1859. He was leader of the High Church party in America the author of many hymns, and the founder of St. Mary's Doane Academy, now St. Mary's Hall in 1837. Webster's Biographical Dictionary.

(64) Broad Street Methodist Episcopal Church, now called the United Methodist Church at 36 East Broad Street, Burlington, founded 1770. The second church was built in 1820 and the present building in 1847.

(65) First Baptist Church, 335 Stacy Street, Burlington, founded 1801. The present church building, at the same location, dates from 1914.

(66) Burlington College, a Protestant Episcopal boarding school. FJD.

(67) Algernon Roberts (1828-1868), J. Warner Erwin's second cousin, the son of Colonel Algernon Roberts and Tacy (Warner) Roberts of Pencoyd. JWJ, p. 456.

(68) John Notman was the architect of Riverside, a striking Italianate villa built in 1837-1839 for Episcopal Bishop George Washington Doane on the bank of the Delaware River at Burlington, NJ. John Notman, Architect 1810-1865, by Constance H. Greiff, Philadelphia 1979, pp. 20, 63-68.

(69) Glasses may mean mirrors. FJD.

(70) General William Henry Harrison, the hero of Tippecanoe, became President of the United States in 1841 and died within a month. He was succeeded by his Vice President, John Tyler. By 1843 Tyler was exceedingly unpopular because of his apathy in carrying out Whig policies. Erwin's calling him "acting president" is a sign of disdain. Scharf & Westcott, p. 662.

(71) "Not cracked up to be" indicating disappointment was first noted in use in 1835. Oxford English Dictionary, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1989, p. 1089. See also, A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, by Eric Partridge, Macmillan Co., New York, 1967, p.108. "Martin VanBuren is not the man he is cracked up to be." Davy Crocket, 1835. Morris Dictionary of Words & Word Origins by William and Mary Morris, Harper & Row, New York, 1971, p. 159.

(72) Dr. Ellis, northeast side of York Street near Union Street. Plan of the City of Burlington, a map published by M. Dripps, Philadelphia, 1849. Burlington County Historical Society.

(73) An 1839 map of Burlington, NJ shows James Sterling's house located on High Street (then called Main Street) near Broad Street. Burlington Historical Society.

(74) James Hunter Sterling was the name of both a well-known Burlington merchant and his son. The senior J.H. Sterling had a brother, Budd Sterling, merchant and politician, who had a son James Budd Sterling (c.1824-1854). It is impossible to know which James J. Warner Erwin intends. FJD.

(75) The frigate Raritan, built at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, was laid down 1820, launched 13 June 1843, sponsored by Commander Frederick Engle. Dictionary of American Fighting Ships, Naval History Division, Department of the Navy, Washington, 1976, Vol. 6, p. 35, (hereafter cited as Fighting Ships).

(76) The steamboat Ohio, owned by the Union Company, was built in Philadelphia in 1832. She ran to Cape May for some years. Steam Navigation, p. 186.

(77) The Philadelphia Public Ledger, first published March 25, 1836. Scharf & Westcott, p. 2000. The price per copy in 1843 was 1¢.

(78) The Philadelphia Almshouse, in Blockley Township, on the west side of the Schuylkill River, where the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania now stands. FJD.

(79) This was the famous tavern that served planked shad. FJD.

(80) Temperance Houses were hotels or inns that served no alcohol. They were popular in the 1840's when the temperance movement was in full swing and were often called Temperance Hotels. Unpublished letter, Deborah Pickman Clifford, 1994.

(81) Main Street, Burlington, NJ, is now named High Street. Burlington County Historical Society.

(82) W.P. Israel's wharf was located at of High and West Pearl Streets. Plan of the City of Burlington, a map, Ibid.

(83) St. Mary's Hall, an Episcopal girl's boarding school in Burlington, NJ founded in 1837 by the Right Reverend George Washington Doane, second Episcopal Bishop of New Jersey. The Handbook of Private Schools, Porter Sargent, Boston, MA 1983. St. Mary's Hall was the sister school for Burlington College. FJD.

(84) Samuel H. Erwin, (b.1819), son of Charles Erwin (1791-1828) and Eliza Spooner, Warner Erwin's first cousin.

(85) Mary Elizabeth Redford Roberts (Mrs. Edward) 1801-1862.

(86) Howard Roberts (1843-1901)

(87) Friends Meeting House, High Street, Burlington, NJ. The building was constructed in 1785 and is used to this day. City of Burlington Brochure.

(88) Stephen Grellet (1773-1855). Quaker missionary and philanthropist, born Limoges, France; to U.S. (c.1775); traveling missionary minister in America and Europe, his reports on the conditions in prisons and poor houses being responsible for many reform measures. Webster's Biographical Dictionary. Grellet lived in Burlington, NJ. FJD. See also DAB, Vol. VII, p. 606.

(89) The steamboat Balloon, built by David Burns of Brooklyn in 1839, had a long stroke beam type engine designed by James Cunningham of New York. She ran the New York-Albany and New York to Newark until she was sent to the Delaware River where it is believed she ran until she wore out. Steam Navigation p. 59.

(90) The steamship New Philadelphia, built in Philadelphia in 1826, was owned by Robert L. Stevens and was as an experimental vessel. She set a record of 12 hours 13 minutes on the New York to Albany route in August 1826. Later, she was owned by the Union line. She was on the Delaware River for a few seasons. Steam Navigation, pp. 48-50 and 185.

(91) The Rainbow, owned by Robert L. Stevens, and built for speed was launched in 1841 and sailed on the Albany run. She was an experimental vessel of very narrow beam compared to length and was powered by a pair of condensing engines. After several years on the Hudson River and not developing the high speed anticipated, she was sent to the Delaware River and after some years went the way of many passenger boats, towing canal boats and coal barges. Steam Navigation, pp. 64 and 168.

(92) Algernon L. Harrison, M.D. (1821-1843), Warner Erwin's first cousin, was the eldest child of Dr. John P. Harrison and Mary Thomas Warner of Cincinnati, OH.

(93) The Recorder of Deeds of the city had his office in a converted house in the State House Row in 5th, just opposite the premises of the mayor and city administration in what is now the west wing of Independence Hall. FJD.

(94) Percival Roberts (1830-1898) son of Algernon Sidney Roberts and Elizabeth Cuthbert Roberts, who later became co-founder of the Pencoyd Iron Works with his cousin Algernon Roberts in 1853.

(95) Adelaide Roberts (1837-1877), daughter of Edward Roberts and Mary Elizabeth Redford, who latter married Dr. Samuel Francis Shaw, U.S.A.

(96) Charles Ellis (b.1835) the son of Jacob Ellis and Sarah C. Erwin Ellis.

(97) Theodore Mitchell, probably the son of Theodore Mitchell of 338 Spring Garden Street, president of the Lehigh Crane Iron Company. FJD.

(98) Mary Elizabeth Ellis (b.1838), daughter of Jacob Ellis and Sarah Erwin Ellis, who latter married Frank McGrath.

(99) On August 5, 1843 a torrent of rain accompanied with tornado winds struck Delaware County [and Philadelphia] causing massive flooding on all its creeks. Extracts from Philadelphia papers give this account: "The rain was so intense that the streams rose six feet within five minutes. In two hours they rose nearly 23 feet.... Kelly's Bridge on Darby Creek was washed away when the water rose 30 feet...." The History and Development of Upper Darby Township 1609-1987, by Thomas J. Difilippo, Upper Darby Historical Society, Upper Darby, PA., 1987, p. 86.

(100) St. Luke's Protestant Episcopal Church on 13th Street above Pine, opened 1840. Scharf and Westcott, p. 1353. Merged to become St. Luke and the Epiphany Church, 313 South 13th Street. FLR.

(101) The Reverend William W. Spear, first rector of St. Luke's Church. Twelves, p. 149. Spear later held Episcopal pastorates in South Carolina, Maryland, New Jersey and at Bristol, PA. FJD.

(102) Angelina Buchey (1830-1881), although she had "matured," was only thirteen years old. She later married Bryon Henry Smith, importer of wines. FJD.

(103) The Princeton, the first steam warship in the U.S. Navy was laid down in 1842 at the Philadelphia Navy Yard and launched 7 September 1843, under the supervision of Captain Robert F. Stockton who commanded it after the launching. It was the first war vessel with all the machinery below the water line. Fighting Ships, Vol. V, p. 383.

(104) Richard Field Stockton (1795-1866), grandson of Richard Stockton (1764-1828), signer of the Declaration of Independence, naval officer in command of the Pacific coast of North America (1845-47), cooperated with the army in conquering California. California proclaimed a territory of the U.S 1846. Assumed title of governor and commander in chief. Resigned from the U.S. Navy 1850. U.S. Senator from New Jersey (1851-53). Webster's Biographical Dictionary. See also DAB, Vol. IX, part 2, p. 48. (Vol. XVIII of the oiginal edition).

(105) The "Peacemaker" and the "Oregon."

(106) The Princeton was fitted with two big guns named "Peacemaker" and "Oregon" under Captain Stockton's direction who got the idea for it while in England. The "Peacemaker's" reinforced breech weighed over 27,000 pounds. When the Princeton was sent to Washington in February 1844, Washingtonians displayed a great interest in the ship and the guns. She made several trial runs with passengers on board down the Potomac River on February 16, 17, 18 and 20, at which time the "Peacemaker" was fired several times. On the 29th she departed for Alexandria, VA on a pleasure and trial trip down the Potomac with President Tyler, his Cabinet and approximately two hundred guests on board. Against the better judgment of Captain Stockton, the Secretary of the Navy, desiring to please the distinguished company, allowed the "Peacemaker" to be fired. The gun burst, killing the Honorable Abel P. Upshur, Secretary of State; Thomas Gilmer, Secretary of the Navy; Captain Beverly Kennon, Chief of the Bureau of Construction, Equipment and Repairs; Representative Virgil Maxey of Maryland; Representative David Gardiner of New York; and a servant of the President. It also injured about twenty people including Captain Stockton, whose judgment was proven correct, for the gun was overheated from previous use that day. A Court of Inquiry exonerated Captain Stockton, his office and crew of all blame in the matter. Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, Naval History Division, Department of the Navy, Washington, 1976, p. 383.

(107) Dunk's Ferry, between the Bucks County, PA and Burlington County, NJ shore. FJD.

(108) Joseph Warner Erwin was born on September 12, 1824. This was his 19th birthday.

(109) Rebecca Warner Erwin's party was a rare event: "Birthdays were seldom celebrated before the end of the 19th century, both because observances were not deemed important and because records were not always accurate or consistent to allow people to identify their birth dates." George Washington's birthday and heads of states were the exceptions. How Old Are You? Age Consciousness in American Culture by Howard P. Chudacoff, Princeton University Press 1989, p. 129.

(110) James Budd Sterling (c1824-1854), son of Budd Sterling of Burlington, NJ, a merchant and politician who owned vessels in the West Indian trade. James Budd Sterling never married. JFD. "Jim" Sterling could be the son of James Budd Sterling or his brother James Hunter Sterling.

(111) The steamship Ohio, built in Philadelphia in 1832 and owned by the Union Line, ran to Cape May, N.J. for some years. Steam Navigation, p. 186.

(112) Mesdames Athenaide Buchey (1800-1874), headmistress of a French seminary for girls at 424 (now 626) Spruce Street, and Virginie Pointe (1787-1861), her older sister, refugees from the slave revolt in Saint-Domingue, later Haiti. The former was the mother of Angelina Buchey, previously mentioned. FJD.

(113) Election day, the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November, was not the law until January 23, 1845. Prior to that, states set their own election dates that had to be at least 34 days before the first Monday in December, the meeting date of the Electoral College. Facts About the Presidents by Joseph Nathan Kane, H.W. Wilson Co., New York, 1981, p. 79.

(114) Nathan Dunn, a Quaker merchant long engaged in the China Trade, and owner of the Chinese Museum in Philadelphia, occupied a picturesque cottage ornZ, erected for him in 1837-38 by architect John Notman. It was an innovative and much admired house. FJD.

(115) The National Theater at 9th and Chestnut Streets, opened in 1837 and closed in 1854. Glazer, Irvin R. Philadelphia Theaters, The Athenaeum of Philadelphia and Dover Publications, New York 1994, p .82. (hereafter cited as Philadelphia Theaters.

(116) Edwin Forrest (1806-1872). Noted American actor. Webster's Biographical Dictionary.

(117) The Franklin Institute, founded 1824, was located on 7th Street between Market and Chestnut Streets in the building designed by John Haviland, completed in 1826. Scarf and Westcott,, pp. 1214-1219. It is now the site of the Atwater Kent Museum at 15 South 7th Street. The Inquirer Regional Almanac 1984.

(118) Charles Ellet's wife (neZ Mary Israel) was the first cousin of J. Warner Erwin's father. FJD.

(119) Lucretia Mott, neZ Coffin (1793-1888), a Quaker "minister." Cooperated with her husband James Mott in his antislavery activities and the first women's rights convention in Seneca Falls, NY in 1848. Webster's Biographical Dictionary.

(120) Animal Magnetism, a spirit like force believed to reside in some individuals akin to hypnosis, alleged by Franz Anton Mesmer (1743-1815). Webster's Third International Dictionary.

(121) Mysteries of Paris, A Romance of Rich and Poor, by Eugene Sue & Henry Champion Deming, 1815-1872. The New World Extra Series, 1844. Fiction 1876-1983, A Bibliography of United States Editions, R.R. Bowker Co., New York and Paris, 1983, Vol. 2, p. 1687.

(122) David Rittenhouse Porter (1788-1867), Governor of Pennsylvania 1839-1845. Pennsylvania Manual of Politics and Government, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Bureau of Publications.

(123) "Taking care of number one," attending to one's own self interest, is an expression common in standard English since the 18th Century. Partridge, p. 573.


1844

JANUARY

1 January 1844. I remained up in Burlington today for the purpose of having the opportunity of starting earlier for the country this afternoon, than if I had gone to the City and come up in the 2 o'clock train. I was at home until about 3 p.m. with exception of about one hour in the morning when I was out skating on a small pond on Kinsey's Lane. It was the first time I was out this season. Left about 1/4 of 4 p.m. with Jim Sterling for Springfield to attend a Party given by the Misses Earl.

We arrived there about 1/4 past 5, and were introduced into

the parlor, where there was a roomful of young ladies, the gentlemen not having arrived. It being dark, it was impossible to judge of the beauty or homeliness of the company collected. In a short time the lamp was lit, which brought to my view among the ladies two of the prettiest girls I have come across for a long while. They were Misses Elizabeth and Kate Earl, no relation I believe, to the family at whose house we were in.

Had a delightful supper and I never enjoyed myself more in my life during the evening by dancing, &c. for Burlington about 1/4 past 12. Messrs. Hays and Hall started at the same time. They took the lead, and we permitted this till we got to the other side of Slatetown, where we passed. We kept ahead for some time trotting our horse all the while, but they being anxious to pass again, set their horse off in full run and passed again. Finding that they were not going to beat us by fair means, we put our horse on full run while their horse was on the same gait. We passed them like the wind, beating them considerably into Burlington, though it was not very pleasant to run our horse. But we were not to be beaten.

Got into Burlington about 10 m. of 2 a.m.

2 January 1844. In the evening attended Mr. Whale's 3rd cotillion(1) party, and as on the two preceding parties, enjoyed myself exceedingly. I made several new acquaintances among the ladies, which added materially to the pleasures of the evening. The party was very large, and the ladies all looked remarkably pretty. The number of cotillions danced was eleven, and I had the pleasure of participating in all of them.

5 January 1844. In the evening around at Jim Strling's until about 8 o'clock, when we went out to take a walk, but in a few minutes concluded to go and find some skating as the night was magnificent. However was disappointed as the ice would not bear.

7 January 1844. Rather cloudy through the day and evening, wind N.W. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and after noon. Mr. Germain preached in the morning, catechized the children and gave them their new year's presents. Evening at home with the exception of about 1/2 an hour when I was over at the Temperance House. The cars did not get up until 1/2 past 8, having run off the tracks.

8 January 1844. In the evening about half past 7, accompanied Ma down to Bishop Doane's to attend the annual party given by him for the young ladies of St. Mary's Hall. I was very much embarrassed upon entering the room as there was about seventy young ladies there, with not one of whom I was acquainted. In a short time this embarrassment wore off when I was introduced to several young ladies. Among them were Miss A. Lippincott, The Misses Brown & Miss Thompson. With each of these ladies I had some conversation, which passed the evening away pleasantly until the doors of the dining room were thrown open which exposed to our view a table well stocked with the good things of the season and to which the young ladies turned an anxious eye. Upon the ring of the bell they all entered, and after the Bishop's asking a blessing, ample justice was done to the ice cream, cakes, &c. After leaving the refreshment room the young ladies assembled in another room where the Bishop finished the evening's entertainment by prayer. The company was dismissed by shaking Mrs. Doane and her husband by the hand as they passed out. The ladies of the Hall, generally speaking looked well, and with some exceptions, pretty. Left about half past 9.

11 January 1844. In the evening went up to Mdme. Hazard's party, the third of the season. Enjoyed myself very much this evening, having danced nearly every cotillion. About the middle of the evening had two fancy dances danced by three of Mdme.'s pupils. Left about half past 11 and went to my lodgings.

12 January 1844. Commenced raining and sleeting about 2 p.m. and continued up to the hour of writing, 8 p.m. The pavements were very slippery and many persons cut queer figures, and measured their length on them. At the office all day and left for Burlington at 5 p.m. as usual. Encountered considerable ice in crossing [the river]. There has been a great deal made within the last few days. It floats up and down the river impeding the navigation considerably.

Did not get further than the outskirts of Camden this evening before one of the wheels of the freight car broke, which obliged us, for some reason or other, to go backwards and forwards a number of times and finally back to the depot to get another car. Did not leave Camden until 6 and arrived at Burlington at 7 p.m.

17 January 1844. In the evening attended Mr. Whale's 4 th cotillion party. The music was not nearly so good, or the party so large as the preceding ones, but all appeared to enjoy themselves very much.

18 January 1844. At the office all day, and left about 1/4 of 6 p.m. when I went down to Hanley's, took tea, dressed, &c. for the purpose of accompanying the Misses Hanley to a Party given by Mrs. Moss. Entered the room about 1/4 past 8, and in a short time dancing was introduced. It lasted until the breaking up of the party. There were several very pretty young ladies there, which of course made the company much more agreeable.

In one of the pound cakes there were two rings, one of which I had the luck to find in my piece. It belonged to one of the young ladies in the room to whom I returned it, and of course had an introduction. Found her to be pretty, agreeable and pleasant in her manners, and had the pleasure of dancing once with her. All parties appeared to enjoy themselves, and the company dispersed about 1/4 of 2 a.m.

19 January 1844. It was my intention to remain in and go to bed early this evening on account of being up so late on the two previous nights, but being invited into Dr. Ellis', did away with my intention and accordingly went in. Spent a delightful evening in dancing &c. Met there the two Miss Biles', being the first time I was introduced. Found them very agreeable ladies.

23 January 1844. Was confined to the house all day (with the exception of about 15 minutes occupied in going to the post office to put a letter in for Cristiani) on account of having a cold and sore throat.

24 January 1844. Was in the house all day, not feeling well enough to go down this morning, having a sore throat and a headache. Towards evening felt much better. Around at Mr. Burne's in the evening, we all having had an invitation. Met there the Misses Biles', the Misses Mackison's, Dr. and Mrs. Sterling, Mr. and Mrs. and Miss Wetherill. Spent the evening pleasantly in dancing, &c.

25 January 1844. There is great deal of floating ice in the river, and has been for the past week.

26 January 1844. Clear and exceedingly cold all day, the coldest we have had this season. Wind N.W. Thermometer at 8 a.m. 10 degrees; at 2 p.m. 20 degrees. Went around to see the Misses Leeds, found them pleasant and agreeable as usual, and looking pretty. Spent a very pleasant evening chatting about matters and things, and was favored with some fine singing and playing from Miss Anathusa.

27 January 1844. The river, both opposite the City and to Burlington, was entirely frozen and persons were skating upon it, though not below Race Street at the City. Left Messrs. Elliott and Robinson's(2) office today for the purpose of going into business for myself in the course of a few days.

28 January 1844. Went down on the River which is entirely closed. In the morning walked 1/2 way over, and in the after noon went all the way to Bristol.

29 January 1844. Left Burlington this morning as usual and proceeded safely until we got just beyond Pensauken Creek, when our attention was arrested by the sudden stoppage of the cars. Upon getting out found two of the baggage cars were thrown off the track, apparently very much broken, while the wheels were strewed along the track for some distance, and the earth torn up considerably. It appears that in severely cold weather frost gets into the cast iron wheels which makes them very brittle. This morning one or two of them broke, which brought the car to the ground, and of course displaced and broke the one following. Theodore Mitchell, Pa, myself, and some others, got on the back of the freight car, which was before the broken cars and attached to the locomotive, and went down to Camden upon it.

Arrived in the City about 10 o'clock while the rest of the passengers (except those that walked) had to get to the City when best they could. Upon our arrival at the City, Pa and I went in search of a desk for the office but were unsuccessful. Then went up to Pa's office(3) but I suppose I must now call it my office, as today I commence business there on my own account. I expect to continue, and hope by a close attention to it, prosper, and merit patronage.

31 January 1844. The navigation of the river continues to be entirely obstructed by ice, which is now very thick and heavy. Opposite the City the continuing passage of the steam ferry boats keeps the channel open between this and Camden. That enables us to cross in the morning and evening without much difficulty. Above and below the City, however, the ice is fast and the bay has much floating in it. A number of vessels are now lying at the wharves, loaded and ready for sea, but it is not thought prudent to move them, even with the aid of steam. It was expected that the United States steamship Princeton would go down tomorrow, on her way to Washington. The City Ice Boat was employed to cut away the ice around, and make a passage for her, but after proceeding as far as the Point, the ice boat returned, and the Princeton is still at the Navy Yard, where she no doubt will remain some days.

At the office through the day until 5 p.m., when I took a stroll down in Chestnut Street, but it was so cold very few were on the promenade. In the evening at Mr. Whale 's 5th cotillion Party, accompanied Miss Mary Wood, Emma Erwin, and Lydia. The Party was very large, and a number of pretty faces were to be found among the ladies. Left after dancing 9 sets, when Miss Wood and Lydia were tired, and my leg paining me very much from having hurt it yesterday. Emma did not dance. Accompanied Miss Wood home where Lydia remained for the night. Then went home with Emma, being invited by Mr. Ellis and cousin Sarah to spend the night. Accepted their hospitality, thinking a nice bed, and no walk, was preferable to going from Montgomery Street to 8th and Arch, and then sleeping on the sofa.

FEBRUARY

1 February 1844. In the evening went around with Frank Woolman to the Lyceum to attend a concert given by the Virginia Minstrels. They are fine Negro singers and very amusing.

3 February 1844. Remained at home throughout the day and evening, on account of my leg being very sore having hurt it on Tuesday last.

8 February 1844. I was astonished on waking this morning to find the ground covered to the depth of several inches with snow, which was still falling very fast. It continued to come down very rapidly until about 1 p.m. There was pretty good sleighing early in the morning but it was pretty soon used up, as there was no foundation to it. In the evening attended Mdme. Hazard's 5th cotillion Party. It was a very fine affair, the company was both large and select. I enjoyed myself more than at any of the others. There were eight sets danced, 5 of which I participated in.

12 February 1844. We went over to the Misses Nesbit's, having made an engagement with them in the morning to cross the river on the ice. All started, that is Mrs. Nesbit, the Misses Louisa, Helen, Clara, Elizabeth, Amelia and Alice Nesbit, and my sister Lydia. Upon arriving at the wharf there was parleying whether we should go, as it was considered by some that it was not entirely safe. But we soon concluded to start, leaving Mrs. Nesbit on the wharf. After walking about 200 yards from the shore Lydia and Miss Louisa Nesbit became frightened, and went back. The rest of the party continued their walk to Bristol. Took a stroll through the place and returned to Burlington safely.

In the evening at home, Ma had a small company. The Company appeared to enjoy themselves laughing, talking, dancing, &c., and left about 11 p.m. I accompanied Miss Helen Nesbit home, who this evening, and as usual, looked remarkably pretty. She is a lady that suits my taste precisely. She is handsome, pleasant in her manners, intelligent, and well calculated to win the favor and admiration of gentlemen.

14 February 1844. At the office through the day and until 1/4 of 8 p.m., when I left and went up to Mr. Edward Roberts. I had an engagement to accompany Miss Elizabeth to a Party given by Mr. and Mrs. Levy(4) in Spruce Street, 2 nd House below 8 th . The Party came off in a most elegant style. The supper table was elegant in the extreme. The house was furnished in the most magnificent style, and must have cost a good deal of money. I enjoyed myself much more than I expected having been introduced to three very handsome young ladies, viz., Miss Layne and the two Misses Lehman. I have been wishing an acquaintance with the Miss L's for the last two years, and am now glad I have received it. Found them to be very agreeable and pleasant in their manners and ladies that pleased me to be acquainted with.

15 February 1844. Towards evening there was a slight fall of snow. However, it soon turned to rain, which fell heavily at night, literally flooded the streets with water and rendered them in some places quite impassable because the gutters filled with ice. Wind N.E.

At the office all day and left about 20 m. past 7 for the purpose of going up to Mr. Roberts to wait upon Anna and Elizabeth to a party given by Mrs. King. I went up there early to see what arrangements were to be made, as the evening was too bad to walk. Found that Miss Anna had engaged a Mr. Leary of South Carolina to wait upon her, who promised to come about half past 8. I, as well as the ladies, were kept in a state of suspense until near 9 o'clock, not knowing whether Mr. L. would come, or whether to get a cab myself. As good luck would have it he came and all got safe to the party.

There were a great number there, and upon our introduction into the room, soon engaged in dancing. The party was in very pretty style, and the company very large, making the rooms almost too crowded. Dancing was the order of the evening, with four musicians hired for the occasion. The supper table was beautifully arranged and well filled. The ladies, generally speaking, were pretty.

20 February 1844. At the office through the greater part of the day, though I was out on business through some portions of it. Having occasion to be in Chestnut Street, found a great number of ladies promenading there.

In the evening called down to see Mrs. and Miss Oliver in Pearl Street, to settle a little matter between them and myself. It appears that someone had written them a very insulting letter and had affixed my name to it. They, of course, thought it was me, and I therefore had to call to inform them of their mistake and at once put a stop to the mean and contemptible trick that had been played upon me which, if I had not contradicted it, would have been a base calumny on my character. I succeeded with ease in convincing them that I had nothing or knew nothing about the letter, and we parted friends, after having conversed of matters and things in general.

22 February 1844. Today being the 112th anniversary of the birth of the immortal Washington, it was celebrated in this City and vicinity in a manner that has not been surpassed, if equaled, in a long series of years, excepting only the centennial celebration.(5) The weather was as mild and pleasant as a May day. All the principal Streets presented the appearance of a holiday. The sidewalks were crowded with pedestrians, and the carriage way thronged with vehicles. Companies and battalions of the military looked remarkably well, and were accompanied by superb bands of music. Flags were streaming from the shipping and public places. All the public offices were closed before noon, and many faces wore the appearance of rejoicing. In the morning the Whig Festival at the Musical Fund Hall(6) was largely attended. The speakers were warmly greeted as they progressed, and the performances of the splendid band added much to the proceedings.

The Whig Ball at the Chestnut Street Theater(7) closed the festivities of the day. It was got up in grand style, and on true temperance principles. Everything passed off pleasantly.

25 February 1844. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon; Bishop Doane preached both times. In the evening accompanied Grandma to a Baptist meeting where I heard a very good sermon.

27 February 1844. At the office all day and left for Burlington at 5 p.m. Arrived there about 1/4 past 6. Upon going into the house found it all in confusion, having commenced moving to the house at the N.E. corner of Broad and Wood Street.(8) I was engaged through the evening in carrying different things down to the other house, and by 10 o'clock was pretty well tired. This is the second time we have moved within the year, although it was not our lot to move in the 20 years previous. I hope when we get settled in our new house we may not want to move for 20 years to come, for it is one of the most troublesome things that can occur to a family.

28 February 1844. Was engaged until about 12 N. in taking down some bedsteads &c. when I took dinner, and at 1/4 of 2 left for the city. In the evening at Mr. Whale's 7th Cotillion Party, it was unusually large. I suppose there must have been 500 persons in the room. Was introduced to 7 ladies this evening.

MARCH

1 March 1844. Today is the first day of Spring, and really, if it is to be a sample of our spring weather, I am very glad. It is one of the most delightful days we have had for a long while. The atmosphere is mild and pleasant, which brings the ladies out in great numbers in our thoroughfares. It was almost too warm to walk in the sun today.

4 March 1844. Did not leave Burlington this morning until 9 o'clock. The cars had been detained by their running off the road previous to their arrival at Burlington. The boat was expected down this morning but did not come, for what reason it is not known. It is thought by all, that she should have been down two weeks ago as the river has been clear of ice for more than that time.

7 March 1844. Clear, warm and delightful all day and evening, being real spring weather, which brought the ladies out in great numbers on the promenade. The steamer Trenton commenced her regular trips today, which is what she ought to have done long ago as the river has been clear of ice for some time.

At the office throughout the greater part of the day, and until about 1/2 past 7, when I went up to the Assembly Buildings to attend Mdme. Hazard's 7th Cotillion Party. I think I may say that I enjoy myself more at her parties than I do at Mr. Whale's. The company appears to be more select, the room is not nearly so crowded, and they have, according to my taste, better music.

9 March 1844. Left Burlington this morning in the Boat for the City at 10 m. past 8, but did not arrive until 1/4 past 11, as we encountered a very heavy fog, and were afraid to run fast. They had to use the lead(9) nearly all the way down. The Trenton presents a very neat and pretty appearance, having had a thorough repairing and cleansing through the past winter. The boat had been painted throughout, and the cabins newly carpeted & cleansed which give them a fine appearance. Waited upon Miss Morris this morning. As usual she looked pretty, and was very pleasant and loquacious.

10 March 1844. At Quaker meeting in the morning, and in the afternoon at St. Mary's Church where Bishop Doane preached.

11 March 1844. Clear and delightful all day. The ladies came out in great numbers and appeared to enjoy themselves in the promenade. Spring is now becoming visible by the workings of nature. The trees are coming out in various places, and I hope before long we can have some flowers out to gladden our senses after the winter that has just passed. In Burlington, or at home (I suppose I must now say), everything is beginning to look beautiful. Some birds are heard in the morning uttering their sweet notes while perched in some of the neighboring trees, and everything wears a clean and a fresh aspect.

At the office through the day, and until 7 p.m. when I left and went down to Bill Hanley 's. But upon going in unexpectedly met Misses Virginia and Caroline Day, and Miss Stigarinne. Concluded to spend the evening there which I did very pleasantly having several dances, some music, plays, and plenty of chatting. Combined, these made the evening pass off delightfully. I have not met the Misses Day for some eighteen months or two years, and the meeting was very unexpected to me this evening. Virginia has considerably improved and is now quite pretty and they are both lively and pleasing in their manners.

13 March 1844. For the last two days we have had rainy weather and people looked rather drooping. Some part of today there were signs of clear weather, but, like many other good symptoms, they were soon dissipated. Our hopes of sunshine and a speedy enjoyment of the usual bright display of pretty faces along our promenades were lost in the returning mists of a gloomy day. However, late in the evening it cleared off.

Went up to the Assembly Rooms to attend Mr. Whale's last cotillion party of the season. The evening passed very pleasantly with the exception of a little difficulty I had with a gentleman in regard to a cotillion dance I was to dance with Miss Bustard. However we settled it amicably. Made several new acquaintances.

14 March 1844. At the office all day, or until 1/2 past 4 p.m., when I left for the cars to start for home. I arrived safely at the usual time, though not without encountering some danger in crossing Rancocas bridge. One of the beams of the draw [bridge] had been broken by the mammoth engine weighing 21 1/2 tons passing over it and rendering it rather dangerous. In the evening, accompanied Ma and Lydia to church. The Bishop gave us a fine discourse which ended by 1/2 past 8. The rest of the evening was spent at home employed in putting up our new blinds in the parlors. We received them today from Mr. Hedges(10) in 2nd below Dock Street.

17 March 1844. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon. Bishop Doane preached both times. In the morning he gave us a very long sermon upon "Confirmation," entirely too long to sit well with comfort, being about one hour and a half delivering it.

19 March 1844. I paid a visit to Mrs. Cristiani to inform her of her son's health having received a letter from him today.

20 March 1844. Went up to the office and remained there until 7 p.m. when I left, got my supper and attended a sale at the exchange of Real Estate.

21 March 1844. About 1/2 past 7 went up to the Assembly Buildings to attend Mdme. Hazard's 8th and last cotillion Party of the season. The company was very large and many of the ladies pretty. The dancing was kept up until half past 12.

24 March 1844. In the evening the rite of confirmation was celebrated by Bishop Doane in a very impressive and solemn manner for 3 men and 18 women, among whom were a number of young ladies from the school.

25 March 1844. At the office from the time I arrived in the City until about 7 p.m. when, looking over the papers, noticed that Mr. Booth(11) was to play Macbeth this evening. As I had never witnessed this tragedy, concluded to go.

Scarcely had I entered the theater than I regretted that I had gone, as the low state of morals witnessed at these places of amusement is hardly to be credited, unless seen. I, however, sat the play out, which was performed well, and left almost with a resolve not to visit a theater again.

28 March 1844. In the evening accompanied Miss Virginia Mitchell and Miss Weston down to the rehearsal at St. Mary's Hall. The entertainment was very good, and the young ladies of the school performed their various pieces with great credit. Many of them looked remarkably pretty. Miss Patterson played and sang exceedingly well, both with the piano and guitar accompaniments. Miss Whitney of New York appears to be quite accomplished, judging from her singing, playing and drawing. The entertainment was concluded about 1/4 past 10 with singing a hymn and a prayer.

29 March 1844. Evening at St. Mary's Church. Bishop Doane gave us a very fine discourse.

30 March 1844. Arrived in the City by 1/4 of 10. On the way, we ran against a canal boat and broke her railing off.

We were visited about 3 o'clock by two pretty sharp flashes of lightning and a real heavy April shower with a March storm of wind, which was succeeded by a cold rain until about 8 o'clock when it commenced hailing and snowing, and continued for more than an hour.

31 March 1844. The frost of Saturday night has undoubtedly done much damage to the fruit trees, vegetables, &c., which, for the most part, were considerably advanced this season, owing to the genial weather we had through the past month, unprecedented by several years past. The greater part of the truck gardens in the vicinity of the City are already made up, and if the frost of Saturday night shall have affected them seriously, it will be a matter of no little regret to all.

APRIL

1 April 1844. We had a fine cold day for the first of April, clear, and a fine sharp wind with plenty of ice, though the shrubberies are getting ready for a spring business. The Horse Chestnut presents its buds quite expanded almost in half. The Willow is feathered up with its half-yellow leaves, and the Lilac bush is putting on its greenness; its upper buds are swelling open, and here and there the flowerstick is putting out its immature buds. Apricot trees, favorably situated, are opening their buds, and with a few more warm days would be in blossom. Perhaps it is a little too soon, all this. The sober Walnut and Oak look as gray as in mid-winter, having no desire to venture out before their time. The incautious smile of childhood is often the cause of ruin - it comes too soon. They who never smile look grave and rebuke. Perhaps it is better sometimes to incur the risk of too early exhibition than to keep our powers and faculties hidden until fear and suspicion surmount love and display. Then we stand flowerless, scentless, fruitless and profitless unless cut down.

But to change the subject, and speak of the day itself which every one knows is called "all fool's day," when endeavors are made by many persons to make fools of others, who, in turn, were in like manner operated on by their fellows. In some instances these efforts were successful, but many a wide-awake chap, when "tried on," put his thumb to his nose, and with his fingers moving to and fro, significantly said "no you don't," and walked off with a strut, indicative of a most signal triumph. Some, indeed, were fooled by letters to them, others by parcels, packages and old pocket wallets, placed in positions where they would attract notice and be picked up. This afforded no little sport to those who laid out the dice, and contributed no less in chagrin and mortification to those who swallowed the baits. One fool, it is said, makes many, and fools in one way may sometimes be made fools another way. The fear of being taken in no doubt interfered with the business relations of life and the intercourse of citizens to some extent during the whole of yesterday. Many, no doubt, who were honestly directed in the course of business, or informed on some matter of reality, doubted the truth, and hesitated or failed entirely to give credence thereto, and acted differently from what they otherwise would have done.

Went up to the Exchange, went into the Sheriff's Sale for a few minutes.

4 April 1844. So warm that fire was not needed and I noticed some persons in the Streets with summer clothes and hats on. Evening at the National Theater to see Rookwood & Columbia's Sons.

8 April 1844. After supper waited upon Anna Roberts and my sister down to the Bishop's, having had an invitation to a small party given for the young ladies who have remained through the vacation at St. Mary's Hall.

9 April 1844. Afternoon and in the evening until 1/2 past 9 at my office writing, when I left and went down to Mr. Sloan's tailor and ordered a pair of light Kessimer(12) pants.

10 April 1844. The warm weather of the few last days has exercised a very sensible effect upon vegetation. The trees throughout the city begin to bud and blossom, and from the number which have been planted along the sidewalks, we have every prospect of enjoying a green and shady summer, and of having the monotony of long lines of brick and mortar relieved by refreshing intervals of foliage. The doomed Lindens of State House Row have undergone a complete shave, a large number of the worm-eaten limbs have been sawed off, but I fear that no pruning or trimming can save them.

11 April 1844. Went out sailing with Mr. Antram, but the breeze soon died away and we came in. After supper took a seat on the steps with Mr. Grubb and brother and smoked a cigar.

12 April 1844. At about 1/2 past 7 went down to the Chinese museum(13) salon to witness the performance of a most astonishing man, who styled himself the "Fakir of Ava." Some of his performances, or tricks, were wonderful in the extreme, the particulars of one I will here record.

It was the passing of a shawl belonging to one of the ladies in the audience to the fire proof [safe or vault] of the United States Gazette office. The "Fakir" passed a number of blank cards through the company, stating at the same time that he wished the persons taking them to place their name and also the name of the place they desired the shawl to be conveyed. He then collected the cards in a small bag, and offered it to a lady to take one out. She did, and wrote on it the name of a person (Viskey, I believe), and that it should be sent to the fire-proof of the U.S. Gazette office. A Committee of 5 was then chosen to get in a cab and drive as fast as possible down to the office. I forgot to mention that during all the time, and for five minutes after, the shawl remained in full view of the audience where the "Fakir" had laid it, having carried it there at full arms length to show it was not changed. Some five minutes after the Committee left, he folded it up (in full view of the audience) in a peculiar style, tied around with black tape, placed it in a small tankard, put the lid on, took it off and it was gone. Some ten minutes afterward the Committee returned (making a great noise) with the shawl in their possession done up in the same style as when passed away by the "Fakir," they having found it in the fireproof of the U.S. Gazette office, after having some difficulty in opening it. A clerk belonging to the office of the U.S. Gazette came forward, and stated to the audience that he had locked the fire proof up at 7 o'clock this evening, and put the key in his pocket.

13 April 1844. Mitchell and I went down to the River and in a short time succeeded in getting a sail boat, and went over to Bristol. Upon our return to Burlington took in Mitchell's two sisters, Caroline and Virginia, and Miss Kidd. After sailing about 1/2 an hour put them ashore, when we put up the boat. In going over a raft in landing, the ladies had some difficulty and signs of fright with the raftsmen, but got off without either side being much injured.

14 April 1844. Took a walk around on the banks early in the morning, they are now beginning to assume a delightful appearance as the grass is now becoming green, and the trees are all putting out.

15 April 1844. Afternoon at the office until about 1/2 past 5 when Harvey Stewart and myself took a stroll down in Chestnut Street, but finding it very dusty and few ladies out, soon returned to my office.

16 April 1844. After supper went down to the river and got a sail boat for the purpose of taking a sail, but upon getting out into the river found there was not sufficient wind to carry the boat along and had to take to the oars and fuel my sail. Did not remain out more than 15 or 20 minutes.

17 April 1844. Went up to Miss H.A. Myers in 4th above Race, No. 249, for Lydia having been invited there by Miss Myers through Louisa Wood. Met there several young gentlemen and ladies. I had not had the pleasure of Miss Myers' acquaintance until this evening, she is rather pretty and very agreeable, and a lady you soon become acquainted with.

18 April 1844. So cold this evening that it is thought there will be frost, which will injure the fruit trees very much as they are now out in blossom. The country is beginning to look very beautiful. The trees are generally speaking out, and some of the early vegetables are coming forward fast. Asparagus is in the market, and has been for some days.

19 April 1844. In the evening accompanied Miss Mary Wood and Lydia to an extra concert given by the "Philharmonic Society." The audience was very large and fashionable, the principal part being ladies, and many of them quite pretty. Mrs. Baily's singing was very fine, and Norton's performance on the horn and Rudolph on the trombone was much applauded. Mr. Wallace's "Carnival of Venice" on the violin, and theme of "The Cracovienne" on the piano was beautiful in the extreme, far superior to anything I ever heard, and the applause was deafening.

20 April 1844. At 2 p.m. left for Burlington to accompany Lydia home. The number of passengers was very large, I suppose 4 or 500, the greater part Quakers as their yearly meeting broke up today.

Called over for Hugh Nesbit, and we both went down to the river accompanied by Sam Jackson of the City. Got Artram's small sail boat and went over to Bristol and back and then down the river as far as the fish huts. We were unable to get back up again as the wind was dead ahead and tide running down so we took the sail down and went up with our oars. This was the first time I ever took the helm of a sail boat to manage it myself.

21 April 1844. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Lyons preached both times. In the morning his sermon was tolerable, but in the afternoon he attempted to give an extemporaneous lecture but failed, though he succeeded in getting through. He appeared to be very much embarrassed, and introduced his references in such a ludicrous manner that he had the audience at times almost in a titter. I was really glad when it was over as well for him as for myself.

23 April 1844. Got Artram's small boat and went out sailing. Came near upset several times, as I had no ballast and the wind blew in flows. After getting Frank Garret in, we went along very well. It was the second time I ever had the management of a sail boat.

24 April 1844. In the southern part of the City and county a perfect hurricane blew. Fortunately its extent was limited, but its principal violence fell upon the Methodist Church in Wharton(14) near 4th Street. It struck the south end of the Church and, though it had been built in the finest manner, it knocked the upper part or peak as it is called, off the gable end. In an instant it ripped into splinters about one third of the roof, carrying some of the fragments a distance of 200 yards. Many persons were dreadfully alarmed by the storm, and rumors were rife of other injuries further below in the district, particularly among the rope walks and small buildings in exposed situations, and vessels on the river. I have no doubt that much and serious mischief has been produced, both on land and on the water in the path of the storm. As I before observed, it appears to have been limited, and beyond Southwark, scarcely to have been felt.

27 April 1844. Cloudy and rainy all day, making it very unpleasant. Left Burlington this morning at 8 o'clock, accompanied by Lydia for the City where we arrived at the usual hour. Went up to the office, remained until 1/2 past 1, when I left with Lydia for the boat to go to Burlington. Arrived there at usual time. Afternoon at home. In the evening all went around to Mr. Byrnes, having had an invitation to spend the evening there as the bride and groom, Mr. and Mrs. McLain (late Miss Mackison ) and several other persons were to be there. Spent the evening very pleasantly in dancing, &c., and left about 11 o'clock.

28 April 1844. In the afternoon about 2 o'clock James B[udd] Sterling, James Smith and myself started for Springfield to see the Misses Earl. Arrived there about half past 4, after passing through Slabtown, Jobstown and Wrightstown, and having a delightful ride. The Country is now looking beautiful. The trees are all in blossom, the lilacs are in bloom, and in fact vegetation appears to be several weeks in advance of the seasons of the last 4 or 5 years. Took tea and spent a very pleasant evening.

30 April 1844. Spent the evening at Dr. Ellis's where there was a small company given for the Bride and groom, Mr. and Mrs. McLain. Spent a delightful evening dancing &c. Met there two of the Misses Biles, the younger looked remarkably pretty.

MAY

1 May 1844. Clear and delightful all day and warm just such weather as is suited for the first of May, and I believe a number of private parties availed themselves of the opportunity of taking a May day frolic, vegetation is a full month in advance of the seasons of the last few years, and the bounty is now looking very beautiful, the orchards are all in bloom, and judging from the number and quantity of blossoms on the trees we may expect a plentiful supply of fruit in the coming season.

Left Burlington this morning in the early train at 1/4 past 6, and arrived in the city by 20 m. of 8, the ride down was delightful, Was away from the office the greater part of the morning attending to business.

At the office during the afternoon and evening engaged writing until 11 p.m. Up at 5 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

2 May 1844. Cloudy throughout the day, during the morning showering, and the afternoon and evening raining until about 8 o'clock when it stopped and by 9 1/2 p.m. cleared off beautifully. At the office all day, and spent the evening at Roberts' in 9th Street. Up at 5 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

3 May 1844. Clear and very pleasant through the day until about 7 p.m., when we had considerable thunder & lightning and some rain, but soon cleared off again. At the office through the morning, and in the afternoon until about 5 p.m., when I took a walk to the Recorders office on business, and afterwards a stroll in Chestnut St., found great numbers of ladies on the promenade. Evening called up for Sam Mitchell, when both of us went up to see the Miss Leeds, Spent a delightful evening there, as usual.

Up at 1/4 past 5 a.m., and to bed at 12 p.m.

4 May 1844. Clear and pleasant though warm until about 6 p.m., when we had a slight shower of rain and a considerable blow. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. left in the New Philadelphia for Burlington, had a great number of passengers on board, and a quick trip up being only one hour and 10 m. from wharf to wharf. Immediately, on arrival, Theodore Mitchell and myself went out sailing in "Antrams" boat. Had a fine breeze and went along gaily, laying over so much at times that the water would run over the gang boards. After we had been out some time, run in. Took Hugh Nesbit and Wm Wilcox out. About an hour afterwards the wind died away, and it was nearly calm, but we noticed a dark cloud rising in the Northwestern horizon when Mitchell predicted that would have wind enough in a short time, and when it did come his prediction became true to the fullest extent.

For a few minutes it blew a perfect hurricane and it was with great difficulty that we kept the boat from upsetting by sitting to the windward and luffing up a little. Stopped at Bristol twice during the time we were out, and returned to Burlington about 7 o'clock perfectly safe and without a ducking which I must say we ran a narrow chance of, had we been down opposite the fish cabins nothing would have saved us from going over.

Evening at home and went to bed quite early having so bad a headache could not remain up. Up this morning at 5 a.m.

5 May 1844. Clear warm and delightful during the day and evening. In the morning about 8 o'clock went out to take a stroll along the banks. Met Mr. Silvester and Mr. [illegible] down there, and they, wishing to go over to the fish cabins and not knowing much about rowing accompanied them over. Returned by 10 o'clock and went up to Church. Bishop Doane preached.

Afternoon took a stroll along the banks with Nesbit & Wilcox, and at about 4 o'clock got a boat and went over to Bristol. I returned in ferry boat. Spent the evening over at the Miss Nesbit's. Helen looked remarkable pretty. Up at 1/2 past 4 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

6 May 1844. Cloudy early in the morning but as the day advanced cleared off beautifully though not to last for any length of time. About 5 p.m a violent gust swept over the City, accompanied by a heavy rain. The wind blew with great force, tearing down awnings and signs, and breaking off the limbs of trees in several of the public squares and streets. The large sign of the Democratic headquarters, Chestnut St. below 6th was blown down by the violence of the wind, and falling upon a lady who was passing injured her severely. The storm and rain did not last longer than an hour when it cleared off beautifully.

Left Burlington this morning at 1/2 past 7 and arrived in the city by 1/4 of 9. Went up to the office and remained there through the day. Left for Burlington again at 5. After supper took a sail over to Bristol and back with Mr. Antram & Jim Sterling, had a very pleasant trip and returned by 8 o'clock, and then went up home where I found Miss Caroline and Virginia Mitchell who spent the evening with us, waited up them home about half past 9 o'clock. Got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

7 May 1844. Clear and warm, but windy and very dusty. It came in such clouds at times it almost blinded all poor pedestrians that were so unlucky to be in the streets.

The riots(15) between the "Irishmen" and "Native Americans"(16) that have been going on for the last few days are still progressing, and from what I hear considerable damage will be done before the matters are settled.

Left Burlington this morning about 1/4 of 8 and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9 went up to the office and remained there through the day. Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m. to accompany ma home. After supper took a sail over as far as the fish cabins and back, when it was about 8 o'clock, then went up to Mr. Sterlings where I spent the evening. Up at 10 m. of 6 a.m., and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

8 May 1844. Cloudy and blustering with considerable quantity of dust about throughout the day and evening.

Left Burlington this morning at 1/2 past 7 and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. Went up to the office and remained there through the day and evening until about 1/2 past 9 o'clock, when there was an alarm of fire, and having heard some rumors of the mob intending to set fire to St. Augustine's Church (Catholic) in 4th St. opposite New, wended my way in that direction.

About 1/2 past 9, fire was communicated to the vestibule of the Church, it is said by a boy about 14 years old. It increased with rapidity when once under way, and dense masses of smoke curled out from every window. In a few minutes the flames reached the belfry, and burst out from the upper window in broad sheets. The whole steeple was soon wrapt in the devouring element, and presented a terrific yet grand aspect. The clock struck ten while the fire was raging at its greatest fury. At 20 m. past 10, the cross which surmounted the steeple, and which remained unhurt, fell with a loud crash, amid the plaudits of a large portion of the spectators. Ten minutes afterwards the steeple, which had stood until burnt to a mere skeleton, fell throwing up a mass of cinders which fell like a shower of gold on the Building & Streets northeast of the church. The heat during the height of the fire was so intense, that persons could hardly look at the flames at the distance of a square, and the light was so brilliant as to dim even the gas lamps.

Besides "St. Augustine's," St. Michael's Church and nunnery and a number of houses were burned this afternoon, and the mob, it appears, has had virtual possession of the county of Philadelphia for the last two days and nights, and the law has been defied with impunity. Lives and property have been sacrificed in a desperate and terrible conflict, and anarchy and riots, amounting almost to civil war, have obtained a power and boldness which is without parallel in the history of our State.

Well may it be asked with regret, and apprehension, what will be the ultimate result of such a fearful state of things? Are our liberties to be surrendered to the rash and headlong domination of mobs, or are we to fly from this greater evil to the lesser one of a consolidated military police? To one or the other of these extremities we seem to be rapidly approaching, and, unless the moral atmosphere of our city be thoroughly purged, we must be content to suffer all the horrors of sanguinary tumults, reckless invasions of right and liberty, and a blind and indiscriminate destruction of property, or submit to be [dragooned] into an obedience to the law. An awful responsibility rests with those who have caused and promoted these calamities, and are yet stimulating to their continuance, and their reward must and will be the abhorrence of all good men and the anathema of every patriot.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

9 May 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day and evening, which brought numbers of the ladies of our city out on the promenade. At the office all day, and in the evening attended the Reverend Henry Giles' Lecture on Goldsmith. It was a very amusing and interesting subject & he appeared to handle it with that precision of one being well acquainted.

After the Lecture took a walk up as far as 13th and Chestnut Streets to see whether there was any mob about St. John's Church. Founded it guarded on every side by soldiers and it was impossible to approach nearer than a square. I believe all the rest of the Catholic Churches are guarded in the same way, every thing was very quiet during the time I was up, and think there will be no disturbance of any account tonight.

Up at 20 m. past 5 a.m., and to bed at 11 p.m.

10 May 1844. Clear and very pleasant through the day, but clouded over towards evening and had the appearance of rain. At the office all day and during the evening very much engaged.

Got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

11 May 1844. Cloudy and rainy in the morning and very cool, but by 3 p.m cleared off pleasantly and very warm.

At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. started for Burlington. Arrived there at the usual time, and about 5 p.m. Mr. Jos. Smith and myself got Antram's sail boat out, though there was no wind. But took with the expectation of one when the tide turned, had a little but were obliged to return as soon as the tide would carry us up. Evening out strolling with Smith and Jim Welch until about 9 o'clock then went home and in a short time after to bed.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

12 May 1844 Cloudy and rained a little in the morning but as the day advanced cleared off delightfully but windy. At home during the morning writing. Afternoon at Church, walked home with Miss Helen Nesbit. Evening at home. Cousin Lydia Roberts came up with us yesterday at 2 o'clock.

Got up at 6 a.m., bed 9 1/2 p.m.

13 May 1844. Clear and delightful through the morning and in the afternoon until about 5 p.m., when it commenced clouding over, and during the evening came the appearance of rain. Left Burlington this morning at 1/2 past 7 and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock, went up to the office and remained there during the day. Left again for Burlington at 5 p.m. where we arrived at the usual hour. After supper, Jim Smith, Jim Sterling, Jim Welch and myself took a stroll down to the river for the purpose of getting a boat and taking a sail to Bristol but unfortunately the boats were all a ground & were obliged to give up our intentions, and retraced our steps. During the remainder of the evening at home writing.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., and to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

14 May 1844. Cloudy rain damp and unpleasant during the morning but towards noon cleared off pleasantly and became rather warmer. Left Burlington this morning about 1/4 past 9. Cousin Lydia Roberts and little Addy Roberts came down with me. They have been in Burlington since Saturday last.

At the office all day, and about 1/2 past 7, went around to cousins in 9th St. Remained until 1/4 past 8, then went up to pay the Miss Leeds a visit, found them in, and as usual spent a very pleasant evening, left about 11 o'clock. Up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

15 May 1844. Clear and delightful throughout the day and evening and rather cool. At the office during the greater part of the day, and through the evening busily engaged at writing. Was out a little while on Chestnut St. in the afternoon. It was thronged with the beauty and fashion of the city, all seeming as if trying to out vie the others in the mode & variety of their dress.

Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

16 May 1844. Clear and very pleasant through the day until about 5 p.m. when it commenced clouding over, and through the evening had several showers of rain. At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington where we arrived at the usual time. Evening at home. Mrs. and Miss Helen Kinsey and son spent the evening with us.

Got up at 20 minutes past 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

17 May 1844. Cloudy and unpleasant all day with an occasional sprinkling or rain. Left Burlington this morning at about 1/4 of 8 and arrived in the city 1/4 past 9. Went up to the office and remained there through the day. About 7 p.m. took a walk down to see Bill Hanly, did not find him in, walked up as far as 6th and Market with Dr. Dickey, and then wended my way to see Miss Susan Much. Found her in, and met her sister Josephine and Mr. [illegible] there.

Up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

18 May 1844. Cloudy with the appearance of rain early in the morning but by 1 p.m. cleared off warm and pleasant. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. left for Burlington. Had over 500 passengers on board, but arrived safely about 1/2 past 3.

A few minutes after our arrival Michael Nesbit, Jim Smith and myself went out sailing. Was blowing tremendous hard and

came near capsizing several times before we got to Bristol. Upon our return from Bristol, were very near being upset twice once just off the point of the island, and again off Bishop Doanes. The latter time she was on her beam ends and the water poured in with a perfect rush over her gang boards fore and aft, wet us all completely, and shipped so much water were obliged to run into the Bishop's wharf to pump out, when Nesbit and I got out thinking it was much safer on shore, than in a small sail boat in such a blow. Smith and Mitchell however got home safe, and without upsetting.

After supper Nesbit and I got a boat and rowed over as far as the fish cabins, returned about 8 o'clock when, meeting Smith, took a stroll around town.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

19 May 1844. Clear and very pleasant through the day until about 5 p.m., when it clouded over heavily, and through the evening wore the appearance of rain. At St. Mary's Church in the morning. Bishop Doane preached. After dinner took a stroll down along the banks with Smith, upon our return met Nesbit, after some little talk concluded to take a walk out to "silver lake." The walk was delightful. Went up as far as the 5th and last lake, when we went over to see Mr. Tage. Did not find him in, and then continued on our way to Burlington again.

In the evening took a stroll down along the banks and through town with Nesbit, and finally brought up at Broad and Main just as the cars came, when both went home. Found Dr. and Mrs. Ellis, who had been spending the evening at our house.

Got up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

20 May 1844. Cloudy and rained very hard during the early part of the morning, but afterwards cleared off, though it again clouded over very heavily about 4 p.m. and had several tremendous hard showers of rain. Left Burlington this morning at 1/2 past 7 and arrived in the city by 5 minutes of 9. Attended to getting some searches out and then went up to the office where I remained the rest of the day. In the evening went down to see Bill Hanly, took a stroll around with him, and about 9 o'clock went up to the office where we spent the rest of the evening.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

21 May 1844. Cloudy through the day, but towards evening cleared off quite cold. At the office all day and in the evening went up to the Assembly Buildings, to see an exhibition of the battle of Bunker Hill, Stony Point and some negro singers.

Up at 20 m. past 5 a.m. bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

22 May 1844. Clear & cool though very pleasant during the whole of the day and evening. At the office all day, and left for Burlington at 5 p.m., where we arrived at the usual time. After supper Smith and I got Antram's sail boat and went over as far as Bristol and returned being too cold to remain on the water long. After landing walked up as far as Sterling's store remained there until about 9 o'clock when Sterling, Smith and I went down to see Hall. Went in smoked a cigar, and about 10 o'clock adjourned to our respective homes. Aunt Eliza Erwin came up in the cars tonight.

Up at 5 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

23 May 1844. Clear and delightful all day, evening clear and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at 1/4 of 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 9. Ma and Aunt Erwin came down, also the Miss Biles. Waited upon Miss Kate ashore, upon arrival went up to the office where I remained through the day. Spent the evening around at Roberts' in 9th St.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

24 May 1844. Clear and delightful all day, and in the evening moonlight, warm and very pleasant. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. left for Burlington. Mr & Mrs O'Calligan and son went up.

Upon our arrival went up home, and about 1/2 past 4 took a walk down along the banks as far as the Bishop's, and around up home again. After supper Mr. Miller and I went out sailing in his boat took a stretch over to Bristol and back, and down the river a piece when the wind died away and we went in. The evening was delightful as it was both moonlight and warm. After landing (which was about 9 o'clock) and in a few minutes afterwards went over to the cars with Mr. O'Calligan to see him off.

Up at 20 m. past 5 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

25 May 1844. Clear and very pleasant during the day, and clear and moonlight in the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock went up to the office remained there until about 1 p.m., when I left attended to some little business and at 2 left for Burlington again. A very large number of passengers went up.

Upon arrival wended my way home where I remained until about 5 p.m., then took a stroll down to the river, and on returning met Jim Welch and Andrew Levering with whom I took a walk out the main Street a considerable distance but returned in time for supper, after which got a boat for the purpose of taking Miss Griffiths and Lydia out rowing, but Miss G. was prevented on account of some friends coming in. Took Lydia, Mrs. Prichett and Mr. O'Calligan. Returned by 8 o'clock. Went home and remained there the rest of the evening.

Got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

26 May 1844. Clear through the morning, afternoon showery, and the evening rained hard. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon the Bishop preached both times, evening at home. Mr. James Smith spent the evening with us. Raining hard when he left, and every appearance of continuing.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

27 May 1844. Cloudy throughout the day and evening, and in the morning from 9 1/2 until 1/2 past 10 had quite a heavy shower. Left Burlington at about 1/4 of 8 and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9, Accompanied Miss Griffiths and Lydia down, were caught in the shower and left them in a store in Walnut St. until the shower went over. Mr. and Mrs. O'Calligan went down this morning Mrs. O'C. has been staying at our house since Friday last, and Mr. O'C. since Saturday, he having returned in the 5 o'clock train.

At the office during the day and evening until 1/4 past 8, when I stopped in to see the Miss Woods. Spent about 20 minutes there, and then started up to see the Miss Leeds, but meeting them on my road up, did not go as far as the house, but retraced my steps and went down to 3rd & Walnut where I stopped in to see Bedlock & Paschall remained until about 10 o'clock when I walked up with Bedlock as far as my office and left him.

Got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

28 May 1844. Cloudy all day with sometimes the appearance of rain, early part of evening cloudy, latter part clear and moonlight.

At the office during the day and at 5 p.m., left for Burlington, where we arrived at the usual time, though not without escaping an accident which might have proved serious. On crossing the sluice bridge run off the track, might have been thrown into the sluice or down the embankment.

In the evening took a stroll down along the banks with Jim Welch and about 8 o'clock got a boat, and went over to Bristol where we remained a short time and returned to Burlington about 1/2 past 9. Up at 5 a.m., and to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

29 May 1844. Clear and delightful during the day and in the evening clear cool and moonlight. Left Burlington about 1/2 past 8 in company with Jim Welch on board the New Philadelphia for Trenton to attend a Whig convention for the confirmation of the nomination of

Henry Clay(17) for President and Theodore Frelinghuysen for Vice President. The boat was so crowded that you could with difficulty move about and at times I almost thought it unsafe to remain on board as she was almost loaded down to her guards. Upon our arrival at Bordentown had considerable difficulty in getting seats in the cars, as the party was full 1000-strong, and some ladies who had come up were unable to go on at all. After a detention of some half hour, started, and after a pleasant ride of 20 minutes or half an hour arrived at our place of destination, where we were received by our friends, the Whigs, with more enthusiastic cheers. Upon leaving the cars Welch and I took a stroll up into town. The Streets were thronged with men, each wearing the badge for the occasions, and the windows were filled with beautiful ladies, who hung from many doors and windows appropriate devices for the day.

After walking around for a while, taking some ice cream We called upon Mr. Thomas Heuling, druggist, a friend of Welches (who by the by I afterwards found to be as fine and clever a fellow as I ever met with) but did not find him in, was informed by his mother that he was down on the parade ground, where we wended our steps.

After looking around for a while found him, when I was introduced, again took a stroll around town and at abut 12 o'clock went down to the parade ground, when we bid our friend Heuling good morning and went into the ranks of the Burlington County delegation (though not without having first an invitation to dinner from him). The prize banner was taken by Salem County they having about 400 men. Burlington County turned out about 1500, and would have taken it, had they been able to rouse another hundred, as they were obliged to have four times the number of Salem, being so much nearer. About 1 p.m., the Newark and other delegations from above came in, in two trains, and such trains I never in my life witnessed before, the first one was composed of 20 eight wheeled cars and the other of 27, all filled inside and out, and I suppose they must have contained at least 3000 people. Shortly after their arrival the procession moved, headed by the national Clay banner taken by the State of Delaware at the Baltimore Convention of the early part of this month. Enthusiasm appeared to be the order of the day, throughout the whole length of the procession there was nothing but shouting and cheering, from a number of windows bouquets and wreaths were thrown to the delegations as they passed, and in return the fair donors would receive three hearty cheers. Wherever there was a Clay banner displayed, or fair faces to be seen at the windows, the cheering was unbounded, the poor fellows hardly seemed to know what they were about as I will show from an instance I will here relate in a few words. My friend Welch was so enthusiastic in cheering the ladies, waving his hat, handkerchief, &c, that he did not discover where he was going until he found himself in the middle of a large mud hole up over shoe top, which added materially to white pants, if dirt is an embellishment. After parading through a number of the streets, the procession went to the state house, and just before arriving there, Welch and I left out of the ranks, having noticed three most beautiful girls who we thought we would like to have a look at, while we could stand on the pavement in front of the house under the pretense of looking at the procession, while taking sly glances at them. Found their names to be the Miss Halsteds, daughters of an eminent lawyer, and a great Whig of Trenton. I think the number of strangers in the city of Trenton today, without exaggeration, 20,000. About 3 p.m., took dinner with Mr. Heuling, after which, went down to see Miss Fanny Brister, a very pretty looking young lady. Spent the remainder of the afternoon strolling about from one place to another. Spent about an hour in one of the upper rooms of the state house where we again had an opportunity of seeing the Miss Halsteds. In the evening took a walk down as far as the cottages, Welch with Miss Heuling, and I with Miss Brister. The walk was delightful, being moonlight, returned about 10 o'clock. Was very much amazed with a simple fellow down at the canal, at his strange and nonsensical expressions, such as "say brass horn with a pusher" (meaning trombone), "say steamboat with a fence 'round it," "say bell went ring," "say steamboat wheel, won't go 'round." Welch accompanied Miss Brister home. Got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 12 a.m.

30 May 1844. Clear and very pleasant during the early part of the morning, but about 11 o'clock came on to rain, and had sprinklings of it through the remainder of the day and in the evening. Mr. Heuling prevailed upon me to remain today for the purpose of visiting the State Prison, Calico works, &c. About 1/2 past 9 o'clock, Mr. Heuling, Mr. Welch, Miss Brister and myself, took a walk down to

the State Prison. It is a splendid building, in the Egyptian style of architecture, & composed of a kind of red stone. The interior arrangements are very fine, and we were shown in every part, not excepting the cells (in one of which a prisoner was confined), bake house, store house, kitchen, &c. Were also on top, from which is afforded a fine view of Trenton and surrounding country. After registering our names, left the prison, and visited the calico works, were shown it passing through every process of dying, stamping, &c, &c While there it came on to rain, but not so hard that we did not get home dry under a borrowed umbrella, and India rubber cloak.

In the afternoon, called on Miss Brister again with Welch, and on the Miss Quiglies with Welch and Miss Brister. After accompanying Miss B. home, Mr. Heuling took us in to see the Miss Evans, two very nice young ladies, and quite pretty. Both were lively and pleasing in their manners, spent about an hour there, and had some good playing and singing, not excepting several "coon songs(18) ." On our return to Mr. H., met a Miss Pitcher, found her agreeable and pleasant in her manners and rather pretty. Left for Burlington again at about 10 m. past 8, with Welch, and accompanied by Miss Heuling, where we arrived about 9 o'clock, and after (so far as regards myself) spending two of the most delightful days I ever had. Up at 4 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

31 May 1844. Cloudy all day, with an occasional sprinkling of rain, the sun would occasionally make an effort to shine out, but the trial was ineffectual. Evening cloudy. Left Burlington this morning about 1/4 of 8 and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. Went up to the office, and remained until about 4 p.m., busily employed writing, when I took a walk down to the Washington Square to see the Sunday school

children, who were celebrating their fourth anniversary by a floral procession. Each child carried a quantity of flowers, which were carried to the Chinese museum salon, where they were deposited, to be purchased by visitors this evening at any price they may choose to give for them to aid some of their friends. Evening at office writing.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

JUNE

1 June 1844. Clear warm and delightful during the day and evening. At the office through the morning until about 1/2 past 12 p.m., then left, attended to some little business and at 2 p.m. started for Burlington. Had a large number of passengers on board, and arrived safely about 20 m. of 4 o'clock. Went up home, remained for about 3/4 of an hour, then went around to Jim Sterling's, where I met Jim Smith and Jim Welch, concluded to take a swim over at the island. All went down to the river, got a boat and rowed over, found the water to be in delightful bathing order, on our return, broke an oar, and Sterling sculled us in.

After supper got a boat, and took a row down along the banks with the expectation of meeting Mr. Welch, Miss Heuling and some others, as I had made an appointment with Mr. W., but having supper too late, missed them. Met Lydia and little Mary Roberts (who came up this afternoon) on the banks, took them a short row, returned and put the boat up about 8 o'clock, spent the rest of the evening at home. Mr. O'Calligan came up in the mail train, and went down in the return train at 9 o'clock. Up at 1/4 of 5 a.m. and to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

2 June 1844. Clear and very pleasant, until about 7 p.m. when it clouded over heavily, and during the evening had several showers of rain, and considerable thunder and lightning. Before church in the morning took a walk down on the banks with little Mary Roberts. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, the Bishop preached in the morning and examined the Sunday school children in the afternoon. Spent the evening over at Miss Nesbit's. Helen as usual looked very beautiful, and I must say that she pleases me better than any lady I ever met with. Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

3 June 1844. Cloudy or misty throughout the day and evening, though pleasant. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock, went up to the office and remained there during the day, about 7 p.m. went out, attended to some little business, and returned to the office about 8 o'clock.

At 1/4 past 8 went up to see the Miss Leeds, found them in and as usual spent a very pleasant evening. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

4 June 1844. Cloudy all day, but cleared off in the evening. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington where we arrived at the usual hour. After supper took a walk around to Jim Sterling's, there met Jim Welch, when he and I strolled down to the river, got a boat and two pairs of oars and rowed over to the fish cabins where they were just hauling in their net. Waited about 15 minutes until they made their haul, and then rowed to Bristol, returning to Burlington about 9 o'clock, then walked around town and parted about 10 o'clock. Up at 5 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

5 June 1844. Left Burlington in the early train this morning and though it was foggy when we first started, cleared off beautifully before our arrival at Camden. The country looked magnificent, and I think those who would enjoy nature in her holiday, should now go forth from the city. It is the time when the year is most beautiful, and when every beauty, and every sweet of field, and tree, and flower, may be enjoyed by the poorest, as fully and perfectly as by the richest. No fence or wall will conceal the luscious richness of the field and meadows, nor shut off the odors that they impart to the air. And gratitude and praise may ascend from every tuneful breast, for all of delight and pleasure, which these displays can make, because everything they give,

"Beyond the rich possessor's narrowed claim,

His tuneful breast enjoys."

It was clear and delightful during the day and evening. At the office during the day, and at about 7 p.m. took a stroll down Chestnut St., it was most too late for the ladies on the promenade, however met quite a number. Spent the evening up at Miss Mary and Louisa Wood, met there Miss Jane Peterson, a very pretty and agreeable young lady, waited upon her home. Up at 5 a.m., bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

6 June 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day and through the evening. At the office until 5 p.m. when I left for Burlington, arrived there at the usual hour. After supper, Hugh Nesbit and myself took a stroll down to the river, where we met Jim Sterling, Jim Smith and Jim Welch going over to the island to swim. Joined them and went over where we remained until about 8 o'clock, and returned to Burlington, none having went in to swim except Sterling. Went home about 9 o'clock where I met Mr. & Mrs. Sterling, and two Miss Biles, Kate and waited upon the Miss B.s home about 10 o'clock. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

7 June 1844. Had a very heavy shower of rain, accompanied by thunder and lightning early in the morning but by 9 o'clock, cleared off beautifully and remained so during the rest of the day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 20 m. past 9, after attending to some little business for Pa who was too unwell to come down, went up to the office where I remained through the day.

In the evening was down at the Native American Meeting, which was the largest gathering I ever witnessed in the city, filling Chestnut St. from 6th to 4th St., and addressed by 5 different persons in as many places, was also down at Hanley's for a little while. Had a heavy shower of rain about 10 o'clock. Up at 5 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

8 June 1844. Clear and delightful all day and evening. At the office until 5 p.m. when I left for Burlington, arrived there at the usual hour. Evening out boating with Sarah Roberts (who came up this afternoon) and Lydia, returned home about 8 o'clock where I remained rest of evening. Up at 5 a.m., bed 10 p.m.

9 June 1844. Clear through the day, but clouded over about 8 o'clock when we had a shower of rain. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Bishop preached both times, in the morning gave us a sermon an hour and a quarter long. Evening at home. Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 9 3/4 p.m.

10 June 1844. Clear and delightful during the day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and arrived in the city about 7. Went up & got my breakfast, and then to the office, where I remained the greater part of the day, and in the evening busily employed writing. Got up this morning at quarter past 4, and to bed at 10 p.m.

11 June 1844. Clear and delightful weather throughout the day and evening. At the office all day, very busy, left about 1/4 past 8, took a stroll around and stopped into see Miss Susan Much for a short time. Up at 1/4 of 5 a.m., bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

12 June 1844. Clear and delightful during day and evening. At the office all day, and in the evening until after 9 o'clock, when a fire broke out in Perth St. below 8th, when thinking I wanted a little exercise after the labors of the day ran up to it. I do not remember that I have been up in that neighborhood for some 7 or 8 years, and was astonished at the Improvements made. Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed 10 3/4 p.m.

13 June 1844. Cloudy early through the morning, and at about 12 p.m. commenced raining and continued through the day and evening. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington where we arrived at 7 o'clock having been detained on the road half an hour, on account of some part of the locomotive giving way. Spent the evening at home. Miss Kate Lynd was there from Cincinnati having come up with Grandma from the city to spend a few days with us. I was very much pleased with her, as she was pretty interesting and pleasing in her manners. She favored us with some fine singing and playing on the piano. Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

14 June 1844. Cloudy with the appearance of rain early in the morning, but by noon cleared off delightfully, which weather continued through the evening.

Left Burlington this morning at a few minutes before 8 and arrived in the city by a few minutes after 9. They hurried the boat along considerably, on account of the Proprietor an opposition and fast boat followed us closely, but we gained upon her withal, and I am satisfied that she will not be able to run with the old Trenton.

At the office during the day and left for Burlington again at 5 p.m., where we arrived at the usual hour. After supper took a walk with Miss Lynd and Lydia on the banks and in the Bishop's garden returning about 8 o'clock. Mr. and Mrs. Sterling and Mrs. Pritchet spent the evening with us. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

15 June 1844. Clear and delightful all day but cool. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city about 9. Went up to the office and remained there until 2 p.m. when I left for Burlington again. After my arrival went up home, remained there a short time when Nesbit called for me. Took a stroll down to the River, got Antram's sail boat, and went out sailing. I returned about 6 o'clock. After supper took Miss Kate Lynd and Lydia out rowing, went down as far as the fish cabins and returned, landing them above the town wharf. Being low tide was very windy, was obliged to carry Kate and Lydia over the mud, the former made considerable resistance. Returned home about 8 o'clock. Dr. and Mrs. Ellis spent the evening with us. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

16 June 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day and evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning with Miss Lynd and Lydia. Afternoon at home until about 3 o'clock when Smith, Nesbit and Welch called for me, and we went out together and took a stroll out to fountain woods. Returned about 6 o'clock. After supper took a walk with Miss Lynd and Lydia down on the banks, afterwards went to Baptist meeting. Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

17 June 1844. Cloudy though pleasant all day. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9. Waited upon Miss Kate Lynd down. I am sorry she has left for I found her one of the most pleasant girls I have met with for a long time. At the office all day, and during the evening until about 9 o'clock when I took a stroll around, and returned about 10 o'clock and went to bed. Had a little sprinkling of rain in the evening. Up at 10 m. of 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

18 June 1844. Clear and exceedingly warm all day and during the evening. At the office from morning early, until 5 p.m. busy, when I left for Burlington, arrived there at the usual hour after a warm ride. Evening out on the river in boat with Jim Smith until about 1/2 past 8 when I returned home, where I remained the rest of the evening. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 9 3/4 p.m.

19 June 1844. Clear and exceedingly warm all day. Thermometer as high as 92¡ in the shade. Had a heavy shower of rain in the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. Went up to the office and remained there until about 8 1/4 o'clock when I went up to see the Miss Leeds and spent the evening there pleasantly. Up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

20 June 1844. Clear early in the morning and very warm, but about 11 a.m. clouded over and had several showers of rain through the day, which cooled the air considerably.

At the office the greater part of the day, left about 8 o'clock and took a stroll down Second Street. Concluded I would go down to see the Miss Coates as I have not been there since last winter. Found Susan and Lydia in and spent the evening there. Left about 1/4 of 11 and walked leisurely up to my lodgings and went to bed. Got up at 1/4 of 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m.

21 June 1844. Rainy early in the morning but afterwards cleared off, though in the evening clouded over again. At the office during the morning, and at about 1/2 past 2 p.m. went down to the Recorder's office to make an examination of the title, where I remained until about 1/4 of 5, and then left for Burlington. Arrived at the usual hour. In the evening out with Jim Welch, lasting until about 1/2 past 8, when we came in and I went home. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 9 p.m.

22 June 1844. Cloudy all day, and in the afternoon very blustering and became quite cold, evening rainy.

Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. Was at the Recorder's office the principal part of the morning, and left for Burlington again at 2 p.m. Arrived there about 1/2 past 3, after which, spent the afternoon partly at home and partly strolling about town.

In the evening over to see the Miss Nesbits, where I spent the evening. Met there Mr. Kinsey and two daughters who I accompanied home about 1/4 of 10. Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

23 June 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant all day, and evening moonlight. Took a stroll down on the banks with Jim Welch early this morning, and went to St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Between church in afternoon, Jim Welch and I again took a stroll on the banks, and when passing the young ladies' boarding school (St. Mary's Hall), our attention was called by several of the young ladies of the hall waving their handkerchiefs, kissing their hands to us, &c, &c, when of course we returned the salutations and carried them on together for about an hour. In the evening Jim Sterling, Welch and I went over to Bristol and attended the Episcopal church, had an excellent sermon and returned to Burlington about 10 o'clock. The trip over was delightful, as it was moonlight, clear, cool and pleasant. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

24 June 1844. Clear and delightful all day and during the evening, which was moonlight.

Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. After a very pleasant trip, waited upon Miss Helen Nesbit down, and after our arrival in the city, up as far as 3rd and Chestnut Sts. At the office the principal part of the day, and in the evening until 1/4 past 8, when I walked down to Mr. McIlhenny's to see Miss Kate Lynd. But found she was staying now up at the corner of Marshall and Spring Garden Sts., in which direction I wended my way. Found her in and looking as pretty and being as pleasant and agreeable as ever. Sat conversing until about 9 o'clock when a walk was proposed, the night being so clear, moonlight and beautiful. But where to go we did not know, when Miss L. proposed to go as far as the Post office, she wishing to put a letter in. I enjoyed the walk very much, occupying two hours, stopped in at Wood's and took some ice cream to refresh us. Up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

25 June 1844. Clear and very warm all day, and evening clear, warm and moonlight.

At the office all day and 5 p.m. started for Burlington on board the New Philadelphia. She commenced running up at this hour last Saturday evening, and lands her New York passengers at Bristol first and then returns to Burlington, which delays us some 3/4 of an hour, and could be avoided by about 3 minutes delay in stopping at Burlington on going up. But we will have to put up with the inconvenience, as there is no changing the company's arrangements, it being the greatest monopoly in the United States.

In the evening out rowing until 10 o'clock with Hugh Nesbit, were in to swim at the Island and also visited Bristol. Ma was taken quite sick this morning and was confined to her bed. Hope she will recover soon. Got up at 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

26 June 1844. Clear and extremely warm all day and during the evening. At the office during the day and in the evening until about 1/4 past 8, hard at work writing. Spent the evening down at Mrs. Cristiani's. Up at 5 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

27 June 1844. Clear and very warm all day and evening. At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington on board the New Philadelphia. Arrived there about 7 o'clock after landing the New York passengers at Bristol. In the evening out on the river rowing with Hugh Nesbit. Was really delightful, being moonlight, cool and pleasant. Returned home about 10 o'clock and found Mrs. Guible, she spent part of the evening at our house and left about 11 o'clock. Took a bath before going to bed. Up at 4 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

28 June 1844. Clear and very warm all day, and in the evening clear and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city 1/4 past 9. At the office all day or until 1/2 past 7 p.m., when Mr. Bird and I went down to the Arch St. Theatre to attend Mr. E. Burton's benefit, Mr. Geo. Campbell having presented me with two box tickets. The audience was large and respectable, and the pieces passed off well, though most too long being 1/2 past 12 when out. Up at 5 1/2 a.m., bed at 1 a.m.

29 June 1844. Clear and very warm during the day and in the evening clear and moonlight. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington on board the New Philadelphia and arrived there about 7 o'clock after our stoppage at Bristol. Spent the greater part of the evening talking with Miss Helen and Clara Nesbit, sitting on their steps. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

30 June 1844. Clear, warm and pleasant all day, evening clear and moonlight. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Before church, and between church time took a walk on the banks. In the evening at home on the steps smoking a cigar with James Kinsey and James Sterling. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

JULY

1 July 1844. Cloudy during the morning with the appearance of rain, but about the middle of the day cleared off delightfully.

Left Burlington this morning accompanied by Hugh Nesbit, and rowed down to Dunk's ferry for the purpose of fishing but after pulling hard against a head wind, and tiring ourselves very much, were not able to catch anything, the river having too great a swell on it.

Returned to Burlington about 1 p.m., went up home, took dinner and then a nap until about 3 o'clock, when Nesbit again called for me. Then both called for James Smith, when we got the sloop Valiant and took a delightful sail for about 5 miles up the river, then returned, going down the river as far as the sluice, when unluckily ran aground and not withstanding all our endeavors were unable to get off again, and were finally obliged to anchor the boat to let her remain until high tide.

Smith and I undressed and jumped over board and by swimming and wading to shore. I succeeded in getting a boat, then rowed out to the sloop again and took Smith and Nesbit off, when we were obliged to walk up to town, being nearly a mile. Got home again about 8 o'clock and took supper, after which Nesbit called for me, and went up to see the owner of the sloop. Were unable to see him, and we made up our minds to get up early tomorrow morning (say 1/2 past 3) when it would be high water and get her off. Nesbit to remain with me tonight. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

2 July 1844. Clear and very warm all day and in the evening. Nesbit and I got up this morning at 1/2 past 3, dressed, went down to the river, got a boat and rowed down to where we left the sloop last night. Found the tide was high enough to float her, and got out into deep water when we made sail and got up to her mooring by 5 o'clock. After which, went home and dressed myself for the day.

Left for the city at the usual hour and arrived there about 10 m. of 9 o'clock. Went up to the office and remained there until the time of leaving in the afternoon. Left for Burlington at 5 p.m. on board New Philadelphia and arrived at the usual time. Paid three visits in the evening, namely to the Miss Nesbits, Miss Biles and Miss Griffiths. Up at 1/2 past 3 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

3 July 1844 Clear and pleasant all day and the evening clear, cool and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at 1/4 of 6 o'clock and did not arrive in the city until about 1/4 of 8. Went up to the office and remained there through the day. Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m. Spent the evening strolling about town. Up at 4 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

4 July 1844. Clear and delightful all day and very cool, especially in the evening, and could not have been suited better for the glorious 4th. I must cut my remarks, &c short for today, as I have no time to write them. I will merely say how I spent the day.

After breakfast took a stroll down to the river, where I met Smith, Nesbit, Collet, brother, Hays, Mitchell and some others. About 1/2 past 8, the party started out sailing on board the sloop May Ann. I did not remain on board longer than 20 minutes, when I landed at Bristol and returned in the ferryboat. The rest of them went down to Risden's ferry to dine.

Spent the rest of the morning and afternoon until 3 o'clock strolling about town and at home, where I went down to the river and met the party again. They arrived back about 1/2 past 3, all took supper at the hotel. Evening took a walk down on the banks with Miss Helen Nesbit to see the display of fire works at the Bishop's, who gave a party for the young ladies of the Hall. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

5 July 1844. Rather cloudy all day though cool and pleasant. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived there about 10 m. past 9. Was introduced to Miss Ogleby, by Lydia coming down, she is of St. Mary's Hall, and a pretty agreeable and pleasant young lady. At the office all day and evening. Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

6 July 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office through the day, and in the evening Nesbit, Smith and I went over to swim. Upon our return, rowed down the bank, and landed about 9 o'clock, then took a stroll through town. Nesbit accompanied me home, and had a chat on the steps until about 1/2 past 10. Up at 5 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

7 July 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. In the morning, Mr. Lyons was ordained priest. After supper called over at Nesbit's for Smith and Hugh and all three went over to Bristol to church. Heard an excellent sermon and returned to Burlington by 1/2 past 10. Should have got home by 10, but came over with Bill Hays in a sailboat and was obliged to row it over. Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

8 July 1844. Clear, warm and delightful all day and evening. Left Burlington at the usual hour this morning and arrived at the city by 1/2 past 9.

Went up to the office and remained there. Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m. On board the boat going up, met Miss Israel from Pittsburgh, a younger sister of Mrs. Olden, to whom I was introduced by Miss Waterman. She is quite pretty and interesting in her manners. In the evening out rowing with Miss Clara and Helen Nesbit, their brother, James Smith and two other gentlemen. Rowed down as far as the Bishop's, then over to Bristol, but did not land, and then continued our course to the upper end of the island, returning to Burlington by the inner channel. When we arrived was near 10 o'clock. Went up with Miss Helen, went in and sat for about 1/2 an hour. Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

9 July 1844. Clear and pleasant all day, and in the evening cloudy and cool. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour. After arrival in the city went up to the office, remained there until 5 p.m. when I left for Burlington again. Spent the evening over at the Miss Nesbit's, and spent very agreeably. Left about 1/2 past 10. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

10 July 1844. Cloudy early in the morning and at about 10 o'clock had a very heavy shower of rain, after which cleared up. Did not go down to the city today, having intended to go sailing with Nesbit and Smith but the wind proving too blowy, concluded not to go. Nesbit and I, together with one of the Kinseys, got our fishing tackle with the intention of going out fishing. Went over as far as the island when we went in to swim. Afterwards practiced with pistols. Did not leave the island until the shower came on and became thoroughly soaked in going over. Went into the hotel and remained until the shower was over, when we went up to Nesbit's lot, back of the house, and commenced practicing with our pistols again. Continued until about 2 o'clock when I went home to dinner, after which took a nap.

About 3 o'clock, Kinsey, Smith and Nesbit called for me to go up to the high banks in a sailboat. It blew very hard and squally. I went about 3 miles up the river with them, when Smith ran the boat into shore and I jumped out, though not without getting a ducking. Walked down to Bristol and crossed over in the ferry. They returned safe, though not without Smith losing his hat. After my return, dressed and went over to see the Miss Nesbits to make up a party to go rowing this evening. Afterwards went down to Welch's to see Miss Brister from Trenton. In the evening the party started for rowing about 1/2 past 7, consisting of Miss Helen Nesbit, Miss Louisa Nesbit, Miss Clara Nesbit, brother Hugh, and Mr. James Smith. Remained on the river until about 9 o'clock. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

11 July 1844. Clear, warm and pleasant all day. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 1/2 past 9. At the office all day and left for Burlington again at 5 p.m. Took a walk on the banks with Lydia in the evening and on our return stopped in to see Miss Griffiths where we spent the rest of the evening pleasantly.

As yet I have not said a word about the riots that have been disgracing the city by fighting, bloodshed and death since Saturday last, on account of my not having time. But I will here record a description of the scene of action, &c, that it may not be omitted from the events of the day for which I keep this book. The streets in which the principal rioting was had, was in Front, 2nd, 3rd and Queen Sts. The church, which their endeavors most tried to destroy, was St. Phillip on the south side of Queen St. between 2nd and 3rd Sts. When the troops fired they were by 2nd and Queen Sts.

There are contradictory accounts as to the extent of provocation and resistance given them before the firing took place. From what I can gather from all accounts, it appears that a good many hard names were bestowed on the soldiers, and afterwards brickbats and bottles thrown at them, and finally an attempt was made to stab Capt. Hill with his own sword, by a person who had him down. The impression must have been strong that the troops would not venture to fire. During the riots of May last they were taunted and jeered to fire, and did not. The firing between the troops and the mob was principally up and down Queen St., between 2nd and Front. The houses, trees, posts, &c, of the square bear ample evidence of the scattering grape and canister shot. At the time when I write, attention has been called off from the church. The issue lies between the civil power and its military face and the insurgents. Third Street, between Chestnut and Walnut, gives a lively idea of military display. Mounted troops and foot soldiers line the street, and the Guard Bank building, situated there, is the headquarters of the Major General, and is also converted into a hospital for the wounded soldiery. The rioters wish to have the affair in their own hands. Death is threatened for any obnoxious soldier to show himself on their ground. One who was recognized there since the military left the place, was pursued by infuriated men and barely escaped with his life. The district is quiet, but is not the quiet of the supremacy of the law, while people take the law into their own hands.

A subordinate soldier, who is bound to obey orders emanating in the first instance from the civil authority, is hardly an object for vengeance. The duty of every citizen in this crisis is plain. He should support the laws. To be in active opposition to the military is to oppose the Commander in Chief, Gov. Porter, now here; and is treason against the entire Commonwealth. I do not stop to inquire, whether the persons opposing this supreme authority consider themselves desperately aggrieved. That has nothing to do with the question. The matter is narrowed down to this. Are the Governor of the State, and the soldiers under his command, to be defied, and the authority of the Commonwealth destroyed? The question is not whether it was an act of folly, or worse than folly, to take arms in the church; or whether persons were shot by the military. It is, whether certain persons who have no legal power, can defy, or threaten with defiance, those who have all the legal power.

Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

12 July 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day and evening though rather warm. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour. At the office all day and left for Burlington again at 5 p.m.

In the evening Hugh Nesbit and myself got a boat and after rowing around for a while, went over to Bristol. Waited until the New York cars came. Among the passengers saw Mr. M. Pope Mitchell. Invited him to go over with us in our boat. Like to have had a serious accident happen to Mr. Mitchell, caused by his missing his footing in getting into the boat and came very near falling over, when I caught hold of his coat and pulled him into the boat again, he getting off with nothing more than a wet coat tail and some little fright and bruises.

Got into Burlington again by 1/2 past 9, when I went up with Nesbit to his house & spent the rest of the evening, say until 1/4 of 11, talking with two of his sisters, Helen and Clara, and Mr. Smith. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

13 July 1844. Clear and pleasant but warm all day and during the evening. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour. Went up to the office, remained there through the morning, and at 2 p.m. started for Burlington again. Waited upon Miss Elizabeth Nesbit. After our arrival in Burlington, Smith, Nesbit, and myself went out sailing, returned safe about 7 o'clock. In the evening Mr. Smith and myself took Miss Helen, Clara and Elizabeth Nesbit out rowing. Went down as far as Bristol College wharf, and returned to Burlington about 10 o'clock. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

14 July 1844. Clear and very warm all day and evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Spent the evening over at Mr. Kinsey's. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

15 July 1844. Clear through the day and warm, towards evening clouded over and had a shower of rain. Left Burlington and arrived in the city as usual this morning. At the office during the day, and at 5 p.m. left again for Burlington.

After supper walked over with Lydia and little Clara Roberts to see Miss Parker. Left them there, and went over to the Miss Nesbits, it having been proposed to take a walk to Silver Lake this evening. But Miss Helen, having a headache, and it wearing the appearance of rain, concluded we would not go, but postpone it until some other evening. Mr. and Mrs. Sterling came over a few minutes afterwards and remained about 20 minutes when it came on to rain and we left, and went over to Mrs. S. Went in, remained a short time, and then called over for Lydia at Mr. Parker's. Went in and remained about 1/2 an hour, when we left for home. Met Miss Wilson there, the intended bride of Mr. Theodore Mitchell. After going home wrote a bond, &c. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

16 July 1844. Clear and very warm through the morning, but about 3 o'clock clouded over, and we had one of the most tremendous storms of rain I ever witnessed.

Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city by about 9 o'clock. Went up to the office, remained there during the morning and at 2 p.m. left for Burlington again.

Just as we came to at Burlington wharf the above mentioned storm came on. Capt. Kester kept his boat at the landing for about half an hour, or until after the hardest part of the shower. It was as good as a farce to see the ladies running and jumping over the water on the wharf. I got up to the hotel without being much wet and up home by about 5 o'clock after stopping at several places to avoid the rain. Evening at home. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

17 July 1844. Cloudy early in the morning, with the appearance of rain and rather cool, but as the day advanced, cleared off quite warm, evening clear and warm. Went down to the boat this morning with the intention of going to the city, but the day being so favorable for fishing, and not having anything of importance to attend to in the city, concluded I would go. Went up home changed my dress, saw Rev. Kinsey, got him to accompany me, and started for Dunk's ferry about 20 m. of 9. Rowed down there in 45 minutes, caught 4 doz. and a half and returned to Burlington by 1/4 of 2. Went up home, got dinner and took a nap until about 4 o'clock. Got up, took a bath and dressed, then over to Kinsey's. Went down in the garden with Rev., ate my fill of pears, gathered about a 1/2 peck to take home. Came out on the porch, sat and talked with Mr., Mrs. and Miss Kinsey for half an hour.

Went home, left my pears, then down to the wharf to see the New Philadelphia come in. Walked up with Pa, got supper, after which, took a seat on the steps. A few minutes afterwards Miss Virginia and Caroline Mitchell came to pay Lydia a visit, she being in the city, came in to see Ma. They remained about 15 or 20 minutes. I accompanied them home, and spent the evening until about 1/4 past 9 there and then returned home. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

18 July 1844. Clear, warm and pleasant all day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 10 m. of 9, a very quick passage. At the office during the day and

left for Burlington again at 5 p.m., where we arrived by 7 p.m.

After supper, called over for Smith at Nesbits to go out sailing with me, but found the young ladies were ready to go rowing, and he had just left to procure a boat. Concluded to walk down to the river with them, see the ladies safe in and then get my sailboat, but they insisted upon my accompanying them, and after some persuasion did so. Had a delightful row, but the ladies suffered considerably from the boat leaking, she being laden very deep in the water, having 8 on board, 4 gentlemen and 4 ladies, viz. Miss Louisa, Clara and Helen Nesbit and Miss Dobin from the city, and Mr. Smith, Mr. Boyd, Mr. Pemberton Hutchinson and myself. Returned to Burlington about 10 o'clock, waited upon the ladies home, went in, sat a while. Afterwards took a stroll around and went home about 11 o'clock. Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

19 July 1844. Clear and very warm all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. At the office during the day and left again for Burlington at 5 p.m. Met on board Mrs. Leland, her twin daughters, who are remarkably pretty, intelligent and interesting, and younger daughter. They were going to Princeton to board for the summer season. Miss Louisa Wood came up with Lydia this afternoon. Evening at home with the exception of about 20 minutes occupied in going over with Louisa Wood and Lydia to Mr. Wetherill's to see his night blooming acres. Met quite a large number of persons there.

Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at half past 10 p.m.

20 July 1844. Clear during the morning, and in the afternoon until about 3 o'clock when a very heavy shower came up and continued until about 6, when it cleared off again.

Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour this morning. Went up to the office and remained there. Left for Burlington again at 2 p.m. Spent the afternoon over at Nesbit's with Hugh smoking cigars, during the rain. In the evening over to swim at the island and rowing along the banks. Returned home about 1/2 past 9 o'clock. Found Miss Helen and Clara Nesbit there, and waited upon them home about 10 o'clock.

Got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

21 July 1844 Clear, warm and pleasant all day and evening moonlight. About 8 o'clock this morning Hugh Nesbit and myself got Miller's sailboat and went down to Bristol College wharf, to bring his friend Walter Clemens up to Burlington. Got away from the wharf about 9 o'clock, but the wind died away, and the tide running down had a difficult time to get up. However after rowing and polling succeeded in getting up as far as the Bishop's wharf by 1/4 of 11 o'clock, when I landed and went up to church. Heard the Bishop preach. Also went to church in the afternoon. In the evening Nesbit and I took Clemens down to Bristol College again, and returned to Burlington again by about 10 o'clock having a hard pull up against the tide, occupying about, but the night was clear and moonlight which made being on the water delightful. Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

22 July 1844. Cloudy during the morning, clear in the afternoon, and clear and moonlight in the evening. This morning Louisa Wood, Lydia, Rev. Kinsey and myself went down to the sluice to fish, but not meeting with much success returned home about 11 o'clock. I went over with Kinsey, and remained there until about 1/2 past 12, feasting on pears. About 1/2 past 2, Kinsey and I got a boat and went out on the bar, caught about 3 doz. fish and returned about 6. In the evening took Miss Helen and Clara Nesbit, and Louisa Wood out rowing, the evening was moonlight, clear and delightful, remained on the river until about 1/4 past 9. Waited upon the Miss N. home. Mrs. Jewell and Mr. George Campbell came up today, and spent the night at our house. The two Miss Kinseys spent the evening with us. Up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

23 July 1844. Cloudy in the morning and rained quite fast at times, cleared off about 2 p.m. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour. Went up to the office and remained there during the day. Left again at 5 p.m. for Burlington.

Mrs. Carr and two children came up this afternoon, which increased our family considerably, having Mr. Campbell, Mrs. Jewell and Louisa Wood staying with us at present. So crowded had to sleep on the sofa in the parlor. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Kinsey's. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

24 July 1844. Clear and very pleasant but warm until about 6 1/4 p.m. when a heavy shower of rain came up and continued through the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour. Met on board Miss Addie Lippincott, had some conversation with her and was introduced to her sister Mrs. Winslow. Mrs. Carr, two children and Mrs. Jewell went down this morning. At the office during the day and left again for Burlington at 5 p.m., was caught in the shower, and did not get home until 1/2 past 7.

Pa went up to Trenton this morning, and returned at noon. Ma, Lydia, Louisa Wood and Mr. Campbell went out to Brown's Mills(19) this morning, and returned by about 1/2 past 8 p.m. They spent a delightful day, until the shower of rain came on, which wet them a little. Mr. and Mrs. Burrough, Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, Mrs. May Roberts and some of the children came up to see us this afternoon and returned in the 5 o'clock boat. Evening at home. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

25 July 1844. Had several very heavy showers of rain during the day though at times it would be clear, rained hard during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city by 1/2 past 9. Miss Clara Nesbit went down this morning.

At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left again for Burlington in the midst of a tremendously hard shower of rain, which lasted all the way up. Received a ducking both on going to, and leaving the boat.

Evening at home. Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 9 p.m.

26 July 1844. Raw, damp, rainy and very unpleasant all day, and in the evening wore the appearance of clearing, but very cool. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city by 1/4 of 10. Louisa Wood came down this morning. At the office during the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Evening at home.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 9 p.m.

27 July 1844. Clear, cool and delightful, evening clear, cool and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. At the office during the day, left for Burlington again at 5 p.m.

Evening out on the river with Hugh Nesbit and Rev. Kinsey. Remained out until about 1/4 past 8. After landing, walked up to Nesbits and remained on the steps until about 9, then went in. Met J. Wallace Collet there, two of the Miss Nesbits and some others. A short time after it was proposed to take a walk. Collet took Miss Louisa, and I Helen, walked as far as the Bishop's and returned. Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

28 July 1844. Clear and delightful all day and evening clear, cool and moonlight. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Ogleby preached both times. After supper made up my mind to go to the city, having some business to attend to early in the morning. Crossed to Bristol in a small boat with Hugh Nesbit and two others. Left in the New Philadelphia for the city about 9 o'clock and arrived there by 20 m. of 11. Were detained some 15 minutes at Burlington wharf, taking in about 200 colored people, who had been up to a quarterly meeting.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

29 July 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant all day and evening clear and moonlight. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Down on the banks in the early part of the evening taking a stroll with George Parker. Went over to hear the Virginia Minstrels for about an hour afterwards.

Up at 5 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

30 July 1844. Clear and delightful all day, evening rather cloudy, with appearance of rain tomorrow. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour.

At the office during the greater part of the time I was in town, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. After tea Miss Virginia Mitchell stopped in to see Lydia, waited upon her home about 8 o'clock, after returning home, spent the remainder of the evening. Mr. and Mrs. Sterling passed part of the evening with us.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

31 July 1844. Cloudy and showering through the day. Evening cloudy but no rain. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour this morning. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Spent the evening over at Nesbits. Jim Smith was there; he came up today but leaves again tomorrow. Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

AUGUST

1 August 1844. Cloudy during the greater part of the day, and evening. Left Burlington this morning, and arrived in the city as usual. At the office during the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. In the evening took a stroll down to the river to see the Trenton pass with the excursion passengers from New York bay, but she not arriving until late, walked up as far as the Post Office. While there, Miss Louisa and Helen Nesbit stopped with some others to see if any letters. Walked up home with Miss Helen and spent the remainder of the evening on the steps with her conversing. The evening, being so exceedingly warm, was not pleasant to be in the house.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

2 August 1844. Cloudy during the greater part of the day and evening, but no rain in the city though they had a heavy shower in Burlington in the afternoon.

Left Burlington and arrived in the city as usual this morning. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Evening at home. Mrs. Howell and daughter Beulah came up this afternoon and stayed all night. Beulah is going down in the morning.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

3 August 1844. Rather cloudy during the day, evening clear. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour this morning. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again.

Evening over to swim with Nesbit and Welch, returned about 8 o'clock, after which took a stroll around town, and finally brought up on Nesbit's steps about 1/2 past 9. Sat conversing with Hugh and his sister Helen until about 1/2 past 10, when I left for home.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

4 August 1844 Clear and delightful all day and during the evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Ogleby preached both times. Between church took a nap and a stroll on the bank with Nesbit. Evening at home. Nesbit spent the evening at our house. Up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

5 August 1844. Clear and pleasant throughout the day and evening, and cool. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour. Arrived there by 1/2 past 9. Went up to the office and remained there during the day. In the evening at the Walnut Street Theatre to see a new pantomime entitled, "Munchausen." There is much fun and humor throughout the piece and was well performed. "The Young Scamp," a farce, was very good. Out about 20 m. of 12.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

6 August 1844. Showering through the day, evening clear. Left the city this morning about 9 o'clock in the Darby stage, to pay a visit to my friend Jas. B. Smith at his father's residence about a 1/4 of a mile beyond the "Bell Tavern."

Got out there about 1/2 past 10, spent the morning strolling about the place with Jim, and in the house. Dined about 1/2 past 1, at which time I was introduced to his sisters, and Miss Harriet Mitchell. Two of the Miss Smiths (Harriet and Elizabeth) are very pretty and remarkably fine looking young ladies, and I must say very much pleased with the former. After Dinner Smith and I went down to "Tinnicum," the residence of his three brothers, who have between them 1000 acres. Paid a visit to all of them. Went through their peach orchards, ate our fill, &c. About 6 o'clock went up to his brother Thomas's to tea. Met there two very beautiful young ladies from Baltimore, Miss Jane and Margaret Handy, the former was as beautiful a young lady as I ever saw. The other was very pretty but not the same style, which I did not admire so much. They were both very lively and pleasing in their manners. At his brother Edward's was introduced to a young lady by the name of Miss Kate Lee from Wissahickon, she was rather pretty, but did not admire her manners. Left Mr. Thomas Smith's and the young ladies (which I did not much like to do) about 1/4 of 9, and arrived at his father's residence about 1/4 of 10, distance six miles. Remained in the parlor until near 11, chatting with the young ladies who were very agreeable.

Up at 5 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

7 August 1844. Clear, cool and delightful all day and during the evening. Got up this morning about 1/4 of 6, dressed, went downstairs and took a seat on the porch & never do I remember a more delightful morning, nor the country look so beautiful. Took breakfast about 1/4 of 7, and at about 1/4 after, left for town in the omnibus, though I regretted much leaving the place, having spent my time so delightfully.

Arrived in the city by 1/2 past 8. Went to the office and remained there during the greater part of the day. Left for Burlington at 5 p.m. Waited upon Mrs. H. M. McIlvaine and Miss Clara Nesbit up. Arrived in Burlington by 20 m. of 7. Ma, Pa and Lydia also went up this afternoon.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed at 1/4 past 9 p.m.

8 August 1844. Clear and pleasant all day, and during the evening. Left Burlington and arrived in the city about the usual hour this morning. At the office through the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again.

After supper took a stroll down to the river to see the excursion boat pass. Upon going on board the New Philadelphia, met three of the Miss Nesbits, Helen, Clara, and Louisa, they had come down to see Mrs. & Mrs. McIlvaine off. Waited upon Helen and Clara home, and spent the evening there. Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

9 August 1844. Clear and warm all day and evening, very windy in the afternoon. About 8 o'clock this morning, Rev. Kinsey and I went out gunning. Got about a dozen and a half birds, when the nipple was blown out of my gun, and we returned. Afternoon out fishing with Rev., the river being very rough was unable to catch more than a dozen and a half.

After supper was out rowing for about half an hour. Miss Helen and Clara Nesbit were to have accompanied me, but some company coming up from town, with whom they had to take a walk, prevented them. Went home about 1/2 past 8, and was there the rest of the evening. Mr. & Mrs. Kinsey spent part of the evening at our house.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

10 August 1844. Cloudy, rainy and unpleasant during the greater part of the day and evening. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour this morning. At the office during the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Spent part of the evening over at the Miss Nesbits with Lydia; remained at home. Got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

11 August 1844. Clear, cool and delightful through the day and evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Odenheimer preached both times. Took a stroll with Hugh Nesbit in the morning before church on the banks as far as St Mary's Hall, where we had some sport with 5 or 6 of the young ladies of the school from the window by waving handkerchiefs, &c., &c. Also took a stroll between church and after church in the afternoon on the banks.

In the evening walked up to the creek with Nesbit, where we met Mr. Byrnes and Mr. Prichett, had a chat of about 15 minutes when all went down into town again. Nesbit and I went down to see the boat off. Went up to N.'s about 9 and remained until 1/4 past 10. Did not go in. Up at 6 1/2 a.m., to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

12 August 1844. Clear, cool and delightful during the day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again.

In the evening walked around with Lydia to Miss Woolmans, left her there, and went over to see Sterling. From there walked down to the wharf with Hall and Hays, to see the New York Bay excursion passengers go on board the boat, they having marched preceded by a band of music from the cars. Hall, while standing talking with Hays and myself, was struck by one of three rowdy fellows, when he drew off and knocked him down. It however

turned out that Hall knew who the fellow was, and they made it up without any further difficulty. Called for Lydia about 1/2 past 8, went in, sat for about 10 minutes, then went home.

Up at 5 3/4 a.m., bed at 9 3/4 p.m.

13 August 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day and evening. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour this morning. At the office during the greater part of the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. In the evening around at Jim Sterling's until about 9 o'clock, then went home and remained there the rest of the evening.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

14 August 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day, evening rather cloudy. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. At the office during the greater part of the time while in the city, until 1/4 past 4 p.m., when I called at Mr. McIlhenny's for Miss Kate Lynd, to accompany her to Burlington according to a previous engagement. Arrived at Burlington about 7 o'clock.

In the evening our family, with Miss Lynd, went up to Mr. Sterling's, having had invitation to be there, to eat fruit. About 9 o'clock had a delightful repast of different kinds of fruit, which I enjoyed very much. Left about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

15 August 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day and evening. Mr. James Hunter Sterling, Rev. Kinsey and myself went down to Dunk's ferry fishing, got down there by 1/4 of 9, and tried in several places, but could catch nothing. When we thought our luck would be poor, finally concluded to try another place, and seemed we just hit on the right spot, for scarcely had we got our lines down when we had fish on. Fished until about 1 o'clock, by which time we had 10 dozen fine perch, some weighing nearly a pound. Upon the turn of the tide, to run up the river became very rough, making it entirely unfit for fishing. Hauled up the anchor, and started for Burlington where we arrived by 1/4 past 3. Went home, got dinner, dressed, &c., and about 6 o'clock took a walk down on the banks with Miss Lynd and Lydia. In the evening at home, Miss Kate and Elizabeth Biles spent part of the evening at our house.

Up at 5 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

16 August 1844. Clear and pleasant all day but warm. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city 1/4 past 9. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Evening at home. Mr. and Mrs. Sterling, Dr. and Mrs. Ellis, Mr. Byrnes, Miss Anabella Griffiths, and Mr. James Welch spent the evening at our house, all I believe dropped in accidentally. Up at 5 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

17 August 1844. Clear and warm all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, via Camden and the cars, the New Philadelphia having broken her shaft in coming to the city this afternoon, the passengers brought down by the tow-boat Pennsylvania. Arrived in Burlington by 20 m. past 6.

After supper Hugh Nesbit, Dick Cristiani (who came up with me this afternoon) and myself went over to the island and took a bath. After our return took a stroll around, and finally halted on Nesbit's steps, where two of his sisters (Helen and Elizabeth) were sitting, chatted until about 1/2 past 10, then went home.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

18 August 1844. Clear but rather warm, evening clear and warm. At St. Mary's church in the morning, Bishop Doane preached. Afternoon over in Nesbit's garden with Cristiani and Nesbit eating pears. Evening over at Bristol to church with Jim Sterling, Jim Welch, Nesbit and Cristiani. Crossed in a small boat, and returned about 1/2 past 9 o'clock. Took a stroll on the bank, before church, between church and in the evening, when I had considerable fun with some of the young ladies of the hall at the side window.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

19 August 1844. Rather cloudy throughout the day, and very warm, about dusk clouded over very heavily, and a considerable blow, rain, thunder and lightning. Dick Cristiani and myself went down to Dunk's ferry fishing this morning, and returned by 3 o'clock, caught but one fish. I had my gun with me, went ashore and shot about a half dozen of birds. After our return home, dressed and about 1/2 past 5 took a stroll on the banks. Found a number of the young ladies from the hall walking, with whom we had some fun. Evening at home.

Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 9 p.m.

20 August 1844. Clear but very warm throughout the day and evening. Left Burlington and arrived in the city this morning as usual. Dick Cristiani came down with me. At the office during the day and left again for Burlington at 5 p.m., where we arrived by 1/4 past 6.

After supper got a boat and rowed down along the banks as far as the Bishop's, where I took Jim Welch in with me, and then rowed several times past the young ladies' boarding school. A number of those with whom we have been carrying on our flirtations were walking on the banks, had a number of signs made by them to us, and of course returned by a sly wave of the handkerchief, &c. About dusk one of them dropped a note on the bank (as we thought). I put Jim Welch ashore, when he picked up the supposed note, found it to be a newspaper, with several love passages scored, and also poetry marked and altered, to one of which Miss A. Matilda Clark's name was signed. About 1/2 past 7 the bell rang for the young ladies to go into the hall, when we left and put up our boat. Upon going up home, stopped at Mr. and Mrs. Sterling, where I remained until about 1/4 of 10 o'clock, then went home.

Got up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

21 August 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day, evening clear and moonlight. Left Burlington and arrived in the city at the usual hour this morning. At the office during the day and 5 p.m. started for Burlington again. After supper Jim Welch & myself took a stroll on the banks as far as the young ladies' school. Were most too late to have our usual evening salutations and signals, as the ladies had been directed to go in, however some were on the porch, which was enough to let them know we were about.

Continued our walk below the Bishop's, where we loitered for some time, or until it was nearly dark, and then strolled up as far as the Bishop's upper gate. Stood conversing for a few minutes, when our attention was attracted by the gentle whisper and slight whistle among the deep foliage of the Bishop's garden. Upon looking more closely saw two beautiful ladies with a quiet and careful step approach the fence. When they called our names in a loud whisper, Welch immediately attended the call, I having to converse with Mr. Sepy and two other gentlemen, who, at that moment came up, and like to have discovered our meeting. The two young ladies threw Mr. Welch a small book and immediately retired. It being too dark to discover what were its contents, went up to Welch's, got a light and with eager eyes glanced over the pages. On the first was written, "Keep this, remember me to all," on the fourth, "my class" being the middle class, on the sixth, "nothing was meant by that paper last night, it was only a piece of waste paper," having reference to the paper we got on the bank last evening. Also, "I have marked the names of all who are concerned in the waving of handkerchiefs." I forgot to mention the small book was a catalog and prospectus of the school. The names of the young ladies marked were Anna E. Brown of Rye, N.Y., Agnes M. Clark, New York, Charlotte M. Cardit, Newark, N.J., Elizabeth W. Davis, Bangor, Me., May A. Peers, Louisville, Ky., Mary C. Smith, Philadelphia, Pa, Mary Mallory and Ellen A. Mallory, Germantown, Pa., and Mary Anderson, New York. If we can carry this fun out without being discovered, it will be attended with much pleasure, but if discovered will protect the ladies by all means in our power.

Miss Adaline Aldrich came up with me this evening. She intends spending the night with us and got out to Mount Holly in the morning. About 9 o'clock took a walk with her as far as the Bishop's and returned.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

22 August 1844. Cloudy throughout the day, with a shower about 12 p.m. Jim Welch, Humes, Woodman and myself, besides several others went out to Vincentown, about 1/4 miles from Burlington, in a wagon belonging to Humes, to a Whig mass meeting held in a Woods, a short distance from the town. Drove our wagon in the line

of the procession which was composed of about 70 or 80 wagons headed by a band of Music, and a schooner, clipper rigged, manned by some dozen small boys, with Vausciver as the clipper. Had a delightful time, marred a little with the shower of rain, and returned to Burlington about 8 o'clock with the procession.

Met a number on the ground that I was acquainted with, both gentlemen and ladies. Among the ladies were three of the Miss Nesbits, Mrs. McIlvaine, Mrs. Olmstead and Mrs. Poulter, a most beautiful lady, was introduced to her sister Miss Risden, a very beautiful young lady. Was also introduced to Miss Stryker of Mount Holly and Miss Guyer of Philadelphia. There were a great number on the ground, no end to ladies. The teams were well worth seeing, there were several wagons drawn by 12 horses, one by 12 mules, and another by 30 oxen.

Pa, Grandma, Lydia and Flora went around on the New York bay excursion today, and were much pleased. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

23 August 1844. Cloudy early in the morning with the appearance of rain, but as the day advanced cleared off beautifully. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. At the office during the day with the exception of about an hour occupied in going down to see Miss Kate Lynd at Mr. Mitchell's in 2nd St., to bid her good bye, previous to her departure for Cincin-nati. She leaves I believe on Monday next. While there was introduced to Miss Mitchell, a rather pretty looking young lady, and daughter of the gentleman at whose house I was in. Left Burlington again at 5 p.m., where I arrived by 1/4 past 6.

In the evening took a stroll along the banks with Welch, but saw nothing of the young ladies of the Hall, much to our disappointment. The evening was clear, cool, delightful and moonlight, well suited to take an evening stroll, and for a meeting of the young ladies, had they made their appearance.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

24 August 1844. Clear and delightful during the day and evening. I went down to the wharf this morning with the intention of going to the city, but met Jim Welch, who persuaded me to go with him to Newtown, about 1/4 mile from Bristol to attend a Whig meeting to be held at that place, he at the same time assuring me that he would procure a means of conveying us both to the place. Accordingly, about 9 o'clock started in a four horse wagon from Bristol, with seven others besides Welch and myself, and arrived at the place of our destination about 12 o'clock amid the shouts and cheers of thousands of men, the waving of handkerchiefs of hundreds of ladies, and the sound of numerous bands of music, all tending to raise the mind to the highest point of enthusiasm. And such another turn-out of women, farmers, mechanics and laboring men, I have seldom seen. As to estimating numbers, I shall not attempt it (though it was said by some there was 20,000 people present). Suffice to say that every avenue to the place was filled from early in the morning until one o'clock, and even before the "rear guard" had arrived, the town was crowded to overflowing. Such a number of vehicles of all kinds, and horses and oxen and mules, I never saw congregated together before. And all came with such joyous countenances; the women smiled, the men shouted and sang; the music, and there were several bands, pealed forth cheering notes; banners and flags waved and added interest to the scene. Judging from the numbers present, I inferred that the whole county had "shut up shop" and gathered together. I noticed one wagon of about 50 feet in length, drawn by 26 yoke of oxen, each yoke bearing the name of a state, and full of sturdy Whigs, with a sprinkling of inquiring Democrats.

Another wagon about the same length was drawn by 33 pair of horses. There were several wagons drawn by over 26 horses, and six, eight and ten horse omnibuses, and wagons of every description in great numbers drawn by one, two, and four horses. I took no note of the various banners, and the inscriptions and devices upon them, save one, which struck me as an excellent reply to one of the vile calumnies so industriously circulated by the Locofocos(20) against Mr. Clay. It was inscribed "Mr. Clay's Last Duel," and represented a spatsman as having just shot a fly-up-the-creek, which is seen tumbling headforemost into Salt River. The poor poke has been "winged" in this mortal combat, and is killed so dead that it cannot even flutter.

A stand had been erected for the officers of the meeting and the speakers, in an orchard just out of the town, whither the multitude repaired about two o'clock. The meeting was organized by the appointment of Dr. Phineas Jenks as President and a large number of Vice Presidents and Secretaries. Seats had been prepared for the ladies, in front of the rostrum, and were filled with the beauty of the county. Seats were also provided for the Philadelphia Minstrels, who discoursed eloquently to the multitude, in sweet and harmonious song. It having been found that not one half of those present could get near enough to the rostrum to hear the speakers, it was announced that another stand would be erected within the town, and that there would be persons to address the people. The speaking was continued from half past 2 until 5, the time of our leaving the ground.

We arrived at Bristol again about 1/4 of 7, and after a delay of some 3/4 of an hour on account of low tide, the ferryboat landed us safely in Burlington, after having spent a most delightful day.

Upon our landing went up home, got my tea, and then called for Jim Welch to take our usual evening stroll on the banks to see our fair young ladies of St. Mary's Hall, but as on last evening were disappointed. We at once supposed something must be wrong, and our suppositions were afterwards fully confirmed, by meeting Hugh Nesbit, who informed us the young ladies had been found out and confessed all. So all is up with us for the present.

Elizabeth Roberts, daughter of Edward Roberts, came up this afternoon and intends spending a few days at our house. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

25 August 1844. Clear through the greater part of the day, though there was a slight shower early in the morning, a heavy one in the afternoon. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Was not down on the banks, either through the day or evening for fear of bringing the young ladies into more trouble by my appearance in the vicinity of the Hall. Evening at home with the exception of about half an hour; I was over with Hugh Nesbit in his room, looking over some pieces of poetry.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 p.m. Mr. Austin, friend of Elizabeth Roberts, took tea with us.

26 August 1844. Clear and delightful all day, evening clear, cool and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning and arrived in the city at the usual hour. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived by 1/4 past 6 o'clock.

After supper took a walk on the banks with Elizabeth Roberts and Lydia. Went down as far as the Bishop's, in passing the Hall did not see any of the young ladies, suppose they are kept pretty close since the discovery of the flirtations by the teachers. Upon our return, left the girls at home, and went over to see the Miss Nesbits. Did not find Helen and Clara at home, and remained but a short time, but while there was shown a note by Amelia, addressed to her by Miss Ellen Mallory. It spoke of her (Miss Mallory) having committed a very unladylike action, in addressing a note to her (Amelia's) brother, and begged that she would ask his forgiveness for having addressed a note while unacquainted, and desired it might be destroyed or returned. The note also mentioned several other things which I did not understand; it was written, I think, merely for effect, and if unobserved they would do the same thing again.

I received through the post office this morning a prospectus from Miss Mary Anderson of New York. Several names were written in it, hers among the rest, and the following words written on the margin of a page: "If you answer this, put it in the Philadelphia post office." What she wished me to answer is impossible to tell, without it was to write her a letter, and that I feared to do, as we had all been discovered; however, if an opportunity offers she shall have a letter.

After leaving Miss Nesbits, went down to see Jim Sterling, remained there until about 9 o'clock, and then went home. Mr. George Campbell came up this afternoon, and will remain until tomorrow with us. Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

27 August 1844. Clear, cool and delightful during the day, and clear, cool and moonlight in the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. At the office through the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again.

After supper got a boat, and took a little exercise in rowing along the banks, returning by 8 o'clock. Afterwards took a walk with Elizabeth Roberts and Lydia. A short time after our return home, Miss Helen and Clara Nesbit came in and spent part of the evening. I accompanied one and Mr. Campbell the other home. Went in and remained about 15 or 20 minutes, during which time my conversation

was with Helen. She informed me they had quite a scene at St. Mary's Hall this morning, occasioned by Mr. Germain giving the young ladies a long lecture on the impropriety of their conduct towards the young gentlemen who were concerned in the flirtations of the last two months. Half the school I believe were in tears. Mr. G. I believe did not particularize any of the young ladies, which I am very glad of.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

28 August 1844. Clear, cool and delightful all day, evening clear and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. Waited upon Elizabeth Roberts down, she introduced me to a Miss Trotter, a very handsome, and as far as I could judge amiable young lady. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived by 5 minutes past 6. After supper walked as far as the river and returned home about 1/2 past 7, remained there the rest of the evening. Mr. Olmstead spent part of the evening with us; it was his first visit.

Got up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

29 August 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. Mr. Campbell came down this morning. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington where we arrived at the usual hour. In the evening strolling about on the bank and town with Jim Welch until about 1/2 past 8, when I went home, found there Mrs. and Miss Kinsey and Miss Caroline Woolman. Waited upon Miss Woolman home about 9 o'clock.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

30 August 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and evening. Went out gunning this morning but met with very poor luck and returned home about 10 o'clock. In the afternoon, Mr. Prichett and myself rowed down to Bristol College to attend a celebration of the pupils of Capt. Partridge's school. There were two companies of soldiers from the city. The display was not very imposing and we left about 5 o'clock. In the evening at home. Got up this morning at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

31 August 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again via Camden and the cars, where we arrived by a few minutes after 6.

Evening at home until about 8 o'clock, when I waited upon the Miss Mitchells home. Afterwards met Hugh Nesbit, strolled about town for a while, and then went over into his yard where we remained until 1/4 past 10, eating pears, &c Then went home.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

SEPTEMBER

1 September 1844. Clear and warm all day and during the evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Bishop Doane preached in the morning and examined the Sunday school children in the afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Grubb had their baby Parker Grubb christened this afternoon. After church in the afternoon, took a walk down on the banks with George Parker, Arnold & Hugh Nesbit. Evening in company with Nesbit & Batton.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

2 September 1844. Very foggy early in the morning but cleared off warm by 9 o'clock, though at times through the day would wear the appearance of rain, and at about 7 p.m. commenced raining, which continued through the night, accompanied by sharp lightning and heavy thunder.

Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. Went up to the office and remained there through the day.

At 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, in the steamboat New Philadelphia. She commenced running again yesterday, having been off the line two weeks on account of breaking her shaft. Miss Hannah Ann Myers took tea and spent the evening with us, the rain coming on so hard she remained all night. She is much improved since I saw her last, or since her return from Pittsburgh, and is quite pretty and fine in appearance and form. Evening at home.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

3 September 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant during the day and evening. The rain of last evening has benefited the county considerably, and laid the dust. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city a few minutes after 9. At the office through the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again in the New Philadelphia.

After supper went up with Lydia, to see Miss Hannah Ann Myers from Philadelphia. She is staying in Stacy Street near Market. Remained there the greater part of the evening, returned home about 1/4 past 9 o'clock.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

4 September 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 1/4 past 9. Waited upon Miss H. A. Myers and her aunt down. Upon our arrival put them in cab, and after attending to some business, went to the office and remained there during the day.

Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m., and accompanied two of the Miss Aldriches up, Adaline and Harriet. Evening at home. Jim Welch was at our house.

Up at 20 m. of 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

5 September 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant all day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at about 20 minutes past 6 in the steamer Trenton. She was to have left at 6 precisely, this arrangement was made for today only to accommodate the "Locofocos," who were going to Trenton to attend their mass convention.

Arrived in the city about 8 o'clock. The two Miss Aldriches went down this morning, also Lydia, who intended accompanying one of them to Wilmington this afternoon, to spend a week or two.

At the office during the greater part of the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington. Mrs. Edward Roberts and little daughter Clara went up. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Nesbits, met Mr. Arnold there. Helen looked if anything more beautiful, and more fascinating than ever. Left about 1/4 past 10. Up at 1/4 of 5 a.m. (before daylight) and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

6 September 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, but did not arrive in the city until near ten o'clock, occasioned by the boat having to stop for some time, on account of the Geo. M. Dallas, a sailboat, swamping, that was in tow. Two of the men like to have lost their lives, by going into her to bail out when she was two thirds full of water, and the boat starting off run her under, the men having to cling to her mast, rope, &c, until relieved from their perilous situation.

At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Evening at home. Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

7 September 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city shortly after 9 o'clock. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again.

Evening out strolling about town with Hugh Nesbit. Edward Roberts and two sons, Edward and Lehman, came up this afternoon, and went down in the excursion train, taking with them Mrs. Roberts and daughter Clara. She came up on Thursday last. Mr. and Mrs. Sterling spent the evening at our house.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

8 September 1844 Clear, cool and delightful all day and during the evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning, Mr. Lyons preached. Afternoon over at Nesbits with Hugh until about 1/2 past 5, when we took a stroll down on the bank, returning in time for supper. Evening got a small boat and rowed over to Bristol with Hugh Nesbit. Heard an eloquent discourse delivered by the Rev. Mr. Suddards of Philadelphia, and returned to Burlington about 10 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

9 September 1844. Clear and pleasant all day, and during the evening. Did not leave Burlington this morning until 1/2 past 8, the boat not coming down until that hour on account of a dense fog on the river. Arrived in the city about 1/4 past 10, went up to the office and remained there during the day. Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m., where we arrived by 7 o'clock, after our stoppage at Bristol, it being nearly dark. Evening at home.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

10 September 1844. Clear all day and evening, but rather warm. Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 7 and arrived in the city by 20 m. past 9. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Evening at home. Mr. & Mrs. Haven spent part of the evening with us. Got up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

11 September 1844. Clear through the morning and in the afternoon until about 4 o'clock, when it commenced clouding over and through the evening wore the appearance of a storm. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived by 7 o'clock, after dark. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Nesbits with Helen. Miss Clara & some of the rest of the family came in about 1/4 of 10. Left about 1/4 past 10.

Up this morning at 6 o'clock and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

12 September 1844 Cloudy, raw & damp with an occasional shower of rain, until about 6 p.m., when the sun came out and had the appearance of clearing. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. At the office during the morning, and at 2 p.m. started for Burlington, where we arrived about 20 m. of 4, having a very heavy head wind. Remainder of the afternoon spent partly at home and partly strolling about town with Jim Welch. Evening around at Whig meeting with Jim Welch and others. Went home about 1/2 past 9.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

13 September 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. At the office through the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington. Evening out with Jim Sterling, Jim Welch and Bill Lippincott. Pa went on to New York this morning, will remain a few days.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

14 September 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived about 1/2 past 6. Found Jim Welch on the wharf waiting for me to take tea with him, as the two Miss Evans and Miss Huings of Trenton and Miss Earl of Burlington were to be there. After a number of apologies on account of dress (as the winter was entirely unexpected) and some persuasion, went with him. Took tea and spent the evening very pleasantly. Left about 10 o'clock.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

15 September 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day and during the evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning, Mr. Lyons preached a very good sermon.

In the afternoon about 2 o'clock Jim Sterling and myself started in a one-horse vehicle to see the Miss Earls at Grassdale, Springfield. Arrived there after a pleasant ride of two hours. Found but one of them at home, Miss Cornelia. The remainder of the young ladies had gone over with Misses Hays and Hall to meeting, they however returned about 5 o'clock and spent the remainder of the afternoon and evening very pleasantly, and left about 10. Had a pleasant ride in, and arrived in Burlington, put our horse up, and was home by 1/4 past 12 a.m.

Got up at half past 6 a.m. and to bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

16 September 1844. Clear and delightful all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9. Went up to the office and remained there the greater part of the time until 1/2 past 5 p.m., when I took a stroll in Chestnut St.

Found a great many ladies on the promenade, many of them beautiful. Met Dick Cristiani according to appointment about 1/2 past 6 and went home with him to tea. Samuel Milliken called in while I was there and after tea all three took a walk down town to make calls somewhere. By some mishap in stopping for a minute or so, I missed Cristiani and Milliken. When I went down to Coates', found Lydia in, and remained until about 1/2 past 9, when I left, and on going up Catherine St., saw Cristiani and Milliken in at Miss Elizabeth Mercers. Went in and spent the remainder of the evening very pleasantly. Met, besides my friends, Miss Susan and Sarah Coats, and a Mr. [line blank]. They left in a few minutes after I came in and also Samuel Milliken. Cristiani and myself remained until about 11 o'clock, when we left and walked leisurely to our homes. Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 12 a.m.

17 September 1844. Clear and delightful all day and during the evening. Lodged at the office last night. At the office during the greater part of the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again at 5

p.m. Evening out strolling about town with Jim Welch until about 1/2 past 8 then went home. Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

18 September 1844 Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 20 minutes past 9. Waited upon two of the Miss Earls from Springfield down (Lydia and Hetty) and upon our arrival as far as 4th and Arch St., when I left them, and went to the office, where I remained the greater part of the day.

Left again for Burlington at 5 p.m., arrived there by 25 m. of 7, after our stoppage at Bristol. Evening at home until about 9 o'clock, then went in to see Mr. and Mrs. Sterling. Remained there until about 10 o'clock. Pa came home from New York today, much improved, I think, in his health. He has been absent since Friday last. Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

19 September 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day, and evening moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. Waited upon Miss Helen and Elizabeth Nesbit down.

At the office during the day until about 6 o'clock, when I took a stroll in Chestnut St. with Sam Milliken. Found a great number of young ladies on the promenade. After supper walked out to Mr. Silvester's in Locust St., 4th door beyond school, 6th St. for the Miss Nesbits (Helen & Elizabeth) to accompany them to the horticultural exhibition according to an engagement made this morning. Mr. and Mrs. Silvester also accompanied us.

Upon our entrance to the lower room found it to be very much crowded with the beauty and fashion of the city, all seeming to wear a smile, as if well pleased at the beauty and display, fruits, flowers, &c, before them. The first and most prominent object that is noticed upon entering the room is a model of the monument now being erected at Edinburgh, in honor of Sir Walter Scott. It is erected in the middle of the room. The gothic style of architecture is well preserved, notwithstanding the difficulties of managing the flowers and moss of which it is composed, and it towers from floor to ceiling, an object of bold and striking beauty to challenge general admiration and regard. Further on is a large and elegant design of an English cottage, fancifully and tastefully wrought out in fresh flowers. Still further rearward is placed a model of a fountain, formed entirely of indigenous flowers. From out of a rustic basin rise twisted serpents, supporting a double basin, from the upper one of which springs a gigantic thistle, admirably represented. The silk of the thistle flower is made to represent the spreading jet of water, and slight and graceful pendant grass gives the idea of the fall of the water into the basin beneath. The idea is unique and beautifully carried out. Before the gallery, and in the centre of the flowers, rests a huge basket of flowers and laurel. The great surface of the basket is entirely covered with rare and beautiful varieties of roses. The design is entirely too large to be pretty. The display of fruits is various and very extensive, greatly exceeding that of last year. The grapes, butter pears and apples are unusually well grown & in great abundance. The vegetables merit high encomium. The exhibition was so much crowded, did not remain more than an hour. On our way to Mr. Silvester's, the Miss N.s stopped in to see their sister Mrs. McIlvaine, did not remain but a few minutes.

After taking my ladies home, went down to the exhibition again, it was then about 20 m. of 10. Went in and had a much better opportunity of seeing than before, as a great many of the visitors had left.

Up this morning at 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

20 September 1844. Clear and delightful all day, evening clear, cool and moonlight. At the office during the greater part of the day, and at about 6 o'clock p.m. took a stroll in Chestnut St., found many walking.

After supper, or say about 1/4 of 8, called up to see Miss Hannah Ann Myers, spent the evening very pleasantly, until about 1/4 past 9, when I left and called down to see Miss Susan Much. Remained there about an hour and then went up to the office where I lodged.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 12 p.m.

21 September 1844 Clear and pleasant all day, evening clear and moonlight. Left Philadelphia this morning at 8 o'clock for Wilmington and arrived there by 1/4 of 10. After calling on a few of my friends, went up to Dr. Gibbons' to see Lydia. She has been down for more than two weeks. Spent the afternoon in napping until about 4 o'clock. Took a stroll around town with Frank Gibbons and Canby Clement. Took tea at Mr. Aldrich's. About 9 o'clock took Miss Adaline Aldrich and my sister and went over to Miss Dunnot's to invite her (Caroline) to take a walk. The evening being delightful, she accompanied us in our stroll. Took some ice cream and returned about 9 o'clock to Miss A. Accompanied Miss D. home about 1/2 past 9.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

22 September 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant during the day and evening. At Quaker meeting in the morning, had four sermons, two by Juo. Brooks, and the others by a person I did not know. Accompanied and walked home with Rebecca Gibbons.

Afternoon took a walk out to the place Dr. Gibbons formerly occupied, with Canby Clement. Met there Frank and Rod Gibbons, J. Bradford, Gilpin and others. In the evening took Miss Adaline Aldrich and Miss Caroline Dunnot to church.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

23 September 1844. Clear and quite cold during the day, and cold and moonlight in the evening. Spent this morning in walking about town and at 1/4 past 1 left for Philadelphia with Lydia, where we arrived by 3 o'clock, then left Lydia and went up to the office, where I remained until the time of leaving for home. Left for Burlington at 5 p.m., in the New Philadelphia. The trip up was delightful, though very cool after dark, being moonlight added greatly to the pleasure of the trip. Miss Sarah Gibbons from Wilmington went up with us this afternoon.

Evening at home. Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

24 September 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day and clear and moonlight in the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city a few minutes after 9. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived by 7 o'clock. Evening at home.

Mrs. Kinsey spent the evening with us. Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

25 September 1844. Cloudy all day, had a shower of rain in the morning, and at about 7 p.m. commenced raining and continued very hard during the night.

Went out gunning today with Russell Batton but met with very poor luck. Were out all day and shot but 7 birds. In the evening accompanied Sarah Gibbons and Lydia to the horticultural exhibition. The display was very fine, particularly the flowers, and the decorations of the room were with great taste.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

26 September 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant during the day, and quite cold, clear and moonlight in the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 9 o'clock. Went up to the office and remained there the greater part of the morning.

At 2 p.m. left for Burlington again on board the Trenton and arrived there by 1/2 past 3. In the evening accompanied Ma, Lydia and Sarah Gibbons down to the "Rehearsal" at St. Mary's Hall. The performances on the piano by some of the young ladies were very fine, as also on the harp and guitar. The singing except in a few instances was not much.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

27 September 1844. Clear, cool and pleasant during the day, but towards evening clouded over. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 20 minutes past 9. Went up to the office and remained there during the greater part of the day. Left again for Burlington at 5 p.m. Evening at home. Dr. and Mrs. Ellis spent the evening with us.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

28 September 1844. Cloudy early in the morning, and about 10 o'clock commenced raining which continued without interruption during the remainder of the day, and through the evening and night. Towards dark commenced blowing quite hard.

Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city by 9 o'clock. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Had a very stormy and long passage up, having a strong head tide and wind. Occupied nearly two hours in going up to Burlington. Rained quite hard when we arrived. Evening at home.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

29 September 1844. Cold, raw, rainy with a strong N.E. wind throughout the day, about dusk the wind shifted and in the evening cleared off. At home during the morning, afternoon at St. Mary's church with Sarah Gibbons and Lydia, the Bishop preached. Spent the evening over at the Miss Nesbit's.

Up at 7 a.m., to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

30 September 1844. Clear, cool and delightful during the day, evening clear and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city a few minutes after 9. Sarah Gibbons came down. She has been up since Thursday week. At the office during the day. Took tea with Dick Cristiani, and in the evening called on Miss Lowery in 2nd below Queen with Dick and Samuel Milliken, being my first visit.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m.

OCTOBER

1 October 1844. Clear, cool and delightful during the day and evening. Was at the office until about 1/2 past 9 o'clock, when I left accompanied by Samuel Milliken and Dick Cristiani to take a stroll through the city to see the display of flags that were on every house top and hung from nearly every window in the city, in honor of the great Whig procession that came off today. Along Market and Front Streets there were thousands of flags. The procession was the largest and most brilliant affair that ever took place in this city. I suppose it must have been 4 or 5 miles long, and in the ranks some 40 or 50,000 people. Persons working at different kinds of trades were drawn in immense wagons, with from 12 to 26 horses. The whole length of the procession the Whigs were greeted and cheered by the ladies, by wreaths & bouquets thrown to them, and the waving of flags, banners, &c I joined in the procession at 4th and Market, accompanied by Cristiani, Milliken and Chambers.

The walk was rather tiresome, as it was a considerable distance up the Frankford Road, and not a great distance from Richmond, but we were fully repaid for our fatigue upon arriving on the ground. Never do I remember seeing such an immense concourse of people, suppose at least 50,000 and no end to vehicles of every description. It was impossible to hear the speaking on account of the great crowd.

In the evening attended the Arch Street Theatre, to see the new piece called "Putnam." It was well performed, and many parts of it funny. The house was well filled.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m., bed at 12 a.m.

2 October 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the greater part of the day, being very busy writing. Left for Burlington at 5 p.m. in the New Philadelphia and arrived there by 7. Evening at home.

The city still presents a very gay appearance and I suppose will wear the same until after the elections. Along Market, Front, Fourth, Fifth and many other streets nothing meets the eye but flags, flags, flags.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

3 October 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 20 m. past 9. At the office during the greater part of the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Evening at home.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

4 October 1844. Cloudy early in the morning with a slight shower of rain, but afterwards cleared off, evening clear. Left Burlington this morning about 10 m. past 8 and arrived in the city by 20 m. of 10. Went up to the office and remained there during the greater part of the day.

Left about 1/4 of 6 and took a stroll down Chestnut St., met a great many ladies on the promenade. After taking supper, met Dave Weatherly, when we took a stroll around to see the arrangement of the "Locofoco tack light procession" to come off. During the evening, after satisfying our curiosity about the state house, went down to see Mr. Delica, a friend of Dave's, where we spent the remainder of the evening, and saw the procession.

It was a lame affair, and was composed of the rakings and scrapings or the mere scum of the city and districts of Philadelphia. About one half were boys, or those not entitled to a vote, and the display of lanterns were poor, and many of the banners very vulgar. The procession occupied 45 minutes in passing. Many of the houses on the route of the procession were illuminated, and presented a very beautiful appearance.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

5 October 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and evening. At the office through the morning and in the afternoon, until about 3 o'clock, when I went out to attend to some business. Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m. Spent the evening over at the Miss Nesbit's. Miss Kennard of Eastville, Maryland was there; she is rather pretty but very quiet.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

6 October 1844. Cloudy during the day and evening and wearing the appearance of rain in the afternoon. At St. Mary's church in the morning & evening. Bishop Ives preached in the evening. Started at 1 p.m. in the Trenton and went to the city, took a walk around to several of the churches, and then called up to see Sarah Roberts in 9th St. Remained there about 1/2 an hour and 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived by 1/4 past 6. Met Samuel Haven on board.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 9 3/4 p.m.

7 October 1844. Cloudy, raw and cold during the day, but in the evening cleared off beautifully. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 10 o'clock. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington where we arrived about 7 o'clock. Evening at home.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

8 October 1844. Rarely has the morning of an election day in Pennsylvania dawned with fairer prospects than today. It was a lovely, clear day, a constant sunshine after a clear frosty night. The streets were gay with the usual display of cabs and omnibuses, decorated with party mottoes and flags. From the houses chiefly in the business part of the city, and all through the districts, the exhibition of flags was particularly imposing. I may say at a moderate estimate, that from upwards of 5000 places the national stripes and stars were floating in the breeze. Small patterns of the same were innumerable. Crowds as usual thronged the vicinity of the polls, but everyone seemed too intent on his own business of voting to interfere with his neighbor. In fact the order that prevailed is highly credible to the character of the city.

Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city about 10. At the office during the morning & part of the afternoon, about 1/2 past 6 called around for Dick Cristiani, took tea with him. After tea went out with Dick to stroll around. Met Jim Welch from Burlington, and a young fellow by the name of Brotler from Washington. Remained in company during the remainder of the evening, walking about town, and seeing considerable fun in our rambles. Left Welch about 11 o'clock, having got lost from Brotler & Cristiani some time before.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

9 October 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the greater part of the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived by about 7 o'clock.

On board this afternoon, met with a Millerite lady going to New York. She appeared to be a full believer in that faith and that the world would come to an end some time this month. She was quite young, and at one time I suppose rather pretty, but the anxiety and fasting she has gone through caused her to look very bad, and her eyes appeared to be almost starting from her head. She had not eaten anything for about 7 days. I pitied her very much, and think their leader ought to be hung for making so many persons miserable, and some even becoming raving maniacs.

Evening out strolling on the bank and through town with Jim Welch and Bill Hays.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

10 October 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day and evening. Left Burlington this morning about 25 minutes past 8 and arrived in the city by 10. At the Recorder's office during the greater part of the day searching a title. Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m. and arrived there about 7. After supper went down to the "Clay Clubroom," the Whigs are in good spirits. Left about 1/4 past 8, and went to Dr. Ellis's, met Ma and Pa there, and spent the rest of the evening.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

11 October 1844. Raw, damp and rainy during the morning and at about 2 o'clock cleared off. Left Burlington about 1/4 past 8 this morning and arrived in the city about 10. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. Evening at home.

Up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

12 October 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning about 1/4 past 8 and arrived in the city by 20 m. of 10. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again. On board met John Sherbun, an old school mate, he had come on board to see a friend and was accidentally carried off. He took tea and spent the evening until the time of leaving for the city again. After supper, out with Hugh Nesbit, Jim Welch, Mr. Lippincott and Sherborn.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

13 October 1844. Clear through the early part of the morning but during the remainder of the day and evening rather cloudy. At St. Mary's church in the morning, Bishop Otto preached and gave us a very fine sermon.

Afternoon took a walk out Kinsey's Lane as far as the mill, and across into the Mount Holly Road, and then home. Evening at home until about 1/4 of 9, then left to go down to the boat to start for the city. Left Burlington about 1/4 past 9 and arrived in the city by 1/2 past 10.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

14 October 1844. Cloudy and rainy during the day and evening. At the office during the day until about 6 o'clock, then went around to see Ma at Roberts' in 9th, but did not find her in. Then got supper and called for Dick Cristiani, and in a short time afterwards went down with him to see Miss Elizabeth Mercer and spent the evening there, and met Miss Kiel.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

15 October 1844. Cloudy and rainy during the morning, and greater part of the afternoon clear. About 6 o'clock commenced raining again and continued through the evening. At the office all day and at about 6 o'clock went down to Dick Cristiani's to tea. After which, not knowing where to go on account of its being a very rainy evening, concluded to go over to the Walnut St. Theatre to see the piece very highly spoken of, called Putnam. The first piece performed was The Three Wives of Madrid and certainly was a very amusing and ludicrous piece. Putnam was well performed, and many parts of it very interesting and entertaining.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

16 October 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 1/4 of 7. After supper went around to see Jim Sterling, and to the Whig Clubroom. Returned home about 1/2 past 8 and remained there the rest of the evening.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

17 October 1844. Cloudy during the day and at about 7 3/4 p.m. commenced raining and continued during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city about 1/4 of 10 o'clock. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left again for Burlington. Evening at home.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

18 October 1844. Cloudy and raining all day and during the evening, but very warm throughout; too warm to have fire. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour. Was very foggy all the way down. Did not rain when we started, but by the time of our arrival, poured.

At the office during the day until about 6 p.m., then got supper and at about 7 o'clock called down to see Miss S. Much, where I spent the evening. Left a few minutes after 10. Up at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

19 October 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day, and evening moonlight. At the office in the morning until about 11 o'clock, then went out with Jim Welch for about an hour and 3/4, and returned to the office about 1/4 of 1 and remained there during the remainder of the day or until 1/4 past 4 p.m., then took a stroll in Chestnut St.

Found great numbers of ladies out on the promenade, all seeming glad to have the opportunity of taking a stroll after so many unpleasant days.

Left for Burlington again at 5 p.m., where we arrived by 1/4 past 6. In the evening out taking a walk around town with Jim Welch until about 9 o'clock. Then returned home, found Mrs. and Mr. Grubb there spending the evening.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

20 October 1844. Clear, cool and delightful all day, being the ples- antest day we have had this fall. Evening clear, cool and moonlight. Took a walk down on the bank with Jim Welch before church in the morning. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Spent the evening over at the Miss Nesbit's.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

21 October 1844. Cloudy during the day, and in the evening rained at times. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 1/4 of 10, went up to the office and remained there during the day.

In the evening went around to the exhibition of the Franklin Institute, the display of American Manufactures this year is very large and fine, and the arrangement of the exhibition is in good taste. The company this evening was very large, larger than has been since the opening, the number of beautiful ladies there was great, and many of them much more pleasing to look upon than the exhibition. Dick Cristiani accompanied me to the exhibition. Met Sam Mitchell, he was with us the greater part of the evening. Just before leaving, met Hugh Nesbit.

The excitement among this deluded people, calling themselves Millerites, increases every day. At an early hour this morning a long string of carriages, cabs, omnibuses, and furniture cars, all filled with well-dressed men and women left the city and passed through Kingsessing on their way to Delaware. They stopped a short time in the village of Kingsessing, and on being questioned as to their destination, replied that they were going to serve the Lord, and would stop wherever He directed them. Several other parties of persons believing in the Millerite doctrine left the city this morning with the design of encamping outside the city, and awaiting the great change of temporal affairs, as predicted by their leaders and expected by them. I learn others went over into Camden.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

22 October 1844. Cloudy and unpleasant all day, and with a slight sprinkling of rain in the evening (early part), in the latter part of the evening cleared off beautifully, and the moon came out in all her glory.

At the office all day, with the exception of about an hour and a half, I was out on some business. In the evening went up to see the Miss Leeds, as usual spent my time very pleasantly, and they looked as pretty as ever. Have not been up there since the 19th of June last.

This day has passed away without the final consummation of all things, Millerite prophesies to the contrary, and I hope these deluded people will now come to their right senses, and give up to foolish idea that any man can tell the precise day of the end of the world. Those that went out last night over Schuylkill and into Jersey, have in great measure returned to the city, being I suppose, fully satisfied that the end of the world will not be today, and suppose take the more wise plan of waiting in their houses.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m.

23 October 1844. Clear and pleasant all day, evening clear, cool and moonlight. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington. Ma, Pa, Grandma and Lydia all went up this evening, they having come down this morning. Never do I remember being on the river on a more delightful night. The moon was shining in all her beauty and brilliancy, and the river was as smooth as a surface of polished steel, giving the whole scene a calm and serene aspect, which far transcends the power of my pen to describe. From this day forward I intend signing my name J. Warner Erwin instead of Jos. W. Erwin as heretofore, and make this note of the circumstance to know the precise time of changing my signature to prevent any difficulty that might arise from the fact.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 9 3/4 p.m.

24 October 1844. Rather cloudy in the morning but in the afternoon cleared off beautifully, evening clear and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 1/2 past 9. Went up to the office and remained there during the day, being very busy.

About 7 o'clock Geo. Way stopped in for me, and after going to see if we could meet a person (not being able to do so) went down to see Miss Elizabeth Mercer, met there Miss Mars, Martin and Beck, and Mr. Kiehl. Left about 1/2 past 9, walked down 2nd St. a short distance and on passing Miss Martin's, saw Miss Frank Craycroft sitting at the window. Went in and remained there until about 1/2 past 10, saw two of the Miss Martins, Way and I waited upon Miss Craycroft home. Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 12 1/2 p.m.

25 October 1844. Clear and delightful all day and during the evening. At the office all day, and in the evening went down to see Cristiani at his store. Remained there the greater part of the time until about 1/4 past 10, then went home.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

26 October 1844. Clear and pleasant all day, evening clear and moonlight. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived by 20 minutes of 7. In the evening out with Jim Welch, Bill Lippincott, Hugh Nesbit & a young man by the name of Smith, strolling about town.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

27 October 1844. Cloudy all day, with an occasional sprinkling of rain. At St. Mary's church in the morning, afternoon and evening. There were five Bishops there today, Bishops Ives, Doane, Southgate, Whittington and __________. Bishop __________ preached in the morning, Whittington in the afternoon, and Southgate in the evening. The latter was ordained Bishop to Turkey yesterday, and gave us a very interesting discourse of the eastern churches. Accompanied Miss Helen Nesbit home this evening after church, went in and spent the remainder of the evening there.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

28 October 1844. Cloudy, raw, damp and rainy all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, and arrived in the city about 1/2 past 9. Went up to the office and remained there all day, until near 8 o'clock, when feeling tired of writing, went around to see Miss Susan Much, and spent the remainder of the evening there.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. & bed at 11 p.m.

29 October 1844. Cloudy with the appearance of rain during the day and evening. At the office all day, until about 1/2 past 5 p.m., then started to go down to 2nd and Pine Sts. to see Dick Cristiani. Met him coming up 2nd St., turned about, and went home with him to tea.

Afterwards, went down to the store with him, remained there a short time, and then called down to see Miss Robinson and Hurley. Remained there until about 1/4 past 9, then went up for Dick to go with him up home again, his sister having requested us to spend the evening there, as several ladies were to spend the evening with her. Did not get up to the house until about 10 o'clock. Upon entering the room was introduced to Miss Buchanan, niece of Senator Buchanan,(21) and Miss Emma Hearns, both very pretty young ladies. Waited upon Miss B. to the hotel (Madison House) she is stopping at about 11 o'clock. Up at 7 a.m., bed at 12 p.m.

30 October 1844. Cloudy all day and very raw and cold. About the middle of the day, had a slight sprinkling of snow, being the first of the season. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the New Philadelphia. Had a very dark trip up and arrived there about 7 o'clock. In the evening went down to see Steirling, Hall and Mr. Israel, returned home about 1/2 past 9.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

31 October 1844. Clear and delightful all day and evening, and rather cold, thermometer down to 39¡ this morning about 7. Left Burlington this morning about 20 m. past 8 and arrived in the city by 1/4 of 10.

Just before our leaving the wharf in Burlington, saw them take from the water a drowned man, his name Reuben Mitchell, and I believe of very intemperate habits. It is supposed while intoxicated he was down on the wharf and accidentally fell over board. He is the second man that I ever saw drowned, and I do not care about seeing any more, as the sensation it occasions is very unpleasant.

At the office all day with the exception of a little while I was out on business. Left about 6 o'clock, got tea, and went down to Dick Cristiani's house, did not find him in, then down to his store. Remained there a short time, when I thought I would call on some ladies. Called at Miss Jo. Much's, E. Mercer's, and Fr. Craycroft's, did not find any of them in and returned to Dick's store. About 10 o'clock Miss M. Robinson & Miss E. Hurley stopped and we waited upon them home.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m., bed at 1/4 of 1 a.m.

NOVEMBER

1 November 1844. Today was just such a day for an election, as one would desire, clear, cool and pleasant. The polls in the city opened at 8 o'clock precisely, and voting continued steadily, quietly, peacefully. The customary parades of music, carriages, &c, were seen in the streets. I never saw so fine a turn out as the Whigs made. They had large omnibuses, with five horses richly decorated, and a band of music, that cheered and delighted whenever it was heard excepting perhaps, at the "Democratic Headquarters." The arrangements at the polls seemed good, and I understand that in the districts generally, there was an unusual quiet, a very gratifying circumstance.

At the office all day until about 1/2 past 4 p.m., when I went out to take a stroll around the election ground with Jim Welch. Was in company with Welch during the whole of the evening, and at about 10 o'clock Dick Chistiani joined us. Then took a stroll around and brought up at the Whig headquarters, where we remained until about 1/2 past 12 to hear some of the returns, then left and Welch accompanied me up to the office where we remained for the night.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 1 a.m.

2 November 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 1/2 past 3. After going up home and getting something to eat, Welch, Batton and myself got a boat and rowed down the bank. Took Lippincott in, and then crossed the river, got some persimmons, and returned to Burlington about dark. In the evening out with Batton, Lippincott and Welch until about 1/2 past 8, then went home.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 1/2 past 8 p.m.

3 November 1844. Clear and pleasant during the morning and early part of the afternoon, but towards the latter part clouded over, and at about 9 p.m. commenced raining. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Bishop McCloskey of Michigan preached both times, very excellent sermons. Spent the evening with Mr. and Mrs. Sterling.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at about 10 p.m.

4 November 1844. Cloudy, raw, damp and raining all day and during the evening, though towards night the wind changed and I think it may be clear tomorrow. Left Burlington this morning about 1/4 past 8 and arrived in the city by 1/4 of 10. At the office during the remainder of the day until about 8 o'clock, then went around to Roberts' in 9th Street and spent the evening there. I commenced boarding at Mr. Spencer's in 6th Street below Chestnut Street today and from what I can judge so far think I will like the place as the table is excellent and the company lively and agreeable.

Got up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 20 m. past 10 p.m.

5 November 1844. Clear and delightful through the greater part of the day, and during the evening, though at two periods in the day it clouded over very heavily, and had a slight shower of rain both times resembling very much those of an April day. At the office all day, in the evening accompanied Dick Cristiani to a "Native American"

shilling concert. I never, with very few exceptions, saw such a crowd at a concert. I suppose there must have been between 3 and 4000 people there, the greater part ladies, and the entertainment passed off very pleasantly. There was a little kind of a skirmish, while the company was leaving the room.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 1/2 past 11 p.m.

6 November 1844. Clear and delightful all day and during the evening. At the office all day, and in the evening went up to see the Miss Leeds, having received a note from them this morning stating that they wished to see me for something particular this evening. Met some 10 or 15 ladies and gentlemen there, quite unexpected to me, and found that it was a meeting to make some arrangement to have a sociable evening hop every other Monday evening at the different

ladies houses, the first to come off at the Misses Leeds on next Monday week. I anticipate considerable pleasure as the mode of arrangement fixed upon is well calculated to make the evening pass pleasantly. Between each dance the ladies are to perform some pieces, and sing some songs, which will add considerably to the pleasure of the entertainment.

Left Miss Leeds about 11 o'clock and walked down with Mr. Dodge (one of the club) as far as the "Clay Club reading room" to hear some of the election returns from New York, they appear to be growing more favorable for the Whigs.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 12 p.m.

7 November 1844. Clear and delightful during the day and evening. At the office the greater part of the day until about 20 m. of 5 p.m., then took a stroll on Chestnut St. Found a great number of young ladies on the promenade, many of them very beautiful. After tea called down to see Miss Martin, did not find her in, then went around to Frank Craycroft's, found her in and also Miss Sarah Martin. Spent the evening very pleasantly. Left a little before 11 o'clock and accompanied Miss Martin home, after which, stopped up at the Clay Clubroom to hear the news, but found there was none by the pilot line of this evening, though the Whigs are still sanguine of gaining the State of New York.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 12 p.m.

8 November 1844 The weather for several days past has been delightful, and today may be added to them. And well for the people that it has been so, for they have had an out of doors time of it, in awaiting the arrival of the boats from New York, to hear of the election returns. Thousands and thousands are constantly passing from corner to corner, from bulletin to bulletin, and all buzzing, looking mournful as the news is good or bad, but all looking and talking as if the balance was suspended with an equal poise, and that only a small weight was required to make one scale preponderate, and the other kick the beam.

At the office all day until about 4 p.m., then left, attended to some business and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived by about 7 o'clock. Spent the evening at home. Miss Virginia and Caroline Mitchell and Miss Anne Wilson took tea and passed the evening with us. Waited upon them home about 10 o'clock.

Up at 10 m. of 8 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

9 November 1844 Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city 1/4 of 10. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived about 1/2 past 6.

In the evening, out with Nesbit, Welch, Batton, Lippincott, and Smith strolling about town. Returned home about 1/2 past 8 or 9 o'clock.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

10 November 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. About 1/4 past 9 this morning my father and self started to ride over to see Mr. South. He resides about 5 miles below Bristol. Arrived at his house about 1/4 of 11, remained there about an hour, and returned to Burlington by 1/2 past 12 n. after having a delightful ride, the weather being just suitable.

Afternoon attended St. Mary's church, Bishop Doane preached.

After church accompanied Miss Helen Nesbit home, went in and remained about 1/2 an hour. Evening at home until about 20 m. of 9, then left and at 9 o'clock left in the New Philadelphia for the city, where we arrived by 1/4 of 11 having been detained on account of fog.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

11 November 1844. Clear and very pleasant during the day and evening, and it seems to be that we are in the full enjoyment of an old fashioned Indian summer -- a mild, subdued sunlight, a southerly wind just wafting along the gossamer web, and looking as if the work of the season was over, and the year, satisfied with itself and its produce, was pausing between its labors and the grave, gathering up its mantle, and seeking to fall with dignity.

At the office during the day until about 1/4 of 5 p.m., then left to attend to some business. After tea went out with Dr. Bun to see some ladies. We called at 5 places before finding any in, namely Miss Josephine Much's, Miss Eliz. Mercer's, Miss Craycroft's, Miss Martin's and Miss Shankland's. Found the younger sister in, and met Miss Mary Martin there, Miss Leanna Shankland came in before we left. Waited upon Miss Martin home about 1/4 of 10 o'clock. Upon our way up home stopped in for Dick Cristiani at 2nd and Pine Sts. He walked up with us and I left him at 8th & Market and Bun at 6th & Chestnut.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

12 November 1844. Cloudy and unpleasant during the day, and at about 1/2 past 5 p.m. commenced raining and continued during the greater part of the evening. At the office during the greater part of the day, and in the evening went around to the Chinese museum salon with Dr. Nelson Bun to attend a concert given for the benefit of a "Native American Association." The attendance was small in comparison with others, on account I suppose of the bad state of the weather.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

13 November 1844. Cloudy, rainy and unpleasant all day, but towards evening cleared off pleasantly, and in the evening became quite cold. At the office during the morning until about 12 n., when I went down to the Recorders office to examine a title; was engaged there during the remainder of the day, with the exception of about an hour and a half at dinner.

In the evening about 8 o'clock went up to see Miss H. A. Myers, and spent the evening there very pleasantly. Left about 10 o'clock.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

14 November 1844. Clear and delightful but rather cold during the day and evening. At the Recorder's during the greater part of the day examining a title. In the evening called up to see the Miss Leeds. Saw Sarah Elizabeth, but Arethusa was in Boston, having left with her father and mother on Friday last. Met Mr. Rafield there, we left about 1/4 past 10 and I walked down with him to the "American House," the place he is stopping at. Went in, conversed a considerable time, and afterwards took supper with him, when he accompanied me as far as 8th and Chestnut and then parted.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

15 November 1844. Clear and delightful during the day and evening, early part of the evening moonlight. At the office in the morning until about 1/2 past 10, then went down to the Recorder's office, where I remained until 1/4 of 3 searching a title. Then took dinner, after which, I went out to attend to some business of the office, which occupied my time until nearly dark so that I did not get up to the office until 5 o'clock. In the evening went down to see the Miss Martins, with Dick Cristiani and a Mr. Smith from Louisiana, boarding at our house. Spent a very pleasant evening and left about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

16 November 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived by 1/4 past 6. In the evening at Mrs. Sterling's with the rest of the family, having had an invitation to supper.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

17 November 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day, clouded over about dark and at 1/2 past 10 p.m. commenced raining. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, the Bishop preached in the morning and Mr. Lyons in the afternoon. Mr. Edward Roberts was at our house today, he came up this morning, and returned in the evening boat. His wife has been up since Monday last, as her mother Mrs. Rieford is very sick. Left for Philadelphia tonight at about 10 m. of 9 in the boat and arrived there a few minutes after 10.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

18 November 1844. Raining and unpleasant during the early part of the morning, continued cloudy until towards evening when it cleared off quite cold and in the evening moonlight. At the office during the day and in the evening went up to Miss Leeds to attend our first meeting of young ladies and gentlemen for the purpose of dancing, &c, but for some reason or other but two ladies came, though there were 6 or 8 gentlemen. Passed the evening rather pleasantly, and it was agreed we should not meet again until the first Monday in January, when perhaps it would suit the generality of ladies better.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

19 November 1844. Clear and pleasant during the day but towards evening clouded over. At the office all day, and in the evening called on Miss Ella with Dick Cristiani. It has been a very long time since I have called upon her. Remained there until about 8 o'clock, then left and went down to Miss Shankland's. While there Miss Mary Martin came in. Left about 10 o'clock and accompanied her home. After leaving her, took a stroll down around by Miss Robinson's. Noticing the door open, went in and remained about 1/2 an hour, and then wended our way home.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m.

20 November 1844. Cloudy and rainy during the day and evening. Out the greater part of the day, attending to some business, remainder at the office. In the evening went down with Mr. Smith of Louisiana to see Miss Josephine Much, but not finding her in, went down to see the Miss Martins and spent the evening. Met there Miss Conrad and Shankland.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

21 November 1844. Cloudy, rainy and unpleasant all day and during the evening. At the office all day and in the evening attended the Chestnut Street Theatre to see Mr. Jamison as Romeo and Mrs. Wilkinson as Juliet. The piece was performed exceedingly well, and with much effect, but the audience was small. Mrs. Wilkinson is the most beautiful actress I have seen on the stage for a long while, and performed her part well. The farce of "The Sleepwalker" was a funny affair and caused much mirth. Mr. Chapman as "Sanno" was excellent.

Up at 10 m. of 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

22 November 1844. Cloudy, rainy and very unpleasant all day and during the evening. At the office all day, and in the evening went to the Arch St. Theatre, being very anxious to see "King Lear." Mr. Hackett took the part of King Lear and played it with much effect. Cordelia by Miss Clarendon, and Edgar by E. S. Conner, were well performed and created much applause. The after piece, "The Nymphs of the Red Sea," was a laughable affair, and beautiful spectacle.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

23 November 1844. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office through the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 1/2 past 6. At home during the evening with the exception of about 1/2 an hour, I was around at Jim Sterling's. Anna Roberts came up this afternoon to remain a day or so.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

24 November 1844. Clear, cold and very windy all day, much colder towards evening. A total eclipse of the moon took place this evening at the time and under the circumstances that had been previously made known. The state of the atmosphere and the apparent scarcity of clouds greatly favored the view, and numbers watched the shadow stealing over the bright surface of the luminary, dimming its beauty, and imparting to it a blood-like tinge. Shortly before 7 o'clock the obscuration was complete, and at that time the heavens were free of clouds, and the grand natural display was completely visible. In a short time, a line of light on the lower edge of the moon, indicating the passing off of the eclipse, was observable, and by degrees the dark veil passed entirely off, and the orb shone forth again with her original and beautiful effulgence.

At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, the Bishop preached both times. In the evening early part in at Mrs. Grubb's with the rest of the family viewing the eclipse, afterwards out with Welch, Nesbit, Thockmorton, Sterling & Hays until about 1/2 past 8, then returned home.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 9 p.m.

25 November 1844. Clear and cold all day; evening clear, cold and moonlight. It seems that winter has now set in, in earnest, pedestrians begin to travel with that locomotive speed, which is generally observed during the cold season of the year; cloaks and overcoats are in great demand. Ice was made to considerable extent last night, being the first of any importance this season, the gutters this morning are coated with ice, and I noticed coming down the river this morning considerable on the margin of the river. The change since Saturday last has been very great. At noon on that day the mercury in Fahrenheit was 56¡, on Sunday at noon, at 40¡, and in eight hours it sunk 12 degrees to 28¡. Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 1/4 of 10. The trip was very cold, and the number of passengers very large, and all being in the cabin made it difficult to move about. Mrs. May Roberts came down this morning but intends returning this evening, as Mrs. Rieford is not much better. At the office during the day and in the evening went to the Menagerie with Mr. Smith of Louisiana.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

26 November 1844. The cold weather has fairly set in upon us, and the atmosphere and sky of today looked as if a snowstorm was gathering and would soon descend. Overcoats were of course in requisition, and glistening eyes, and blue and red noses, looked as if a sudden epidemic had visited the city, so numerous were they. The preparations for the season of festivity which now approaches, begin already to be observable, especially in those articles which constitute gifts, or afford the means of passing or permanent pleasure and amusement.

At the office all day, and spent the evening at Mrs. Spencer's, the place where I am boarding at, having an invitation, as a bride and groom, Mr. and Mrs. Dallam and the two bridesmaids, Miss Dallum and Miss Hedges of New Jersey were to be there. Spent the evening very pleasantly, and was much pleased with Miss Dallam and Miss Hedges, the former being rather pretty, but the manners of the latter I liked much better. The bride sang and played very well, and had some pretensions to beauty, but her manners I cannot say I was altogether pleased with, as she appeared to be rather affected in her movements, but perhaps I may be mistaken and she would improve on acquaintance. Waited upon Miss Hedges, went in and remained for a short time.

After leaving went down to Mrs. O'Callihans for Lydia, she, and Ma and Pa having spent the evening. I had an invitation but did not go. Found they had all left before I got there, though I expected Ma and Pa would have remained.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

27 November 1844. Cloudy and cold all day and during the evening. At the office during the morning, and in the afternoon, at the Recorder's office making a copy from the records. In the evening went down to Miss Martin's with Mr. Smith and spent the evening. Met there Miss Frank Craycroft, accompanied her home shortly after 10 o'clock. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

28 November 1844. A cold, rainy, dismal, sleety, and freezing day, the consequence was slippery sidewalks and frequent falls, which rendered it good for nothing but cabs and omnibuses. At the office all day, and in the evening at my boarding house until about 8 o'clock, then left to go up to the office but stopped on the way to see Miss Susan Much.

Up at 10 m. past 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

29 November 1844. Raw, cold, damp and disagreeable all day and during the evening. At the office all day, and in the evening at my boarding house until about 1/2 past 7, then Smith and I went out to take a stroll. Called upon Miss Craycroft but did not find her in. Afterwards walked about until about 1/4 of 10, then went up to our boarding house again, where I remained until 1/2 past 10 and then went to my lodgings.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

30 November 1844. Cloudy, rainy and unpleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the morning, and in the afternoon went up to Burlington in the Trenton at 2 o'clock. Met on board Miss Burling and Miss Lydia Earl. Arrived in B. about 1/2 past 3, remained until about 4 o'clock with Miss Earl and Burling, waiting for the carriage to come in for them from Springfield. But its not arriving, went home, remained a short time, and then returned to the hotel, where I still found them. Mr. Hall started up with the ladies about 5 o'clock in a wagon he procured. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Nesbits. Helen looked beautiful, much improved since she has thrown off black, and Clara looked handsomer than I have ever seen her before.

Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

DECEMBER

1 December 1844. Cloudy, rainy and very disagreeable all day and during the evening. This day is the first of the month, the first of the week, the first of winter, and the first of the ecclesiastical year, or in other words, the first Sunday in Advent.

At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Bishop Doane preached in the morning and examined the Sunday school children in the afternoon. Evening at home. Mr. Edward Roberts ocame up last evening, and returned this evening. Mr. R.'s wife and daughter Clara dined with us today. Little Clara has been up since Wednesday last.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 9 p.m.

2 December 1844. Clear & cold but pleasant during the day and evening. The ladies were out in great numbers, all seeming glad to have the pleasure of a promenade after too many days of unpleasant weather. Left Burlington this morning at about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 1/4 of 10. When opposite the bake house, took off the

passengers of the Bolivar, she having broken some part of her machinery, which disabled her so much as only to be able to run with one wheel. Waited upon Miss Wistar down this morning, and in the city as far as 3rd and Chestnut Sts.

At the office all day, and in the evening Dick Cristiani called and persuaded me to go to see the Miss Ashleys with him, though I had partially made an engagement to go up to see Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 3/4 p.m.

3 December 1844. Cloudy all day and in the evening about 1/2 past 8 commenced raining and continued through the night. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the Steamer New Philadelphia, where we arrived at about 7 o'clock, after a dark and dreary passage. Evening at home. Miss Helen and Clara Nesbit spent the evening with us. Waited upon them home, went in and remained until about 1/4 past 10 conversing.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

4 December 1844. Cloudy, rainy and very unpleasant all day and through the evening. Left Burlington this morning about 1/4 past 8 and arrived in the city by 10. The trip was cold and unpleasant and the number of passengers few. At the office during the day, and in the evening about 7 o'clock called up for Samuel Mitchell. Went in, saw his sister Caroline, remained about 15 minutes, and then went up to see the Miss Leeds. Found Sarah Elizabeth at home, Arethusa not having returned from Boston. Spent a very pleasant evening and left about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

5 December 1844. Cloudy and unpleasant all day and during the evening. The streets for the last week have been in a deplorable situation, covered with mud and very wet, rendering them very unpleasant for the pedestrian.

At the office during the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the New Philadelphia, where we arrived at about 7 p.m., after a dark and dreary passage. Mrs. Ploughman went up this evening, to return tomorrow. Evening at home with the exception of about an hour I was out with Ma, and at Sterling's.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

6 December 1844. Cloudy, damp, rainy, drizzling, muddy, and in fact everything that was necessary to make up an unpleasant day. Left Burlington this morning at about 1/4 past 8 and arrived in the city a few minutes before 10.

At the office all day, and in the evening about 1/4 of 8, went up to Mrs. Edward Roberts', to attend a party styled a "Sociable." It

is composed of about 30 or 40 ladies and gentlemen, who meet at each other's houses every Friday evening for the purpose of spending an evening in a sociable way by dancing, waltzing, playing on the piano, singing, &c. Some of the young ladies were very pretty, and all agreeable. Was introduced to Miss Elliott, daughter of Commodore Elliott,(22) Miss Wistar, and Miss Poulson, the two first were pretty, and agreeable and I danced several times with them. Miss P. is an agreeable young lady but not so pretty as the other two. A Miss Scull, a very pretty young lady, was not introduced. The company left shortly after 12 o'clock, and if I can judge the rest by myself, spent a very pleasant evening.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

7 December 1844. Cloudy and rainy all day, evening cloudy but did not rain. In the afternoon the winds were around to the southwest, blowing quite fresh, from which circumstance think we shall have a clear day tomorrow.

Out on business during the greater part of the day and in the evening went around with Mr. Smith of Louisiana to the Walnut St. Theatre to see Mr. Forrest play Sparticus in The Gladiator. I think it is one of the most thrilling things I ever witnessed. Forrest played his part well and with much effect. The house was crowded from pit to dome.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 12 a.m.

8 December 1844. Clear and cold all day and during the evening, much colder towards evening than in the morning. At Grace church in the morning, and heard a good sermon from Mr. Suddards. After dinner or about 3 o'clock, Cristiani and myself took a walk down to see the Miss Ashleys. Remained there about an hour and then went up into Walnut St., met Dr. Turnbull(23) and took a stroll in this street to see the ladies. Went home with Dick to tea, afterwards called down to see the Miss Martins, though much in opposition to my wishes, and wanted very much to go to St. Luke's or Grace church. Left about 1/2 past 9 and came up home.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

9 December 1844. Clear and cold all day, and evening ice made in great abundance last night, and overcoats, cloaks, &c, in great demand, and a beautiful day it was for the second week of December.

After almost three weeks of incessant rain, the sun was welcomed by an unusual array of fair pedestrians. Chestnut St. looked quite metropolitan. What with the brilliant exhibition of holiday goods in the shop windows, and the gay throng on the sidewalks, we had good reason to believe that the good city of William Penn had departed irrevocably from the plain rules and habits in which he rejoiced. By the way, the fashions of no season within my memory have combined such richness of material and varied elegance of design in feminine apparel as the present. To make a slight transition - while on the subject of weather and women - the sun was eclipsed partially in the afternoon, unless the almanac makers were at fault in their cyphering. A few scattering clouds threatened about noon to run an opposition to the moon and do an eclipse on their own account. How far they succeeded we must await the report of the Philosophical Society to ascertain.

At the office all day, until about 1/2 past 4 p.m., when I took a stroll down Chestnut Street to see the beauty and fashion there congregated, and returned about 5, where I remained until after 6 and then went to tea. In the Evening called upon Miss Hannah Ann Myers. On entering the room found quite a company assembled, very unexpected to me, among whom were Miss Matthews of Cincinnati, and Mr. Clapp of Boston. Miss M. is quite a pretty young lady, and in conversation found she was acquainted with many of my friends in Cincinnati. And much to my astonishment she informed me that Miss Kate Lynd who spent last summer in Philadelphia, and was at our house two or three times, had married Mr. Snow some three or four weeks ago, a gentleman who we had joked her about considerably while here. Spent the evening very pleasantly in dancing, conversing, &c, and left about 1/4 past 10.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

10 December 1844. Clear and cold all day and during the evening. At the office all day until about 1/2 past 4, when I left for the boat to go home, Pa wishing to remain in the city. In going down Chestnut St., met Hugh Nesbit, took a short stroll to see the ladies, and then went to the boat. Arrived at Burlington about 7 o'clock. Spent the evening over at Miss Nesbits.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11p.m.

11 December 1844. Cloudy and very cold all day, with appearance of snow, ice made during the whole of the day. At the office all day from about 11 o'clock, before which time I was occupied in coming from Burlington and making some examination of title at the Recorder's office.

In the evening took a stroll down as far as the Navy Yard with Mr. Washington Smith of Louisiana. Returned to Mrs. Spencer's, remained there about half an hour, then he walked with me up to my office, and sat until about 11 o'clock, then left.

Got up this morning at 10 m. past 7 a.m. & to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

12 December 1844. Clear and cold all day but pleasant. At the office during the day until 1/2 past 4 p.m., then took a stroll down Chestnut St. Met a number of ladies on the promenade, and returned to the office about 5 o'clock, where I remained until 6 and then went to tea. After which, walked down with Smith to 5th and Spruce, then parted and I went up to see Miss Louisa Wood. Found her in and spent the evening there.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

13 December 1844. A very changeable day. We had a sprinkling of snow, early in the morning, sunshine about 12 o'clock, rain about 6, and clear weather again about 11. The atmosphere through the afternoon was quite mild but in the morning early, rain and cold.

At the office all day with the exception of about an hour and a half in the morning I was out on some business. Spent the evening at my boarding house Mrs. Spencer's, having had an invitation, as there were to be some company, viz. Mr. and Mrs. Dallam, Miss Dallam, and Mr. Kenderton Smith's two daughters. Spent the evening very pleasantly, had some good singing and playing from Mrs. Dallam, and playing from the eldest Miss Smith. Waited upon Miss D. home.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 11 3/4 p.m.

14 December 1844. Clear and cold all day and during the evening. At the office all day until about 1/2 past 4 p.m., took a stroll in Chestnut St., which was crowded with ladies, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington.

Had a quick trip up, arriving there by 1/4 past 6. After supper went over to see the Miss Kinseys, met there Miss Mary and Ellen Mallory from Germantown, and Miss Newell, three young ladies from the Hall. The two first named were among those with whom we carried on the flirtation last summer. They looked rather confused when I entered the room, but they soon gained confidence, and I found Mary to be a very pleasing, as well as handsome young lady. Waited upon her to the Hall, and found her quite loquacious, much more so than could hardly be expected from a boarding school young lady. Had very little to say to Ellen, she is very pretty. After leaving Kinsey's, went over to see Mr. Palatene at Mrs. Nesbit's, to give him a package. Upon leaving his room went in to see the Miss Nesbit, found Clara and Helen and Mrs. N. and remained about an hour or until 1/2 past.

Up at 6 3/4 a.m. and to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

15 December 1844. Clear, cold and windy all day. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Mr. Germain preached in the morning and Mr. Lyons in the afternoon. Spent the evening at Dr. Ellis' with Emma Erwin and Lydia. A Miss Mary Ellis is now staying there, found her to be a very pleasant and agreeable young lady.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

16 December 1844. Cloudy all day, and in the evening had a slight fall of snow. Very cold last night and made considerable ice in the river, some half an inch thick, being the first of any account this season. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 10 o'clock, then went up to the office, where I remained until about 2 o'clock. Then left for dinner, after which, went over to the Recorder's office, where I remained until dark examining a title.

At 5 p.m. left in the cars for Burlington, being the first trip in them this winter, the New Philadelphia having drawn off on account of the ice. Found it much pleasanter to go up in them, as we arrived at home by 1/4 past 6, an hour earlier than in the boat.

Out in the evening until 1/2 past 8 (part of the time at Mrs. Nesbit's), when I returned home. Met there Miss Mary Ellis from Freehold and Dr. and Mrs. Ellis. Waited upon Miss E. home about 10 o'clock, she is a very pretty and pleasant young lady.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. & to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

17 December 1844. Cloudy and very cold all day, ice made to considerable extent last night. Found considerable in the river in going down this morning. Do not think the boat will make more than one trip more if this weather continues, thermometer stood at 31¡ all day.

Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 8, the boat did not arrive until that late hour on account of the quantity of ice above. Arrived in the city about 1/2 past 10, met considerable ice, which detained us. Met Miss Emma Parker on board, with whom I was in company the greater part of the way down, and on arrival waited upon her off the boat and as far as 2nd and Chestnut.

At the office all day, and in the evening went up with Dick Cristiani and his sister to Miss Thomson in Callowhill St. below 13th. On our way up called for Miss Mary James, and Miss Caroline Fletcher, the latter lady I have not seen for the last 5 or 6 years, when she was quite a child. Since then she has grown up to be a woman, and rather pretty. Spent rather a pleasant evening and left about 11 o'clock. After waiting upon Miss Fletcher home, walked as far as 8th & Market with Dick and his sister and then went to my lodgings.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 12 1/4 a.m.

18 December 1844. Cloudy during the greater part of the day and evening, and very cold, thermometer at 5 a.m. 25¡, and through the day 39¡, being the coldest of the season. At the office all day with the exception of about three hours occupied at the Recorder's office, &c. In the evening attended Mr. Whale's 1st cotillion party of the season. It was very small and rather a lame affair, there were not more than half a dozen pretty young ladies in the room. I danced but three sets, and my partners were new acquaintances of this evening. If the first party is a specimen of the succeeding ones, they will not be worth attending, broke up about 12 o'clock.

Got up this morning at 1/4 of 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 3 a.m.

19 December 1844. Cloudy all day, and evening at times wearing the appearance of snow and quite cold. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, via Camden and the cars. Were obliged to go around the island on account of low tide, which detained us some 15 minutes, there being a considerable quantity of floating ice in the river, arrived at Burlington about 25 m. past 6. Evening at home.

Got up this morning at 7 and to bed at 10 p.m.

20 December 1844. Clear & cold but very pleasant all day, evening clear and moonlight. Did not leave Burlington until about 20 m. of 10 this morning on account of some detention of the cars and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 11. Lydia and Ma came down. After leaving them went up to the Recorder's office to make some examinations, did not get up to the office until about 1/2 past 1.

At the office during the afternoon, in the evening attended a party given by Miss Hannah Ann Myers. The company was small, but very sociable and agreeable, there were several very pretty young ladies, among whom were the youngest Miss Potter, Miss Farr, Miss Matthews and Miss Seal. The last named lady I think remarkably pretty, interesting and agreeable. Spent the evening in waltzing, dancing, promenading, &c. Left about 12 o'clock and accompanied Miss Seal home.

Got up this morning at 7 o'clock and to bed at 1/4 of 1 a.m.

21 December 1844. Clear and pleasant all day, and during the evening. At the office through the morning and at 2 p.m. left in the cars for Burlington, where we arrived about 4 o'clock. After going home, went out to "silver lake," skating with Hugh Nesbit. Found the skating very fine and returned about 1/2 past 5. In the evening accompanied Miss Clara Nesbit to a lecture, delivered at the "Lyceum" by Professor Wines.

Up this morning at 7 o'clock and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

22 December 1844. Clear and mild in the morning, but towards noon clouded over, and through the afternoon and evening had rain, the result of which will be to clear the river of the ice, which had been floating & covering it from shore to shore of the thickness of three or four inches for the last week. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Bishop Doane preached both times. Spent the evening at Mr. Sterling's with Pa.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

23 December 1844. Cloudy and rainy with an occasional sprinkling of snow through the day, and in the evening had quite a snowstorm lasting for about an hour and a half. It covered sidewalks on the south side of the way. Left Burlington this morning at about 1/2 past 8 in the cars, and after sundry detentions, arrived in the city by 1/2 past 10. At the office during the day, and in the evening after going to an Alderman's with Mr. Washington Smith, went to the circus with him, where we were entertained by a new Pantomime entitled The Wandering Jew, &c.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

24 December 1844. Clear and delightful all day and evening moonlight. At the office during the day until about half past 4, having a little business, went out to attend to it, and after which, took a stroll in Chestnut St. Found it crowded with ladies and gentlemen, all seeming glad to join in the promenade after the bad weather we have had for the last few days. In the evening out with Mr. Washington Smith of Louisiana, strolling about town, there were thousands upon thousands of people out. Chestnut St. was so crowded you could scarcely get along.

Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m.

25 December 1844. Clear, mild and pleasant, being one of the most delightful days I ever witnessed, resembling more one in spring than in midwinter, and just suitable for Christmas, when everyone wishes to turn out. My account of today I shall cut short, not having time to write a more full one. Suffice to say that it, as all the Christmases, passed off with considerable hilarity and joy.

Spent the morning strolling about town with Smith of La., until about 1 o'clock, then went up to Mr. Edward Roberts', where I dined, in company with the rest of our family. Finished dinner about 1/2 past 3, and left about 4 and took a stroll in Chestnut St. Never did I see in my life so many persons together, it was a perfect jam from one end to the other on both sides of the street, and it really seemed as if the whole city was emptied into this fashionable thoroughfare. Went up to Mr. Roberts' again about 8 o'clock, where I met with a company composed of the family and a Miss Sharp, quite a pretty and pleasant young lady, had some dancing.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

26 December 1844. Clear, warm and very pleasant during the day, overcoats or cloaks are unnecessary, being more like spring than winter weather. Clouded over in the evening and had the appearance of rain.

At the office all day and in the evening went with Mr. Smith of La. to the Walnut St. Theatre to witness the performance of the Bohemian Girl and Silver Tower or Harlequin and the Little Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe. The former piece I was not pleased with, not being able to understand it; found it to be very tedious. In the latter there was a great deal of fun, and was much pleased. The theatre was not out until 20 minutes past 12 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 1 a.m.

27 December 1844. Raining and very unpleasant during the morning, but about 12 n. commenced snowing which continued during the afternoon and evening with but little abatement. It did not lay at first, making very slushy walking, but towards night it grew colder, when it covered the streets to the depth of an inch or two, being the heaviest fall of snow we have had this season.

At the office all day and in the evening went up to Mr. Edward Roberts' to see if my sister was there, remained until about 8 o'clock, then went to the office and wrote during the remainder of the evening. Up at 7 a.m. & to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

28 December 1844. Clear and pleasant overhead, but the walking was very unpleasant, being sloppy from the snow of yesterday melting. There were a few sleighs out this morning, and quite a number in Burlington, being considerably more snow there than in the city.

At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the cars, where we arrived a few minutes after 6. At home until about 8 o'clock, then went over to Mrs. Nesbit's. Not finding any of the ladies in, went over to the lecture, was out in a few minutes, then strolled down to Jim Sterling's with Jim Welch, stayed a few minutes and returned home.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at half past 9 p.m.

29 December 1844. Clear and very pleasant all day, but the walking was miserable. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, evening at home. My friend Mr. C. Cox Harper from the Eastern Shore of Maryland came up and spent the day with me, also the night.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m. & to bed at 10 p.m.

30 December 1844. Cloudy during the greater part of the day, with the appearance of snow or rain. Cleared off about dark. The walking since the snow has been miserable.

Left Burlington this morning about 8 1/2 o'clock and arrived in the city by 10. Waited upon Miss Clara Nesbit down. Mr. Harper came down with me this morning. At the office during the day, and in the evening Cristiani, Smith and myself took a stroll down 2nd St. Upon going down, got separated from Cristiani, and Smith and I went into Miss Martin's. Found Sarah in but did not remain long, and went in search of Dick Cristiani. Found him down at the Miss Ashleys', and spent the remainder of the evening there.

Got up this morning at 1/4 past 7 and to bed at 11 3/4 p.m.

31 December 1844. The walking today was rather unpleasant, from the muddy condition of our thoroughfare, but the weather itself was as mild and beautiful as the most fastidious could desire. The principal streets were crowded to a late hour, but not to the extent they were on Christmas Eve. The "Ole Bull Caps," against which such a dead set was made by the boys on Christmas Eve, received last evening additional evidence of their unpopularity, by the appearance of some "cap."-tious individuals, with all kinds of ludicrous imitations. I am afraid the manufacturers of these articles will find it a losing speculation.

At the office all day, and in the evening took a stroll with Mr. Smith of La. until about 1/2 past 8, then left him, and went up to see Miss Susan Much. Remained there until about 10, then went home. I subscribed to "Hudson's Gymnasium" today for three months.

Up at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Notes:

(1) Henry Whale's dancing school, Assembly buildings, S.W. corner 10th Streets. FJD.

(2) Elliott & Robinson, Conveyancers, 81 Chestnut Street. FJD.

(3) Henry Erwin's office: 301 Arch Street below 5th.

(4) L.J. Levy, a fancy dry goods merchant in Chestnut Street, whose house was at (old number) 276 Spruce Street. FJD.

(5) Possibly the celebration of George Washington's (1732-1799) 100th, February 22, 1832.

(6) Musical Fund Hall, was renovated by William Strickland from an old church at 1806 Locust Street. "It was so nearly perfect that it was the favorite auditorium in the city." Waynewright and Wolf, Philadelphia, A 300 Year History, W.W. Norton, New York, 1982. p. 251.

(7) The Chestnut Street Theater at 6th and Chestnut Streets, built in 1822 and demolished in 1855, was the third of its name at that location. The first, from a plan of a theater in Bath, England, opened in 1794, was extensively altered by Benjamin Henry Latrobe in 1802. It was destroyed by fire in 1820. The theater of 1822 to 1855 was designed by the architect William Strickland, a student of Latrobe's.Philadelphia Theaters, pp. xiii-xiv.

The Chestnut Theater on the north side of Chestnut Street, west of 6th, was built in 1791 to 1794. It burned in 1820, but was rebuilt in 1822 after a design of William Strickland "with the splendor if gas lighting." ibid., p. 192 and 250.

(8) The red brick Federal house, now 45 West Broad Street, was built about 1833. It was purchased in the 1870's by St. Mary's Church and is used to this day as its rectory. St. Mary's Church is in the next lot west on Broad Street. Unpublished letter of Joan Lanphear, Burlington County Historical Society, 1994.

(9) Depth soundings taken with a lead weight attached to a marked line. Robert C. Degeberg.

(10) May be Mrs. Hedges. The 1846 Directory lists Eunice Hedges, Venetian blind maker, located at 111 South 2nd Street. FJD.

(11) Probably Junius Brutus Booth (1796-1852), a British actor who was on the U.S. stage from 1821. He was the father of several well known actors: Edwin Thomas Booth (1833-1893) and John Wilkes Booth (1838-1865) assassin of President Abraham Lincoln. Webester's Biographical Dictionary

(12) Probably Casmere [Cashmere (Kasmir)]: fine wool from the undercoat of the cashmere goat, also yarn of this wool. A soft fabric made originally from cashmere. Webester's Biographical Dictionary.

(13) Chinese Museum, N.E. corner of 9th and Sansom Streets, was the name given to the Philadelphia Museum building after the opening of the lower floor in 1838 of a superb collection of Chinese art objects, models and life figures of Chinese engaged in their occupations, executed in clay. It was exhibited by the collector Nathan Dunn, a rich merchant engaged in trade with China, in which country he lived. FJD.

(14) Erected 1841. Scarf and Westcott, p. 1399.

(15) "On 6 May 1844, a Protestant meeting in Kensington provoked a riot and bloodshed that lasted for three days and only terminated after the militia had been mobilized. These disorders resulted in the burning of two Catholic churches, Saint Michael's at 2nd and Jefferson Streets and Saint Augustine's at 4th and Vine Streets; the destruction of dozens of Catholic homes; and sixteen deaths.... In July the Southwark area was plagued by similar outbreaks." The Irish in Philadelphia by Dennis Clark, Temple University Press, 1973, p.21.

(16)

(17)

(18)

(19)

(20) Locfoco: A member of a radical group of New York Democrats organized in 1835 in opposition to the regular party organization.

(21) James Buchanan (1791-1868) United States senator from Pennsylvania 1834-1845, later fifteenth president of the United States. Webster Biographical Dictionary.

(22)

(23) Probably Lawrence Tumbull,M.D. JFD


1845

JANUARY

1 January 1845. The year 1844 is now numbered with the cycles of time which exist only in history, and with the rising of this morning's sun another year has opened upon us with all its hopes and cares, its events and pleasures. The year just past has left an indelible record upon the page of history; it is an epoch in the annals of our country no less than in those of the race. Its events have been great either for good or evil, and whether we view them as Christians, as philanthropists, or with a view to their political bearings, we can but recognize their importance. The growth and prosperity of this country has been great and rapid without a parallel in the history of the world. Within the compass of a single lifetime, within the memory of some who yet move among us, this nation has gained in population and wealth to an extent never realized or dreamed of by any nation in ancient or modern times. And it has risen not by wars of conquest, not by invasions of neighboring defenseless territories, not by placing the iron heel upon the necks of subdued races of men, but by the peaceful arts, by enterprise at home and abroad, by toilsome industry, by virtue, intelligence and independence. Thus, by the large-minded enterprise of the people, and by the benignity of God's providence shining upon her cloudless skies, has the vigorous youth of young America been nurtured into almost excessive greatness.

The year just past has added its quota to this miraculous growth. We have seen the manufactures of this country spring fresh again from the vortex of apparent ruin into which shortsighted public measure had hurled them. The avenues of industry have been re-opened, labor has met with encouragement, capitalists have found confidence, and our ships have traversed almost every sea laden with the products of the American soil, or of the people's labor. The political convulsions and elections of the past year have been of the greatest interest to the whole, civilized world, and have started questions, yet undecided, of considerable importance to the country.

In the Presidential election we have witnessed one of the most sublime moral spectacles ever presented to the vein of any nation under heaven. The millions of American people, scattered over the vast continent, approaching the ballot box for the choice of a national ruler, and all with a degree of order and propriety scarcely to be accounted for. The most equal popular vote ever deposited, has decided the issue, and now the attention of the people is turned to the position of parties in Congress, anxiously looking for an indication to be pursued by that body on the great political topics which agitate the country.

Without particularizing farther, however, I may roundly assert this fact, that the past year has developed great and memorable events in church and state, that the expansive character of our people has developed itself more and more, and their enterprise, boundless as the hills and valleys of the territory which they inhabit, has achieved fresh and splendid triumphs. If, with all the experience of the past, the beneficence of Divine Providence to us as a people, the triumphs of our genius and enterprise, and the results of our political doings, we have learnt wisdom and prudence, it is well. The opening year is to us, then, full of promise and bright anticipation. May its golden dreams be realized.

Never have we seen in any latitude, a more lovely "New Year's Day," than was enjoyed today in this city. I say enjoyed, because there must have been deep-seated cause for disquietude, or an unhappy temper, where such a sunshine in midwinter did not produce a correspondent smile. The joyous salutations of the young, as they wished a happy new year to their elders, and whatever might result from those wishes to themselves, the generous and cordial exchange of felicitations with the middle-aged, and the grateful recognition of the new year, and thankful return of wishes in the old, added to those charms of the weather, to make all delightful and delighted.

Did not look at the thermometer yesterday. No one thinks of measuring heat on such an occasion, by the ordinary glass. Beside, the glass itself proved treacherous to its object; the height of the mercury was as much influenced by the new warmth of feeling that was gotten up, as by the influence of the sun upon the atmosphere.

Spent the day as follows: at the office during the morning, or until 2 o'clock, then went to dinner and returned about 1/4 past 3, remained until 1/4 of 4, and then went out and took a stroll in Chestnut St. Found great numbers on the promenade, in fact the sidewalks were so much crowded it was with difficulty you could get along, though not so bad as on Christmas day. At 5 p.m. left for Burlington, for the purpose of attending a party to be given by Dr. Ellis, arrived about 1/4 past 6. Went up to the Dr.'s about 8, and spent a delightful evening. There were about 30 there, among whom were Mrs. Grubb, Miss Emma Parker, Miss Wilson, Miss Mitchells, Miss Helen Nesbit, &c. The evening was passed in dancing, &c. Left about 1/2 past 11 and accompanied Miss Emma Parker home. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

2 January 1845. Today was as mild a one as we might look for in April, and clear. The ice in the river has almost disappeared, and several vessels arrived today without having received any obstruction from that article in the navigation of our river. Overcoats and cloaks have been useless for the last few days, something astonishing for midwinter.

At the office all day and in the evening attended Miss Mallet's first "cotillion party." The company was not very large but select. The "Polka," a new dance brought up this season, was danced this evening, some parts of it I think are beautiful, others I do not like. Spent the evening very pleasantly, made several new acquaintances, namely Miss Sharp, Miss Peterson, Miss Chandler, and Miss Gillingham. The first named lady, I cannot say I became acquainted with this evening, as I met her at Mr. Edward Roberts' last Christmas evening. The hour appointed for the commencement of the party dancing was 7 o'clock, but did not commence until 1/2 past 8 or 1/4 of 9. From present appearances I think these parties will prove a very pleasant way of passing an evening, as the company is select and music good.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. & to bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

3 January 1845. Cloudy during the greater part of the day and evening, had quite a heavy shower of rain about 10 o'clock p.m. The warm weather still continues. At the office all day, and spent the evening up at Miss Myers, remained until about 10 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

4 January 1845. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 1/2 past 6, meeting with some detention on account of the mails, and having to go around the island, instead of through the canal.

In the evening accompanied Miss Mary Ellis and my sister to Professor Wine's last lecture. Miss Ellis took tea with us. Lehman Roberts came up today, and intends remaining until tomorrow night. Left Mrs. Spencer's today, not being pleased with the table. Up at 7 a.m., to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

5 January 1845. Clear during the day but towards evening clouded over and wore the appearance of rain. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon.

The Bishop preached in the morning, and examined the Sunday school children in the afternoon, and also made them their annual presents. After church in the afternoon, walked home with Miss Elizabeth and Helen Nesbit, went in and sat about half an hour. Spent the evening over at Mr. Kinsey's, until about half past 8, then left as I intended going to the city this evening. Left about 1/4 past 9 in the cars, with Lehman Roberts, and arrived in the city about 20 m. past 10.

Up at 8 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

6 January 1845. Clear early in the morning but afterwards clouded over, and at about 5 p.m. commenced snowing very hard, which continued until about 9 o'clock, when the pavements were covered, and then commenced raining which made the walking very slushy and unpleasant. At the office all day, and spent the evening in the parlor of my boardinghouse (Mrs. Parker's) conversing with Mr. Smith of La. and Mr. Varnum of Va. Left about 10 o'clock and went to my lodgings.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. & to bed at 11 p.m.

7 January 1845. Cloudy, rainy and very unpleasant all day, cleared off during the evening. At the office all day, and in the evening called up to see the Miss Leeds. Did not find them in, then went down to see Miss Susan Much, and spent the evening there.

Up at 20 m. of 8 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

8 January 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived at about 6 o'clock.

In the evening attended a small party given by Mrs. Sterling, being the second of the sociable parties. There were about 20 or 30 there, and enjoyed ourselves very much by dancing, &c.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 1 a.m.

9 January 1845. Had quite a snowstorm early in the morning, which was soon followed by rain, and made the walking very bad. Cleared off beautifully about 10 o'clock, and remained so during the rest of the day and evening.

Remained in Burlington today for the purpose of attending a party in Springfield to be given by the Miss Earls of Grassdale. Spent the morning writing and doing other matters. Left for Springfield about 1/2 past 3, and arrived there about 1/2 past 6, after a very tedious ride of three hours, the roads being in a dreadful condition.

The party was given for Mr. Charles Mickle, who lately married Miss Matilda Black, and was quite large, being between 60 and 70 there. We enjoyed ourselves very much in dancing, &c. Was introduced to several very pretty young ladies, among who were Miss Chambers of Philadelphia and the Misses Caroline and Harriet Davis. The two last named ladies were the most beautiful, chaste, and pleasing young ladies I have met with for a long time, and it seemed with difficulty that I could separate myself from their company after our introduction. Danced with them several times during the course of the evening, and generally waited upon them, and I do not think it will be long before I pay them a visit, as they please my taste exactly.

Left after having a delightful time at about 1/2 past 1 and arrived in Burlington at about 1/2 past 4, after a very rough and tedious ride, and running no little risk of having our necks, or limbs broken.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 4 1/2 p.m.

10 January 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day, and during the evening. Left Burlington this morning about 20 m. of 9, and arrived in the city about 1/2 past 10. At the office during the remainder of the day and during the evening.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 9 p.m.

11 January 1845. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 1/4 past 6. In the evening around to see Jim Sterling, also stopped in to see Miss Helen Nesbit, where I remained about an hour. Returned home by 9 o'clock. Up at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

12 January 1845. Clear and much colder than it has been for the last 2 or three weeks, evening clear, cold and moonlight. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, the Bishop preached both times. After church in the afternoon, took a walk with Mr. Wm. Hays. Evening at home, Jim Sterling spent the evening with me.

Up at 10 m. of 8 a.m. & to bed at 9 1/4 p.m.

13 January 1845. Snowed a little quite early in the morning, and through the remainder of the day remained cloudy, sometimes with the appearance of snow, and again with the appearance of rain, until towards night, when it cleared off.

Left Burlington this morning about 20 m. after 8 and arrived in the city by 1/2 past 9, went up to the office and remained there during the day. In the evening took Mr. Smith of La. up to see the Miss Leeds, but did not find them in, remained about 3/4 of an hour talking with Mr. & Mrs. Leeds and then left. While there, Mr. Vansciver came in, he left when we did. After leaving Mr. Leeds' went with Smith to see a Miss Williamson, did not remain long & then wended our way to our respective lodgings.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed 1/4 of 11 p.m.

14 January 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day, until evening when it clouded. At the office during the day, and in the evening attended Miss Mallet's 2nd cotillion party. The party was much better attended than the first one, and a number more pretty young ladies. The only thing I dislike in them is the Polka is too much danced, giving those who do not understand it an opportunity of dancing but four times. Was introduced to two young ladies this evening and danced with them, viz. Miss Kerr or Carr and Miss Wainwright. Also danced with Miss E. Gillingham & Miss Sharp, the latter lady I find improves much on acquaintance. Was in her company a considerable time during the evening. Left the room about 1/2 past 11 and went to my lodgings, having spent a delightful evening, and not regretting in the least that I have subscribed to the parties.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

15 January 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day, evening rather cloudy. At the office all day, and in the evening went down to see the Miss Martins with Mr. Smith of La. Found Mary in, and remained until about 1/2 past 9.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

16 January 1845. Cloudy all day, and in the evening rained. So warm that overcoats and cloaks were unnecessary, in fact there has been but a very few days this winter that they were necessary.

At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the cars, where we arrived about 1/4 past 6. In the evening attended a small party given by Mr. and Mrs. Kinsey, being the third of the sociable parties to be given every week. There were between 30 and 40 there, and spent a very pleasant evening in dancing, &c, though we did not keep it up so late as at Mrs. Sterling's, leaving by 1/4 past 11. I danced with Miss Emma Parker, Miss Helen Nesbit, Miss Virginia Mitchell and Miss Mary Ellis.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 11 3/4 p.m.

17 January 1845. Cloudy, rainy, damp and unpleasant day and evening. Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 8 and arrived in the city by 10. At the office during the day, and in the evening at my boarding house, until about 1/2 past 7 Dick Cristiani stopped in. In the meantime he, Smith of La. and myself went around to Dick's residence, and played whist, &c, during the remainder of the evening.

Left about 1/2 past 10. Up at 7 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

18 January 1845. Clear and pleasant all day, and evening moonlight and quite cold. At the office during the day or until about 1/2 past 4 when I left for the boat to go home. But just before I arrived at the wharf, found I had left my watch at the office, and being afraid of losing it, concluded to remain until morning and get it.

In the evening Mr. Smith and I went to the circus. The house was very full; in fact I never saw a more crowded house. The riding passed off very well, and the last piece, which was performed on the stage, entitled "Anthony Wayne," was very good, exhibiting some very bold horsemanship. Out about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

19 January 1845. Clear and cold during the morning and in the afternoon clouded over, thermometer down to 21¡ at 8 o'clock a.m. Left for Burlington this morning at 9 o'clock accompanied by Mr. Washington M. Smith of La., where we arrived about 1/4 past 10.

Attended church in the morning, the Bishop preached. In the afternoon took a walk around the town, to show Mr. S. In the evening remained at home. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Roberts came up yesterday afternoon, Mrs. Roberts remained, and Mr. R. went down last night. He again came up at 5 this afternoon and took Mrs. R. down this evening. Up at 7 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

20 January 1845. The ground was covered with snow when I got up, and shortly after, commenced raining. The result of this combination was anything but pleasant to those who had to move abroad.

Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 8 and arrived in the city by 10. Mr. Smith came down with me this morning. Miss Helen Nesbit also came down in the cars. At the office all day, after supper went down to the Jewish Synagogue, to get my ladies tickets for the ball to be given on Thursday. After which, returned to my boarding house, when Mr. Varnum of Va. and Mr. Smith of La. went down to see Mr. Harper of Md. at Mrs. Spencer's. Saw Rhobe & Blanchard of Maine, Betton & Cole of Florida and Harper. Remained there until after 10.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

21 January 1845. Cloudy, raw, damp, snowy, and rainy all day; in fact everything to make it disagreeable until about dark, when it cleared off beautifully and the moon came out in all her glory.

At the office all day, and in the evening took Mr. Smith of La. to see the Miss Leeds. Found them both in, and spent a very pleasant evening, left about 11 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 3/4 p.m.

22 January 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day, evening clear and moonlight. The weather of today would do credit to the latter end of April, instead of being the middle of January.

At the office all day, and in the evening attended a small "Polka" party, given by Miss Sarah Roberts. Met there the two Miss Sharpes, Miss Lex, Miss Line Jones & the Misses Elizabeth and Anna Roberts, and a number of gentlemen. Spent the evening rather pleasantly and left about 1/4 of 12. Waited upon Miss Line Jones and Miss Lex home. Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

23 January 1845. Clear and pleasant all day, and during the evening. At the office the greater part of the day, and in the evening about 1/2 past 8 called for Miss Mary Ellis of Freehold and my sister at Mr. Edward Roberts', to accompany them to the third anniversary "Hebrew Benevolent Ball."

Entered the room about 9 o'clock, the company was not very large at that time but soon increased and by 10 o'clock I suppose there must have been 8 or 900 persons present. The company was exceedingly select for one so large. Met a great number of my acquaintances and found no difficulty in obtaining partners. Among my lady acquaintances present were Mrs. Burrough and sister, Miss Mary Elliott, Mrs. Nevens, Miss Elizabeth Roberts & daughter, Mrs. Thomas, Miss M. Cuthbert, Miss Peterson and a number of others not remembered. The ladies all looked remarkably well, and many of the Jewesses were very handsome. They dressed with considerable taste, and many of their dresses were very costly. Left the ballroom with my ladies about 1/2 past 1, waited upon them home, and then returned, where I remained until about 1/2 past 3.

Up at 1/2 past 7 a.m. and to bed at 4 a.m.

24 January 1845. We had a regular southeast storm, and a general outpouring of rain today. At the office all day, and evening about 1/2 past 7 went up to see Miss Mary Ellis and my sister at Mr. Edward Roberts'. Remained until about 9 o'clock, and then went to my lodgings.

Up at 1/4 of 8 a.m. & to bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

25 January 1845. A rainy, snowy, damp & disagreeable day and evening. At the office all day, or until about 1/2 past 4 p.m., when I accompanied Miss Mary Ellis and Lydia (they having stopped at my office) down to boat, and after crossing the river, in the cars to Burlington. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Nesbits playing whist, Miss Helen as my partner, and Mrs. Nesbit and her son Michael as our opponents. Beat Mrs. N. and son 5 out of 7 games, left about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 1/4 of 8 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

26 January 1845. Clear, cold and pleasant all day and evening, contrasting greatly with the weather of the last few days. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. The Bishop preached in the morning and Mr. Germain in the afternoon. In the evening attended Baptist church with grandma, heard an excellent sermon delivered by Mr. Dickerson (the pastor) to the youth.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

27 January 1845. Today was one of which, for mildness and beauty, would be worthy of being classed among the most balmy days of an Indian summer. The ladies taking advantage of it to enjoy the pleasures of a promenade, appeared in Chestnut St. and on over other fashionable promenades or thoroughfares in great numbers.

Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 8 and arrived in the city about 10. Met with an accident by running off the track, on backing on one of the turnouts to let the mail train pass. Were not detained more than 10 minutes.

At the office all day, and in the evening accompanied Sally Roberts to a large party given by Miss Matilda Barclay, daughter of A. C. Barclay.(1) The party was very large, say between 80 and 100. Was acquainted with a number of the company, dancing was the order of the evening, principally the "Polka." The supper was superb, and decorations of the table elegant. The ladies generally speaking were handsome, and all looked remarkably well. Made two new acquaintances: Miss Busby and Miss Penn-Gaskell. The ladies of my acquaintance, who were there, were two Miss Sharpes, Miss Anne & Elizabeth Roberts, Miss Paulson, & Miss Wistar. Left about 1/2 past 1.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 2 a.m.

28 January. 1845 Clear and pleasant all day, resembling spring weather more than winter. At the office all day, and in the evening attended Miss Mallet's 3rd "Polka Party." Danced four times, viz. twice with Miss Peterson, once with Miss Matilda Sharpe, and once with Miss E. Gillingham. The party was much larger than either of the others, but did not enjoy myself so much.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 12 1/2 a.m.

29 January 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day and evening. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 3 m. before 6.

In the evening went around to Jim Sterling's, remained there a short time, then went over to Mrs. Nesbit's. Helen was out, but came in about 1/2 past 9. Met Mr. Rogers there and had several games of whist played until about 11 o'clock, then went home. Ma and Pa were not up this evening.

Up at 1/4 of 8 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

30 January 1845 Clear and pleasant all day & much colder than it has been for some days past. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the city about 10 o'clock. At the office all day, and during the evening.

Up at 1/4 past 7 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

31 January 1845. Raw, cold and very unpleasant all day, commenced snowing about 1/4 of 7 a.m., and continued to come down about as fast as I ever saw, until about 9 o'clock, when it ceased, leaving about three inches of snow on the pavements. After 9 o'clock it was alternately clear and cloudy with an occasional sprinkling of snow, until evening, when it cleared up and became very cold, the mercury falling to 20¡ by 10 p.m., colder than we have had it this season.

At the office all day and evening went up to see the Miss Leeds, did not find them in. Went and saw Mr. Leeds and remained about half an hour, then went down to my office, stopping in to see a friend of Dick's for a few minutes on our way down.

Up at 20 m. of 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

FEBRUARY

1 February 1845. Clear and very cold all day, and during the evening. At the office all day or until about 1/2 past 4, then took a stroll in Chestnut St. for a while and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived a few minutes before 6, having a very quick passage. Spent the evening at Dr. Ellis's playing whist. Mrs. Ellis was my partner, and Dr. and Miss Ellis played against us. Out of 4 games, Mrs. E. & I beat 3.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

2 February 1845 Clear and exceedingly cold all day, thermometer ranging at 20¡. Thermometer yesterday morning at 7 a.m. was 13¡, yesterday and today were the coldest we have had this year. The river at Burlington was fast this morning. At St. Mary's church this morning and afternoon and in the evening at Mr. Kinsey's from about 1/2 past 7 until 9. Remainder of evening at home.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

3 February 1845. Clear, cold but pleasant. Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 8 and arrived in the city by 10. At the office during the day, with the exception of about two hours, out on business.

In the evening went up to the Miss Leeds, having received a note from Arethusa stating that our sociables would commence again this evening. But as before, it failed, not more than three ladies and about 5 gentlemen being present. However, spent a pleasant evening and left with a determination of trying it again next Monday. Waited upon Miss Wainwright home, in Race S. side 3rd door below Del 7th St.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

4 February 1845. Upon waking this morning found the ground covered with snow to the depth of several inches and very good sleighing. The snow continued falling until about 9 o'clock, when it turned into a hard rain, which continued with but slight intermission until dark, when it became very cold, and commenced hailing and snowing again. Today was a severe one on pedestrians, in consequence of the snow, slush and sleet. The streets and crossings for a portion of the day were almost impassible for foot passengers. A number of individuals fell upon the pavements and were more or less injured. There were a considerable number of sleighs out this morning but the rain soon did away with sleighing.

At the office all day, and in the evening waited upon Miss Sally Roberts to Mr. & Mrs. Burroughs' party, in Chestnut St.2nd house below 13th N. side. The party was quite large, and I enjoyed myself more than at any other party this winter. Made several new acquaintances viz. Miss Julia Vogdes, Miss Clark, Miss Cochran and Miss ________. Left about 1/4 past 1 a.m. Considerable of the "Polka," as usual this winter, was danced.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 1/4 of 2 a.m

5 February 1845. Clear and very cold all day, in the evening cloudy and had another slight fall of snow. The sleighs are out in great numbers today, the sleighing being in excellent order. At the office all day, spent the evening at my boarding house in company with Smith of La. until 9 o'clock, then went to my office.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

6 February 1845. Clear and very cold all day, the thermometer at 7.

a.m. was down to 14¡ and ranged at 20¡ through the day. The sleighing continued during today, and the streets were alive with people riding and walking. The omnibuses slid on runners, and many of those who could not take a ride in a sleigh of their own, enjoyed an equal pleasure in a trip in an omnibus. There were many runaway horses and sundry sleighs were broken. The mails are greatly deranged on account of the great storm. After a long delay (from Tuesday afternoon last) the communication between this city and New York was reestablished this evening about 1/2 past 6 o'clock.

At the office all day, and in the evening attended a small party, given by Miss Noland. Spent rather a pleasant evening and left about 1/4 of 1 a.m., waited upon Miss Cristiani home.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 1 1/2 a.m.

7 February 1845. Clear and cold but rather more moderate than it has been for the last few days. At the office all day and in the evening went up to see Miss Louisa Wood, did not find her in. Then called upon Miss H. A. Myers, found her in, but was just ready to go to a party. Remained a few minutes, then went to my office, & went to work at some writing, which I wished to complete by early on tomorrow.

Up at 1/4 of 8 a.m. and to bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

8 February 1845. Clear and pleasant all day and during the evening, very few sleighs out, the sleighing being nearly over. At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 1/2 past 6, being detained on account of the ice in the river. In the evening went over with Lydia and spent the evening at Mrs. Nesbit's playing whist. Out of 5 games, Helen Nesbit and I beat 3. Played until about 1/2 past 11.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 12 a.m.

9 February 1845. Clear and pleasant all day. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Bishop Doane preached both times.

After church in the afternoon walked with Miss Helen Nesbit and Lydia down as far as the river. It has been closed for the last few days, and the communication between Bristol and Burlington perfectly safe for pedestrians. Spent the evening at Dr. Ellis', met there Miss Elizabeth Ellis, sister of Mary who has been spending the last two months with the Dr., she arrived last evening. Left about 10 o'clock.

Up at 1/4 of 8 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

10 February 1845. Cloudy all day and evening, but no rain. About 1/2 past 8 this morning, in company with Rus. Batton, went out skating on the river; found it very good, and perfectly safe. Over to Bristol, continued skating until about 1/2 past 10, then returned home for the purpose of preparing to go down in the 11 o'clock train. It did not arrive until near 12, and consequently did not arrive in the city until 1/2 past 1.

At the office during the remainder of the day, and in the evening went up to the Miss Leeds' to wait upon them to the "Sociable," which was to meet at Miss Graves in 6th St. Met at Miss Leeds', Miss Hindman, youngest Miss Carter, and Miss Spencer, also Mr. Rafield, and the whole 7 went down together and spent a very pleasant evening. This was the first evening of my meeting Miss Spencer, and was much pleased with her; she is rather pretty, and pleasing & gay in her manner. Accompanied Miss A. Leeds home, went in had a waltz, &c, and left about 1/2 past 11.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 12 p.m.

11 February 1845. Cloudy all day, and sometimes wearing the appearance of rain. The weather has become quite mild again, and if it continues will soon open the river.

At the office all day and in the evening attended Miss Mallet's 4th "Polka Party." The company was large and very select this evening, and more visitors than dancers. I danced three times, the polka being the order of the evening had not an opportunity of dancing more.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 1 a.m.

12 February 1845. Cloudy all day, with a shower of rain in the morning. Cleared off towards evening and was moonlight. At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 6. In the evening about 1/2 past 7 went around to see Jim Sterling, remained there until about 8, then went home, where I remained during the rest of the evening.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 9 1/4 p.m.

13 February 1845. Clear and very cold all day and evening, a great change from yesterday. Thermometer ranged at 20¡ during the day, colder towards night. Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 8 and arrived in the city about 10.

At the office all day, and in the evening waited upon my sister to a wedding party, given by Miss Mary and Louisa Wood. Entered the room about 1/2 past 8, and remained until about 10 when we were obliged to leave, having to attend another party given by the boarders at Mrs. Carr's in 3rd St. E. side below Spruce. The company was very large at Wood's, say over 100, and as far as could judge from my short stay would have proved very agreeable. Danced twice viz. with Miss Mary Ceil and Miss Wainwright. We entered the room at Mrs. Carr's about 1/2 past 10. The company was rather large, but not so large as I expected, enjoyed myself dancing, &c, and spent a pleasant evening. The supper was very good and table well arranged. The music for dancing was good, being two violins and violoncello. Left about 1/2 past 1 a.m. and waited upon Miss Sally Roberts, oldest Miss Mary Cuthbert, and my sister home.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 20 m. past 2 a.m.

14 February 1845. Snow commenced falling at an early hour this morning and continued to come down densely until about 1 o'clock, when it changed into a slight mixture of rain and hail. Good sleighing was produced in consequence of the downfall, and the sleighs, which had hope of rest on Thursday, were again in active use. The weather was bitterly cold during the day and evening.

At the office all day, and in the evening conversing with Smith in his room until about 1/2 past 8, then went around together to Mrs. Cooper's boarding house, to see some friends of Smith. Spent the remainder of the evening there and left about 10 1/2. Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 3/4 p.m.

15 February 1845. Today opened with all the promise of a general thaw, and before noon, the mixture of half water half snow, which cumbered the streets, proved that sleighing had departed. A fog hung in misty denseness over the city, and added to the general discomfort; but at night there was a real downpour of rain, and now and then there were the unusual accompaniments of thunder and lightning. The water came down in perfect torrents for some hours, which I have no doubt will completely clear the streets of snow.

At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived about 1/4 past 6. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Nesbit's playing whist. Miss Louisa & Elizabeth were up. Left about 10 o'clock.

Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 20 m. past 10 p.m.

16 February 1845. Cloudy during the greater part of the day, evening clear and moonlight. The ice in the river as late as 6 o'clock this evening, had not started, and will bear a boat at some places between Burlington and Bristol. The snow has almost entirely disappeared with the hard rain of last night, and this morning the streets were clear of snow and cleanly.

At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Bishop Doane preached. Spent the evening at Mr. J. H. Sterling's in company with Pa and Ma. Up at 20 m. of 8 a.m., bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

17 February 1845. Clear and very pleasant, resembling a day in the middle of April more than February, evening clear and moonlight. Left Burlington this morning at 1/4 past 8 and arrived in the city 1/4 of 10.

At the office all day and in the evening attended the "Sociable" at the Miss Leeds, and for the third time proved a failure. There were present, besides the two Miss Leeds, Miss Hindman, Miss Spencer, and Miss Sally Longacre. Was introduced to the latter young lady this evening, and was much pleased. She is beautiful in her face, tall, graceful, and well proportioned in her figure, very pleasant in her manners and accomplished, and according to my judgment a perfect lady. Waited upon her home, she lives on S. side of Spring Garden St., 3rd door W. of 12th St., and afterwards waited upon Miss Hindman home.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

18 February 1845. Clear and very pleasant, resembling spring weather more than winter, evening clear and moonlight. At the office during the greater part of the day, and in the evening attended a small party given by the Misses Patton in 5th St. W. side above Willow, in company with Dick Cristiani and his sister. Spent the evening pleasantly, there were several very pretty ladies there among whom were youngest Miss Brooks & Miss West and sister. Spent the evening in dancing, conversing, &c, and left about 1/4 of 1 a.m.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 1 a.m.

19 February 1845. Clear and pleasant, weather still continues spring-like, evening clear and moonlight. At the office during the greater part of the day, about 1 p.m. called upon the Miss Barclays with Sarah Roberts, it was the party call. The youngest, Matilda, is very pretty and both are very agreeable, did not remain more than 10 minutes. At 5 p.m. left in the cars for Burlington, arrived there about 6 p.m. after a very pleasant ride, as we got there before dark. In the evening around at Jim Sterling's until about 8 o'clock, then went up to Nesbits to leave a package, went and remained about 3/4 of an hour, then went home, found Helen and Mrs. N. in.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

20 February 1845. Clear and pleasant all day, evening cloudy, weather very warm. At the office all day, and in the evening called down to see the Miss Martins with Mr. Smith of La. Not finding them in went down to see the Miss Ashleys, where we spent the remainder of the evening.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

21 February 1845. Cloudy all day, but warm and pleasant. At the office during the greater part of the day, and in the evening attended a party given by the Misses Mary and Elizabeth Elliott, with my sister. The company was not very large, and generally speaking quite young. Did not enjoy myself at all, left about 1 a.m.

Up at 20 m. of 8 a.m., bed at 1 1/2 a.m.

22 February 1845. Clear and delightful during the morning but about 2 p.m. commenced raining. Notwithstanding, the brigade orders were for a parade on Monday, several volunteer companies turned out to do honor to the day. The spirit of patriotism seemed as usual to burn the brightest in the more juvenile portion of the community, as several processions of boys, with banners and flags, passed through the street.

In the evening a number of the houses had their windows illuminated. The suggestions of some of the correspondents of newspapers, who have been urging the fashion of keeping the shutters of the front windows open and the parlours lighted during the evening, was complied with in a number of instances in spite of the weather. It gave the streets quite an animated and lively appearance, compared with the gloominess of long rows of houses without a single ray of light about them to denote that they are tenanted. I hope the custom will grow in popular favor and produce an agreeable change.

At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. left for Burlington in the cars, where we arrived at about 1/2 past 4, having been detained an hour in one place on account of a freight train having run off the track, in running on the turn-out a short distance below the fish house.

After arriving in Burlington went around to see Jim Sterling, found he was in the city. Upon my return home, stopped in at Mr. Rodger's office, where I met him, George Parker and Jim Welch. Upon leaving, Jim Welch walked home with me, went in and remained a short time, I wishing to show him a note I had received. Mrs. Rieford accompanied by her daughter Mrs. Edward Roberts, Ma and Grandma went down to the city in the 11 o'clock train. Ma and Grandma returned in the 5 o'clock train, they had considerable difficulty in getting her down, on account of her having become very weak by so long a sickness.

Evening at home. Up at 7 a.m., bed at 8 1/2 p.m.

23 February 1845. A rainy, gloomy and very unpleasant day, in the morning we were visited by a very severe thunderstorm, accompanied with vivid lightning and tremendously heavy showers. One good result of the rain has been to remove the accumulation of mud from our sidewalks and crossings. During the storm of this morning two houses in Philadelphia were severely injured by the lightning, a rather strange occurrence for this season of the year. There is a considerable difference in regard to the navigation of the river Delaware between the 23rd of Feb. 1844 and the 23rd of Feb. of this year. On the 23rd of Feb. of last year the navigation of the Delaware was much obstructed by the large quantity of ice in it. While today there was scarcely an atom of ice in it and our city was visited by a severe thunderstorm, which would have better suited the month of June or July. At the St. Mary's church in the morning, the Bishop preached.

Afternoon at home, and in the evening over at Mr. Kinsey's, remained until about 1/4 of 9.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

24 February 1845. Today was like a gala day in our streets. The delightful weather drew out numbers of ladies, who looked charming in their spring dresses. The military contributed not a little to enliven the scene. The whole brigade of General Cadwalader paraded, and both officers and men appeared in fine trim. A new spirit seems to have been infused into our volunteer companies. They turn out in greater numbers, dress in handsomer uniforms, and take pride and pleasure in going through their evolutions with true military exactness.

The weather has been singularly mild for some days past, and as an evidence of its mildness, the small field flowers "the crocuses" are four or five inches high, and in bloom. This is remarkably early for the appearance of field flowers, but this is a remarkable season. We have had all kinds of weather within the last month; ice enough to fill the empty ice houses, snow deep enough for good sleighing, and thunder and lightning enough sufficient to waken all the frogs and snakes from their torpidity.

Left Burlington this morning a few minutes after 8 and arrived in the city about 20 m. of 10, having a very delightful ride. At the office during the day, and in the evening called up for the Misses Leeds to wait upon them to Miss Hindman's, as the sociable was to have met there this evening. Found it had been postponed until next Monday, on account of a large portion of the company having to attend a party this evening. However, accompanied Miss Arethusa down to Mr. Beaver's (on the E. side of 6th, few doors above Vine) to see the Miss Wilkins. Met there two Miss Conrads, the younger of whom was remarkably pretty, the eldest was also rather pretty and very agreeable. Left about 1/4 of 11 & accompanied Miss Leeds home.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 20 m. of 12 a.m.

25 February 1845. We have lately enjoyed a large share of delightful weather, and today appeared to be incapable of being surpassed, for pure air and pleasant sunshine.

At the office all day, and in the evening accompanied Sarah Roberts, Ma and Lydia to Miss Mallet's 5th "Polka Party." The company was large and respectable this evening, the number of dancers not quite so large as usual. Left shortly after 12.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m. and to bed at 1 a.m.

26 February 1845. Clear, warm and spring-like weather during the morning, but about two p.m. clouded over and became much cooler, and for a while wore the appearance of rain, cleared off again about 5 p.m., and continued during the evening.

At the office during the morning, about 12 o'clock Dick Cristiani called for me, and both went up to pay our party visit to the Miss Pattons. Remained about 20 m., then left, and after attending to some little matters returned to the office, where I remained the rest of the day. In the evening at my boarding house until about 8 o'clock, when Smith and I took a stroll down 2nd St., and on our return stopped in to see Dick Cristiani, waited until he shut up, and walked up with him.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

27 February 1845. Cloudy during the greater part of the day, and through the evening much cooler than it has been for the last few days.

At the office during the day, with the exception of about an hour and a half at noon, during which time attended to some business, and called on Miss Rebecca Gibbons, she is staying at her brother Charles'. While there, Sarah Roberts and my sister came in, and upon leaving called upon Mrs. Carr (being the party call). Walked with Sarah and Lydia up as far as 8th and Chestnut Sts., then went to the office. Remained there during the afternoon.

In the evening waited upon Lydia to a small party given by Miss Mary Ceil, in Marshall St. E. side a few doors above Noble. Miss Seal as usual looked very pretty. Was introduced to Miss Berget, Miss Harrison and eldest Miss West, the first named lady was very pretty and agreeable. Miss West is not pretty in the face, but agreeable in her manners and graceful in her figure. Miss S. Wood & Miss H. A. Myers were there besides several gentlemen that I was acquainted with. Spent a delightful evening and left about half past 12 o'clock.

Up at 20 m. past 7 a.m., bed at 1 a.m.

28 February 1845. Clear, cool and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office all day, and in the evening about 1/2 past 7, Dick Cristiani called for me, then went up together to see the Misses Leeds. Found Arethusa in, and spent the evening there. Left about 10 o'clock.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

MARCH

1 March 1845. Clear and exceedingly warm for this season of the year, a fine commencement for the first spring month. At the office through the day, until 1/4 past 4 p.m., when I took a stroll in Chestnut St.; found large numbers of ladies on the promenade.

Left for Burlington at 5 p.m. in the cars, where we arrived about 6. In the evening went around to see Jim Sterling, where I remained until about 8 o'clock, then went up to see the Nesbits and spent the remainder of the evening there. Found Clara & Helen home.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

2 March 1845. Clear and warm during the day, and towards evening clouded over, about 9 p.m. had a shower of rain. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. The Bishop preached in the morning & examined the Sunday school children in the afternoon.

After church in the afternoon waited upon Miss Elliott, daughter of Commander Elliott of U.S.N., home from church. She is a very pretty and agreeable young lady. Between church took a walk with Jim Welch on the bank, and up around by the crick. On our return met Sammy Crosdale riding, he invited me to get in, and took a delightful ride up the river road for about two miles, and around by another road home. Afterwards rode around on the banks. Evening at home, Dr. Ellis spent it with us.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

3 March 1845. Cloudy early in the morning with a slight shower of rain, about 10 o'clock a.m. cleared off beautifully, very windy. Left Burlington this morning at 8 1/4 o'clock on board the New Philadelphia and arrived there about 10, our passage much longer than it should have been on account of a strong head wind and tide. This was the first trip the boat has made this season, it is the intention of the company to run the New Philadelphia until the Trenton is ready, when they will put her on the New York line.

At the office until about 12 n., then called around for Sally Roberts for the purpose of making my party call in company with her at Mrs. Nelson Burrough's. Found Mrs. B. in, met there Mrs. Daniel Robinson, and a Mrs. Way, the latter lady is very handsome. Remained about 15 minutes and after waiting upon Sally home returned to the office, it then being about 10 o'clock, remained there the rest of the day. In the evening called up for the Miss Leeds and waited upon them to Miss Ellen Hindman's to attend the sociable that met there this evening. Spent the evening dancing, &c, and after waiting upon the Miss Leeds home, returned to Miss Hindman's and waited upon Miss Spencer home.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., to bed at 1/4 of 12 a.m.

4 March 1845. Cloudy all day and evening, commenced raining and hailing about 2 p.m., which continued at intervals during the remainder of the day.

At the office all day, spent the evening at my boarding house in George W. Varnum's (of Petersburg Va.) room. Dick Cristiani and Smith were also there, played whist all the evening, Cristiani

as my partner, and Varnum and Smith as our opponents. Cristiani and I beat them 3 out of 5 games. Left about 1/4 of 11.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

5 March 1845. Cloudy and clear alternately during the day, with several very heavy showers of rain. Cleared off beautifully towards 5 o'clock p.m.

At the office all day, and in the evening about 8 o'clock called upon Miss Hannah Ann Myers. Not finding her in, called upon Miss Louisa Wood, but met with the same disappointment. Then called to see Sally Roberts, found her in, as well as the rest of the family and spent the evening there. Met Eliza Jones, & Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Matson there.

Up at 7 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

6 March 1845. Clear and delightful all day and evening, the weather is like that of the latter end of April. At the office during the day, and 5 p.m. left for Burlington. Arrived there about 1/4 past 6, after a very pleasant ride. Spent the evening at Mr. Sterling's playing whist. Dr. and Mrs. Ellis and Miss Elizabeth Ellis were there, left about 11 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

7 March 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day, clouded over towards 6 p.m. and remained so during the evening. Left Burlington this morning on board the New Philadelphia at 8 o'clock for the city, where we arrived by 20 m. past 9.

At the office during the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived by about 6 o'clock. Spent the evening over at Mr. Kinsey's with Lydia playing whist.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 m. of 11 p.m.

8 March 1845. Clear, warm and pleasant during the day and towards evening clouded over. Left Burlington this morning at 8 o'clock, and arrived in the city by 20 m. past 9. Went up to the office and remained there during the day, or until about 1/2 past 4 p.m., then left and took a stroll in Chestnut St., found a large number of ladies on the promenade.

Left for Burlington at 5 p.m. Washington M. Smith of La. accompanied me up this evening, to remain until Monday. In the evening Mr. Smith, Lydia and myself went into Dr. Ellis' and spent the evening. Met there the Misses Clara, Helen, and Elizabeth Nesbit, had several games of whist, and spent the evening very pleasantly.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

9 March 1845. Rainy and disagreeable in the morning, afternoon and evening raw and cold but no rain. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, the Bishop preached. After church both in the morning and afternoon took a walk with Mr. Smith. Spent the evening at home.

Up at 1/2 past 7 a.m., bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

10 March 1845. Very disagreeable and real March weather, it rained, hailed and snowed, on and off throughout the day and evening. Left Burlington this morning at 8 o'clock on board of the boat in the midst of the snowstorm and arrived in the city about 20 m. past 9. Smith came down with me this morning.

At the office all day and in the evening at my boarding house conversing with Smith until about 9 o'clock, when both went around to Mrs. Cooper's to see Holmes and others who are boarding there, but did not find them in.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

11 March 1845. Snowed quite fast during the early part of the morning, but did not lay, cleared off about 12 o'clock, and after that had cloud & sunshine alternately. At the office all day, and in the evening attended Miss Mallet's 6th "Polka Party," the company as usual was large and select. I enjoyed myself much more than usual this evening, danced 4 times viz. with Miss Drexel,(2) Miss Harry Sharp, and Miss Kate & Lizzy Gillingham. Left about 1/2 past 12.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 m. of 1 a.m.

12 March 1845. After some days of rough, snappish weather, such as March indulges in when he puts on his vinegar-faced aspect, there is again a clear sky, and a warm sun. Not warm enough, however, to do away with the sense of cold when out of direct influence of its beams.

At the office during the day, about 5 o'clock took a stroll in Chestnut Street, where I found a great number of ladies on the promenade. In the evening according to engagement called up to see Miss Mary Drexel in Chestnut St. L. side 3rd door below Schuykill 6th St. Spent the evening very pleasantly, saw her two brothers and father. She played and sang several pieces in a very beautiful style. I expected to have met Miss Penn-Gaskell, but was disappointed, she not being in the city.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 12 p.m.

13 March 1845. Clear and pleasant during the greater part of the day, towards the latter part of the afternoon clouded over, the wind having got around to the S. E., think we shall have rain again tomorrow.

At the office all day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the cars, where we arrived about 6 o'clock. Evening at home, and had a small company. It was composed of Mrs. Nesbit, daughters Elizabeth and Helen, Mr. and Mrs. Kinsey and daughters Helen and Nancy, Dr. and Miss Elizabeth Ellis, Mr. and Mrs. James H. Sterling and Mrs. Byrnes and son. Spent the evening dancing and playing whist, they left about 11 o'clock. Waited upon Mrs. and the Miss Nesbits home, went in and remained about 5 minutes.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 3/4 p.m.

14 March 1845. Raw, damp, and raining the greater part of the day, towards night the wind got around to the N. W. and cleared off beautifully.

Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 1/4 past 9. Went up to the office and remained there the greater part of the day. Spent the evening until about 9 o'clock in Mr. Smith's room at my boarding house. Mr. Joseph J. Holmes and Mr. Robert K. Holmes of Mississippi and Mr. Moore of Alabama and Dick Cristiani were there. About 9 o'clock all went out together and took a stroll around town, went home a few minutes after 10.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

15 March 1845. Clear and much colder than it has been, and windy. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. left for Burlington in

the boat, where we arrived about 1/2 past 3. Went up home, remained about 1/2 an hour, then took a walk with Lydia. While out with Lydia, stopped in at Dr. Ellis's for half an hour. Spent the evening at Dr. Ellis's playing whist.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

16 March 1845. Cloudy and quite cold all day, ice made freely again last night. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Bishop Doane preached both times. After church in the afternoon waited upon Miss Helen Nesbit home, went in and sat for about 1/2 an hour. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Kinsey's.

Up at 1/4 past 7 a.m., bed at 1/4 past 10 p.m.

17 March 1845 As usual on St. Patrick's day, we were furnished with a snowstorm. It was however of short duration, and melted as it fell. In the afternoon we enjoyed a bright sunshine, until about 6 p.m., when a very black cloud from the West passed over the city, and for about 15 minutes gave us a considerable sprinkling of snow and rain. Evening clear and moonlight.

Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 1/4 of 10, being considerably later than our arrivals last week, having a head tide. At the office all day, and in the evening went to the National Circus with Mr. Smith of La. The performance was very good, and ended with the laughable Pantomime of the Wandering Jew.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 1/4 past 11 p.m.

18 March 1845. Cloudy and clear alternately through the day with an occasional sprinkling of snow and quite cold, evening clear and moonlight. At the office all day, and also in the evening.

Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

19 March 1845. Clear and cloudy alternately with snow, and very cold, reminding us of winter again after the warm weather we had a few weeks since. Left Camden this morning at 8 o'clock for Woodbury, arrived there about 9 o'clock and attended to some business at Clark's office and returned in the next car, which left at half past 9, arrived in Philadelphia at 11 o'clock. This was my first visit to Woodbury, and as far as I could judge from my very short stay, think it a very pleasant place. At the office during the remainder of the day, and in the evening called up to see Miss Drexel. Found her in, and also her two brothers, spent the evening very pleasantly. Expected to have met Miss Penn-Gaskell there & some other ladies but was disappointed. Met a Mr. King, left about 1/4 past 11 o'clock.

Up at 1/2 past 5 a.m., and to bed at 12 p.m.

20 March 1845. Clear, but very blustery, cold and disagreeable, evening cloudy and cold, thermometer at 7 o'clock this morning 28¡.

At the office all day and in the evening, accompanied Ma and Lydia to a very large party, given by Mrs. Elizabeth Roberts. There were about 190 invitations out. The supper table was beautiful in the extreme, everything that could be thought of in the way of eatables was to be found on it. On the centre of the table was a very large bouquet some three feet high, which added materially to the beauty of the table. I was acquainted with many that were there, and enjoyed myself very much by dancing, chatting, &c. Mrs. Tyson, late Miss L. Heuling, very lately married, & the bridal party were there. Left about 1/2 past 1 a.m.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 1/4 past 2 a.m.

21 March 1845. Clear and fine weather, but very windy, and dusty. At the office all day, with the exception of about an hour from 1/2 past 4 to 1/2 past 5 p.m., Lydia and I made our party call on Miss Mary Ceil. In the evening Mr. Smith and I went down to see Miss Ellen Kirby, but did not find her in, then went down to the Miss Martin's and spent the evening. Met there Miss Frank Craycroft, left about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

22 March 1845. Clear and windy, throwing the dust about pretty freely. At the office during the greater part of the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived at about 6 o'clock. After supper went around to see Jim Sterling, did not find him, then went over to Frank Woolman's, sat a while with him, after which went home.

Up at 1/4 past 7 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

23 March 1845. Cloudy during the greater part of the day and in the evening had a shower of rain. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon. Evening over at Mrs. Nesbit's. Emma Erwin came up yesterday with Lydia.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

24 March 1845 Clear early in the morning, but towards 10 o'clock clouded over and remained so during the rest of the day. Left Burlington this morning at 8 o'clock, arrived in the city at the usual hour. Went up to the office, remained there until about 11 o'clock and then went to the Recorder's office, where I remained the rest of the day, busily employed making an examination of title. Spent the evening up at Miss Drexel's.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 3/4 p.m.

25 March 1845. Clear and pleasant, but quite cool. At the office the greater part of the day, very busy. In the evening attended Miss Mallet's 7th Polka Party, danced three times and left about 1/2 past 11.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 12 p.m.

26 March 1845. Clear early in the morning, but soon clouded over, and remained so during the rest of the day and evening, but no rain, and very dusty. At the office all day and evening, very busy.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 12 1/4 a.m.

27 March 1845. Clear and quite warm all day and evening, but quite dusty. At the office during the day, and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the cars, where we arrived at about 5 minutes of 6, having a very quick passage.

In the evening attended the rehearsal at "St. Mary's Hall" with Lydia and Emma Erwin; the performance on the piano was well done by many of the young ladies, some of the singing was excellent, especially that of Miss Sally Kerr of Va. (Eastern Shore). The young ladies generally speaking looked remarkably well.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

28 March 1845. Clear and pleasant all day, and evening. Left Burlington this morning at 8 o'clock, and arrived in the city about 1/4 past 9.

At the office all day, and in the evening went down with Mr. Smith and Mr. John Castner to see Miss Ellen Kirby. Met there Miss Sarah and Dick Craycroft, Miss Craycroft and two Miss Stevensons, also a gentlemen by the name of ________. Spent a very pleasant evening and left about 1/4 of 11 o'clock, waited upon one of the Miss Stevensons home. This was my first visit to Miss Kirby.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

29 March 1845. Clear and quite warm all day and during the evening. At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the cars, where we arrived at the usual hour. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Nesbit's playing whist, left at about 10 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

30 March 1845. Clear, pleasant and warm all day and evening. At St. Mary's church in the morning, Mr. Lyons preached. In the afternoon about 1/2 past 10 o'clock, Jim Sterling and myself started to go up to the new Presbyterian church about 14 miles from Burlington. Arrived there about 1/4 past 3, heard a very good sermon delivered by Mr. Earp. Met a number of the Springfield ladies there. After church went over to Grossdale, having been invited there to take supper with the Miss Earls. Spent a very pleasant evening there and left about 10 o'clock. Arrived in Burlington by 20 m. of 12 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 1/4 past 12 a.m.

31 March 1845. Very warm and cloudy early in the morning, but cleared off soon, and was succeeded by a showery, blustery day. A pleasant month has just closed, one which but for the few days of wintry weather, from the 11th to the 23rd, might well have graced the closing instead of the opening month of spring. And the old saying that "March comes in like a lion, but goes out like a lamb" had proved but half true. For the 1st was a fine mild day, which mild weather continued until the 5th, when about noon a violent wind sprung up, and continued blowing strong the rest of the p.m. About 8 1/2 o'clock a.m. a very sudden change took place in the temperature, in the short space of half an hour the thermometer rose from 44¡ to 53¡. With the 10th commenced really "hard" weather; before daylight it commenced snowing mingled with rain, and continued till noon, at intervals snowing very hard, mingled with hail, melting as fast as it fell. On the 12th there was the first ice this month, together with a heavy frost. If it is true as the poet says, that "variety is the spice of life," we certainly then have had the very essence of it in the weather of the 17th, 18th and 19th, with the thermometer ranging from 30¡ to 45¡. Days clear in the morning and fine as a "March day" could be, and a violent snowstorm before noon, with an occasional edition of it during the rest of the day, separated by a fine clear blue sky, and the variety made up by a strong wind, with sometimes a little rain, some ice in the mornings, and finished by the cold, rainy, unpleasant, windy and exceedingly dusty day of the 20th, which was followed by others, but little more agreeable, except in temperature. A little rain in the evening of the 23rd, varied the scene some, but it was not sufficient to lay the dust which was raised, much to the discomfiture of pedestrians as well as others, in clouds by every breeze. On the 25th the weather began to assume rather more of the appearance we might look for if we expected it to be such as we have had. The 26th was a warm day, but the 27th was warmer, still continuing dusty and therefore unpleasant, and the 28th was the warmest. At noon today the thermometer rose to 73¡ in the shade, the day was fine and clear, wind west and southwest. The 30th and 31st were also hot and sultry days.

Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock and arrived in the city about 20 m. past 9, after attending to some business went up to the office and remained there during the day. In the evening Smith and I took a stroll down 2nd St., stopped in to see Dick Cristiani, Miss Martins, and Miss Craycrofts, remained but a few minutes at each place.

Up at 6 1/4 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

APRIL

1 April 1845. Today being All Fool's day, many tricks and pranks were played off upon the unsuspecting, among which was one, which afforded much amusement to the members of the bar, although it exposed many to a hearty laugh. Somebody gave out notice that a meeting of the bar was to be held in the District Council room in the morning, and Jenny Owens, the good natured and indefatigable attendant of the room, was put to work in great haste to prepare the room for the company. The notice was soon circulated through the courts, and as the meeting of the day previous was quite an interesting and animated one, a large number of the bar posted away with alacrity to attend this. Although Philadelphia lawyers, they were a little "puzzled" at not finding the "meeting" or any occasion for one, and did not discover the cause of their disappointment until some one, looking over his pocket diary of engagements, discovered that the day was the funniest of all in the calendar, the first of April.

Another was practiced on Mr. Coale in 2nd St. Letters were sent around informing persons to go and witness the performance of the "Polka" at the Exchange by a well known and excessively dignified politician (Mr. Coale) accompanied by a staid and equally well known Quaker (Townsend Sharpless) "on the organ."

I also read an account of tricks played upon some of our grave Representatives at Harrisburg. Among them was one in the shape of a pocket book nailed fast to the boardwalk, at which nearly every member made a grab as he passed, and then muttering "April fool" to himself, left the joke for his successor. Until at length one of them, unable to keep his temper under the disappointment, kicked away the trap.

Clear through the greater part of the day, though as is usual in April, had several slight showers of rain. At the office all day, and in the evening at Miss Hannah Ann Myers. Spent a pleasant evening and left about 10 o'clock.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/2 p.m.

2 April 1845. Clear and delightful weather through the day and evening, though rather dusty. At the office all day, and in the evening Mr. W. M. Smith of La. and myself went up to see the Misses Leeds, found them in, but they were just going out to spend the evening at Miss Sally Longacre's. I being acquainted, we were pleased to go. Found Miss L. in, looking as pretty as ever, and spent a very pleasant evening. Had several songs and some playing by Miss A. C. Leeds and Miss Longacre. Met there a cousin of Miss Longacre's, name ____________.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

3 April 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day as regards weather, but very dusty. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the cars, where we arrived at the usual hour.

After supper went around to see Jim Sterling, remained there a short time, then returned home, where stayed until about 9 o'clock. Then went for Lydia, who was spending the evening at Miss Mitchell's. Upon entering the room, much to my astonishment, met quite a number of ladies, among them were Miss Brown of Philadelphia, Miss M. Lain of D. C., Miss Wilson, Miss Grant of Baltimore, and several other ladies. The last named young lady was quite pretty and interesting in her appearance.

Left about 1/2 past 10. Up at 7 1/4 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

4 April 1845. Cloudy early in the morning, but soon cleared off, and might be considered almost a summer's day. It had the heat of June, and the wind of March. There has been little or no rain for a long time, and the high winds of the last week have been most actively employed in gathering all the dust in the county, and driving it about the streets of our city. There were many tearful eyes, and some that could shed no tears; the sluices of the eye, the lachrymal ducts themselves were choked up.

Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour, on board the steamer Trenton, it being her second trip this season, she having made her first yesterday morning. She has been thoroughly repaired, cleansed and painted, and has had her wheels considerably enlarged, which improvement, after her machinery has been worked a little, will improve her speed considerably.

At the office all day, and evening until 8 o'clock up in Mr. Smith's room, talking with Mr. Holmes of Miss., then went down to see Miss Ellen Kirby with Mr. Smith. Met there a very pretty young lady by the name of Miss Louderback, left about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 1/4 p.m.

5 April 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived at about 6 o'clock. At home during the evening, with the exception of about half an hour I was around at Jim Sterling's.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 1/2 past 9 p.m.

6 April 1845. I awoke this morning in the full enjoyment of a snowstorm, the trees and fields were completely covered. The white blossoms of the plum tree were vying with the snowflakes in purity, while the blush of an incipient bloom on the apple tree, looked to the surrounding mass of snow, like the hectic flush in the cheek of consumption. I very much fear that the weather has destroyed the early first blossoms; indeed some of the plum trees were set, and these can scarcely survive. The sun came out by 10 o'clock, and by 12 n. not a vestige of the snow remained.

At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, the Bishop preached both times, evening at home.

Up at 1/4 of 7 a.m., bed at 1/2 past 9 p.m.

7 April 1845. Cloudy early in the morning, but cleared off towards 9 o'clock, clouded over again towards dark and in the evening about 10 o'clock had a shower of rain. Quite cold all day, and in the evening much colder.

Left Burlington this morning about 8 o'clock, arrived in the city at the usual hour, went up to the office and remained there during the day. In the evening Mr. Smith of La. and myself went around to the Chinese saloon for the purpose of attending a temperance celebration, but not being able to get in, on account of the great crowd, went down to see the Miss Stevensons in 5th St. East side above Lombard. Spent the evening and left about 1/2 past 10.

Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 p.m.

8 April 1845. The weather today was fearfully cold, and there was several times in the course of the day, slight snow squalls. The wind was from the northwest, and a constant mass of wild, jagged clouds was springing up, from whose sides thin yellow streaks were seen flying, like tokens of a thunder gust. I have rarely seen a more tempestuous day in April. Ice formed in the streets, and we have reason to fear that the fruit trees suffered irreparable injury.

At the office all day and in the evening attended Miss Mallet's 8th and last "Polka Party." Danced twice, did not enjoy myself much and left about 1/2 past 11 o'clock.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 12 a.m.

9 April 1845. Clear and quite cold and blustering all day and evening, much warmer towards dark. Ice made in great abundance last night, and fear all the early fruit will be killed.

At the office all day and in the evening called up to see Miss Mary Ceil. It was my first evening visit, spent it very pleasantly. Miss C. as usual looked very pretty and fascinating, left about 10 o'clock.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

10 April 1845. Cloudy early in the morning, with a slight shower of rain, but soon cleared off and became much warmer than it has been for the last few days.

At the office all day, and in the evening called down with W. M. Smith to see Miss Louderback. Did not find her in, then called upon Miss Frank Craycroft, found her out also. Then took a stroll around, and finally stopped in to see Dick Cristiani at 2nd and Pine, where we remained until 10 o'clock, and then wended our way to our respective lodgings.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

11 April 1845. Clear, cool and very dusty. At the office all day, and in the evening Mr. W. M. Smith, Mr. John Czastairs and myself went down to see Miss Ellen Kirby. Spent a very pleasant evening, met there Mr. Frank, Mr. _________, Miss Gardiner, two Miss Stevensons and Miss __________. Left about 11 o'clock. I waited upon the last named young lady home, did not fancy the walk much as it was so long, being in Market St. below School 5th.

Up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 past 12 a.m.

12 April 1845. Clear and pleasant all day and evening. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington on board the Steamer New Philadelphia, where we arrived by 1/4 past 6. It was my first evening trip on this boat of the season; she commenced running up at 5 p.m. last Monday. Spent the evening over at Mrs. Nesbit's with Lydia and Miss Elizabeth Ellis. Left about 1/2 past 10 o'clock.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 11 p.m.

13 April 1845. Clear during the morning and in the afternoon until about 4 o'clock, when it clouded over, very warm throughout the day and evening, which has again started the trees, making in a slight measure, regain their state of forwardness. The county now looks beautiful, the trees are all out in blossom and the fields and forest trees begin to look green. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Mr. Lyons preached both times.

Up at 1/2 past 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 9 p.m.

14 April 1845. Clear throughout the day and evening, but the atmosphere was very hazy, which caused a strange appearance in the sun and moon. On last evening the sun went down red and lurid, and seemed to be quenched in a thick haze, impervious to light, rather than to sink beneath the horizon. And the moon which was half full, being in the heavens, only visible in its dull, copper colored appearance, but so bereft of every reflecting beam, as to cast no shadow, even where not a cloud intercepted its light. Here and there a "Dim love star diffused an anguish light." And, altogether, the evening presented one of those scenes at which poets aim, when describing some great convulsion, whose portents are seen in the heavens above, and are felt in the earth beneath, and the waters under the earth; worse, far worse, than the wild deformity of a storm. Such a scene seems to excite feelings of indescribable awe. And in gazing at the planets that appear to retain their places without discharging their office, we feel a wish for action, for change, for some outburst, some wild uproar of the elements, to rouse us either to preventative action, or, at least, to definite fear. Rather than such a quiet, chilling, fearful gloom, one would prefer the alternative, whose "Storms rock the sky, afflicted oceans roar, and sanguine billows dye the shadowing shore."

Left Burlington this morning at 8 o'clock and arrived in the city by 1/2 past 9. Ma and Lydia came down with me this morning. At the office all day, and in the evening Mr. W. M. Smith and myself called up to see the Miss Leeds, found them in and spent a pleasant evening, left about 11 o'clock.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

15 April 1845. Clear, warm and pleasant. At the office during the day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived at about 1/2 past 6. Spent the evening at home, Mr. Kinsey's sister was there. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 10 p.m.

16 April 1845. Cloudy and misty all day, and in the evening had a slight shower of rain. Left Burlington this morning at 8 o'clock, arrived in the city by 1/2 past 9, after attending to some business, went up to the office, where I remained the rest of the day.

In the evening Mr. Smith of La. and myself called up to see Miss Sally Longacre, did not find her in. Then called to see Miss Ellen Kirby, found her out also and finally stopped in to see the Miss Stevensons, where we spent the remainder of the evening. Left about 1/2 past 10, and went up with Smith to Mrs. Parke's and spent the night with him.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 11 p.m.

17 April 1845. Cloudy, raw and unpleasant, and at times sprinkling rain. At the office all day and in the evening Mr. Smith and myself called down to see Miss Ellen Kirby. Not finding her in, called upon Miss Louderback, where we spent the evening. Met the two Miss Stevensons there.

Up at 7 a.m. and to bed at 20 m. of 12 a.m.

18 April 1845. Cloudy and misty all day, and very unpleasant, also raw and cold. At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the steamer New Philadelphia, where we arrived at about 10 m. of 7 o'clock. In the evening at home writing a deed.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

19 April 1845. Cloudy and drizzling rain all day and through the evening. Had considerable rain during last night, which has made everything look very green, as we have been very much in want of rain. At the office all day, left for Burlington at 5 p.m., where we arrived at about 1/2 past 6, evening at home.

Up at 6 a.m., bed at 9 1/2 p.m.

20 April 1845. Cloudy all day, damp and cold. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Bishop Doane preached. Evening at the Baptist church with Lydia and Grandma.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

21 April 1845. Cloudy during the day and evening though the sun would occasionally peep from the hiding place, which he has maintained for the last week. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour 8 o'clock and arrived in the city about 1/4 past 9. After attending to some business, went up to the office, where to my great astonishment, found my uncle, Professor John P. Harrison, waiting to see me. I have not seen him since September 1837, and he looks about as well as ever. He arrived yesterday morning about 3 o'clock, and intends remaining with us about a week.

At the office all day and evening went down to see the Miss Stevensons with Mr. Smith. Met there Miss Ellen Kirby, spent a very pleasant evening and left about 11 o'clock.

Up at 10 m. of 6 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

22 April 1845 A clear, warm and delightful day, strangely con- trasting with the damp, raw, gloomy and unpleasant weather of the last week or ten days, evening clear and moonlight. At the office all day and spent the evening out at Mr. Algernon Roberts'. It was a small company, given for Dr. Harrison, composed of Roberts in 9th St., Spruce St. Roberts, Mr. Elliott and others. Left about 1/4 of 11 o'clock.

Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

23 April 1845. Clear, warm and very pleasant all day and evening moonlight. At the office during the morning, and at about 1/2 past 12 o'clock went out with Algernon S. Roberts. Took dinner with him and then rode out in his carriage to the sale of the "Warner Estate" about 2 miles over the bridge on the Lancaster Turnpike. They got through in one afternoon, and it brought rather over $21,000.00. Got into town again about 1/2 past 7, took tea at Mr. Roberts', and at about 9 o'clock went to my office, where I remained the rest of the night.

Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

24 April 1845. Clear and warm all day and evening. At the office all day, evening up at Mr. Edward Roberts. There was a small company given for Dr. Harrison, left about 11 o'clock. Up at 6 1/2 a.m., bed at 11 1/2 p.m.

25 April 1845. Cloudy all day and in the evening had a shower of rain. At the office all day, and in the evening with Smith of La. in his room until about 1/2 past 9, then went to my lodgings. Up at 1/4 of 6 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

26 April 1845. Cloudy in the morning but towards noon cleared off pleasantly. At the office all day and at 5 p.m. left in the boat for Burlington, where we arrived at about 1/4 past 6. Went up home, found they had all gone to Dr. Ellis's to tea, except Grandma. Then dressed and went in myself, accompanied by Grandma. All our family and my uncle, Dr. Harrison, were there. Left about 1/2 past 9. Up at 1/2 past 5 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

27 April 1845 Cloudy during the morning, but in the afternoon cleared off. At St. Mary's church in the morning and afternoon, Mr. Lyons preached both times. Evening at home, Dr. Ellis was there. Dr. Harrison has been at our house since last night and will remain until tomorrow morning.

Up at 7 a.m., bed at 10 p.m.

28 April 1845. Clear and pleasant during the morning, in the afternoon clouded over, and at about 1/2 past 5 and 7 p.m. had heavy showers of rain. Left Burlington this morning in the early train and arrived in the city by 8 o'clock. Out on business the greater part of the day. Pa, Grandma and Ma came down in the boat this morning, also Dr. Harrison who leaves for Cincinnati tomorrow morning at 6 o'clock. Spent the evening at cousins in 9th St.

Up at 5 a.m., bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

29 April 1845. Clear and very pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office during the day and in the evening down at my boarding house in Smith's room, talking with him and Holmes of [illegible] until about 1/2 past 8. Holmes left then and Smith and I took a walk as far as 5th and Library, and then both went to our lodgings.Dr. Harrison left this morning at 6 o'clock for Cincinnati.

Up at 5 a.m., bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

30 April 1845. Cloudy all day and towards evening grew very cold, rainy and unpleasant. At the office all day until 1/2 past 4 p.m., then left and at 5 p.m. left for Burlington, where we arrived at about 1/2 past 6. Evening at home. Up at 6 a.m. and to bed at 1/4 of 10 p.m.

MAY

1 May 1845. The clerk of the weather is evidently a crusty old bachelor. Today, when thousands of children awoke in the hope of a May-Day frolic, he managed to hang the heavens in black and give a sort of sepulchral chill to the air, forbidding a ramble beyond the limits of brick and mortar. The omnibus drivers had tricked out their coaches in vain with lilacs and green branches. Their accustomed crowds of happy little passengers were not forthcoming.

Left Burlington this morning at 1/2 past 7 and arrived in the City about 9 o'clock. Went up to the office, remained a short time. Then went out on business which occupied my attention until nearly 4 p.m. Then returned where I remained until 11 p.m. writing, with the exception of 3/4 of an hour at supper.

3 May 1845. Hugh Nesbit called for me, and we both went down to the river, got a boat and rowed over to the fish house. Saw them draw their skein once, and then returned to Burlington. Played whist during the evening.

6 May 1845. In the morning at my office in Arch Street and at about noon moved down to my new office in 5th Street below Library, where I spent the afternoon fixing up. Ma had the carpets put down yesterday.

7 May 1845. At my office all day until about 10 m. of 5 p.m. At 5 started for Burlington, where we arrived in the midst of the rain. Evening at home. I got a young man or boy yesterday. He is to remain with me to learn the business provided he likes it. His name is James House, age about 14 years.

8 May 1845. About 7 o'clock p.m. I was taken very sick and commenced vomiting, which continued at intervals of 10 minutes to 1/2 an hour until 1/2 past 11 o'clock. My bowels also became very much disordered. I cannot imagine what caused the sickness, but am in hopes, and think I shall be well.

9 May 1845. At the office all day and in the evening took a stroll around with Smith of Louisiana. Returned to our room at about 1/2 past 9. I began boarding at Mrs. Parke's altogether yesterday, that is to say, I commenced sleeping there, heretofore I only took my meals. I felt much better when I woke up this morning and was able to get up and attend to business.

10 May 1845. At 5 p.m. left for Burlington in the Steamer New Philadelphia; had a delightful trip. Went over to see James Sterling. He soon shut up the store, and Mr. Dillard of North Carolina (lately from Princeton College) and I took a walk down as far as the river.

11 May 1845. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon. The Bishop preached in the morning, and examined the Sunday School children in the afternoon. About 1/2 past 6 p.m. Mr. William Hays and myself started up to see Miss Emily Black in Springfield. This was my first visit to see Miss Black and was much pleased.

15 May 1845. Cloudy during the morning and oppressively warm. At the office all day, and in the evening went up to see Miss Sally Longacre with Mr. Smith, and spent quite a pleasant evening.

14 May 1845. This morning, people were disagreeably surprised to see hail patterning thickly on the green leaves of the trees that drooped beneath the blows of the unwelcome visitor, and shrunk from the raw, cold breath of the morning. Fires were quite desirable and overcoats very comfortable, for the feel of everything out of doors was winterish, and the freshness of verdure and the bloom of flowers appeared as a kind of mockery of the dismal, chilly weather.

19 May 1845. At 2 p.m. left for Burlington in the Steamer Trenton, having heard that Pa was not quite so well today.

23 May 1845. In the evening went up to see my friends the Roberts in 9th Street. Remained there until about 1/4 past 9, then waited upon Sally Roberts, Mrs. Caufman and Miss Hebron to 10th and Locust Street. Then left them and went to my boarding house.

Miss Hebron had dressed herself as an Indian squaw, and went to the house to be introduced as an Indian girl by the name of Mandaline to her father, mother & others.

26 May 1845. The public squares look beautiful, with all the freshness of spring and opulence of summer in their foliage. We have not for a long time seen the streets look gayer than at present. A few persons of leisure have left town, as they find abundant enjoyment in the shady side of Chestnut Street. The fair pedestrians who are there to be seen never looked better than in the fashions of the season. In New York the weather has been quite winterish, flakes of snow fell on Sunday. The cucumber vines and early beans were destroyed by the frost of Saturday night.

30 May 1845. Clear and quite cold during the day and evening, so cold last night that ice was formed the thickness of paste board in the outskirts of the city.

Miss Jane Stevenson made me a present of a very handsome purse knit with silk and steel beads.

JUNE

1 June 1845. Clear and one of the most delightful days I ever experienced. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon. The Bishop preached in the morning and examined the Sunday school children in the afternoon.

5 June 1845. At the office all day, busy. In the evening Mr. W.M. Smith and myself went up to the Misses Leeds, found them in, and also a large company of little girls and boys, there being a party for one of the younger Leeds. Our first impulse was not to go in, but Mr. and Mrs. Leeds and the Misses Leeds' finally persuaded us, and we spent quite a pleasant evening among the children. Met there Miss Wainwright, Miss Longacre and her cousin.

8 June 1845. Clear and excessively hot all day and evening. At home during the whole day and evening. Pa being so very low I did not go out.

9 June 1845. Today was the hottest day experienced in our City for the last four years with the exception of that known as the "warm Sunday of 1842." In the reading room of the Exchange at 11 1/2 a.m. the thermometer was 99¡, and at 3 p.m. it ranged at 101¡.

10 June 1845. Clear and very warm until about 7 p.m. when we had a rain shower. At my office during the morning, but left in the 12 o'clock cars for Burlington, having heard by Mr. James H[unter] Sterling this morning my father was worse, and sent for me to come up. Arrived in Burlington about 1/2 past 1. Upon going home, went into my father's chamber. He appeared to be very uneasy from pain, and extremely weak, though he recognized me and shook hands, though it was the last, but one, he ever did.

I was in Pa's room several times during the afternoon, but did not remain long, as it pained me much to see his sufferings. About quarter past 5 p.m. I went to his bedside, took him by the hand and asked if he knew me. His reply was he did, and that was the last time my dear father ever spoke to me. At about 7 minutes past 6 p.m. he breathed his last - peace be to his soul. He died perfectly resigned, and in full belief of a happy hereafter. The last intelligible words he was heard to utter were "receive my spirit, O Lord." May the Lord receive the spirit of my dear departed father is my earnest prayer. He was a dear, kind parent to me, and who can tell the pang that now shoots through my heart, when I think that he is gone never to be seen by mortal eye again.

Oft have I thought since he has left us, of the many small kindnesses rendered me in the days of my childhood and long since forgotten. Hundreds of them have occurred to me since he has gone, that perhaps never would have been thought of. But we must be resigned, it was the will of God to remove my dear father, and we must look at it in the light of a mere veil dropped between him and us for a few short years, when we shall all meet again. May the Lord receive his soul, and peace be unto him as I now trust he is happy.

Ma, Grandma, cousin Lydia Roberts(3) and Edward P. Borden(4) were present when my dear father died.

11 June 1845. Clear and exceedingly warm all day and evening. In the house all day and evening. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Elliott, and Mr. Edward Roberts and Mr. Isaac Elliott were up, and returned to the City today. We had one of the last tributes of respect paid to my dear departed father this afternoon at 4 o'clock by having Bishop Doane to perform the funeral service at our house. The principal part of our Burlington friends were present.

12 June 1845. Clear, cool and pleasant all day, so that we were much favored for our arduous undertaking for today. This was a melancholy day for us, as it became our duty to follow to the grave the remains of my dear departed father. Ma, Grandma, Lydia and myself (also Mr. James H. Sterling, who has acted the part of friend indeed to us during our trials) left Burlington this morning in the cars for Philadelphia for the purpose of going to Wilmington, Delaware.

In the boat at 1/4 past 9 to convey the remains of my dear father to be interred in Wilmington, according to his desire. We arrived in Wilmington at about 1/2 past 11, and after paying the last tribute of respect to my dear father we returned to the boat. Bishop Lee and Mr. Weinkoop officiated at the grave.(5)

Arrived in the City by 3 and at 4 o'clock left for Burlington, where we arrived by 1/4 past 5 p.m. after a very fatiguing journey for my mother and sister, laboring under such severe affliction. I am now fatherless and an orphan, but I hope through a kind providence to prosper in business and be an honor, comfort and support to my dear mother and sister. May the Lord give us strength to bear up under our afflictions. It is a severe trial to lose a parent, but it is a trial we all have to undergo, and is brought about for some wise purpose. May the Lord be praised that this day of trials is over.

13 June 1845. Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 7. At the office all day, then to my boarding house.

17 June 1845. In the evening attended a real estate sale to buy a property for Mr. Rawl.

18 June 1845. At the office all day and in the evening up at the house at No. 301 Arch Street arranging some papers of my late dear father. My boy James House was there assisting me. Left about 10 o'clock and after attending to getting a dressmaker for Ma, went to my lodgings.

20 June 1845. Today I commence my regular trips every day to Burlington. I think it will be of service to me, as I have been so closely confined to business lately I need recreation.

24 June 1845. After supper I took a row along the banks with Jim Welch.

25 June 1845. At 5 p.m. left for Burlington again, where we arrived at about 1/2 past 6. Met on board going up Miss Mary Ann Aldrich, or so I addressed her when I spoke, but was later introduced to her by the name of Mrs. Bush, she having been married today or very lately.

26 June 1845. Left Burlington this morning about 1/2 past 7 and arrived in the City about 9 o'clock. There were a large number of passengers on board going down to see the funeral solemnities of the late President Andrew Jackson.(6)

At the office until about 1/2 past 12, then went out to see the procession, but sun being so warm did not wait to see more than the military display, which was about 2000 strong.

Evening at home with the exception of about an hour occupied taking walk down the bank.

27 June 1845. Up at 4 a.m. to write. After supper took a walk with Dr. Ellis up the River Road.

28 June 1845. Up at 4 a.m. and wrote until breakfast time. Bed at 1/2 past 10 p.m.

JULY

1 July 1845. Clear and quite cool all day, a fire this morning would have been quite comfortable.

3 July 1845. The "Independent Rifle Company" went up in the boat this afternoon. They intend spending their 4th at Trenton. Evening at home. Up at 5 a.m. and took a walk before breakfast.

4 July 1845. Clear and delightful, just such a day as should be for celebrating the glorious anniversary of our Country's Independence. The people turned out in great numbers, some went to New York, others to Baltimore, and so they dispersed themselves throughout the country to enjoy the 4th. Several sailing clubs, as well as other sailing parties, came up to Burlington. For my part I enjoyed the day.

In the morning Jim Welch and myself took a stroll around town, and finally down Kinsey's Lane, where we were celebrating the 4th with a large pistol when a party passed by composed of the Misses Clara, Helen, Elizabeth, Amelia and Alice Nesbit, Miss Biddle, Miss Helen Kinsey, Miss Elizabeth Ellis, Mr. Cooke, Mr. Palitene, Mr. Lepe, Mr. John Rodgers and others, who invited us to join them. So we did, and strolled as far as the mill, where we were all weighed. My weight was 134 pounds. After leaving the mill strolled up along Silver Lakes, and after arriving at the last, took seats in the shade and rested ourselves. While resting we were joined by Mr. Clark(7) ex-mayor of New York, and Miss Lamb. We returned through the woods and had a delightful time.

Stopped in at Miss Kinsey's and went through the garden, where we had plenty of currants, raspberries, gooseberries, &c., to eat. The party left about 12 o'clock when Mr. James Kinsey, Reu Whar and myself had a grand firing with pistols, crackers, &c., until dinner time.

After dinner took a short nap. At about 2 o'clock Jim Welch called for me, and we took a stroll down on the banks. While in front of St. Mary's Hall we found some of the young ladies (and among some of the last summer party) quite as ready to carry on a flirtation game as ever. They made a number of signs from the windows with handkerchiefs, &c, which we of course returned.

While in front of the hall a club of small boys dressed as sailors, bearing flags &c., and commanded by a boy by the name of Peacock, went through a number of gyrations, keeping excellent time and good order & doing good credit to themselves.

At about 1/4 past 3 the steamer Trenton came up with a large number of passengers. I went over to Bristol in her with Mr. John Rodgers, leaving Welch as he was going out of town at 6 o'clock. Remained in Bristol for about an hour and a half, and returned to Burlington in the Steamer Sun(8) at 5 o'clock, when she left Burlington to go to the City. She must have had 5 or 600 people on board and was crowded in every part. Lydia and I spent the evening at Mr. Kinsey's. James Kinsey had a number of fireworks with which we amused ourselves during the evening, setting off many of the "reels." The "Roman Candles" were very handsome. Upon the whole I spent a very pleasant day.

5 July 1845. Left Burlington this morning at the usual hour and arrived in the City about 9 o'clock. Ma, Grandma, Lydia and Flora all went down, and closed the house in Burlington and intend to remain until Monday or Tuesday.

12 July 1845. Mrs. Gibbons and her son Rodmond went up to remain [in Burlington] until Monday. This afternoon at 4 p.m. the thermometer stood at 98¡ in the shade in our garden in Burlington, and in the sun 120¡. After arriving home in the boat remained in the house during the afternoon and until after tea. Then Rodmond and I got a boat, took a row down along the bank, and over to the island and took a swim. It was the first time I was in the river this season.

14 July 1845. The heat of the weather today was more oppressively felt than it has been any day this season, and indeed for many years. The thermometer indicated the following excess: at 10 1/2 o'clock a.m. 98¡, at noon 100¡, at 2 o'clock 102¡, at 3 p.m. 101¡. This is the greatest heat that has been felt for years. I never remember anything like it. Every individual you meet, no matter how choleric his temper, seems to be desirous of keeping cool, and every puff of air and gentle breeze is courted with assiduity and pleasure that a lover bestows on his mistress.

Although Sunday was a hot day I think today was the hottest that I ever experienced. At 9 o'clock this morning at Bloodgood's Hotel at Walnut Street wharf the thermometer stood at 104¡, at the Exchange at 11 a.m. it was 100¡, and at 2 p.m. was up to 102¡. It continued nearly all the afternoon, up to the time of the shower of rain which commenced about 1/2 past 5 and continued until near 9 p.m. cooling the air considerably, and doing the country immense good. We have been wanting rain for a long time.

About 1/4 past 10 went down to the Navy Yard and from there went on board the Steamer Princeton for the purpose of seeing Lieutenant Bleeker on business. While waiting to see him went through every part of the ship.

16 July 1845. Left for Burlington at 5 p.m., in the cars again, the boat having broken her shaft. It will require some time to repair her.

17 July 1845. Took a walk up the creek, and on our return home stopped in to see Hugh Nesbit with Mr. W.M. Smith. Went into the garden and spent the rest of the afternoon there eating pears, &c. After supper Smith and I got a boat, went over to the Island and took a swim.

21 July 1845. I learned through Mrs. Hedges that Dr. William Gibbons was very ill, and not expected to live. Remained at Mrs. Hedges until about 1/4 of 8, then went in to see Mrs. Reynolds and Aunt Peggy. Did not see the former. Then went up to Dr. Gibbons. Saw all the family with the exception of the Dr. and Mrs. Gibbons.

22 July 1845. My friend Mr. Washington M. Smith left today for the south. He intends spending his time in North Carolina until about the middle of September when he will leave for his home near Pattersonville, Louisiana. I bade him farewell upon stepping into the cars at Gray's Ferry, having met the Baltimore and Wilmington train there.

26 July 1845. After going home and getting something to eat, Hugh Nesbit called for me, and we both went out fishing in a boat below Mrs. Chester's. Our luck was poor. I only caught two. Returned home about 6 o'clock.

28 July 1845. At 2 p.m. returned to Burlington with Ma and Lydia with intention of showing Mr. Wharton Lewis our house in Burlington. He has some intention of buying it. However he could not land, his wife being too much fatigued to go ashore at Burlington, and so went on to Bordentown.

Spent the afternoon taking a stroll on the river with Jim Welch, saw Lippincott, Kinsey and Gaunt come in with a sailboat from a fishing excursion. Got their boat and sailed up the river above the saw mill. Was obliged to row back, the wind and tide being up the river.

AUGUST

1 August 1845. Evening at home until about 8, then took a walk around town where I found a peddler disposing of his wares at auction. Listened to his amusing and ridiculous talk for a while.

3 August 1845. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon. The Bishop preached in the morning and examined the Sunday school children in the afternoon. After supper took a walk down on the banks, met Bill Lippincott, and saw several of the young ladies at St. Mary's Hall setting at the window. Among them were Miss Anderson and Miss Davis. They carried on pretty high with us until the bell rang for prayers when they kissed their hands to us and left. Bill and I then took a seat on the bank opposite to his house and smoked a cigar, but finding it too damp went up on his porch.

5 August 1845. Ben Kinsey, John Burns and myself went down to Dunk's Ferry fishing today. Had poor luck, only caught 5 dozen small. Returned to Burlington about 5 p.m. having taken a swim at Burlington Island before landing. After going home all went over to Kinsey's and got our fill of pears and apples.

10 August 1845. After church in the afternoon was detained for some time on account of the rain, during which time I had a fine opportunity of looking &c., &c. at the young ladies of St. Mary's Hall, several of whom I have a slight acquaintance with.

12 August 1845. Got Autram's sail boat "After You" and went over to the fair at Bristol. After looking around, returned to Burlington. After supper took a walk down on the banks with Mr. Hays. The young ladies of St. Mary's were out on the banks but left a few minutes after we got down.

17 August 1845. After dinner, Mr. W.H. Hays and I got a horse and vehicle and rode out to his father's farm about 3 miles from Burlington on the River Road. Spent the afternoon very pleasantly talking with his two sisters Amanda and Margaret. The younger, and last named, I was much pleased with. She is quite pretty. About 1/2 past 5 had supper after which Mr. Hays and myself started to take a ride up to see the Misses Davis, about 14 miles. We arrived there about 8 o'clock, found the ladies in and spent a very pleasant evening. They both looked as pretty as ever, names: Caroline and Hancel. The latter is my favorite. Met there a Mr. Jones and a Mr. Jenks from Philadelphia. I was introduced to the Misses Davis last winter at a party given by the Misses Earl, and was then much pleased and have been trying ever since to pay them a visit.

23 August 1845. Cloudy throughout the day, and at intervals there were very heavy showers of rain accompanied with thunder and lightning. One flash of lightning struck in Harmony Court, about a square from my office, and the thunder followed immediately with a terrific crash.

26 August 1845. At 5 p.m. left for Burlington. Was detained some time in taking on board soldiers at Bristol. Arrived in Burlington about 1/4 past 7.

27 August 1845. About 1/4 of 8 p.m. jumped in an omnibus and rode up as far as 10th and Spring Garden. Then went up to see the Misses Leeds in Spring Garden above 11th Street. Found them in, remained a short time when Mr. VanSciver came in. The ladies informed us they had an engagement at Miss Coates and invited us to go long. After some little persuasion, Mr. Smith and I consented to go. I accompanied Miss Sarah Elizabeth.

When nearly there met Miss Mary Carter and Mr. Rafield coming up 9th Street. They made us turn back to go with them to see a Mrs. Badger in 9th above Spruce while Messrs. Smith & VanSciver went on to Miss Carter's. Spent about an hour at Mrs. Badger's and then went to Miss Carter's. Found Messrs. Smith & VanSciver and Miss A. Leeds and Miss Harriet Carter had gone into Miss Hindman's. Remained at Miss Carter's about 3/4 of an hour, and then all went to Miss Hindman's where we spent half an hour very pleasantly. Met there two very pretty young ladies by the name of Miss Campbell. They live in 6th Street above Wood, on the west side. Left Miss Hindman about 1/4 past 11, walked with the Misses Leeds as far as 10th & Chestnut when Smith and I went to the American Hotel where we shall remain for the night.

31 August 1845. At St. Mary's Church in the morning and afternoon. Evening at a Baptist meeting. Bishop Doane preached at St. Mary's both times, and Mr. Dickinson at Baptist meeting.

SEPTEMBER

3 September 1845. In the evening went out and bought some packing boxes for Ma, as we are now about commencing to pack up our furniture to break up housekeeping. Afterwards took a stroll around with Jim Welch on the bank and then returned home.

4 September 1845. Woke up this morning with a very bad headache, but went to the City as usual. Was obliged to return at 2 o'clock. Laid on the bed during the afternoon. Felt so bad could scarcely hold my head up. Went down to tea, took a cup and at about 1/2 past 7 went to bed and took a dose of salts.

5 September 1845. Clear and pleasant all day, went down to the City this morning having to attend to some business, but being very unwell was obliged to return at 2. After getting home went to bed. In the evening took medicine again & throughout the night had a severe headache.

7 September 1845. Felt much better this morning and went to St. Mary's Church. Heard Mr. Lyons preach. After dinner took a nap. When I got up to go to church with Lydia, was taken with a chill which prevented me from going. Sent for Dr. Cole shortly afterwards and he came in about 6 o'clock. He prescribed five grains of calomel(9) for me. Went to bed about 8 1/2 o'clock with an extremely bad headache, which lasted until near daylight, at times almost setting me crazy.

9 September 1845. In bed all day. Felt much better this morning & continued so until about 1/2 past 2 p.m., when I was taken with a chill which lasted for about an hour. That was followed by a very hot fever which I was almost unable to bear. It parched my mouth and filled it with a thick slime. Towards 9 p.m. my fever went off & I felt better.

11 September 1845. Was in bed during the whole of the day and evening, thinking by that means I could avoid my chill but was unsuccessful. About 1/2 past 2 my chill came on & lasted for half an hour. It was followed by a severe fever, which lasted until about dark. Did not rest well through the night.

12 September 1845. Towards 6 p.m., had a slight chill followed by fever, which took me to bed. The fever went off about 10 & I rested pretty well through the night. Today is my 21st birthday(10) . I cannot say I spent it as pleasantly as I could desire, but as it is willed otherwise I am willing to put up with my sickness, hoping to have a speedy recovery & to be able to attend to business.

13 September 1845. In bed all day to try to avoid my chill, which was accomplished to some extent, though I had a severe fever which lasted till near 11 o'clock.

14 September 1845. Felt much better and was up nearly all day.

15 September 1845. Felt pretty well with the exception of a sick sensation at the stomach at different times through the day. About 5 1/2 p.m. vomited after which was much better.

18 September 1845. I was much better today. Was so well I wrote a long catalog of the furniture, &c., which we have concluded to sell.

20 September 1845. This was my first trip to the City since my sickness.

26 September 1845. At 2 p.m. left for Burlington. Went up home and found Ma & Grandma there. They went down to the Steamer Sun a short time afterwards, while I waited to show Captain Dixey & wife through the house before the sale. Afterward went down to the boat & saw them off. Took tea with Jim Welch who has kindly invited me to remain with him during my stay in Burlington. He and I went up to the house about 1/2 past 8 and went to bed thinking it safer that somebody should sleep there.

27 September 1845. Clear and pleasant all day and evening, a day just suited for our sale. I was engaged all day at the sale of our furniture, with the exception of about an hour at dinner.

28 September 1845. Clear and pleasant all day and evening, at Baptist meeting in the morning. Heard Mr. Dickinson preach.

29 September 1845. I was engaged the principal part of today in delivering furniture at our house. The things sold pretty well on Saturday, the sale amounting to $525 exclusive of parlor & dining room glasses & many other articles kept by Ma.

OCTOBER

1 October 1845. Did not get to my office until nearly 11 as I brought considerable freight down with me which I had to take charge of & deliver. I took up my lodgings at Mrs. Crim's(11) today, No. 108 Walnut Street. From present appearances think I shall like the house.

2 October 1845. Went up to Mrs. Edward Roberts to see Ma & Lydia who are now staying there, previous to their leaving for Cincinnati.

5 October 1845. In the house all morning, and in the afternoon went to St. Philip's Church. Heard a fine sermon from Mr. Neville. In the evening went to St. Andrew's Church heard a fine sermon from Mr. Clark.

7 October 1845. At the office all day and in the evening went up to see the "Bazaar" which is now open at the Chinese Museum saloon. The display of articles is very fine. The proceeds are to be appropriated for the rebuilding, &c., of the Artist Fund Hall which was burned down last spring. Returned to my boarding house about 9 o'clock. Sat in the parlor talking with some of the ladies until about 10.

9 October 1845. In the evening went up to the Bazaar. In addition to the other attractions there was a concert given by the blind this evening. Some of the singing was very fine. The room was exceedingly crowded and consequently warm. I visited that part of the exhibition called "The Old Curiosity Shop," in which there are many great curiosities, among which are: Washington's chair, a chair which formerly belonged to William Penn, another which was formerly used by Marie Antoinette, the ill fated Queen of Louis the 16th. There were also suits of armor, sundry other articles of great curiosity, and a number of paintings, some 300 years old.

10 October 1845. At the office all day, and in the evening up at the Bazaar. The number of persons there was quite large, more than I expected to see on so unfavorable a night. We were favored by some fine instrumental music from the "Philadelphia Brass Band" who volunteered their services.

13 October 1845. In the evening up at the ladies' grand Bazaar, the audience was large. Had some fine instrumental music to enliven the company. I was weighed this evening and much to my astonishment found that my weight was 138 pounds, 7 pounds more than I weighed before I was taken sick. Left the Bazaar about 1/4 past 9, went up to 8th below Arch, got some ice cream and then went down to my boarding house.

14 October 1845. Clear and delightful throughout the day, evening clear, cool and moonlit. I do not think the day could have been more favorable for an election day.

At the office during the greater part of the day until about 1/2 past 5 when Jim Welch called for me. We both took a stroll up Chestnut Street, after which got tea. Then he and I took a stroll around the City election ground. After that went down to the Southwark grounds. Found everything quiet. Went up to Dick Christiani's. He was not in.

I put in my first vote, today, and voted the full Whig ticket.

17 October 1845. Had a heavy frost this morning.

23 October 1845. There was some ice made last night. At the office all day & about 6 p.m. went up to Aunt Lydia Jones where Ma & Grandma had been spending part of the day and took tea with them.

23 October 1845. In the evening attended a law book sale.

26 October 1845. Went down to Mr. Edward Roberts to dine, having had an invitation to dine there with my mother and sister. It may be the last time for a long while as they leave tomorrow for Cincinnati, to stay an indefinite period.

27 October 1845. Got up this morning at 6 o'clock, dressed and went up to Mr. Edward Roberts, to see Ma, Grandma and sister and to accompany them to the cars. They left for Pittsburgh at 8 o'clock via Harrisburg & Pennsylvania Canal under care of Mr. Samuel Cuthbert of St. Louis. Immediately on their arrival in Pittsburgh they will leave for Cincinnati. God grant that they may have a safe passage and be blessed with health, and that I may in a short time be able to see them again & have them with me.

At the office all day & in the evening called up to see Miss Ceil and invited her to go to the "Franklin Institute Exhibition." She accepted my invitation. Found the saloons to be very much crowded, and at times so much it was with difficulty to get along at all. The display of articles was very fine. Went entirely through the exhibition. Met several of our friends. Found Miss Ceils to be very pleasant and agreeable in her manners, and looking remarkably pretty this evening.

NOVEMBER

1 November 1845. At the office all day and in the evening went to the Walnut Street Theater(12) with Mr. W.H. Hays of Burlington N.J. I was much pleased with the plays. The first was a new one entitled "The Fatal Dowry," a tragedy in five acts, & the last was a very amusing farce entitled "Deaf as a Post."

7 November 1845. At the office all day. Felt quite sick toward evening, and soon as tea was over went to bed and took some medicine.

9 November 1845. There was considerable sprinkling of snow, being the first of the latter commodity we have had this winter.

Left for Burlington this morning. After church walked home with Misses Helen and Clara Nesbit. They invited me to take dinner with them. I went in, but before dinner was ready, was taken with a very sick feeling and could not eat any. After that a chill came on me and I was obliged to go to bed, where I remained until about 5 p.m. When my chill and fever had gone off, got up and went downstairs into the parlor, and sat there until almost 7 when I was again obliged to go to bed, having a severe headache.

10 November 1845. Felt much better. Was at the office.

11 November 1845. Went up to see Holmes, Moore and others, but not finding them went up to the National Circus. The performance was good and house crowded to excess. The last piece, a National Drama called The Champion of Freedom or West Point in 77 and the Death of Andre was well performed & elicited much applause.

12 November 1845. In the evening went to see Mr. Murdock at the Walnut Street Theater perform as Claude Melnotte in the "Lady of Lyons." He sustained his character well and brought down great applause. "Pauline" was sustained by Miss Logan, quite a young lady, who performed her part well. The other characters were well sustained, particularly Mr. Logan as Colonel Damas. The last piece, "Mr. and Mrs. Pringle" was quite a laughable farce and passed off well.

13 November 1845. There was an eclipse of the moon this evening and as the sky was unclouded, the natural phenomenon was clearly visible to all eyes. The cloud that faintly dimmed the edge at first, gradually stole across and hid the luster of the orb, and the light that struggled through the veil upon its beauty had a blood-like hue. The obscuration was nearly total and lasted for some time, but it passed off.

14 November 1845. In the evening attended Mr. Murdock's benefit. He appeared as "Hamlet" and performed it well to a crowded house. Miss Logan as "Ophelia" performed well. After the first piece a very handsome copy of Shakespeare's works were presented to Mr. Murdock by a number of gentlemen, through the hands of Colonel Page. He delivered one of the volumes to Mr. Murdock after a short and well spoken address, which was answered by Mr. Murdock in a very beautiful and impressive manner. The after piece "A Feint Heart Never Won a Fair Lady," was very amusing and well performed.

22 November 1845. At the office during the day and also in the evening very busy writing.

25 November 1845. In the evening attended a real estate sale of Moses Thomas.

27 November 1845. Today was appointed by the Governor of the State as a day of the general thanksgiving, and was generally observed. The principal part of the stores throughout the City were closed, and the churches were all open and I believe generally well attended for such an unpleasant day. The weather was so unpleasant I did not go out but remained in my office all day.

29 November 1845. I received today very unexpectedly the melancholy intelligence of the death of my dear grandmother who, not quite four weeks ago, bade me farewell to go to Cincinnati. She was in good health, and from outward appearances seemed that she would be a long while. But God in his all wise providence has seen fit to remove her from us, and again visit our family with affliction. But grant, O Lord, that my dear mother and sister may be able to bear up under this truly great trouble, as well as her other relatives.

30 November 1845. Not feeling very well and being in very low spirits from the melancholy intelligence received yesterday I spent the day in the house and passed the time in reading the Bible &c.

DECEMBER

1 December 1845. At the office all day though very unwell, went to bed directly after tea. I had quite a fever, a bad headache and threw up twice.

10 December 1845. I left for Burlington, and had considerable difficulty in crossing as the tide was low, and we were obliged to go around the island. Met with a great deal of ice, and the boat had considerable difficulty in passing through it.

14 December 1845. The waking eye was met this morning with the house tops and streets covered with snow to the depth of about two inches. About 8 o'clock commenced raining which continued the remainder of the day and through the evening making the atmosphere very damp and unpleasant. The walking was very wet, slushy and disagreeable. Notwithstanding the unpleasantness of the weather, Mr. Welch and I rode out to see the Misses Earl at Grassdale, Springfield Township. We started this morning about 1/2 past 10 o'clock and got out there about 1/2 of 1. Jim went in and remained about 15 minutes, and then left having several other places to go. He promised to call for me tomorrow morning. Spent the rest of the day and evening in company with the young ladies conversing, &c.

15 December 1845. Left the Misses Earl at about 20 m. of 9 and after a pleasant drive, though the roads were a little muddy, arrived in Burlington and in the City by 1/2 past 12.

16 December 1845. In the evening went down to attend a sale of N. Thomas & Son of real estate at the Exchange, as the properties of my late uncle Samuel Erwin were to be offered for sale. They were offered but not sold for want of bids.

22 December 1845. The river was fast for part of the day opposite the City. Some boys crossed to the Island on the ice, a rather venturesome experiment. The ice boat soon broke it up.

23 December 1845. In the evening went up to see Mr. Edward Roberts & family, but on upon going found them just about leaving to pay an evening visit. Remained but a short time after they left. Upon going down Chestnut Street stopped in at the Circus about half an hour, saw the last act of a piece (the name I do not remember) and then left and went down to my boarding house, sat in the parlor until about 1/2 past 11 and then went to bed.

24 December 1845. The weather today was wintry, not exactly of the kind which the storekeepers or sightseers desired, for the snow came down merrily and with such driving force as to make it uncomfortable for the ladies who appeared in the Streets. But it is the day before Christmas, and sights were to be seen, notwithstanding the descending snow and the keen wind. There was a very lively bustle along the principal thoroughfares, Chestnut Street especially, occasioned by the passing to and fro of the shopping pedestrians. In the evening the snow came down rapidly. The Streets were crowded and the sleighs flew merrily along.

25 December 1845. At the office in the morning until about 1/4 of 10 o'clock, then went up to St. Phillip's Church and heard an excellent sermon delivered by Mr. Neville. After church took a walk down Chestnut Street and then up to Mr. Edward Roberts where I had been invited to dine with the family. Upon going to the dinner table melancholy reflections were brought to mind, reflections that were fraught with the deepest gloom, when I thought on this day one year ago I sat at a table with my dear father, grandmother, mother and sister. Now, one short year has glided away. Mark the change: a dear parent, a father, has been laid low, snatched from me when I most needed his fostering hand. A dear grandmother has also been removed from among us never to be seen again by mortal eye. Now, three remain out of the five that were then so happy together.

Oh may we all be prepared to die. And again I have been separated from a dear mother and sister though not by the hand of death, thank God, and left as it were alone in the world with no one to care for me. It is a gloomy thought to know that in the space of one short year such great changes are brought about. But, to pleasanter thoughts and something of the day.

Christmas was spent in the exercise of those pleasant feelings which belong to the day and the season. Though the storm was disagreeable, and the sky gloomy, even unto tears, at times, yet the general hilarity could not be subdued. The thronged churches and thronged streets gave practical evidence of the spiritual and secular observance of the holy day. It mattered but little that the walking was excessively disagreeable, that the air was damp and a faint approach to a fog somewhat dimmed the clear aspect of objects. Pedestrians picked their way along the muddy streets, secure in the protection of their "India rubbers," too light hearted to think anything disagreeable or annoying. Of course the shops were full during the day and evening, and those who had provided largely found themselves called upon to answer large demands. We saw numerous toys borne along by rosy-faced youngsters with more pride than a conqueror could possibly entertain for the trophies of his victory. The places of amusement were filled to their uttermost capacity, and in all places where amusement was to be had, eager expectants crowded to enjoy it. I trust all who set apart the day as a holy day enjoyed it rightly and well, that the heart was pure and the pleasure of the character which leaves, always, pleasant remembrances.

28 December 1845. At the Unitarian Church in the morning with Mr. Welch. Mr. Furness preached. Afternoon at Grace Church with Welch. I was very much surprised to see Charles West Thompson enter the pulpit to preach. I had no idea he had been studying for the pulpit.

The above sermon delivered by Mr. Thompson was the first delivered in this City.

29 December 1845. At the office all day and in the evening Jim Welch and myself went around to the "Bazaar" now being held through the Christmas holidays for the sale of fancy articles at the Museum Building at the corner of 9th and George Street in the upper saloon. Left there about 9 o'clock and went around to the National Circus to see a pantomime. It was a very amusing piece and well played.

31 December 1845. With this day we close another year. It is good for a man to take a solemn farewell of the year, as if it were the last with which he would shake hands before he entered the ocean of unbroken cycles, years, months, and days. It is nothing against all this, that these divisions of time are arbitrary. They are understood. They create proper feelings, and as they come and go they remind us not only how much is gone from our allotted portion, but they serve to remind us of the incidents that have marked the passage of time thus closing.

We close, on this day, a year of remarkable prosperity to our country - a prosperity not equaled by any other period and diminished only by disturbing causes not arising out of the ordinary elements of success, causes that lie in a mistake of true national policy. The retrospect then must be pleasant, and ought to be profitable. We know, all know, that in this period of time, events have occurred that brought sorrow to blossom of individuals and disturbed the quiet flow of happiness. These are the ordinary events of our life. We must learn to meet these with the full expectancy of their occurrence, but not with the affectation of stoicism that would contemplate death without a shudder, or the loss of friends without a tear. We neither cherish nor recommend such a state of feelings. Tears fall with the good, like the raindrops of June, to enrich and beautify; returning pleasure, quiet, sober, rich pleasure pours its beams upon the passing tears, and gilds them with prismatic hues, rainbow beauties that fill the heart with promises of peace, promises that fulfill themselves, that work out every good which they indicate. Individual afflictions, that are in the ordinary course of human events, may not be computed for deduction from the amount of happiness, because the Providence that afflicts makes profitable the suffering. And he that hath not made his calculations for these sorrows is incapable of appreciating the whole good of his time.

We look back, then, upon a year whose fruits should excite in us gratitude. The abundance of the harvest, the smiles of sunshine, and profit of rain; the health-giving frosts that fall with enriching power, and snow, that is sent like wool to warm the earth, these things make for the comfort of our kind; and a grateful appreciation of the good, and a recognition of their source, works in us more good, more true excellence, than does the earth receive from all the stimulating and fruit producing gifts of the clouds. And while we sum up the whole matter, public good, social improvement, domestic improvement, and individual comfort, shall we not rejoice, that we have had a share in these?
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Notes:

(1) Andrew Crawford Barclay, the shipping merchant. JFD

(2) Mary Johnson Drexel, daughter of artist-banker Francis Martin Drexel, and future wife of Dr. John D. Lankenau. JFD

(3) Lydia Roberts (1783-1862) unmarried daughter of Algernon Roberts and Tacy Warner Roberts.

(4) Edward P. Borden, son of Francis Borden and Letitia Erwin, his second wife.

(5) Henry Erwin was buried in his family's plot at the First Presbyterian Church, 10th and Market Streets, Wilmington. In 1917, the church building was moved to 11th and Monument Streets, Wilmington. The grave stones and remains were re-interred in the Wilmington/Brandywine Cemetery, 701 Delaware Avenue, Wilmington.

(6) Andrew Jackson. 1767-1845. Seventh president of the United States 1829-1837.

(7) Aaron Clark, Mayor of New York 1837. Notable Names in American History, James C. White & Company, Clifton,NJ. 1973.

(8) The Sun, built in 1824 by James P. Allaire, was one of the first compound steamboat engines. She had four cylinders of 16 inches with 30 inch diameter by a four foot stroke and was one of the fastest steamships on the Albany run when new, but was latter sent to the Delaware River. Steam Navigation, p. 48.

(9) Calomel, a white compound (mercurous chloride) used as a purgative. Webster's Collegiate Dictionary.

(10) Joseph Warner Erwin was born on September 12, 1824. This was his 21st birthday.

(11) Mary Crim, Boarding House, 108 Walnut Street. McElroy's Philadelphia Directory, 1847.

Mary (Weatherby) Crim (c1778-1886) of Burlington, NJ and Philadelphia, PA, a member of the Religious Society of Friends. FJD.

(12) "The Walnut Street Theater, northeast corner 9th and Walnut Streets, is the oldest playhouse in the English speaking world that is still in active use." It opened in 1809 as 'The New Circus,' was renamed the 'Olympic Theatre', then the 'American Theatre,' in the 1820's. In the 1830's became known as the Walnut Street Theater. 1972 Bulletin Almanac, The Evening and Sunday Bulletin, Philadelphia, 1972, p. 337.


1846

JANUARY

1 January 1846. Once more I am permitted to write on the pages of my Journal at the commencement of another new year, and most sincerely do I thank that God who is constantly watching over me for the blessing. Eighteen hundred and forty five years have passed away since the most auspicious morning that ever dawned upon the human race; and in the eternal progress of time, another year has commenced. With the door of the future thus opened before us, we cannot be better prepared for our onward way, than by pausing for a brief examination of the past. The future casts its shadows before us. But how can we comprehend those shadows as a guide without referring for a standard of comparison to the shadow of the past! Knowing the one we may, by comparison, measure the other. Beholding the past in perspective, we see in all things the great law of progress, leading both the physical and moral world to improvement. In this perspective the past diminishes not merely with distance, the present enlarges not merely with proximity. This would be merely optical illusion. The past not only seems to be, but really is, smaller than the present, or than any point of approximation to the present, and the enlargement of the present, or any point of approach from the past, is not merely apparent but real.

To verify this, we are not compelled to travel far back in the perspective of human history. Passing over the whole period from the Revelation on Mount Sinai to the Declaration of Independence, through the whole of which we find the human race progressive, or preparing for progress, and leaving all other countries and communities, we will merely review our own, from that ever memorable day, when it began its glorious march in nationality. Has our country improved since that auspicious morning? Has its improvement indicated that it was charged by the Great Ruler of nations with a mission of political and moral instruction, and that it has been fulfilling its mission? Physically, our country has expanded from 13 to 29 States, and from three to nearly twenty million of the human family, and this expansion is the reclamation of the wilderness to the gardens of civilization, the extension of Freedom's domain, and the augmentation of their physical comfort. Nor is our country's intellectual less than its physical expansion. Has our country morally improved?

We justly venerate the generation of the Revolution, for they were a generation of wise and virtuous men. They had their Washingtons, their Hancocks, their other great leaders in the council and the field; and they followed these leaders to victory, to independence, to peace, to wise and stable institutions. But the political and social fabric raised by that generation has continued to improve in the hands of their descendants, and is now better than any former period. Such a brief view of the past enables us, in some degree, to scan the future. It enables us to foresee that our nation will cover the whole continent, binding all its parts firmly in the bonds of mutual interest and confederated freedom, the guarantee of perpetual peace; that the garden will bloom in the place of the wilderness, and the regions now trod by savage beasts will feed, lodge and clothe millions of freemen; that science will continue to explore the field of creation, and that art, closely following, will apply its discoveries to human improvement; that religion and morals will proceed together, making all wiser and better; that legis- lation will continue to reform abuses, and raise new and better instruments around right; and that education, the shield of liberty and morals, will continue to expand, as it has since our national existence began. Such are the bright hopes of the future, founded on the past.

I cannot say much for the pleasure I received today. I spent the morning at my office, and at about 1/2 past 1 p.m. was attacked again with my old complaint, the chills, which though not so severe as those I have had before rendered me entirely unfit to do anything more than sit all the afternoon in the rocking chair near the fire. I anticipated great pleasure this evening by accompanying the Misses Leeds to a party given by Mr. and Mrs. Cook at Congress Hall, at which I expected to meet a number of my lady acquaintances, but was unable to go on account of my chill.

2 January 1846. At the office during the morning and during the afternoon until about 1/2 past 3, when Mr. Welch and I took a walk out to Fairmount. Returned in an omnibus.

3 January 1846. At about 12 N I was again attacked with a chilly sensation which was followed by fever and headache and rendered me unfit for anything during the rest of the day.

5 January 1846. About 1/2 past 4 p.m. Mr. Welch and myself took a walk up Chestnut Street to see the beauty and fashion that were there assembled for a promenade. After our stroll went down to the office of "Morse Magnetic Telegraph"(1) which is in the 3rd story of the Exchange. The performance of this recently invented machine is truly wonderful. For the satisfaction of my curiosity I had my name conveyed by means of the telegraph to Norristown (the point to which it is now completed) and returned in the short space of 10 seconds.

In the evening attended a party given by the Misses Harriet and Mary Carter. I entered the rooms about 1/4 of 9 and enjoyed myself exceedingly in dancing, conversing, &c.

6 January 1846. At the office during the day until about 5 p.m. when Mr. Welch and myself went over to Mr. Hoffman's bowling saloon & rolled ten pins for about and hour & a half for exercise.

7 January 1846. My chum James C. Welch left today at 5 p.m. for Burlington to act as groomsman to Mr. William Rodgers of Burlington who is to marry a Miss Lippincott. He expects to be gone about a week.

8 January 1846. In the evening went up to a small company given by the Misses Conrad in Wood above 6th Street.

10 January 1846. At 2 p.m. left in the cars for Trenton on business & arrived there after a tedious ride of about 3 hours. Mr. Hewlings persuaded me to stay until tomorrow.

11 January 1846. I attended the Episcopal Church in the morning with Mr. Hewlings and heard an excellent sermon delivered by the Reverend Mr. Starr.

Before Church in the morning walked up as far as the State House to see the improvements and additions made to the buildings since my last visit in May 1844. The improvements make it one of the prettiest buildings in the United States. It is fully double the size it was before alterations, and it is now surmounted with a beautiful silver dome, which when the sun strikes, makes it look like a large ball of fire when viewed from a distance. The front of the building is finished in a very chaste and neat style with eight columns in the direct front and with wings.

18 January 1846. Left this morning on the 9 o'clock mail train for Burlington.

About 8 o'clock Jim Kinsey & myself went down to the stopping place of the cars. They came along about twenty minutes of 9, being rather late. Arrived in the city about 10 o'clock. We had some difficulty in getting into the dock on account of the large ship Wyoming lying in front of the slip where the boat generally lands, so we had to go to another slip. When running in, got fouled by one of the vessel's hawsers which carried away our flag staff before the boat could be stopped. After some little delay we were landed. The Wyoming had been placed in front of the slip on account of a large fire in some stores in front of which she had been moored, consequently she was in great danger of taking fire. We had a fine view of the fire in crossing the river. It presented a grand spectacle and was beautiful to look upon. The night was intensely cold, so that the firemen could not operate well.

21 January 1846. Snow capped roofs met the waking eye this morning, which was proof that old Winter had returned again, and presented us with hoary head. It rained, hailed and snowed at different periods throughout the day and evening, freezing as it fell, which gave those anxious to enjoy the sport an opportunity to "go-a-sleighing." But sleighing appeared to be rather poor in quality. The river was blocked up from shore to shore today, and the steamboats had much difficulty in forcing their way through the ice. The trees today presented a beautiful sight, with every branch and twig encrusted with ice, but the sidewalks were in a sad condition for pedestrians.

In the evening called up for the Misses Mary and Anna Patton in a chaise,(2) having an engagement to accompany them to a party to be given by the Misses West at the N.E. corner of Noble and Marshall Streets. Entered the room about 1/2 past 8 and spent a delightful evening in dancing, &c.

22 January 1846. Clear and very cold throughout the day and evening. The unusual sound of sleigh bells were constant today, and the vehicles dashed about with the speed which causes an exhilarating flow of blood in the spectator, and wakes a joyousness in those who are gliding swiftly along that is bodily and mentally refreshing. The sleighing was good, very good, and the most was made of it. Sleighs that have been quietly resting under shelter for a long time were pressed into service, and the speed of horses was unmercifully tried. Some very queer arrangements made their appearance in the Streets, but the occupants seemed to heed but little the roughness and unshapely appearance of the vehicle in which they rode, because they forgot it in the pleasurable and unusual excitement. The omnibus sleighs too did good service, and large numbers enjoyed cheap rides to and fro over the regular routes, reaping as much pleasure, perhaps, as those who sat behind swifter horses and in more costly vehicles.

At the office all day, and in the evening went up to Miss Lizzie Roberts' wedding, having received an invitation more than a week since. She was married to Mr. Lewis E. Ware(3) at about 8 o'clock p.m. by the Reverend Mr. Spear of St. Luke's Church in the presence of the relatives of the family, and some intimate friends. There were three groomsmen and bridesmaids.

In the evening, after the marriage, they had a very large party, I suppose there were 200 present. 250 invitations went out. I enjoyed myself very much in dancing, chatting with the ladies, &c., &c. The supper table was beautiful in the extreme. In the center was a beautiful bouquet about 3 feet high composed principally of japonicas, and on either side were large pyramids of candied fruit, encased in woven candy, while a little further along were placed beautiful baskets composed of candy, filled with artificials and sweetmeats. Besides that, there were ice creams of every kind formed in beautiful pyramids, oysters of every variety, terrapins, chicken salad, wines of every sort and description, and other delicacies too numerous to mention. We had excellent music composed of violin, violoncello, cornet and harp. In a word everything was conducted in a most approved style. I met a number of my female acquaintances there.

23 January 1846. The sleighing still remains good, and the people of our city seem to try and make the best of it. Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Ware (late Miss Lizzie Roberts) left the city this morning for Washington to spend a few days, and then return to this City, when he will take his bride, I understand, to the "American House" until they can suit themselves with a house. What a spring of powerful action is love! What but this impels the blooming bride to relinquish the society of friends - to give up her father and mother - to sacrifice all the pleasures of home, and become the companion of man? What else enables her to bend night after night, and to watch hour after hour, over the couch of disease - to excite expectations which she fears cannot be realized, and impart consolations in which she has no share? The love of woman! Oh! it is not an inoperative, cold principle, but an enlivening, acting quality that prompts her to give up her own enjoyment, her own tranquility, for the happiness of another. If she have wealth, influence, beauty and health, she will, without reluctance, lay them all upon the altar of devotion and sacrifice them to him whom she has chosen as the object of her fervent attachment. Now obstacles vanish, difficulties lessen, and mountains become hills, before that all subduing power of love!

At the office the greater part of the day, and in the evening at my boarding house not feeling very well from the dissipation of the two previous nights.

29 January 1846. In the evening attended a large party given by Miss Hannah Ann Myers. The company was very large, I suppose about 120 or 130 present, and the rooms were very much crowded. Dancing was the order of the evening. About 1/2 past 11 had a magnificent supper. The candy pyramid, the ornament for the center of the table, was the prettiest thing of the kind that I have ever met. It resembled in a measure a Chinese pagoda. Everything was in profusion, wines of every description, full and plenty of them.

30 January 1846. To Burlington at 5 p.m. to attend a party to be given by Mrs. Parker this evening, having received an invitation a day or two since. Arrived in Burlington about 6 p.m. Went over to the "Temperance House," engaged myself a room.

The Misses Caroline and Virginia Mitchell were attractive at a distance, but I think they were dressed without much taste, and have lately grown entirely too large, even to grossness. We had full and plenty refreshments, but no table set, they were all handed. There was plenty of wine. We amused ourselves generally in dancing.

31 January 1846. After breakfast started in the cars for Philadelphia, which came along about 20 m. past. We ran slowly on account of the fog for almost two miles when we were obliged to return to Burlington on account of meeting the New York train coming up.

FEBRUARY

1 February 1846. Started for the church which we reached about 7 o'clock, though none too early to get a seat, as the church was crowded to excess and nearly every place was filled at that time. The sermon was a very interesting one by the Rev. Mr. Clark, on the behalf of the "Pennsylvania Seaman's Friends Society."

2 February 1846. In the evening went up to the Circus with Mr. Marple to see the new piece they are now playing there entitled 15 Years of a Seaman's Life. The piece was well got, and I suppose with considerable expense. The characters were all well sustained and excited considerable interest. Many of the scenes in the piece were beautiful, particularly that of the ship wreck.

3 February 1846. In the evening James C. Welch and myself went up to Mr. Algernon S. Roberts to attend a party. There were a large number there, over 100 I suppose, together with Mr. and Mrs. Ware and the bridal party.

We had an elegant supper at about 12 o'clock composed of every delicacy that could be thought of, together with great abundance of wines, &c. The decorations of the table were very beautiful. Amused ourselves principally in dancing. Our music was very good being composed of two violins, bass violins, & harp.

5 February 1846. Clear, warm and pleasant, being a real visitation of spring weather. Ladies, gentlemen, and children were out enjoying themselves. Even the Moon and Wind came to keep company with the Sun, on such a delightful occasion. It was just such a day as to teach men not to grumble at a whole week's rain.

At the office all day, and in the evening at a party given by Miss Louisa Clarke, who resides in Arch Street above 3rd. The company was quite large, say 120 or 130. I enjoyed myself very much in dancing &c. Also met a number of my lady acquaintances there.

The music was good, instruments violin and harp. The decorations were very fine, and the supper table was well supplied with every delicacy, and an abundance of different wines.

6 February 1846. In the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater with Mr. James Kinsey, to see the new piece now performing entitled The Enchantress. Many of the scenes were beautiful in the extreme, and some very amusing, in fact the whole piece was well got up and did great credit to the manager. Many of the songs were very beautiful, but as for the music I cannot say much. There was also some very fine dancing. The theater was out by 1/4 of 11 o'clock.

9 February 1846. At the office during the morning with the exception of about 3/4 of an hour occupied in calling upon Miss Hannah Ann Myers, as my "party call." Met there the two Misses Peterson, their beaux, and two other young ladies whose names I do not remember.

11 February 1846. In the evening went up to one of Mr. Whale's cotillion Parties, Mr. Richard Leeds having given me a ticket. The party was very large but the company generally speaking, was not of such a kind as I like. I danced three times. I did not enjoy myself very much.

12 February 1846. At the office all day, with the exception of about an hour in the latter part of the afternoon, which was occupied in taking a walk out as far as Chestnut Street and the Schuylkill River for exercise. In the evening at a small party given by Mr. and Mrs. Carter, in Pine above 9th Street, for Mr. William Ellison who has recently been married. Spent a very pleasant evening in dancing and other amusements.

13 February 1846. In the evening went up to a party given by the Misses Harbet. I spent a very dull evening, not being at all acquainted with the company. In fact I spent the greater part of my time in the dressing room. There was very little dancing for want of music, which, I suppose, was one reason the party passed off so stiffly.

14 February 1846. Cloudy throughout the day until about 4 p.m. when it commenced snowing, and after dallying a little while, as if to create hope that the few shavings that had descended were nearly all that were to come, sent down thick flakes so fast so close together, that in a short time there was a covering on the ground some three inches deep. The wind rose too, and blew sharply from the westward, increasing in strength until about 3 o'clock Sunday morning, when it blew a perfect gale. The wind swept along with a terrific force, and sung and whistled in a manner quite unbecoming in a sober latitude like this, committing, as it went, such pranks as will be anything but pleasant to those who have to repair the damages it occasioned.

Today being St. Valentine's Day, there was a vast consumption of ideas and note paper, and so much labor for the Post Office and Dispatch Post that it is to be presumed they will remember their achievements in the difficult process of a timely delivery of all the missives which enamored Valentines poured in upon them. Yet, if there were pleasure derived from these little love tributes and poetical prayers, it was worth all the exertion; and the postman must have felt himself dignified by being the medium by which so many hearts held sweet converse, an inspiring self respect, derived from his occupation, which lent him new energies and took from the huge piles of letters before him the aspect of dismay they were calculated to call up. There were too many hearts to be satisfied - too many expectations, longing and impatient, to be gratified, and the Mercuries of the Post Office had need of all their swiftness. The number of Valentines sent were beyond all precedent, and I heard of a carrier of the Post Office who at one delivery received as his portion 1100 notes. Of course there were numerous others who were very largely supplied, and several deliveries were made during the day. Some of them were of the most costly character, and not a few contained popularity offerings - testimonies of affection from which as much delight was reaped in the giving as in the receiving. But whether rich or poor in its material, if the missive contained the opulence of the heart of generous, unreserved and unalloyed love and esteem expressed in written lines, it could not but have been rich enough for the one to whom it came as an offering.

15 February 1846. It was still snowing when I got up this morning, and continued until about 12 N, with a severe and tempestuous wind. When it cleared off the weather moderated considerably, causing a considerable thaw. The storm was perhaps the severest known for a long period, as the wind blew a gale for the greater part of the time. Among the disasters attendant upon the gale was the uprooting of the venerable Lombardy Poplar, which stood in front of the Friends School, in 4th below Chestnut Street. There are associations connected with this time-honored and cherished tree, and it is one of the "Ten Trees" spoken of in Watson's Annals(4) of the City. I have heard the consequences of the gale are to be seen all over the City in the prostrate awning posts, uprooted trees, signs torn from their fastenings and other exposed objects. The heavy storm, of course, laid an embargo upon the railroad trains, the Southern mail due at 4 o'clock yesterday morning did not arrive until 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon. The violence of the wind was so great that the ferry boat while crossing the Susquehanna River to Havre de Grace with the Philadelphia passengers, was blown across the end of the pier and went aground, where she remained a little more than 7 hours. About three miles this side of the Susquehanna the snow storm was encountered and three locomotives were sent out with snow plows. The train proceeded on until within three miles of this City, where the snow drifted into a deep cut and resisted the snow plows for three hours.

The Eastern mail arrived at about 5 o'clock, some 3 hours after the time at which it was due. I understood that the most strenuous exertions were made, as soon as the storm came on, to keep the road clear, and between New Brunswick and Bordentown seven locomotives were employed in clearing it by the aid of snow plows, and the communication with New York is uninterrupted.

In consequence of the disagreeable weather this morning, I spent it in my office writing and reading with Mr. Marple. In the afternoon went up to St. Phillip's Church. There were very few persons there, had a very fine sermon.

16 February 1846. There was good sleighing today, not a usual thing with us in these latter times. The snow lay so thickly upon the Streets, the opportunity was so tempting, and the invitation so pressing, that the sleighs in requisition as a means of locomotion superseded the wheeled vehicles. The jingle of the sleigh bells, and the rapid progress of the horses as they dashed along the streets at a rate that old people would be tempted to call imprudent, gave a lively appearance to everything, and pedestrians stirred themselves and tramped along in the snow, as if they shared the excitement which the dashing sleighs created.

17 February 1846. At the office all day, and in the evening went up to a party given by Mr. and Mrs. Burroughs (N. side of Chestnut below 13th). I met a number of acquaintances there and spent a delightful evening, in fact never spent a more delightful evening in my life. Danced nearly every set of plain quadrilles. Among the ladies I danced with were Miss Julia Vogdes, Miss Elizabeth Gillingham, Miss Louisa Clarke, Miss Anna Roberts, and Miss Juliet Carrington of Connecticut. The ladies generally speaking looked remarkably pretty. Miss Carrington and Miss Clarke as usual looked very pretty, and were dressed with much taste. We had a delightful supper at about 1/2 past 11, composed of terrapins, oysters, stewed and fried, chicken salad, ices of every kind, candied fruits &c., &c., together with all kinds of wine. The decorations of the table were very beautiful. On the center was placed a large bouquet composed of japonicas and other beautiful flowers, and on either side were large pyramids composed of candy oranges and white Malaga grapes, surmounted by a figure representing cupid. These were the most prominent decorations, while the ices formed in different shapes filled up the remainder of the table. We had excellent music for dancing, with the instruments violin, violoncello and harp.

18 February 1846. In the evening called up in a chaise for the Misses Arethusa and Elizabeth Leeds to accompany them to a party given by the Misses Schively, who live on the North side of Spruce Street (No. 397) below 13th. I spent a very agreeable evening in dancing, &c., and made two more acquaintances, viz., Miss Sally Keyser and Miss Elder. The former young lady is very remarkably pretty and fascinating in her manners. She is one of the most beautiful young ladies I have met this winter. In regard to the beauty of the latter I cannot say much, but her manners were pleasing.

19 February 1846. About 1/2 past 8 p.m. commenced snowing, which continued falling rapidly until the time of my going to bed. I never saw it snow faster in my life, if it should continue until morning we shall have quite a deep snow.

20 February 1846. The storm that commenced last night continued until early this morning, when sleet began to take the place of snow. In a short time there was an execrable cover of "plosh" upon the pavements, rivulets of water meandering along in places where they were never intended to run, and high pools of water at many of the crossings, which latter were the cause of many wet feet, and sundry cuffings of temper not at all proper. The weather this morning was essentially disagreeable, uninviting in its skyward aspect, and decidedly repulsive in the view of what had come from the clouds. The omnibuses labored along, each one with an additional pair of horses, all steaming like locomotives and slow as tortoises in their pace. All other vehicles seemed as if an embargo had been laid on their progress. Yet there was a gratification to be derived from these disagreeables, for the melting influences which were at work contributed to make the stay of the snow more brief than it would otherwise have been. Looking to its rapid disappearance in a fluvial state, the hopeful mind had reason to content itself in the present discomfort in the knowledge that it was but a hastening on of finer and more acceptable weather, to be the more enjoyed by contrast with that which had been endured.

I was informed that the snow on the railroad track between Trenton and Jersey City is heavier than it has been for many years, the drifts being very deep.

21 February 1846. At 2 p.m. left Philadelphia for Burlington in the cars where we arrived at about 20 minutes past 3. After attending to some little business, called on Mrs. and Miss Emma Parker, found Miss Parker was in Philadelphia, but Mrs. Parker was at home. Remained there about 15 minutes and then left and called upon Mrs. Gruble; found her in and well, met a Miss Nancy Kinsey there. Left in about 20 minutes and went over to see Mrs. Buckman; found her in also and well, remained there some 20 minutes and then called on Mrs. Nesbit; found her and her two daughters, Helen and Clara, at home. After leaving Mrs. Nesbit, went over to see Dr. Ellis and his wife, took tea and remained until about 8 o'clock, when I went in to see Mr. and Mrs. James H. Sterling. Remained there until about 1/2 past 8, when the cars came along and I left for Philadelphia.

22 February 1846. In the evening called for Miss Louisa Clarke, and accompanied her to St. Phillip's Church. Mr. Neville gave us an excellent discourse, in which he spoke very much against Theaters, Balls and Private Parties, and reading Novels.

23 February 1846. Washington's birthday was commemorated yesterday, by a very general attendance of the volunteers at the different Churches of the City and County. The bells of the churches, the districts, and of the fire companies, generally, were rung in honor of the day. There was a pretty general celebration in honor of the Birthday of Washington. The weather was delightful for the season and Chestnut Street exhibited a brilliant display of the beauty and fashion of the City.

The day was ushered in by a grand national salute from the guns at the Navy Yard, Christ's and St. Peter's Church bells rang a merry peal, accompanied by many other bells throughout the City and Districts. In the course of the day several military companies paraded, and the anniversary closed as it had opened, amid the firing of guns, the beating of drums, and the pealing of bells. About 10 o'clock went to my lodgings, found Mr. Nye and Mr. Kinsey in the parlor, and all three adjourned to "Our house" to get some whiskey punch to finish the celebration of Washington's birthday.

24 February 1846. At the office during the morning until about 12 o'clock N, then left and made my party call on Mrs. Burroughs. Found her & remained about 15 minutes; met Miss Sally Roberts there. Then went up to the Broad Street exchange where I had promised to meet James C. Welch. Found him waiting and then went out to see the Misses Harbet to make our party calls. Found them in, remained about 15 minutes.

26 February 1846. The weather today was at times intensely cold. There was not much wind but the atmosphere seemed possessed of a piercing sharpness that penetrated through the most comfortable coverings, and gave the faces of most persons, contrary to their desires, I hope, a most lugubrious aspect. Benumbed toes and frozen noses are not pleasant accompaniments to a walk it is true, but as we cannot expect at all times to have things regulated to our liking, there will be only need of philosophy to make the endurance of the infliction easy, and to await the coming of a temperature more agreeable.

The thermometer at McAllister's on the south side of Chestnut Street above 2nd Street ranged as follows: at 9 a.m. 18¡, 12 N 26 1/2¡, at 45 minutes past 6 p.m. 17 1/2¡. In Broad Street at 7 a.m., 12¡.

27 February 1846. The weather continues to be excessively cold, and the snap has come so suddenly upon us, that people seem scarcely to know whether to take it kindly or not. It is well to submit, however, to what we cannot help, and though this morning the thermometer did stand at 6 1/2 above zero, yet we have hopes of seeing the mercury possessed of a more rising ambition, urged on by its attentive but somewhat fickle friend, the atmosphere.

MARCH

1 March 1846. The snow was still falling when I got up this morning, and continued until about 9 o'clock a.m., when it held up. It has lasted a period of nearly 36 hours. This is the heaviest storm of the kind we have had this season, and the severest for many years. The weather has been unusually cold for several weeks, and now at the commencement of the 3rd month we find ourselves in the midst of winter. The lovers of sleigh riding have the prospect of a long season of enjoyment, as this snow added to that which has already fallen has put the streets and country in fine sleighing order. In fact we have now finer sleighing than we have had for some years and a prospect of long continuance. I see by the papers we are to have at least nine more snowstorms, which added to the 21 that have fallen will do pretty well for one winter.

Went to Cherry Street Quaker Meeting this morning with the Messrs. Welch, Nye and Wheaton. Heard three sermons one of which was from Lucretia Mott. After Meeting was out, Mr. Welch and I walked up to St. Phillip's Church.

The fall of snow was six inches deep on a level.

3 March 1846. The Delaware River was covered with floating ice from shore to shore again today, and the ferry boats were enabled to cross only with great difficulty. The arrival and departure of vessels is entirely suspended. The ice boat is laid up for the season, so there is no resort but to wait patiently for the disappearance of the ice.

At the office all day, and in the evening waited upon Miss Louisa Clarke to a party given by Mrs. G.R. Graham,(5) No. 191 Arch Street above 6th. We entered the room about 1/2 past 9, and a short time after commenced dancing. We had very fine music on instruments: a violoncello, two violins, cornet and bells. I enjoyed myself very much throughout the evening and danced nearly every cotillion. Danced three times with Miss Louisa Clarke, who as usual looked very pretty. Was introduced to four young ladies with whom I danced.

About 12 o'clock had a delightful supper of oysters, stewed & fried, terrapin, chicken salad, ices of every kind, champagne, Hock wine and all other kinds of liquors. The decorations of the table were beautiful in the extreme. In the center was a large candy pyramid made to represent a pagoda some 5 feet high, while on either end of the table were large bouquets composed of white and red japonicas. The other portions of it were filled up with ices in different forms and other luxuries. After the supper had several dances.

4 March 1846. At the office in the morning until about 1/4 of 10 then went up to the old Rotterdam Hotel in 3rd above Race Street. At 10 o'clock started for Germantown in the omnibus on business. Arrived there about 1/4 past 11, went over to see Mr. John Wistar. Attended to my business, went over to the hotel, ate some oysters, and at 12 N. started for Philadelphia, where we arrived by 1/2 past 12. In going out this morning, I noticed that the snow had almost entirely disappeared on the roads, thus destroying the sleighing, though large bodies of it lay on the fields and drifted on some parts of the road to the depth of three feet. The snow had also drifted on the railroad to the depth of several feet.

9 March 1846. About 1/2 past 12 p.m. left to call upon Miss Clarke according to engagement to accompany her in making our party call upon Mrs. G.R. Graham, found Mrs. G. out, then waited upon Miss Clarke home.

In the evening went up to a party given by the Misses Leeds, where I enjoyed myself very much in dancing, &c. The supper table was well supplied with oysters, chicken salad, ices &c., &c. but very little decorations and no liquors.

11 March 1846. In the evening went to the Arch Street Theater(6) to see the play entitled The Stranger, or Misanthropy and Repentance. The character of "the stranger" was well sustained by Mr. Becan who has appeared but once or twice before a Philadelphia audience. Mrs. Haller had appeared but once before, and I must say sustained her character miserably. In the last scene, where she dies of a broken heart, she fell directly under where the curtain dropped, and had to roll over to avoid the curtain falling on her, which created a general volley of hisses. The other characters were well sustained. The after piece, The Wizard of the Wave, was very amusing and well played.

12 March 1846. At 2 p.m. started for Germantown in the cars to see Mr. John Wistar on business, arrived there by 1/2 past 2.

14 March 1846. It rained tremendously hard throughout last night, and we had some very heavy thunder and lightning, the first we have had this season. The rain, it is supposed, will cause considerable of a freshet in the Schuylkill, and consequently much damage may be expected.

In the evening at the Arch Street Theater with Mr. James Kinsey to see the new piece called Valsha or the Slave Queen. It is an admirable piece and was well played. Nick of the Woods, the last piece, was amusing and well played.

15 March 1846. The weather today was delightful and Spring like, such as will move the sap of trees. Already the grass is lifting its slender form in the greenness of Spring beauty, and the buds of trees of southern exposure are swelling into promises of early leaves. Those who love to watch Nature in her progress, to mark her earliest steps of Spring and trace them down till the snows of Autumn bury every vestige, may now begin their observations. It is a pleasant sight. Here and there we see too many buds swelling in a branch, they will crowd each other and some will fall, with no fulfillment of promises; neither foliage nor fruit will spring from them, and the outspreading of others will make even their inceptive beginnings forgotten. And here and there an old leaf of last year's growth lingers yet upon the branch, as if loath to quit its hold, proud of having withstood the dying cold of autumn and the stormy blasts of winter, and looking as if it had a sort of a lease for another summer.

The first gush of the vital current of the tree will make it fall; that which was to renew its greenness and make it part of the decoration of the parent branch will weaken its hold and it will cease to be. Spring, the youth of the year, loves to give, not merely to renew life, and the herbage and the foliage that have had their summer should not cling too closely to soil or to limb, remembering that beautiful as they have been in their vigor, they may be useful even in their fall, their death, by the richness they impart to the soil, and to the roots that give them greenness and vigor.

As was expected the heavy rain on Friday night caused a considerable freshet on the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers. On Saturday the rise in the Schuylkill was 7 feet, 1 1/2 inches over the dam at Fairmount, bringing down considerable lumber, &c. As far as I have been able to learn the damage is not so extensive as apprehended. I was down at the Delaware River yesterday at 2 1/2 p.m. and found many of the wharves overflowed, and the tide, then, still running up.

17 March 1846. The anniversary of St. Patrick, passing without rain and storm, disappointed those who proverbially identify the day with an unfavorable state of the weather.

In the evening accompanied Miss Louisa M. Clarke to a concert given by the "Musical Fund Society" in their Hall in Locust Street, south side above 8th. The room was crowded with a brilliant audience. DeMeyer was received with great enthusiasm and played, as he always does, superbly. On being encored in the Carnival he gave a fantasia on national airs which drew down thunders of applause. Mr. Burk likewise made a favorable impression. DeBeriot's concerto was given by him in very good style and pleased much. He particularly excels in the cantabile and arpeggio passages. Occasionally some slight defect or finish are apparent, but they will vanish wiith practice, and I have no doubt he is destined to great eminence as a violinist. Mr. Gilbert, announced in the program as a "vocalist from Paris," has perhaps some points as a singer, but unfortunately he has no voice wherewith to display them. Beethoven's Symphony in D Major, although abounding in difficulties, was well performed by a small but highly efficient orchestra. On the whole the Society has ample reasons to be much gratified with success of their concert.

18 March 1846. In the evening went up to the Museum, now in the "Masonic Hall," with Messrs. Robert R. Holmes, Council F. Moore, and Joseph F. Holmes. The amusements were quite interesting and were of a theatrical nature. The first piece performed was Old Grandfather Whitehead which was amusing and well performed. After which had a dance and then another play, entitled Simpson and Co. which if anything was more amusing than the first.

After leaving the museum adjourned to Messrs. Holmes' and Moore's room, where I wrote a number of invitations for the greater part of the boarders to meet Messrs. Joseph F. and Robert R. Holmes & Moore in the dining room at 1/2 past 11, to partake of an oyster supper in celebration of Holmes, Moore & Holmes having passed their examination for taking the degree of M.D. today.

At about 1/4 of 12 p.m. 20 of us, including six or seven ladies, sat down to an elegant supper, composed of 15 dozen stewed, and 10 dozen fried oysters, terrapins, chicken salad, 2 1/2 gallons whiskey punch, &c., &c. Never do I remember a more lively party than the one which composed the celebration of the passing of the examination of Holmes, Moore & Holmes. Toasts of different kinds were drunk, and we continued our hilarity until about 1/2 past 2 when we adjourned for bed, all seeming pleased and satisfied with the entertainment.

The above entertainment was at the house of Mrs. Cole at the S.W. corner of Minor and 5th Streets, known as the "Central House."

20 March 1846. Clear, warm and pleasant all day and during the evening. At the office all day and in the evening called to see the Misses Harriet and Mary Carter. Found them in and spent a very pleasant evening. Met there Miss Ellen Merriman, Miss Arethusa and Miss Sarah E. Leeds, Mr. Thomas McKean and Mr. Jerry VanSciver. Had a dance, and I left about 1/4 past 10, then went down to my boarding house, where I found Jim Welch waiting for me in the parlor. Both went over to Mrs. Cole's "Central House" according to invitation to partake of an oyster and terrapin supper, given by Mr. Penning to the Messrs. Joseph F. Holmes, C. F. Moore, & Robert R. Holmes. We sat down to table at 1/2 past 11, and got up at 1 a.m., after having a very pleasant time. The company numbered 22, 7 or 8 of whom were ladies. We had full and plenty of oysters, stewed and fried, terrapins, chicken salad, &c.

21 March 1846. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. left on board the Steamer Trenton for Burlington. Arrived there about 1/2 past 3, waited about the wharf until the Steamer Sun came up with Mr. James C. Welch. After he arrived we took a stroll around town, and in evening after supper, he and I took a walk until about 1/2 past 7, when he went to see Mr. William A. Ryers and I called to see Mrs. Nesbit & daughters.

22 March 1846. At St. Mary's Church in the morning, Bishop Doane preached both times. In the evening went to the Baptist Church with Mr. Welch, Mr. Dickinson gave us a very good sermon.

24 March 1846. Cloudy, rainy, damp and unpleasant all day and during the evening. The late warm weather and the recent damp atmosphere are producing their effects upon vegetation. In all parts of the City the trees have begun to put forth, and the grass of the different squares have assumed a green, lively and spring like appearance. For the last few days the gardeners of the public squares have been at work upon the plants, and arranging them for the coming season.

At the office during the day, and in the evening attended one of Moses Thomas & Son's Real Estate sales at the Exchange, as my Uncle Samuel Erwin's Estate was to be closed out this evening. The property at the S.W corner of George & 13th Streets sold for $3100, and the adjoining property to the South for $2950. Lots 20 feet front by 66 feet deep. Left the sale about 1/4 past 8 and went to my boarding house. Found a greater part of the boarders (ladies) assembled in the parlor engaged in dancing. There were several cotillions, one of which I participated in. The dance I suppose was got up by Mr. & Mrs. Moses and the two Misses Openheim from Charleston. Left the parlor about 1/4 past 11.

25 March 1846. The weather today was unusually propitious. The sun shone out, but with a subdued strength that prevented continuous exertion from being very fatiguing. The Streets were in that good order which was most desirable for the Firemen, who had their traditional parade today, which was a very brilliant affair. The engines and hose carriages were in the best order, and were loaded with floral offerings cast from the dwellings along the route. The members of different companies, in many instances, were decked with wreaths and bouquets bestowed by fair hands, and the fortunate wearers seemed vested with a new dignity, for they strode along with a firmer and loftier step than their fellows. The harmonies of the different bands of music on the line arose together in pleasant discord, and the banners, flags and floral ornaments which shot up above the moving mass gave a novelty and beauty to the whole. Notwithstanding that, most of the companies located within the bounds of the City proper did not participate in the procession. It was nevertheless imposing and attractive. The devices which were brought in requisition were effective, and the skill and taste displayed in ornamenting the fire apparatus were worthy of all praise.

In one portion of the parade a party appeared as a moving tableau of the Treaty of William Penn with the Indians, and one of the "red men" looked as if he was really a veritable son of the forest. In another place a skillful Jehu guided fourteen gray horses attached to a fire engine. I observed that most of the engines were drawn by two, four and six horses each, the animals being handsomely caparisoned and led by grooms. The whole affair passed off quietly, and though the streets were lined with spectators, and every window and place of view was filled with lookers, no accident or disturbance occurred. Doubtless those who were the active participators in the pageant were gratified with the effect they had achieved. And the citizens who gazed at it as it passed along could not have been unmindful of what a strength of effective defense against the ravages of fire was presented in the long line of gaily bedecked and costly apparatus, and the crowd of hardy men who attended them.

27 March 1846. In the evening at my boarding house, they had a little dance in the parlor.

28 March 1846. At Grace Church in the morning with Jim Welch. After church went out to Algernon S. Roberts and dined there.

About 5 p.m. Lehman (?) & Percival Roberts & myself took a walk on Walnut Street where we found great numbers in the promenade on Walnut Street from 10th to the Schuylkill, being the fashionable promenade of a Sunday promenade after Church.

29 March 1846. Had a slight fall of snow last night.

APRIL

1 April 1846. All fool's day has again arrived and with it the numerous deceptions that are generally played on that day. Among them was an announcement of a ship launch to take place from one of the yards in Kensington. Of course it attracted many persons, but to their astonishment and surprise found "1st of April" put upon the gate leading to the yard. Another instance was, some wag circulated a report that a certain huckster, giving her name, had a shad some 3 feet in length with scales as large as a half dollar, for sale. Many persons went to see it, but, as those who went to the ship launch, it was the 1st of April. I have no doubt many other incidents occurred.

At the office during the day, and in the evening went up to the Arch Street Theater with Messrs. Robert, Joseph Holmes and C.F. Moore. The pieces played were Crimson Curries and The Swamp Fox, both pretty good in their way.

3 April 1846. About 12 N went up to the commencement of the University of Pennsylvania held at the Musical Fund Hall, but on account of the great crowd was unable to get in. Several of my friends had the degree of M.D. conferred upon them.

About 1/2 past 6 p.m. called up to see Messrs. J.F. and R.R. Holmes, C.F. Moore and D.H. Quin at Mrs. Cole's. Took supper with them and then went into the parlor. Sat conversing with the ladies for a little while, then we adjourned to my office to take a parting glass of wine as our friend D.H. Quin leaves at 10 p.m.

4 April 1846. Clear and pleasant all day. I took a walk on Chestnut Street in the afternoon for about 1/2 an hour, and met a large number of ladies on the promenade. Independence Square, opposite my office, is beginning to assume a spring like appearance. The center walk was thronged this afternoon, with a number of children invigorating themselves by pursuing their accustomed sports after the confinement of a tedious winter. The boys seemed determined to get up an indignation meeting because some girls made their appearance mounted upon velocipedes. The boys say the invention was intended entirely for their amusement, and they will not suffer their rights to be invaded, but I anticipate the weaker and fairer sex will prevail in this controversy, as they did several years since in the adoption of the hoop as a means of feminine recreation.

Spent the evening at home. We had quite a pleasant little party composed of the boarders and danced until about 5 past 11. My partners were Miss Matilda Openheim twice, her sister Miss Sarah, and the two Misses Winslow.

8 April 1846. Cloudy, raw, rainy and unpleasant. I was up in my room all the morning & until about 2 p.m. in bed, feeling too unwell to be at the office. Felt better towards that time and in the afternoon went over to the office again.

9 April 1846. In the evening, according to a previous engagement, called upon Miss Sarah Elizabeth Leeds, to wait upon her. Spent the evening with Miss Susan Estlack in Chestnut, North side, below Schuylkill 6th Street. Met at Miss Estlack's a Miss Ellen Beatty from Mount Holly, and a Miss Sally Watson who lives next door to Miss Estlack. Miss Watson is quite a pretty and a graceful young lady. I could not judge her manners as I had no conversation with her. Miss S. Estlack is quite pretty and agreeable. I had quite a chat. This was my first visit. Miss Beatty is not very pretty but very agreeable in her manner.

11 April 1846. At the office through the morning and in the afternoon until about 1/2 past 5 p.m. when Mr. Welch and I took a walk out Chestnut Street to Schuylkill Front, then up to Market Street, crossed the bridge, and walked on the other side up to the wire bridge, crossed, and then back to the office, making the whole round 6 miles in one hour and a quarter.

In the evening went up to the Museum to see two new pieces, one entitled the Cricket of the Hearth, which was admirably performed, and the other entitled the Two Queens, which was a very amusing piece.

12 April 1846. At the office during the morning and in the afternoon until 4 p.m., being so pressed with business I was obliged to write today to get through. I was going to Church this afternoon but just at the time it commenced raining very hard. I, however, went to St. Phillip's Church after the shower was over, and heard part of a very excellent discourse from Mr. Neville.

13 April 1846. The weather today was rather of an unexpected character. A little rain fell, and the wind having risen, blew a strong gale from the west, so piercing and so chilling that overcoats, which had been oppressive, were desirable additions to the bodily covering. The wind, the rain, and the chilliness of the atmosphere might have been passed without remark, but the strange visitors in the form of thick and quick-coming hail, and flakes of snow, soon excited wonder, and made people ruminate as to the probability of a day properly belonging to March. March had just broken up and had vented its fury with all the sudden activity of a sluggard who, having dallied till the last moment, seeks to do in haste what should have been done at leisure. During a portion of the day a coal fire was quite comfortable.

There was quite an excitement this afternoon in "Independence Square," occasioned by a meeting of "Oregon Men" who are in favor of 54 x 40 as the boundary line.

17 April 1846. Out of the office a considerable part of the day on business, and in the evening accompanied Miss Louisa M. Clarke to Signor Capnano's Complimentary Concert held at the Musical Fund Hall. The music generally speaking was very fine, particularly Capnano on the cornet. Miss Coad's singing was very fine and received much applause. The Medley Overture performed by the Clarinet Band was well performed and received the universal approbation of the audience by their applause. The house was not more than half full, say 500 persons. Out about 1/2 past 10, waited upon Miss Clarke home, and then went to my boarding house, stopping on the way at John Devon's for some oysters.

18 April 1846. Left on board of the Steamer Trenton with Jim Welch for Burlington. Had a very pleasant trip up and met on board Miss Louisa M. Clarke, with whom I had a chat, and Miss Hetty Burling and Miss Lynda Earl of Springfield. After arriving in Burlington Mr. Welch and myself took a walk around town and around by Mr. Dugdale's, who is now building. After tea we took a walk, and I called upon the Misses Nesbit, found Helen and Clara and remained about half an hour, and then went over to Miss Emma Parker, but not finding her in, called to see Mrs. Kinsey and family; found them in and remained until about 9 o'clock, when I left and went down to Mr. Welch's, meeting Jim at Rodger's store on my way down.

19 April 1846. Clear and very warm all day but unpleasant on account of the light wind which prevailed and caused it to be very dusty. Got up this morning at about 20 m. past 6, got breakfast, and then took a walk with Jim Welch down around by the sluice, and up by way of the railroad home. The country is beginning to look beautiful. The grass is becoming quite green, and the trees are putting out their tender foliage. Rain is much wanted in the country. About 2 1/4 o'clock James Kinsey and myself walked out to the "Silver Lakes" and returned by way of Mr. Powell's late "Pages" farm.

21 April 1846. About 1/2 past 4 p.m. went over to see Colonel Tucker and do a little piece of writing for him which detained me until 1/4 of 6. Returned to the office, remained a short time when Jim Welch and myself took a walk in Chestnut Street. Met a large number of ladies on the promenade.

In the evening attended the Walnut Street Theater to see Madame Augusta, the great dancer, in La Somnambula, in Spanish. I was much pleased with her dancing and think it equal to Fanny Essler. The last piece, Glorious Minority, was very amusing and well played.

22 April 1846. Got up this morning at 1/4 of 6, dressed and went over to the office. Miller not being done cleaning, got the newspapers, took them over to the house and read until breakfast time. Then went over to the office.

About 1/4 of 6 p.m. Mr. Welch and myself took a walk down to the Marine railing dock, went in, where we found the barque Pons lying at the wharf. She is the vessel captured some months since by the U.S. sloop of war Yorktown(7) with some 900 slaves on board. Went on board and after our curiosity being satisfied walked around.

Spent the evening at home, Miss Sally Ann Crim having given a small company to the boarders and others to which I was invited. I spent a very pleasant evening in dancing &c. I danced with the two Misses Winslow, Mrs. Godwin, and a Miss Smith (youngest sister) quite a pretty girl. The company left the parlor about 1/2 past 11, after which the gentlemen had several songs in the parlor.

23 April 1846. Clear and pleasant all day. I received a letter this morning from my mother which relieved my mind considerably as I have not received one from her since the 20th of last month which made me apprehensive that something was the matter. For the last three weeks I have been much worried. I was agreeably disappointed on the reception of the letter that she as well as Lydia had been spending a delightful time for three weeks in Louisville.

24 April 1846. At the office the greater part of the day, and in the evening Jim Welch and myself went up to "McGuire's Dancing School" where we remained about 1/2 hour.

25 April 1846. At 2 p.m. started on Board the Steamer Trenton for Burlington.

26 April 1846. I wrote two letters: one to my mother and the other to W.M. Smith of Louisiana.

28 April 1846. At the office all day until about 1/4 past 5 p.m. when Welch and myself took a walk out Chestnut to Schuylkill 2nd Street down Schuylkill 2nd to South, out South to the Gray's Ferry Road, and down the Road to the Naval Asylum.(8) Walked around and through the grounds which are beautifully laid out, and through part of the building. In the evening called down to see the Misses Harriet and Mary Carter. Found them in and spent a very pleasant evening. Met Dr. Henry Gibbons there. Amused ourselves part of the time in taking each other's profiles by the shadow of the face thrown upon a piece of paper.

29 April 1846. We were visited last night with a heavy shower of rain from the South East, which continued with but slight intermission till near mid day. Through the afternoon the showers were numerous and heavy, and there is every indication that the storm has extended a considerable distance into the country, doing incalculable service to all kinds of vegetation. It was indeed a Godsend to the farmers, for the ground in every direction was parched by the recent dry spell.

30 April 1846. In the evening called to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in and spent a pleasant evening. Went home and remained a short time when Lieut. Dansell, Jas. C. Welch and myself went over to a Ball given at "McLatey's Hall."

MAY

1 May 1846. Mr. Welch and myself took a walk out to the Market Street Bridge, crossed, and walked up as far as the hills which are opposite Fairmount. Took a stroll over them, and not finding many persons there went over to Fairmount where we found a great many persons walking. Went over to tea, after which I went up to the Chestnut Street Theater to see the performance of the new opera entitled Don Pasquale brought out by the Seguins about a week or ten days since. I was not much pleased with the piece as there was too much sameness and dialogue in it. The only song that I was much pleased with was the Serenade.

2 May 1846. In the evening went to the Chestnut Street Theater with Mr. Maginnis of New York to see the opera of the Bohemian Girl. The opera was well performed, but the chorus was hardly strong enough. Mrs. Seguin sang I Dreamt I Dwelled in Marble Halls delightfully, also several other songs. Messrs. Seguin, Frazier, and Myers sang their parts admirably.

3 May 1846. I received the melancholy intelligence of the death of my cousin Algernon L. Harrison received by letter from my mother. She gave no particulars of his death, they merely heard or read of it in a newspaper. Thus in the midst of life we are in death. My cousin Algernon was about 24 years of age, had taken the degree of M.D. About 18 months since had gone to Mississippi to practice his profession, where had gained some practice and was about to do well. But an all wise Providence hath seen fit to remove him from us just in the bloom of life, which has shocked us all.

5 May 1846. At the office all day, and in the evening Mr. Maginnis, Mr. J.C. Welch and myself went down to the Navy Yard to see Lieutenant Dansell. After passing the guard at the gate went into the officers' quarters where we found him. Had a chat of about an hour, when we took a walk down through the yard, were hailed by the guards several times, when Dansell gave the countersign and we passed.

6 May 1846. Clear and pleasant all day, until towards evening when it clouded over. At the office all day, and spent the evening at my boarding house. The Misses Winslow gave a small party to which several of the boarders were invited including myself. There were about 50 present. Spent a pleasant evening dancing, &c. There were several very pretty ladies among the company. They left principally about 12 o'clock.

8 May 1846. Spent the evening down at Dick Cristiani's with him, his mother & sister. Also met Miss Grigg and Miss Nolan there. Miss Grigg has been residing in New York for the last two years, for which length of time I have not seen her. She is now on a visit to this City and is a daughter of the Reverend Mr. Grigg. Miss G. sings and plays on the piano beautifully. We were favored with several songs and pieces of music.

9 May 1846. The opera performance this evening was a new one, this being its 4th night in this City. It is entitled The Brewer of Preston. It is well got up and the singing very fine. Parts of it are very amusing. The chorus is excellent.

10 May 1846. We had a very heavy shower of rain accompanied by vivid lightning and very heavy thunder about 1 o'clock this morning. At Grace Church in the morning. Heard an excellent sermon by the Rev. Mr. Luddards. After church walked down 12th to Walnut, out Walnut to 13th, down 13th to Spruce, up Spruce to Schuylkill 7th, up 7th to Walnut, out Walnut to Schuylkill 3rd, and then returned down 3rd to my Boarding House, and got in just as it began to rain.

After dinner sat in the parlor until about 4 p.m. when Mr. Kinsey and myself walked down to the New York boat and at 4 1/2 o'clock started for Burlington.

11 May 1846. I met a great number of ladies on the promenade. In the evening called down to see Miss Ellen Curly. I left about 1/2 past 9 and went up home. On my way up stopped in at the Exchange and got some oysters. After going home sat in the parlor for a short time, and then stopped in the Misses Winslow's parlor to see and bid them good bye, as they leave for Boston in the morning to spend the summer. I remained about 15 minutes and then left, though not without first having an invitation to call on them if I visited Boston this summer (No. 4 High Street).

12 May 1846. The excitement occasioned by the news from the seat of war, Mexico, had reached the utmost intensity yesterday and today. Business for a time seemed practically suspended, and knots of persons were seen in every direction discussing the tendency of events. Along Market, Front, 2nd and 3rd Streets, among the mercantile community, the greatest degree of interest seemed to be excited, and at almost every other door persons were engaged in reading, and others engaged in listening to the accounts as published by the numerous extras. The different companies of volunteer soldiers have become thoroughly aroused, and are busily preparing for any emergency which may call for their services. Nightly drills have been ordered by several of the captains. The first of those took place last night in the state house yard. The same result took place this evening and in every direction the note of preparations is loud. The people are ready.

13 May 1846. There was a large and enthusiastic War meeting held in the State House Yard this afternoon. The number there was estimated at from 10,000 to 15,000 persons. They all seemed to be of one mind and resolved on one point, viz., to protect and defend their country, let whatever emergency may arise.

14 May 1846. In the evening went up to the Arch Street Theater to witness the drill of a company of boys from Harrisburg under the charge of Captain J.M. Eyster, calling themselves the "Junior Guards." They acquitted themselves with great credit, both to themselves and captain, and received thunders of applause from the audience. The Card Drawer or the Face of Evidence was a very good piece but not very well played. Did You Ever Send Your Wife to Germantown? was a very amusing and laughable piece. There was another piece to be played entitled Black Bug of Bermuda which I did not wait to see, it being 11 o'clock before the other two pieces were over.

17 May 1846. In the afternoon went up to St. Luke's Church, sat in Mr. Edward Roberts' pew, heard a very good sermon delivered by the new minister, Mr. Howe.

18 May 1846. After dinner, which was about 1/2 past 3, Mr. Welch, William C. Russell and myself took a walk out to the wire bridge, crossed and thence to Mantua Village where there was a grand Military review of some 8 or 10 volunteer Companies of the City. Their movements were beautiful and imposing, and well repaid for the trouble of walking out. I suppose there must have been from 1000 to 1500 soldiers in the field. Several fine bands enlivened the company. On our way home we were unfortunate enough to get caught in the rain, and consequently got a ducking.

20 May 1846. At 3 p.m. left 9th and Green Street in the cars for Norristown, where we arrived after a delightful ride of about an hour. Upon my arrival at Norristown took the stage for Doylestown, Bucks County, a distance about 18 miles. Had a very pleasant ride and arrived there at about 1/2 past 7 p.m. Put up at the house where the Stage stopped by "Pettits Inn." Shortly after supper I took a little stroll around town, then returned to the Hotel, and in a short time afterward went to bed.

21 May 1846. Got up this morning at 1/4 past 6, went out and took a walk around the town. I was much pleased with its appearance and situation. It is on very high ground and has a fine view of the surrounding country. The houses generally speaking are neat in appearance; the Streets are very irregular. There are many pretty rides in the vicinity.

After breakfast went up to the Court House where I was employed until 1/2 past 12 o'clock in making examination regarding a title for Mr. J.A. Haven, after which I went to dinner. About 2 p.m. got a horse and rode over to Mechanicsville, a distance of about 5 miles, to look at a property for Mr. Haven. While there met with a Mr. Peter Lester who lives in the Property opposite to the one I wished to look at. He was very kind, polite and obliging and showed me all through the premises and gave me every information possible. He also took me over to his house and gave me considerable information regarding the title of the property, and took every pain to do so. I shall feel very much indebted for his interested friendship and politeness to a stranger.

I returned to Doylestown by another road from which I came, and had a very pleasant ride. After tea I again took a ride on the same horse of about 4 or 5 miles, and returned to the Hotel at about 1/2 past 7. I have not been on a horse's back for 7 or 8 years, and I expect I will suffer enough tomorrow.

22 May 1846. Got up at 1/2 past 5, dressed and then took a walk as far as the Court House to see whether some searches I had ordered yesterday were prepared, but finding they were not, returned to the hotel. At 1/2 past 6 got breakfast, after which went down to the Court House again to see about my searches, and was again disappointed, and found I should have to leave without them, and have them sent by mail.

Went up to see Mr. Gilbert in reference to the rent due on the property which he occupies, having heard today that he had failed a few days since. Went home, going around by way of 8th and Arch to get some ice cream.

23 May 1846. In the evening went up to the Museum with James Kinsey. The pieces performed were the Chimes, or the Bells that Ring the Old Year Out and the New Year In. It is an admirable piece and performed with great credit. Mr. Burk, as old Toby, and Mrs. Burk as Maggy, were well sustained. There were several dances, which added materially. The last piece, Irish Hay Making, was very amusing.

24 May 1846. There was great excitement today in the City from the news received from Mexico, the seat of war. Most everybody on the Street or going to Church would have an "extra" containing the news, walking slowly and reading it. The news is glorious in some respects. The Americans have had two battles with the Mexicans and came off victorious. But we have the melancholy intelligence of the death of the gallant and brave Major Ringgold, and of a number of other officers. The excitement was very great throughout the day, and everyone seemed anxious to get a look at an "extra."

26 May 1846. Previous to our going home went around to "Our House" and got a couple of "Cherry Cobblers" which were very fine on so hot a night.

28 May 1846. At about 1/2 past 7 a chaise I had engaged called for me, which conveyed me to Miss Leeds, I having an engagement to wait upon Miss Arethusa to the Museum to see the piece entitled The Chimes performed. But much to my astonishment she informed me that her parents would not allow her to go as the performance was of a theatrical nature. After a delay of some half an hour it was proposed to go down to the "Floral Exhibition" held at the Chinese Museum Saloon at the N. E. corner of 9th and George Street. The display of flowers was large and beautiful and the company large and rather fashionable. After walking around the saloons several times, buying a bouquet, &c., it then being 20 m. of 10, left and took our chaise which was waiting at the door, and went to Miss Leeds.

Both the upper and lower saloons of the Museum Building were occupied by the exhibition. Sarah Elizabeth did not go with me this evening, only Arethusa.

29 May 1846. At the office all day and in the evening went up to the Museum with Samuel Ludlow and Maginnis to see the performance of the Somnambulist, and the Cricket of the Hearth, both pieces were well played and sustained.

30 May 1846. In the evening went up to the Museum to attend Mr. and Mrs. Burk's benefit. The pieces played were The Deserter, Yankee Courtship, and The Lady of the Lyons, a burlesque on the Lady of Lyons. The house was crowded to excess which I was glad to see as the Burks are great favorites.

JUNE

1 June 1845. At the office all day and in the evening after tea Mr. Welch, Mr. Kinsey & myself took a walk up Chestnut Street as far as Broad. On our return stopped in at the Museum to see Miss Kate Ludlow in The Day in Paris. I was much pleased with her performance. In this piece she sustained five characters. The last piece was very amusing, entitled She's Not a Miss. Mr. John Lefton, the comedian, appeared as Mr. Prettyman and created much amusement and laughter. My favorite, Mrs. Russell, also appeared.

3 June 1845. In the evening went down to Dick Cristiani's with Jim Welch to spend the evening having received an invitation from him the day before. Met there Mr. Nolan and his two sisters, the Misses Mary and Anna Patton, Miss Grigg, and a gentleman whose name I do not remember.

Spent a pleasant evening. I waited upon Miss Grigg home. After leaving Miss Grigg, walked up with Dick and Miss Anna Patton as far as her father's residence which is the west side of Delaware 7th Street near Noble. On my way up had some difficulty regarding an affront to me from the Misses Patton. It was explained and apologized for which I am glad. On our way home met a serenading party in 6th above Vine, which discoursed elegant music.

4 June 1845. To Burlington. Jim Welch and myself soon after our arrival took a walk down the bank as far as St. Mary's Hall, saw but very few of the young ladies.

6 June 1845. At the office during the morning and in the afternoon until about 20 m. of 4. I then left, got in an omnibus and went up to the Germantown Railroad. At 4 p.m. started for Germantown where we arrived at 1/2 past 4. I immediately went over to see Mr. John Wistar on some business.

At 5 p.m. left for Philadelphia again. Went to my boarding house and got tea. After tea went up to the Museum with Mr. Kinsey. The pieces played were My Neighbor's Wife and the Cricket of the Hearth. The former piece was very amusing and caused much laughter among the audience. One gentleman seemed as if he could not contain himself, and set the actors all to laughing so that they had to stop the piece two or three times. Miss Kate Ludlow as Dot in the Cricket of the Hearth is nothing to compare with Mrs. Burke in the same character.

7 June 1845. At St. Phillip's Church in the morning. After Church went home. Upon going into the parlor found Mrs. Ludlow and her daughter Elizabeth there. Mrs. Ludlow introduced me to her daughter. They have been boarding at our house for some time but this is the first time I had spoken to Miss Ludlow not having an introduction. I think her quite pretty and found her to be quite agreeable in her manners. After dinner went upstairs into my room, smoked a cigar and then took a nap.

About 1/2 past 3 went downstairs with the intention of going to Church. I stopped in the parlor where I found Miss Ludlow. I sat down to talk with her a few minutes but found her company so agreeable did not go out until nearly 5 o'clock, it being then too late to go to Church. However I walked up to Mr. Neville's Church, and when out walked home with Miss Louisa M. Clarke and made an engagement to go to St. Andrew's Church in the evening. Did not go in with her.

Went to St. Andrew's Church, found it very full. Mr. Clarke preached a very excellent sermon on the horrors of war, a very appropriate sermon at this season.

8 June 1845. After tea went up to see Mr. George Cleaden with Mr. James C. Welch, with the expectation of meeting Charles Rowland there, he having made an appointment to meet us at 1/4 of 8 regarding a note of his for $355, which I hold. We arrived there a few minutes before the appointed hour and waited until 5 minutes past 8, when Mr. Rowland not appearing, we left.

11 June 1845. In the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater with James Kinsey to see the new piece entitled Wyoming and a farce called He's a Ghost in Spite of Himself. The former piece had some very beautiful scenery, and parts of it very amusing. The close was marked with considerable beauty exhibiting the 26 states in the form of 26 women, dressed in the "stars and stripes" and bearing a banner representing the coats of arms of the several states. Texas, bearing a banner of the "lone star," came in and was welcomed by the sisters into the union of the 26. Oregon and California also appeared and the Oregon question was settled amicably by John Bull and Uncle Sam.

20 June 1845. About 1/4 past 4 went down to the steamer John Stevens and at 4 1/2 p.m. left for Burlington.

21 June 1845. Took a walk down along the bank as far as the Bishop's and took a survey of Harry Perkins' yacht which is a beautiful craft, and is now lying off the Bishop's wharf.

After dinner Jim Welch and I started out to take a ride to see some ladies, notwithstanding a lecture from his mother and sister and one of the ladies from Salem, Massachusetts.

30 June 1845. Persons disposed to grumble at the clerk of the weather for the quality of the commodity he bestows on us poor mortals had another chance yesterday to vent their spleens. At daybreak a disagreeable easterly wind was blowing, which continued, accompanied by occasional sprinkles of rain, up to one o'clock, when all doubts as to its being a rainy day were removed by a shower which fell unremittingly during the whole afternoon and evening.

A month remarkable in many respects has just closed, and as it has occasioned a good deal of remark with respect to its meteorological features, we think it better to give some comparison between it and other months of the same name. The average temperature was rather above what it ordinarily is in this month, and was two degrees above that of last June. But what makes the season most remarkable is the unusual succession of rainy days, accompanied sometimes with a cool North east wind. There were but nine days without rain, and 7 of these were cloudy and threatening.

JULY

1 July 1846. At the Office all day though very unwell. About 6 p.m. went over and lay down until about 7 when, feeling much better, got up and went down to tea.

3 July 1846. A cloudy, rainy and very unpleasant day. About 4 p.m. a cab called for Mr. Edward Maginnis and myself to convey us to the New York boat, to carry us to the City of New York, he on a visit to see his mother and sister, and I on the same errand though with the intention of taking a much longer passage before I can once more have the pleasure of seeing them.

After bidding Miss Sally Ann Crim, Miss Priscilla Nicholson, and Mrs. Ludlow and daughter Elizabeth (who seemed to take some interest in our departure) farewell, we stepped into the cab and soon found ourselves placed on board the John Stevens.(9) After procuring checks for our baggage and feeling everything secure, we began to look about us. There was an immense number of passengers on board. One was a military company, and an association called the "Shifflers" who soon afterwards proved themselves to be great rowdies. There were two bands on board and of course we started in the midst of music, and we had a sufficient supply on our way up.

I met on board several acquaintances among whom were Mr. Arthur Drexel and Mr. James Kinsey. Arrived at Bristol at about 6 p.m. where we met Jim Welch. Kinsey, Welch, Maginnis and myself placed ourselves in the aft car, and were just congratulating ourselves on a pleasant trip and plenty of room, when to our discomfiture, the "Shifflers" with their band made their appearance and took complete possession. Mr. Welch left us at Trenton and I bade him farewell.

But to return to our company in the cars: the Shifflers. Never was I in a more disagreeable crowd, they were all more or less intoxicated and kept up a great noise both with the instruments & by hollering, yelling, screaming. It seemed they did everything to make the trip unpleasant. In crossing the "Trenton Bridge," which is very long and some parts so dark that you cannot see your hand before you, they commenced making all kinds of noises with their instruments which made it awful, and if any ladies should have happened to be present they could not have helped being very much frightened as it seemed more like the lower regions than anywhere else.

At every stopping place they would get more liquor, and then a worse noise would be made. I must give them credit for one thing. On our stopping at Trenton, Princeton, Brunswick and some other places, the band gave us some very fine music. Did not arrive at New York until near 11 o'clock and then in the midst of a heavy and drenching shower of rain.

We had great trouble getting our baggage out, and I got pretty much out of patience between the rain, yelling of the "Shifflers," the pulling and hauling of the cab drivers, &c. However after great trouble and considerable delay we got a carriage and baggage on it, when we proceeded to the "Howard House" where I arrived tired, sleepy and hungry.

4 July 1846. Well heigh ho, here I am in the great city of New York, and upon peeping out of the window, another rainy day salutes me, and for the glorious 4th. It was hard work to sleep last night, for one might well suppose that the British were bombarding the City, for there was nothing but one continued round of cannons, guns, pistols and crackers throughout the night. Through the whole night long, some fellow seemed to take great pleasure in keeping up a continual fire of a small cannon that seemed directly under my window and with every cannon I would jump up in my sleep as if I had been shot by the report of this fellow's gun. Truly this New York is a great place for firing of guns, &c. on the eve of the glorious 4th.

Got up this morning at about 20 minutes of 6, it being impossible to sleep any longer on account of the repeated report of guns. Took breakfast about 8 o'clock after which went down to the post office to mail a letter, and upon my return saw Mr. Kinsey. We concluded to take a walk up to the park and have a view of the fountain which, by the by, is a very beautiful affair with the water being thrown in such a manner as to form a kind of mist.

All law seemed to be set aside today in the streets of New York (in regard to firing arms, squibs, etc., in the streets). Every boy you meet in the street seems to have either a gun, pistol, or pack of crackers, which they fire off at pleasure in the presence of the police, keeping a continuing crack, crack, crack in your ears. The Park and Battery Grounds seem to be the chief resort for firing, though the streets are by no means excluded.

Upon our return met Mr. Maginnis. All three strolled down to the Battery to see the Military review by Governor Wright(10) of New York. Upon our arrival at the Battery took a walk around, saw the Governor and the troops, but there being such a crowd and bustle concluded to go up to the Hotel again and see the procession pass. The procession passed at about 1/4 past 11, and the military display was very fine, after which Maginnis, Kinsey and I went over to "Florence's Oyster Saloon" where we took some oysters and drank a bottle of Champagne, then went to "Plumes Daguerreotype Saloons" where we saw likenesses of many distinguished personages, among whom were James K. Polk and lady, John Q. Adams, Mrs. John Tyler, George M. Dallas, and many others whose names I do not remember. Mr. Maginnis left us here to go to dinner. Kinsey and I went down to the North River to see some of the Steamers which play on this River.

After dinner lounged about the Hotel until about 1/4 past 5, the afternoon being so very unpleasant. To kill time I proposed to Kinsey, who was sitting with me, to take a ride up town in the first omnibus which came along to see something of the upper part of New York; accordingly jumped in one which conveyed us up to Broadway to Beekman St., up Beekman to the 8th Avenue, and up the Avenue to 23rd St, being a distance of some two or three miles, and for which they charged us the small amount of a sixpence apiece.

On our return took tea, and then an Omnibus and went up to "Niblos" to see the Ravels. The performances were not much, with the exception of the Ravels in the characters of the Bedouin Arabs' Arabian festival, in which they accomplished some astonishing feats of gymnastic exercises.

The rain continued throughout the day and evening, which rendered the Streets of New York very muddy and unpleasant, though they were thronged throughout the day and evening. For filth, the Streets of New York, I think, exceed anything I ever beheld.

5 July 1846. A small streak of blue sky greeted the waking eye this morning, and seemed to inspire one with new vigor.

After breakfast Mr. Kinsey and I went down to the post office, then down to the foot of Fulton Street and crossed to Brooklyn. Took a walk around town and visited the new church of "The Holy Trinity" which is now building on the same plan as that of Trinity Church, New York. Also stopped in the "Church of Our Savior" which is a neat structure of the Gothic style. We then continued our walk on to the "Heights" from which we had a beautiful view of New York and the Bay and Harbor.

Then to the Hotel. I changed my dress and Kinsey and myself went down to "Trinity Church." It is one of the most beautiful structures in the United States, built of a dark red stone in the Gothic style. The interior of the church is beautiful in the extreme, the style is confined entirely to the Gothic, and the whole is of solid masonry. The windows are stained glass, presenting a beautiful appearance.

At the back is a huge window some 30 feet high of stained glass with a representation of the Apostles. The pulpit is placed in rather a singular position on the right of the Church. The ceiling is of solid masonry formed in immense arches of Gothic structure. Upon the whole it is the most noble building I ever saw or met with.

After Church Mr. Kinsey and I took a walk up Broadway; there were a very great number of persons walking.

After tea took a walk down to the Battery, found thousands of people there. Also went into Castle garden. The saloon of this place is very large and beautiful and is fitted up as a concert room. The shape is circular with a beautiful fountain in the center. The breeze from the bay is delightful and refreshing. There was to be a concert of sacred music but I did not wait for it.

6 July 1846. I took passage on board the splendid Steamer Niagara(11) for Troy. Started at 7 a.m. and had a delightful trip up the River past Peekskill, West Point, Poughkeepsie, Hudson. About a mile or so below Albany the steamer John Mason,(12) a smaller boat, came alongside and took on board the Troy passengers, the River being most too shallow for large boats to go up further than Albany.

Arrived at Troy at about 1/2 past 6, went up to the "Troy House" and took lodgings. After supper went up to Rensselaer Institute(13) in search of Percival Roberts and found him. We took a walk around the town and on the hills back of the City from which we had a view of Troy beneath us, and Albany and the Catskill Mountains in the distance. Walked around by Washington Square and into the lower part of the town, returned to the hotel at about 1/4 of 9, when Percy and I took a Cherry cobbler together.

7 July 1846. Got up at 10 m. of 5 a.m., dressed and then took a walk through the greater part of this beautiful town (Troy). The streets, generally speaking, cross each other at right angles and are prettily laid out, and many of the houses are beautiful in their appearance but not equal to those of Philadelphia.

Around Washington Square the houses are very handsome. The square is for the use only of the houses surrounding it, and not for the public. There are many fine churches in this place. After breakfast Percival Roberts called for me, and we went out together to visit some of the dentists to see what luck I could have in selling an article of teeth I have with me. Did not meet with much as there had been some person a little ahead of me, who had supplied the Dentists. Sold about 72.(14)

About 12 o'clock Percy and I went around to the large coach and car manufacturing establishment of Eaton, Gilbert & Co. It occupies a very large space and is I believe the largest establishment of the kind in the United States. Went through the painting, trimming, building, and in fact all of the rooms, and saw the coaches in different stages of completion.

At about 1/2 past 1 p.m. left Troy in the cars for Utica via Schenectady. The locomotive got to the other side of the Troy bridge about 1/2 past 1. The ride from Troy to Utica is very beautiful. We continued nearly the whole route along the banks of the beautiful Mohawk. The country is very mountainous, and part of the road leads through a very rocky country and must have caused great labor to cut through immense beds of rock. At times rocks upon rocks will be towering a hundred feet above, threatening almost instant death by their overhanging and apparent loose position.

Many villages were passed, and are distinguished by their beautiful and picturesque appearance, each one appearing to be well supplied with handsome public buildings and churches with spires which add much to their beauty. The first village of any note passed was Amsterdam, 36 miles from Troy. At 20 m. past 4 arrived at another beautiful town called Fonda, 47 miles from Troy, a new place of about 7 years' growth. It is the county seat of Fulton.

The court house is a very pretty building, having 5 or 6 large columns in front, something of the same style as the present Custom house at Philadelphia. There is a very good eating House at this place, at which the passengers favored the inward man.

The next place of any importance is St. Johnsville where we arrived at 20 m. of 6. It is 68 miles from Troy, and very handsomely situated. The scenery around this town is very wild and romantic, for which it is noted by the traveler. The Mohawk is obstructed by numerous rocks at this place, and also small Islands, and the water becomes very rapid, forming a variety of cascades and little water falls. An aqueduct bridge crosses the river at this place to the Erie Canal. The next place of importance is Herkimer where we arrived at 1/4 of 7, 85 miles from Troy and 14 miles from Utica. A very pretty place and beautifully situated.

Arrived at the beautiful town of Utica, 99 miles from Troy at 1/2 past 7 p.m. after one of the most delightful rides, and through one of the most beautiful pieces of country I ever witnessed. Utica is beautifully situated, and has many fine buildings. The streets are wide and have a very neat appearance. Judging from the number of stores there must be considerable business carried on. It is the capital of Oneida County.

After my arrival took lodging at "Bagg's Hotel and Bleecker House," apparently a very fine house and evidently the largest house in the place, fine clean room and good table.

8 July 1846. I got up this morning at about 1/4 of 4, and at about 1/4 past 4, started in an open air horse vehicle, driven by a boy, for the "Trenton Falls." The ride was very cold, I had a very thick sack coat and was half frozen when I got there.

Arrived at the falls at 1/4 past 6. This superb scenery of nature, to which thousands now annually resort, a scenery altogether unique in its character, as combining at once the beautiful, the romantic, the magnificent and the enchanting, all that variety of rocky chasms, cataracts, cascades, rapids, &c., elsewhere separately exhibited in different regions. Until recently it was not accessible without extreme peril and toil and therefore not generally known.

From the door of the Hotel you stepped at once into the Forest, and walking only about 20 rods strike the bank at the place of descent. This is about 100 feet of perpendicular rock, made easy and safe by a flight of stairs. You land upon a broad pavement, level with the water's edge, the river of black water at your feet, perpendicular walls of solid rocks on each side, and the narrow zone of ethereal sky far overhead; your feelings are at once excited. You have passed to a subterranean world.

The first impression is astonishment at the change. But recovering instantly, your attention is forthwith attracted to the magnificence, the grandeur, the beauty and sublimity of the scene. You stand and pause. You behold the operations of incalculable ages. You are thrown back to Antediluvian times. The adamant rock has yielded to flowing water, which has formed the wonderful chasm.

I strolled up along the shore as far as I could safely go, and as far as visitors usually ascend to the last fall, though I believe there is still another some 3 miles up, not often visited on account of the danger and fatigue in accomplishing the same. On my return I took a description of the falls in my note book, which is as follows:

The sixth fall in descending the river is not so high as those below, and runs through a wild chasm of rocks for the distance of some 50 or 60 feet, the descent I suppose is some 30 feet, the rocks overhanging are wild & and romantic. After the water passes over this falls there is a dark basin, appearing to rest from its labors in the wild cascade above, and relieved by a collection of white foam, which frequently assembles within an eddy, and dances to each other in fantastic forms and capped like caliphs, pressing the course of all hands round in an eternal circle.

The fifth falls make their descent over the rocks of some 40 feet. It is a much greater falls than the upper and handsomer. The fourth falls extend the whole distance across the ravine which is about 75 feet wide. These falls are more perpendicular than the others and are very beautiful, the water falls over a perpendicular rock of about 30 feet. The third falls are the principal ones, a high falls, and also extend the whole distance across the river. They are rather more broken then the others and make two descents. There is a very large body of water falls here. In the two descents the water must fall from 70 to 80 feet, making a grand spectacle to gaze upon. The water rushes over immense shelving rocks from which there is a continuing and dense spray arising. Upon the whole it is one of the most grand picturesque and romantic sights that I have ever looked upon.

After passing the falls the water passes through a deep ravine, and the rocks on either side are from 150 to 200 feet high. At the second falls there is an immense body of water that rushes over, but in a much smaller space. There is an immense rock extending across the chasm here some 40 feet high, and when the water is high I suppose this is the most beautiful of all the falls.

The first falls extend for a greater distance than either of the others, rushing through a narrow channel of rocks, giving them a very grand and sublime appearance. The descent here is gradual, about 20 feet say in 100 feet.

After fully satisfying myself with a view of this work so full of grandeur & magnificence, went up to the Hotel and in a few minutes afterwards got breakfast. I forgot to mention I met Mr. & Mrs. Reeves of Philadelphia taking a view of the falls. They spoke very politely.

At 2 p.m. started for Rochester in the cars. The first village of much importance passed after leaving Utica is Rome. Also stopped at Oneida Depot. At this place saw a number of Indian squaws of the Oneida tribe. They had for sale trinkets of one kind or other.

Arrived at Syracuse at 1/2 past 5, 152 miles from Troy. This is a very large, beautiful and flourishing town. It has a number of very fine hotels, the principal of which are the Empire House and Syracuse House. The manufacture of salt is carried on to a great extent here. I notice a very large number of sheds and mats for evaporating. Arrived at Auburn, 178 miles from Troy, about 1/4 of 8. At this place I had a view of Auburn State Prison, a very large and beautiful building. Arrived at Cayuga Bridge about 9 o'clock. I here took a cup of coffee and a roll for supper. We crossed Cayuga Lake at this point, the bridge is about a mile and a half long. A short time afterward passed along the shores of Lake Seneca. Also passed through Seneca Falls, Geneva and Canandaigua, all beautiful places.

9 July 1846. Arrived at Rochester, a very large and beautiful town, 257 miles from Troy, at 1/4 past 2 a.m. It was my intention to have gotten out at this place and spent today, but arriving so late and being necessarily detained a day, concluded to go on, ride all night and arrive in Buffalo in the morning. Arrived at Batavia, a very pretty town at l/2 of 5 a.m., at Attica at 1/2 past 5 a.m., passed Darien, Alden, Lancaster and arrived at Buffalo, 325 miles from Troy, at 20 min of 8 a.m., after some sixteen hours passage from Utica.

The city of Buffalo is a beautiful, clean and well laid out city. It has numerous handsome public as well as private residences, and is a place of considerable business. I put up at the "American House," a very large, handsome, but poorly kept house on the Main Street. Was employed during the greater part of the morning trying to make sale of some of the teeth, but with no success.

After dinner went down, engaged passage and state room on board the steamer packet St. Louis for Chicago, to start tomorrow evening at 7 p.m. I attended to some little business and at 5 p.m. started on board the cars for "Niagara Falls," where we arrived at about 1/2 past 6 p.m. after a ride of some 22 miles. Though not a very interesting country, part of the route was by the Niagara River.

Upon my arrival put up at the "Cataract House," a large, magnificent and well kept House. The table is excellent, servants attentive, and rooms large, clean and well ventilated. I soon went out to gain a view of the great falls. After passing down through a forest of some 30 rods, arrived in view of that great and grand wonder of nature, "the falls."

Advancing on a small bridge which extends some ten feet over the precipice, you have a grand view of the American Center, and Horseshoe Falls. I will not pretend to give a description of this great work of nature, but merely make a record of my visits to different spots in the vicinity.

After taking a view of the falls from this situation, and my very first view, returned to the Hotel and got tea. After took a walk across the Bridge which extends to Bath Island. On this Island there is a paper mill of some size and house for the sale of curiosities. There is another bridge, extending from this Island to Iris Island. After leaving the bridge there is a path extending to the right, to what is called Hog Back.

From this elevated point you have a view of Center falls, which is about 100 feet wide, and also of the American falls. You are at the distance of some 200 feet above the level of the River. From Hog Back there is a bridge running over the rapids of Center Falls to Prospect Island, from which you have a view of both Horseshoe and the American falls. This Island is quite a small affair, and directly between the immense falling sheets.

From this point I extended my walk along the bank of the precipice, passing Biddle's Stair Case, to Prospect Tower or Terrapin Rocks. This tower is situated on the point of Iris Island, and at the edge of the Horseshoe falls. This Tower is of a circular form and is some thirty feet high, with an observatory on top. From it is presented a full view into the very midst of the great falls, and into the great chasm beneath. After visiting this tower, it being near 9 o'clock, returned to the Hotel by a rear cut across the Island. And after writing a letter to Mr. James C. Welch went to bed which was about 10 o'clock.

10 July 1846. Got up this morning at 20 m. of 6, dressed and started off for a ramble on Iris and Bath Islands. After crossing the bridge to Bath Island turned to my left and crossed a small bridge which leads to what is called Brig or Sloop Island. After viewing rapids which rush on all sides of you with fearful swiftness, and watching them come dashing and roaring down the river here, seeming as if at every moment you would be dashed from the Island, I returned to Bath Island and visited the paper mill.

In this mill I procured a sheet of paper, which I saw in pulp, and in the short space of about a minute saw it pass through the various changes, and come out dry, fit for use.

After leaving the mill, continued my walk to Iris Island, and then down to Hog Back to take another view of the falls from this point. I here met a gentleman from Michigan who I fell in company with last evening. Went over to Prospect Island again with him, returned and continued our walk along the Banks to "Biddle's Staircase." Here you descend a spiral stair case down the precipice some 100 feet to the rocks below. We proceeded along a ledge with the rocks towering above in awful grandeur, and then in a sloping manner descending as far below to within a few yards of the Horseshoe falls. The spray was so great that we could not remain long, being completely drenched in a few minutes.

About midway between the Horseshoe falls and the staircase is a delightful spring of water coming out of the rocks, slightly impregnated with sulfur, at which we took a refreshing draught. We advanced on a rock where we could look directly into the cave of the winds. The scene was most beautiful indeed. This cave is directly under the falls, and is represented to be nearly 120 feet wide and about 30 feet deep, with a noble arch hanging overhead about 80 feet high, with the sheet of water rolling in front. If I had had suitable clothing with me, should have procured a guide and gone in, though it is said to be quite an adventure. Returned to the Hotel for breakfast.

After breakfast walked down to the Ferry House. Here there is an inclined plane extending down the precipice to where the boats start for the Canadian shore.

Upon arrival at the water's edge, took a small boat and passed over to the Canadian shore about 100 yards below the falls. You are covered with spray in crossing.

Arriving at Canada you ascend a steep hill and arrive at the Clifton House. Met with a Mr. John Dixon from Durham England who I found to be a perfect gentleman. Some of the party being acquainted with him, he volunteered to show us about the falls. The first place we visited was the precipice where a young lady fell off some years ago in endeavoring to pick a flower and was dashed to pieces below. Then continued our walk to "Barndt's Museum." It is a fine collection of minerals, animals, fish, etc. They have also two Rocky Mountain buffalo, several bear, horses, &c., all alive.

After leaving the Museum went up to the House near Table Rock, to change our dress to go under the falls. Put on a red flannel shirt, a pair of coarse duck pants, old pair of shoes, and an oil cloth hat resembling a bonnet. Thus equipped, we made a rather "hard looking company." Our guide, a large Negro dressed in a black oil cloth suit first descended the stairs and we followed. We descended some 100 feet before we reached the ledge of rocks which lead under the falls. There was a lady who went under with our party.

The guide proceeded, and we followed keeping close to the ropes, with our heads turned toward them, which gave us an opportunity of breathing more freely, as the wind blows with a perfect hurricane force, dashing the water in every direction, and at times almost taking your breath.

We proceeded as far as Termination Rock, where we stopped to gaze at the grand scene before us. Upon looking up, you see the immense sheet of water rushing over the precipice above you at the distance of some 180 feet. Below you see the water dashing upon the rocks, while spray thrown from it almost envelops you. You can scarcely hear each other speak for the roaring of the torrents. The scene is too grand for me to think of giving a description. Remained under some half hour, then we returned to the foot of the stairs and then clambered down the rocks, with another black as our guide, to what is called Miss Clark's Rock. This is an immense rock, part of a table rock which fell some years ago from the precipice above, the distance being say 100 feet. Went on top of this rock, which is about 20 feet high, from which you have a fine view of the whole of the falls. Then returned to the dressing rooms, changed our dress and went out on Table Rock.

The greatest body of water flows over the Horseshoe falls, & in the center of it the water is a beautiful green color, contrasting greatly with the pure white of the water on either side. On Table Rock I laid down on my back, while Mr. Dixon held my feet and I threw my head over the precipice and looked around. The scene was grand.

Went over in the Ferry to the American side. On my way to the Hotel bought some bags, &c., from a pretty Tuscaroran Squaw. Dined at 1 o'clock and at half past 2 started for Buffalo.

Went down to the Steamer St. Louis. Started on board of her at 20 m. past 7 p.m. for Chicago. There were a very large number of passengers on board, both cabin and steerage. The St. Louis is a very fine boat of over 600 tons. All state rooms and good accommodations. We had not been out on the Lake more than an hour when we experienced a heavy squall of wind, rain, thunder and lightning. It blew tremendous hard for a while and made the boat lay pretty well over.

11 July 1846. We arrived at Cleveland, Ohio at 2 p.m. It is about 180 miles from Buffalo. I went ashore and took a stroll though the town as the boat was to remain about an hour and a half. The situation of the place is very beautiful, being on a bluff of some thirty feet in height, directly on the Lake and at the mouth of the Cuyahoga River. The streets are wide and, generally speaking, laid out at right angles. There are a number of fine Public Buildings, also Private Buildings. It appears to be a place of considerable business. The pier extending into the lake at this place is a beautiful piece of mason work, built by the United States Government. It extends some 1200 feet into the Lake, and is of solid mason work, affording a safe harbor for vessels in rough weather.

Left Cleveland at l/4 of 5 p.m., and had a very pleasant sail up the Lake. Remained on deck until about l/2 past 9, the weather being very delightful, then turned in.

12 July 1846. Had a very heavy shower of rain accompanied with a heavy blow and thunder and lightning about 2 o'clock this morning. We were about 8 miles off Detroit River when the storm came on. For a while it blew very hard. We partially lost our bearings in the storm, and had to stop the engines and sound. However, we got safely into Detroit River and arrived at Detroit, 318 miles from Buffalo, at 1/4 of 5 a.m.

In passing up the River noticed several very pretty towns among which were Amherstburg, below Detroit, and Sandwich directly opposite. Both towns are beautifully located on the East side of the Detroit River, in Canada.

Upon arriving at Detroit went on shore with Mr. Reynolds and took a stroll through the town. It is situated on a hill, on the west side of the Detroit River about 20 miles from Lake Erie and six miles below Lake St. Claire. The City is beautifully laid out and extends over considerable ground. The streets running from the River are very wide and are termed avenues. Saw the court house, a fine building with columns in front, a Catholic Church with twin steeples, Baptist Church, large Market House, &c. Also another very fine large building with pillars. The store houses appear to be large and commodious. A considerable business is done at this place, and it is rapidly on the increase.

Left Detroit at 1/4 past 6 a.m. and continued on up the River. The country on both sides is very beautiful and apparently fertile. There are a great many houses along each shore, and a large number of windmills on the Canada side, I suppose erected a number of years ago by the French. Passed the Light House where we enter Lake St. Claire at 10 minutes of 7 a.m. This lake is about 30 miles long and very shallow, so shallow that the boat drawing about 9 feet of water would often drag.

Entered the St. Claire River at 10 a.m. The shore for some 7 or 8 miles on either side is low and marshy, not even fit for cattle. As you get further up the land becomes apparently very fine, and quite high. There are a great many houses on both the Michigan and Canada sides of the river, mostly of the smaller class, and many built of logs. Those on the Canada side are much the worst and generally occupied by Indians of the worst grade. Saw a great number of them along the shore, many in the water swimming.

Christy's band of Minstrels came on board this morning at Detroit. There were also several pretty lively young ladies who came on board. Two of them were the Misses Butler from Palmyra, New York, and a Miss Sarah Ann Kingman from Buffalo, New York. In the evening, though Sunday, they gave us some pretty good music on the piano, and fine singing, at times accompanied by the Minstrels.

Entered Lake Huron at 4 p.m. Just before passing the Light House passed Fort Gratiot, a military post in St. Claire County, on the St. Claire River, which defends the entrance into Lake Huron. It stands a little below the mouth of the Lake. Lake Huron is a very large body of water and much deeper than the other Lakes. The water, unlike the others, is of a dark color in a body, but when taken up in a glass is clear and cold. After entering this Lake the atmosphere became much colder.

13 July 1846. Had considerable dancing on board this morning, and some good music from "Christy's Minstrels."(15) Last night in passing Saginaw Bay, had a very heavy sea running, which gave the boat considerable motion, it was impossible to walk straight. After breakfast wrote to Ma and Jim Welch, and then brought up my Journal.

The waves at times would break clear over the upper deck, which is 20 feet from the surface of the water. After dinner had some very good singing and playing by one of the Misses Butler of Palmyra, New York.

Arrived at Mackinaw, an island of the same name, at about 7 p.m. This place is of but little importance except for its fisheries. The houses are generally miserable low hovels, occupied by half breeds, Indians and lower classes of Whites. There are several stores for the sale of different kinds of goods, and Indian trinkets along the shore. There are but two streets, both parallel to the shore. I noticed a church in the lower end of the village. The Island on which the town is situated is very high on the eastern end.

The principal object of interest at this place is the American Fort, which is situated on a high bluff on the Eastern Side of the Island. Went up and through the grounds. Everything is marked with neatness and taste. From the Fort you have a fine view of the town below, and of the surrounding Islands and water scenery. There is an arch rock at this place well worth a visit, and also a sugar loaf rock, but our time was so limited had not time to visit them.

At Mackinaw noticed a number of Indian wigwams along the shore. They are erected by driving a number of stakes in the ground and bringing them together at the top. Then a kind of matting is wrapped around them to keep the weather out, leaving a large hole in the top for the dismissal of the smoke from the fire built in the center. The Indians huddle inside this but I think they are not much protected against rain. In about six weeks there will be from 800 to 1000 Indians at this place, located in their wigwams along the shore. They come to receive their annual pay from the United States Government. At this place we got some fine Mackinaw trout, a delicious fish.

At 1/4 past 10 p.m. entered Lake Michigan. This evening had a delightful entertainment on board. The Misses Butler favored us with some good playing on the piano with singing, after which we were entertained with some Negro songs and fine playing of "Christy's Minstrels." After they were done had a waltz, and then the Minstrels gave us some Negro dancing.

I made the acquaintance of a very pretty and pleasant young lady today, a Miss Dunlap from Cherry Valley, N.Y. I was very much pleased with two little children, and they appeared to be likewise pleased with me, as they are constantly at my side or in my lap. Names Louisa M. and Ida Wood of New York. Louisa M. is the oldest. The company generally speaking on the boat is very pleasant both ladies and gentlemen, State room maids are very agreeable. I met with a gentleman coming in the cars to Buffalo, who has been my companion ever since. He is a very clever fellow and Irishman by birth, his name is M. Normandy. He is going as far as Chicago, where I suppose we shall part.

14 July 1846. Arrived at Sheboygan, Wisconsin Territory, 50 miles from Milwaukee, at 3 1/2 p.m., went on shore and walked up into town. The place is quite new, and on a considerable elevation directly on the lake. They have a very good pier, which makes a safe harbor. The country is very wild in this vicinity. Noticed a number of Indians, some half naked, lying exposed in the sun asleep. Others were on the pier with their faces painted in a singular manner.

Arrived at Milwaukee 90 miles from Chicago at 1/4 of 9 p.m. This is a place of considerable importance directly on the Lake. Did not have an opportunity of seeing as the boat only stopped half an hour. There were quite a number of passengers who left, among whom was Miss Dunlap of Cherry Valley, New York, my favorite among the ladies. Her manners were so unassuming that they were well calculated to win the favor of anyone, and withal she was quite pretty. The two little children by the name of Wood also left at this place, one of them, the youngest, had quite a crying spell at leaving. After leaving Milwaukee had a concert by the Minstrels on board, and some dancing and waltzing. Also some good playing on the piano and singing.

15 July 1846. Arrived at Chicago, 1004 miles from Buffalo, this morning at 1/4 of 6 a.m. My state room mates were a very clever set of fellows. Upon our arrival Mr. Blakey of Chicago, Mr. J.C. Reynolds of St. Louis, Mr. Thomas Wright of England, and Mr. M. Normandy of Ireland and myself all went up to the American Temperance House and took lodgings. After which Messrs. Wright, Reynolds, Blakey and myself took a walk around town. It appears to be beautifully laid out. The Streets are all very wide and cross each other at right angles. They are not paved, and the sand is full and plentiful in them. They remind me very much of Jersey. The sidewalks are all planked, no stone or bricks being at hand. The buildings generally are of frame, but there are many built of brick both private and public.

I noticed a number of fine churches, among which was a very large Catholic church. The town appears to be rapidly improving, and is destined to be one of the greatest cities in the West. Mr. Normandy and I visited the large steamer Empire this morning. She is a magnificent affair, her upper cabin is 230 feet long.

After breakfast hired a horse and carriage and rode round to see the town, and then went in pursuit of Miss Anna C. Mulford who lives about 10 miles from Chicago, for whom I had a letter from Mr. Welch. The ride was very pleasant, the greater part of it being through the prairie, and the roads very fine. I found the house without much difficulty. It was a neat two story frame House, and very neatly furnished. Found the young lady in and very agreeable and intelligent. She was inclined to be pretty.

In the afternoon employed myself in trying to sell some of the teeth, also wrote a letter to Ma and to Jim Welch. The evening was employed writing this journal, and with a dentist making a sale of some teeth.

16 July 1846. Got up this morning about 2 a.m., and at 1/2 past 3 a.m. started in the stage for Galena. Arrived at Oak Ridge, 10 miles from Chicago, at 5 a.m. almost frozen, went to a fire they had in the store and found it very comfortable. The roads were very rough so far.

Arrived at Naperville at which place I had an excellent breakfast; had some very fine prairie hens. Breakfast only 25 cents, everything clean and neat. Naperville is quite a small village. Arrived at Aurora and changed horses and stage here. After leaving Aurora, passing down a steep hill in making a short turn, broke the Key bolt of the stage. Happily we had another with us. By the aid of some plying with rails, &c., we soon got on our way. Had a very fast and good natured driver out of Aurora.

Arrived at Shabney's Grove, a Country house 68 miles from Chicago on the verge of the prairie in a small grove of wood at 20 minutes of 5 p.m. and took dinner, washed and cleaned up from the dust. Have a beautiful view of the prairie from this House. Had good, clean and comfortable dinner.

Left Shabney's Grove at 1/4 of 6 p.m. and rode through a beautiful rolling prairie, and continued until after dark when night closed the scene and we continued on our journey in the dark. The country through which we passed today was very beautiful, being rich rolling Prairie Land, and a considerable portion of it under a high state of cultivation. The crops all look remarkably fine and very heavy. There is a great deal more of this prairie land under cultivation than I expected to see. The fields of corn, wheat, rye and oats in this quarter are immense. I never saw anything to equal them in the East. The roads over these prairies are very fine, being as level as a floor and hard as a turnpike. The passengers in the stage were quite agreeable with the exception of two children, sons of a Mr. Preston who lives in Iowa territory. Mr. Preston was quite agreeable.

17 July 1846. Night clear and cold. Arrived at Dixon on the Rock River, 120 miles from Chicago at 2 a.m., after riding all night without much sleep. Crossed the Rock River in a flat boat, and rode 12 miles to Sterling. Had a very rough breakfast at the "Rapids House," not very clean or inviting, but it tasted very well after riding all night. Arrived at Fulton on the Mississippi River, a very small town 50 miles from Galena, at 10 a.m. This is the place we take the boat for Galena.

The County is very fine, and as you approach the Mississippi River it becomes much more hilly and picturesque. We have been waiting at this miserable place (Fulton) for the boat to arrive to take us up the River since 10 a.m. to the time of present writing, 7 p.m. For some unknown cause, we have been disappointed. It is supposed she has either run aground or busted up. Our prospects at present are very dreary and we do not know how soon we shall be able to get off.

I got a boat this afternoon and rowed across the Mississippi River to a place called Lyons in Iowa Territory, remained about 1/2 hour and then returned.

In crossing the prairies saw great quantities of game, Prairie hens, quail, rabbits, lark, and in fact every kind of game was in the greatest plenty. They would come so close to the stage that you could almost knock them down with a stick. Went out this afternoon to try to shoot something, had nothing but my pistols. Saw plenty of game but could not shoot it not having a gun. My friend Mr. Reynolds had a gun and shot some.

About 1/2 past 8 p.m. we heard the joyful sound of "the boat is coming" and at first were not disposed to believe it but in a few minutes heard her "puff" when of course we were sure she was running. Her delay was on account of some derangement in her machinery. Her name was the Governor Briggs, a small and light draught. Her accommodations were poor for coming up at night. However at about 9 o'clock started in her.

After she started I prepared for sleep by putting my carpet bags for a pillow on a hard settee, and laid down for the night and slept soundly, not having had any of much account since 1 1/2 o'clock Thursday last.

18 July 1846. Went out on deck and found the boat moored to the side of the bank, where she had been lying for some time, on account of the fog which prevented her from running. However in a short time the fog cleared off and we started on our way. The scenery along the Mississippi River is very beautiful. On either side are high bluffs giving the scene a picturesque and elegant appearance.

Entered the Fever River, a narrow and crooked stream, at about 1/2 past 7, and after some difficulty in making the various turns in the river, arrived at Galena at 1/2 past 8 a.m. Went up to the "American House" with Mr. Reynolds and took Lodgings, this being the Best House in the place. Galena is situated on the Fever River about 7 miles from where it empties into the Mississippi and about 7 miles south of Wisconsin Territory, and in Jo Daviess County [Illinois].

There is considerable amount of business done in this place, and on the principal business street there appears to be as much bustle as in any of the principal business streets in Philadelphia. The houses in town are principally of frame, but there are many fine brick stores and dwellings, and many in the course of erection. The town is surrounded by immense hills, those back of the town are but a very short distance from it, not over a quarter of a mile. These hills are covered with beautiful residences, many built in a neat cottage style. They all have a commanding view of the Country around which is beautiful indeed. These hills I suppose are 200 feet above the level of the River.

The principal part of the town is on one street which extends for over a mile. There is another street directly back of it on which the churches are built, which are very neat structures with small steeples. There are also many fine houses on this Street.

Galena is in the midst of the lead region, and you see immense quantities of it drawn through the streets by teams of Oxen, from 2 to 6 yoke. The levee is covered with pig lead.

In the afternoon I got a horse and wagon and Mr. J.C. Reynolds and myself took a ride out to see the various mining operations going as for lead in the vicinity. It appeared that all the hills around the country have been dug into for lead, and many fruitless attempts have been made to find the ore. It appears they dig a hole anywhere in the earth in search of ore, and after digging some distance, if none is found, they abandon the place and go to another until some is found. We visited a number of the "diggings," as they are here called, and got some specimens of the lead. Also visited a smelting furnace, and saw the operation of smelting the ore performed, which is very simple. It is first thoroughly washed in a running stream, and then thrown in an excessively hot furnace which melts the lead out, and that runs into an iron pot, from which it is ladled out and poured into molds which form it into what is called "pig lead" and is ready for transportation.

I went out alone to see "Sander's Diggings" which are the most extensive in this vicinity. These diggings extend down into the ground some 100 feet perpendicular, and then branch off.

My position at this place is very uncertain as I do not know at what time I shall be able to leave. There are no boats here and no telling how soon there will be any, there are two expected. I am very anxious to leave but will have to take it cool and wait the pleasure of the boats.

19 July 1846. Went over to a small Presbyterian Church on the back street with Mr. Reynolds, heard a very good sermon by Mr. Young. Church out about 1/4 of 12 a.m. then went over to the hotel and remained lolling about until about 1/4 of 4 p.m. Started to go to Church, but found they were all closed, so meeting a friend of Mr. Reynolds concluded to take a walk up on the hills back of the town.

Upon arriving at the top of the hill took a walk into the grave yard belonging to the city. It is beautifully situated directly on top of the hill. While there a funeral came in of a young lady of about 18 which we attended and heard the ceremony.

Returned to the Hotel until about 7, when Mr. Reynolds and I took a walk and attended the new Presbyterian Church and heard a very good sermon. On the opposite side of the river to the main town there are many very pretty residences & also a very pretty Catholic Church.

After Church returned to the Hotel and I had just gone up to my room when Mr. Reynolds came and knocked at my door and told me that a boat had arrived, and we had better go down and see what one it was. I accordingly went down with him and found it to be the Governor Briggs from Albany. But she reported two boats coming up, the Uncle Toby and the Cumberland Valley so I suppose we shall get off tomorrow.

After learning the above facts returned to the Hotel and on my way up saw a grand Irish spree(16) and fight in passing a grog shop.

20 July 1846. Got up this morning at 1/2 past 5, dressed and went down to the River to see what boats had come in during the night. Found that both the Cumberland Valley and the Uncle Toby had arrived but the first named boat had left again. Saw the captain and he told me that the Toby would not leave for St. Louis before tomorrow evening, as she was obliged to go up to Du Buque and Potosi first and then return.

Upon going up to the Hotel found my friend Reynolds had resolved to go up to Du Buque and Potosi in the boat to pass away time, as we were both heartily tired of remaining in Galena. So as soon as breakfast was over had our baggage put upon the boat, and at 8 a.m. left Galena for Du Buque, Iowa Territory.

We were 1 hour and 20 minutes before we reached the Mississippi River then took in tow a keel boat loaded with a variety of articles: hogs, pigs, pots, pans, jugs, corn, &c.

The scenery along the River is very beautiful and along the Iowa side there are many high bluffs presenting a beautiful and picturesque appearance. There are also a great number of very beautiful Islands along the River.

Arrived at the slough which runs up to Du Buque at 20 m. of 1 p.m. The River being so low we were not able to go up and had to land on an Island on the Mississippi River, walk across it and then be conveyed in a small boat to the main Land. Du Buque is a very pretty and thriving place situated in Iowa Territory.

There are many large brick store houses, and there appears to be an active business carried on. The stores are generally large, and have fine stocks of goods. The main street is a fine wide one, and was in the course of grading and leveling. The soil is sandy and the streets are not paved which rendered it very hot.

There are several horse powered ferry boats plying between Du Buque and the Wisconsin shore. Just after leaving Du Buque the scenery along the Wisconsin shore is very beautiful being high rocky bluffs resembling greatly the Palisades on the Hudson just after leaving New York.

At 5 1/4 p.m. entered what is termed the swift slough, which leads into the river front on which Potosi is situated. Just after entering the slough struck a log which twisted and threw the boat considerably on her side, it however gave no damage.

Potosi is situated in what is called "Snake Hollow." It is between a range of high Hills, and extends scattered along the hollow for about 2 1/2 miles, the principal part of the town is about 2 miles from the landing. The houses principally are of log, though there are a number of very pretty bricks and frames. The "Wisconsin House," a hotel, is quite a large and pretty brick Building, decidedly the largest Building in the place. There is but one Street that runs directly through the town.

Potosi's principal trade is in lead, though considerable other trade is carried on. The Catholics through these towns appear to have a strong footing, even in this place they have a church, though built of logs. We shall be under the necessity of lying here until morning, as we have considerable lead to take on board and a keel boat to unload. I am much pleased with the officers and boat.

The table is excellent, everything neat and clean and the cooking very good. Had a very nice dinner and supper, superior by far to that at the "American House" at Galena. I went to bed about 1/2 past 9, and Mr. Reynolds went out gigging fish with the clerk of the boat. No doubt they will have luck.

21 July 1846. Got up this morning at about 1/2 past 5, not having had a very good night's sleep on account of the mosquitoes.

23 July 1846. Slept very uncomfortably last night, got up this morning about 1/2 past 2 & slept in an arm chair in the cabin, took a nap in my berth about 1 o'clock this morning. The boat laid at the head of the rapids all last night and until 1/4 of 9 this morning, having to put the freight off the steamer into the keel boats in tow, so as to be able to go over the rapids.

Just after starting ran into a rock which jarred the boat considerably but did no damage. Passed a small town called Bryan. Stopped at a small town called Hampton on the Illinois side. One of our flat boats got ashore, and for this reason, together with the wind blowing hard we were obliged to be here all day and not likely to leave until tomorrow morning early.

The company is good, and the table excellent, so we spent a very pleasant day. Shortly after stopping at Hampton Mr. Reynolds, Mr. S.A. Nicholson of New York, the Misses Mary and Elizabeth Leffingwell of Bloomington, Iowa, two very pleasant young ladies, as well as intelligent and one quite pretty, and myself went on shore and took a stroll along the beach to hunt cornelians,(17) and succeeded in finding a number. On our return stopped in at a pottery, saw their mystery of making jugs, and then returned to the boat. Took a swim off of the keel boat then took a nap until about 1/2 past 4, when I got up and played whist until supper time with the two Misses Leffingwell and Mr. Reynolds.

After tea Mr. Reynolds, Mr. S. A. Nicholson, Mr. M. Hempstead of Galena, the two Misses Leffingwell, two gentlemen and myself got the yawl belonging to the ship and took a row down the Mississippi. Passed the evening playing whist. I admire Miss Elizabeth Leffingwell the most, as she appears to have a better disposition than her sister, and is certainly the prettiest.

24 July 1846. Got up this morning at 4 o'clock, at which time we left Hampton to proceed over the rapids. Just after leaving Hampton noticed on the Illinois side a very pretty little town called Moleen [Moline]. It is beautifully situated, and has been built within the last five years. It has quite a large mill, which receives its power from the Mississippi, which is dammed up between the main shore and an Island opposite to the town. Got safely over the rapids with but one rub and arrived at the pretty town of Rock Island, which has 1,200 inhabitants, a very pretty Court House and a number of fine buildings. The town is very much scattered, and do not think it is much of a business place.

Left Rock Island at 1/2 past 6 a.m. & proceeded directly across the River to the beautiful town of Davenport, Iowa. The situation of this town, though directly opposite Rock Island, is much prettier. It is beautifully laid out with many fine brick houses, and also a fine large brick Hotel called La Clare House. I should judge there was more business in this town than in the town opposite. The country surrounding it is much finer and is in a higher state of cultivation. I noticed, in passing down the river, that the land on the Iowa side appears to be superior to that on the Illinois. Just before arriving at Rock Island noticed old fort Stevenson, used some years ago in the Indian troubles.

Was much amused, as well as the rest of the passengers, at a fellow who happened to be left at Rock Island. He chased the boat for about 2 miles along the shore hollering and bellowing like an Indian waving his coat &c., and withal barefooted with nothing but rocks to run on. The captain would not stop for some time, but since some of our passengers had gone down the river in the yawl, he was obliged to stop for them, and the poor fellow got on board nearly worn out. He was made more mad by two fellows charging him 4 bits to bring him on board.

The scenery along the river is very fine particularly along the Iowa side, being a rich rolling country and under a high state of cultivation. Stopped on the Iowa side to wood about 1/2 past 10 a.m. which detained us about an hour. Went on shore and took a walk around.

Arrived at Bloomington, Iowa. This place is very pretty and situated with a high hill in the South. The town is rather scattered but has many fine brick buildings with pillars in front and presents a fine view from the river. Remained here but 15 minutes which, however, gave us some little time to go up into town and look around. The streets are not paved and are very rough and uneven. The Misses Leffingwell left us at this place, which I regretted exceedingly as I found them to be very agreeable and good company. They reside at Bloomington.

New Baltimore, Illinois. They have quite a pretty Baptist Church which looks quite pretty from the River. It has a cupola, covered with tar or some bright substance which presents a fine appearance in the sun. Remained but a few minutes. I had hardly time to run to the top of the bluff when the boat started and I came near losing my passage, but with a wet foot succeeded in getting on board. The sand in this place is about 6 inches deep, and I do not see how the inhabitants get along through it.

Just after leaving New Baltimore the clerk put a man ashore who seemed disposed not to pay his passage. He said he had no money, but when he found they were in earnest about putting him ashore he offered to pay but it was then too late.

The scenery after leaving New Baltimore is beautiful indeed. On either side of the River is an immense forest of lofty trees, while its bosom is covered with many beautiful Islands. After supper I took a chair and sat in the fore part of the boat until near dark, watching and delighted at the beautiful panorama passing before me.

Arrived at Burlington, Iowa about 1/4 past 10 p.m. From what I could learn from others this is decidedly the prettiest town we have passed through since leaving Potosi. There are many fine large store houses, all apparently of brick. The town is beautifully situated and does considerable business. Walked up as far as the "Bath House," a very fine and large Hotel. Left Burlington at about 11 p.m., and proceeded down the River, expect to arrive at the head of the lower rapids by daylight.

25 July 1846. Arrived at Montrose, Iowa, at the head of the lower rapids. After breakfast one of the passengers and myself took the ferry and went over to Nauvoo, to see the great temple of the Mormons. The situation of the City itself is very beautiful being on a very flat piece of ground considerably elevated above the River. The Houses generally are of brick and are scattered over an area of some 4 miles square, this being the size of the corporate limits of the City. It presents a dull and deserted appearance, there being no stir of business, caused no doubt from the frequent trouble with the people of the County.

The Temple(18) is situated on a high and commanding hill at the distance of about 1 1/2 miles from the landing. The site is beautiful, and the height of the hill above the level of the River is 100 feet.

After a fatiguing walk, reached the object of our destination. The temple is built of a kind of white stone, dressed, and is four stories high, surmounted by a beautiful tower, with a dome over 200 feet high. The sides of the building are finished with pilasters extending to the roof, and capped with singular carved heads. The interior is reached by a flight of stone steps which lead to three arched entrances, which pass you into a lofty and large vestibule.

We were met with the attendant of the temple who showed us through every part. We first entered the lower hall, a large and spacious room fitted up with benches and the backs of them can be changed at will to face either way. On either end of the room are four rows or tiers of box-shaped seats marked in part with letters denoting the order of the priests who occupied them. On either side there are six large columns. The ceiling is of the rotunda order, and I judge the room is a fine one for speaking. We next descended to the basement of the building which is paved entirely with brick. In the center is the baptismal font in the shape of a large bowl carved out of an immense block of stone which rests on the backs of 12 oxen, also carved out of large blocks of stone. Each animal is of the size of life. The font is reached on either side by a flight of stone steps with iron railings. On either side of the font are small rooms fitted up as dressing rooms for persons after baptisms. After satisfying our curiosity in this part of the building we ascended on a circular stair case to the rooms in the second story. These rooms are on both sides of the half circle made by the arch of the rotunda of the room beneath. They extend the whole length of the building and are intended as class rooms for Sunday school children. They are lighted by windows of a circular form, resembling port holes. Above these rooms is another large one not finished, but when completed will resemble the lower one first described, and to be used for the same purpose.

We then ascended the fourth story. This room is quite a large one and is to be occupied as a school. On either side are a number of small apartments fitted up for class rooms. This suite of rooms are lighted from the roof. We next ascended into the tower which is gained by some half dozen very steep flights of stairs. At the head of the second flight there is a very neatly finished room to be used as the receptacle of the bell. The view from the tower is beautiful. Indeed you are 168 feet above the ground on which the temple is situated and about 268 feet above the level of the river. You have a fine view of the mighty Mississippi as it takes its serpentine course through the country, with a beautiful rolling country on the other side. Directly beneath you lies the town of Nauvoo, with its houses scattered in every direction, while further back you have a beautiful view of rich rolling prairie country.

The descent from the top of the winding staircase is 80 feet. The size of this building is 87 feet front by 128 feet deep, and it is said to have cost $1,000,000.

After registering our names, and paying our attendant 25 cents each, left for the ferry and after some little detention succeeded in getting over just in time to be placed on the keel boat Corporal Teine, to be conveyed over the rapids. The Captain, having obliged all the passengers except the ladies, had taken all baggage and everything movable off the boat so that she would not stick in passing over the rapids. I should have preferred going down by land in a carriage, but having gone over to Nauvoo lost my chance, and was obliged to undergo the unpleasant task of floating some 12 miles down the Mississippi in a burning sun on a flat boat.

Started at 1/2 past 9 a.m. with a keel and flat boat lashed together loaded with pig lead, the baggage of the passengers and a number of passengers on board. The keel was a covered boat, inside of which the most of us took shelter from the burning rays of the sun. Got along admirably until near our journey's end, a very swift part of the rapids where the current runs at the rate of about 10 miles an hour called "Sucker Shoot." At this place the Steamer Time was aground directly in the channel, and in endeavoring to pass her, we came in contact. In an instant the whole covering of the boat came down with a crash, burying those underneath and injuring them severely. I was sitting talking with several gentlemen in the bow of the boat, though under the covering when the accident occurred. Immediately on hearing the crash we bounded out and jumped into the flat boat thus saving ourselves severe injury. Some of them jumped onto the steamer as we swept by, all of whom jumped back except one. We supposed him lost during the afternoon until about 6 p.m. when he returned unhurt. There were several of the passengers severely hurt, among whom was an old man and his wife. The former I do not think will get over it. It is supposed several of his ribs are broken, and his kidneys severely injured. He appears to be in great pain and I do not think can last long.

I thank God for preserving me from the injury received by the old man, for but a short time before I occupied the same position he did. One of the passengers made a wonderful escape. He was sitting directly under the falling timbers, in a rocking chair. The rocking chair was completely broken up and he not hurt at all. I received but two slight bruises, one on each wrist, and I thank God that I escaped. The greatest consternation prevailed for a while: the crying of those under the fallen deck, and the hollering of the hands that we were sinking. The rush of the water made it truly awful for a while, and to make our situation more perilous the keel boat sprang a leak and for a while thought we should all go down, but by timely application of coats, &c. in the stave [hole] prevented the water from filling us. If the keel should of happened to sink, I have no doubt many would have been drowned. The water varies from 3 to 10 feet in depth and runs at this point at about the rate of 10 miles per hour. The descent of these rapids is 22 feet in 12 miles and the descent of the upper rapids is 24 feet in 18 miles.

We arrived at Keokuk where we found the steamer at 1/2 past 1. After a trip of some 4 hours on the keel boat, such another I do not wish to have again. This town is of but little note, situated directly on the brink of the river with immense hills directly back of it. The buildings are of but little importance, principally old frames. There is a Hotel at this place but should judge not much of one. The hands were employed all the afternoon in removing the lead from the flats to the keel and steamboat, and removing the rubbish from the keel. My friends Mr. Reynolds, Mr. Nicholas and Dr. Osgood left me this morning, though I may meet Reynolds and Osgood again.

Left Keokuk at 1/2 past 9 p.m., and about 1/4 past 10 p.m. arrived at Warsaw, another small town of but little importance.

26 July 1846. Passed Tully City, Missouri, early this morning and also passed La Grange, Missouri. Arrived at Quincy, Illinois, one of the prettiest towns on the Mississippi River, at about 20 m. past 8 a.m. The situation of it is beautiful. The town lies back from the river, on the top of a hill the level of which extends back for some distance. The streets are wide and cross each other at right angles, and the buildings and store houses are generally fine. There is a public square and many beautiful private residences. Noticed several neat churches with spires. The principal trade of this town is produce with the country back of it. It has a beautiful levee and several fine streets, beautifully graded, running up to the town, all of which had to be cut through the hill. The distance from the landing to the top of the hill, where the town lies, is over a quarter of a mile.

My friends Dr. Osgood and Mr. Reynolds came on board again at Quincy having come the whole distance from Keokuk to Quincy, 40 miles, in a skiff. About 11 a.m. ran aground and laid for about an hour and a half. When the lead from the boat was removed into one of the keels, we succeeded in getting off. Passed Marion City,(19) Illinois, a small town consisting of but few houses and of but little importance. This is the celebrated town of Dr. Ely(20) of Philadelphia.

At 1/2 past 1 p.m. passed a very pretty little town called Hannibal. It is in Missouri. The Buildings seen from the River are fine looking and generally of brick. Did not stop. At 6 p.m. passed the town of Louisiana, Missouri. Stopped to wood several times today, and are now wooding at 7 3/4 p.m. from an island on the Illinois shore. I have just been ashore and took a stroll through the mighty forest at this place. Nothing is to be seen in the way of a house except the wood choppers' huts built of logs. I forgot to mention that we passed a very pretty town called La Grange, Missouri. Arrived at Clarksville.

27 July 1846. So warm last night I laid on the cabin floor. Passed the mouth of the Illinois River at 6 1/2 a.m., it is 40 miles from St. Louis and its mouth is marked on the South side by two immense bluffs. Commencing at the mouth of the Illinois River are a range of high rocky bluffs ranging from 50 to 150 feet high presenting a grand & picturesque sight. Many of these bluffs are so arranged by nature that they look as though they had a part cut out so as to form immense pillars to support the towering rocks above.

Alton Illinois. Did not go on shore it being so excessively warm. The town lies principally on the river with many fine store houses. The levee is quite steep and covered with stone. Noticed the penitentiary, a six story building built of stone with a high wall on the north side of an immense bluff.

After reaching the mouth of the Missouri River, which we passed at 1/4 of 10 a.m., both the country and the river change their appearance altogether. On either side the shore presents a dead level, and the water of the river changes from a pure clear stream to a thick muddy one. On taking up the water in a glass it looks more like clay and water mixed together, but the inhabitants seem to relish it. When both streams are of equal height, the water of the Mississippi on the Illinois side preserves its natural color, while that of the Missouri side is of the nasty mud color, and continues all the year round.

Arrived at St. Louis, Missouri at about 1/4 of 12 a.m. This is a place of considerable importance and of great business. Its situation is quite high, and has a fine levee. The streets in the lower part of town are narrow, the part laid out by the French, but as you go back the streets are wide and beautiful with fine private residences, many equal to those in Philadelphia. The store houses, generally speaking, are fine brick Buildings. Upon my arrival went up to the "Planters House," the finest (it is said) Hotel in the place. It certainly is very large, being four squares around it, but as for the table, I will not say much.

After dressing, went down to dinner, after which went down to the River and engaged my passage on board the Steamer Saluda to start for Cincinnati tomorrow. Spent the rest of the afternoon in trying to make sale of some of the teeth but with little success. In the evening called down to see Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Mitchell at the "City Hotel" found them in and well, remained about an hour. At 6 1/12 p.m., in an unexposed spot, the thermometer stood at 97¡.

28 July 1846. Clear and excessively hot all day. It was beyond all endurance until after I left St. Louis. The thermometer must have stood 100¡ in the shade. It seemed as if I would melt, and it was out of the question to walk about. If this is the kind of weather they have at St. Louis I should not want to live there. From all I could learn they have been favored with it for the last 6 weeks.

I got up early this morning before it became so excessively warm and took a walk up along the levee to see some of the large steamers. Went on board of the steamers J.M. White and Maria, two of the largest boats on the Mississippi River.

After breakfast attended to some little business when I returned to the Hotel and met Theodore Mitchell. He and I went over to the Court House which is now in course of erection and new modeling. The rotunda of the building is very beautiful and the largest in the United States with the exception of that of the Capitol at Washington. The court rooms are fine, large and airy, far superior to those in Philadelphia both in regard to size and accommodations. After going through the building ascended to the top of the dome from which you have a beautiful view of the City of St. Louis and surrounding country, together with the Mississippi River as it wends through the Country.

Went down to the Steamer Saluda, it being near 10 o'clock, the time she was advertised to start. She however did not get off at the time. Mitchell afterward came down to the boat when he, Mr. Wilkinson of Philadelphia, and myself went up to the "Empire" and took a "Cherry cobbler." From there went up to the post office where I received a letter from Ma, and then returned to the boat where we remained until the time of starting.

The scenery on the River after leaving St. Louis on the Missouri side is very fine for some 30 or 40 miles, being composed of high, rocky and picturesque bluffs, after which the country becomes low on either side of the river and uninteresting. At 10 m. of 2 p.m. passed Jefferson Barracks 12 miles below St. Louis. Forty miles below St. Louis passed the wreck of the West Wind, and in a few minutes afterward passed the Steamer George Washington going up. Passed St. Genavee, a town of little importance.

Arrived & stopped at Chester, 80 miles below St. Louis on the Illinois side. It is a poor looking place.

The boat I am on, the Saluda, is rather a fine and roomy one, her table is not very good though passable. There are over 100 passengers, many have to lie on the floor. I was fortunate enough to get a state room. Am in hopes the table will improve. The supper was much better than the dinner. There are two Philadelphians on board besides myself, with whom I have become acquainted and am not at a loss for company; names: Messrs. Wilkinson & Rawne.

29 July 1846. Got up this morning at 4 a.m., and after partly dressing, went out to take the luxury of a morning wash, but quickly, in the Mississippi River. I would as leave wash in a mud puddle. It would certainly be as refreshing and clean. The water seems so thick that you can almost stir it with a stick and this is what we have to drink and wash in. The inhabitants say it is fine and prefer it to any other. Every man to his taste, but thanks to the Steamer she will soon convey us into the Ohio River and we will once more have passable water.

Entered the mouth of the Ohio River at 6 a.m. The change in the appearance of the water attracts the eye of the stranger. From a mud hole, as it were, you get into a clear and placid spring. At the mouth of the river on the Missouri side, I noticed the new town called Ohio. It is as yet not much of a place, but have no doubt it will some day become something, if it does not follow in the footsteps of the noted City opposite, namely the town of Cairo. This place was laid out to be a large City, but, as it is, there are nothing but a few houses scattered along the shore. There are two large buildings among them, a large Hotel, built I believe of wood, and a large foundry built of brick. Just after entering the mouth of the River passed the Steamer Star Spangled Banner bound down.

Arrived at Paducah, Kentucky. It is situated quite high and has a number of fine brick store houses along the river. The Steamer Meteor passed us going up, being rather faster than we are. Arrived at Smithland at the mouth of the Cumberland River, Kentucky. After leaving this town had to pass over a very bad sand bar, one of the worst on the river. We succeeded in getting over safely, though at times making a very close shave, the water being at times only 4 1/2 feet, and our boat drawing nearly 4 feet. Passed a small town called Elizabeth.

The scenery along the Ohio River is flat and uninteresting until you arrive at Paducah, when the shore on the Illinois side rises into high rocky and picturesque bluffs. Before reaching this point the shore on either side is covered with heavy timber. About 1/2 past 7 p.m. stopped at what is called the "Robbers Cave." It is a cave of considerable size and was occupied some years ago by a band of robbers. About 8 p.m. had a big heavy blow and rain, accompanied with thunder and lightning. Am still very much dissatisfied with the fare on board of this boat. It is actually miserable and shall be glad when I get off.

30 July 1846. Passed Anderson, Kentucky. Stopped at Evansville, Indiana, 200 miles from the mouth of the Ohio River or half way to Louisville at 1/4 of 8 a.m. This is a very pretty place with a high situation. Little after 9 a.m. passed the Steamer Lehigh bound for Cincinnati from St. Louis. She started some 20 hours before us. At 1/2 past 9 a.m. stopped at the mouth of the Green River, Kentucky. The beautiful green water pouring into the muddy water of the Ohio soon attracts the eye of the passer. Passed the town of Owensboro and Hansville.

Went up on the hurricane deck after supper, where I remained until about 1/2 past 8. Found the scenery beautiful and the air delightful. To make it more pleasant we were favored with the gentle light of the moon. Many of the ladies were also up there. The scenery along the Ohio today has been at times beautiful. High hills covered with heavy timber would glide by while ever an anon, a richly cultivated piece of ground would show itself in the valley.

Met considerable rise in the river this morning, they say about 8 feet, which I am very glad to see as it will make our passage more certain. The table and board still continue to be miserable, and the most of the passengers are complaining. There has been no milk or cream since the first night of starting, and butter strong enough to draw a wagon. Dirt abounds, really I should like to keel haul the Stewart. We have some of the most profane characters on board of this boat I have met for a long while, one of them is playing cards now behind me, cursing, swearing and using the most indecent language possible. Cannot say much for the beauty of the ladies on board, there are but three even passable and those three I believe are from Kentucky. Shall be very glad to get off this boat, both on account of the company and table. I have some idea of leaving at Louisville.

31 July 1846. When I got up found the boat lying fast to the shore at the foot of an immense hill, where we had been lying since 1 o'clock this morning on account of a dense fog. About 1 p.m. had a tremendous blow and shower of rain which continued for more than an hour. For a while I feared it would overturn the boat, as we had but very little freight, and considerable upper work, but by keeping the head of the boat well on, succeeded in weathering it out. Stopped at Brandensburg. The situation of this town is very high, being on top of a very high hill. It is, however, beautiful. Wooded at the mouth of Salt River, Kentucky at 11 a.m. This is the great river where all politicians are rowed up; it is 20 miles below Louisville. Became acquainted with a Mr. Levitt of Quincy, Illinois. He introduced me to his wife. Found them both to be remarkably pleasant and agreeable. They introduced me to a Miss Carlisle who has been residing at St. Louis for the last 7 years and on her way to Louisville. She informed me she was formerly a native of Philadelphia. She is not pretty nor agreeable to me, and I was not at all pleased with her.

Passed the town of New Albany, Indiana. A great many steamboats are built at this place. Entered the mouth of the canal to go around the falls at 1/4 of 3 p.m. It extends for about 3 miles, and the principal part is cut through solid rock which must have cost an immense amount. The toll on steamers going through it is very heavy. To avoid the delay in going through the canal, which is generally three hours, Mr. Levitt, a Mr. Catherwood, also of Quincy, Illinois, and myself hired a carriage and rode up to Louisville where we arrived in about half an hour. Called upon Mr. and Mrs. Cassidy, neither of them were at home, but found Mrs. McNutt. While sitting talking with her, Mr. & Mrs. Cassedy came. Sat for an hour.

When fearing that the boat would leave me, went down to the river but found she had not arrived from through the canal. Went up and took a walk through the City, noticed many handsome buildings among which was the new Court House, a magnificent building. Went down to the river again, found the boat just coming in, it being nearly 3 hours from the time she had entered the canal. Had to land some 200 bales of hemp which detained us until about 9 o'clock when a dense fog sprang up, which lasted until about 11, when much to our surprise and delight it cleared off and we started for Cincinnati.

A white man in company with three Negroes (singular amalgamation for the South) came on board at Louisville and gave us some very good music during the evening which made the hours pass rather more pleasantly than they would otherwise of done.

AUGUST

1 August 1846. Passed Madison, Indiana; Carrelton, Kentucky; Warsaw, Indiana; Rising Sun, a fine town; Laurenburg, Indiana. At 3 p.m. 22 miles from Cincinnati. At 4 p.m. passed the late lamented Harrison's House. Noticed his tomb(21) on the top of a beautiful knoll from the river. The situation of his house is beautiful indeed, being in the midst of a beautiful grove. Arrived at Cincinnati at 1/2 past 6 p.m. and immediately took a carriage and went up to my Uncle's where I found my mother and sister in good health as well as my Uncle, Aunt(22) and Cousins. They all appeared glad to see me as was I to see them. My Cousins have all grown out of my recollection with the exception of Sarah, Lydia, Rebecca and John more particularly. Sarah and Mary I think quite pretty and fine looking. Remained during the evening talking over matters and things.

2 August 1846. After breakfast took a walk around and down to the post office. The City has improved vastly since I was last here. Noticed many beautiful buildings in my walk but hope to see more of the town tomorrow. In the morning attended "Presbyterian Church" with Cousin Sarah, Harrison, Ma, Lydia and some of the rest of the family. Heard a very excellent sermon.

In the afternoon cousins Sarah & Rebecca, sister Lydia and myself went up to the new Catholic Cathedral, a very large building recently erected and not yet finished. The interior is large and beautiful indeed. On either side of the church are 9 large Corinthian pillars, beautifully capped, which gives the whole a grand appearance. The altar is of white marble. There is a beautiful ceiling extending the whole distance across the church which is beautifully carved and gilded. This church has no galleries, with the exception of that occupied by the choir in which they have a large and magnificent organ. The building is of a dark stone and is to be surmounted with a steeple which is to have a chime of bells.

When the services of the Cathedral were over went to a small Episcopal Church where we met Ma and heard an excellent sermon. After tea sat talking on the steps with my Cousins Sarah and Mary, Ma and Lydia and a Mr. Thomas Browne, until Church time when Cousin Mary, Ma and I went down to an Episcopal Church on Fourth Street below Walnut, called St. Paul's Church. The interior arrangements of this church are very neat. The sermon was pretty good. I noticed today, with the exception of the Catholic Church, very small Congregations. Was introduced this morning to Miss Louisa Kirby, who I think quite pretty and agreeable in her manners, and in the short time I was in her company took a great fancy. Her manners are very agreeable and pleasing and withal full of life.

After our return from Church in the evening sat on the steps until about 1/2 past 10 talking as the evening was so clear, beautiful and moonlit.

3 August 1846. After breakfast went out to attend to some business, returned to Uncle's about 1/2 past 10, where I met Miss Louisa Kirby. A walk was proposed to visit the Bishop's House and Cathedral. Accordingly Cousins Sarah and Mary, Miss Kirby, Lydia and myself went. Did not find the occupant at home, but did find a priest who fills his place when he is gone, whom they call Father Collins, a very agreeable, and as far as I could judge, an intelligent man. He was very communicative and gave me a full account of matters concerning the building of the Church. After passing through several of the rooms in the house, in one of which I noticed some very fine paintings, went into the Church. This is a magnificent Building. It is 155 feet long by 80 feet wide and will seat a large number of persons. On either side are 9 stone pillars, which add materially to beauty and grandeur of the church. The altar is of white Italian marble beautifully carved, and on either side, elevated from the body of the Church, are two galleries looking more like stage boxes for a theater than anything else. These are for the Sunday School children. In front of the altar is a beautiful railing of cast iron beautifully gilded. The organ is a very fine and large one.

After leaving the Cathedral went down to the Catholic Orphans' Asylum, where we were shown through a number of the rooms by one of the sisters. Among them are the dormitories which are furnished in a neat and clean manner. Also visited the school rooms.

After leaving the Orphans' Asylum, it being most too warm to walk, we returned as far as Mr. Fox's, who lives next door to Uncle's, and called on his daughter Miss Frances. She is quite pretty and agreeable. I found Miss L. Kirby very agreeable, and I do really think her one of the most pleasant, affable and agreeable young ladies I have met for a long while, and withal she is quite pretty.

Got an early tea so as to make a visit across the river in Covington, Kentucky with Cousin Mary and Miss Kirby. In crossing met a very pretty young lady, a Miss Jane Leathers, found her quite agreeable. Directed our foot steps over some rough hills and ravines and finally arrived at Mr. Robins' house which is a very beautiful one. Mrs. Robins was formerly a Miss Lynd, sister of Miss Kate Lynd, now Mrs. Snow. Had the pleasure of seeing Mrs. Snow and her sister Mrs. Robins. We also had a delightful song from Mrs. Snow. Remained about a half hour during which time we had what might be termed a "rich time." Many queer things were said, and many hearty laughs were had.

After leaving called upon Miss Leathers, where we found several very pretty young ladies. Remained about 15 minutes then went down to the ferry and crossed to Cincinnati again. In crossing, we were amused with two couples of ladies and gentlemen, who seemed to be very affectionate in encircling each other in their arms.

On our way home stopped at "Louderbachs" and took some ice cream. Really this was one of the most delightful, though curious, evenings I ever spent. Miss Kirby is a charming young lady, and makes everything pass agreeably. She makes many queer remarks calculated to enliven the most sedate company, and make herself agreeable in any company. After arriving home she played several very pretty airs and sang some fine songs, and then left for home with her cousin. She lives about five miles from town.

4 August 1846. Out during all the morning running about to attend to some business, and in walks visited the new College(23) Building at the corner of 4th and Walnut streets in which the "Mercantile Library Association"(24) has their rooms. These are fitted up neatly but not so large as those in Philadelphia.

At about 4 p.m. Cousin Sarah and I rode up the river for about a mile and a half and then turned up an immense hill called "Mount Harrison," on the top of which lives Mr. Morgan and family. Found Mr. Morgan and his daughter Elizabeth at home. She is quite pretty and very agreeable, has very beautiful black eyes, and has such manners as to win the attention of a gentleman. Remained about 3/4 of an hour and then started for town again, but had not gone far before we met Mrs. Morgan and her daughter Cornelia Pendleton, who has been married since I saw her last.

About 1/2 past 9 four couples, that is Mr. & Mrs. Beggs, Cousin Mary and Mr. Champion, Mr. Browne and sister Lydia, Cousin Sarah and myself, all went down to a very handsome ice cream saloon at 4th St. to get some ice cream.

5 August 1846. Out during the morning and during my rambles visited the new College in which the "Mercantile Library Company" has rooms. Went up on top of the College from which you have a fine view of Cincinnati and surrounding country. About 3 p.m. Aunt, Cousin Lydia, Ma, sister Lydia, Cousin May and myself started out to take a ride over Mount Auburn and pay a visit to Mr. & Mrs. Kirby and daughter.

Had a very pleasant ride out, and from the top of the mount had a beautiful view of Cincinnati with the beautiful hills which surround it on all sides. Spent a very pleasant time.

Just before leaving Miss Kirby proposed a little foot race with me which I readily acceded to knowing her intention. Did not run but out of sight of the house, when she took my arm and we had a delightful moonlight stroll, which I regretted exceedingly could not have been longer than it was, as her company was so agreeable to me. I felt quite melancholy when I came to bid her good bye as her charming ways and pretty looks have made quite an impression upon me.

After proceeding about a mile and a half on our way home the carriage that Ma was riding in drove up when she told us she had forgotten her cap. I, being glad of the chance of seeing Miss Kirby again, hurried back and in short time found ourselves at the door of her father's beautiful mansion, much to her surprise. We kept her in suspense for a while then told her our errand. Remained about 15 minutes, and had her sing one of her beautiful songs. Left for town, first having tried to prevail on her to go in with us, but could not get her to go farther than the gate, at the same time stating she would like to go but her parents would not let her.

6 August 1846. Got up this morning at 5 o'clock, packed up my trunks, and after breakfast attended to some little business. Shortly after 8 o'clock the omnibus called for us to convey us to the Rail Road depot, in which, after bidding our relatives good bye, were conveyed to the cars.

At 9 a.m. left Cincinnati for Xenia, passed Milford, a place near Mainville, and several others. Arrived at Xenia at l/2 past 1 p.m. This place is 65 miles by Rail Road from Cincinnati, and is a town of considerable importance. It is quite a pretty place and contains some fine buildings, though most of the buildings of the town are frame. Dined here at "Merrick's Hotel." The dinner was a miserable affair, and I think we must have got into the wrong house. They had rather a novel affair for keeping the flies off of the table, a kind of a swinging machine worked by hand with towels attached.

Left Xenia at 1/2 past 2 p.m. in a stage well filled for Columbus, South London, Charleston, Jefferson.

Arrived at Columbus, the Capital of Ohio, at 1/2 past 11 p.m. after a very dusty and tiresome ride. But we were in some measure repaid by being landed at one of the finest Hotels west of the Mountains, called the "Neil House." It occupies a whole block and has fine airy rooms. The building is 5 stories high and is built of brick. They gave us a very good supper.

The country through which we passed by the route of the Rail Road was very beautiful being nearly all the way along the banks of the Little Miami. The country was also very beautiful after leaving Xenia, and until our arrival at Columbus, but not very rich.

7 August 1846. Took a little walk round to see the town which is beautifully laid out with wide streets, fine buildings, &c. Left Columbus for the stage to Cleveland at 1/4 of 9 a.m. and after a dusty ride arrived at a small town called Galena, 22 miles from Columbus, vastly different from Galena, Illinois.

Arrived at Sunbury at 2 p.m. This is a place of considerable size, and quite a pretty town. There are many very pretty Buildings. Took dinner at this town, but a miserable affair. They, however, did not neglect to charge enough for it.

Left at 1/4 of 3 p.m. for Mount Vernon. On our road at a place we stopped to water was much amused with a company of "Buckeyes" mustered for militia training. Their dress was of a very singular style, indeed many of them had not any uniform at all. Just as we drove up they marched off in single file, presenting a ludicrous appearance. There were not more than 4 or 5 muskets in the whole party, the remainder carried sticks.

Arrived at Mount Vernon. This is a town of considerable importance and of much business. The streets are wide and beautifully laid out. The population is about 3000. Stopped at the "Kenyan House" which appears to be well kept. They gave us a pretty good supper. Found it very acceptable after a long, warm and dusty day's ride.

The country passed through today was very hilly, and the land, according to my notice, poor, though I noticed some fine crops of corn and wheat. At 10 p.m. started on our journey again.

8 August 1846. About 1/2 past 12 a.m. changed horses 10 miles from Mount Vernon, at the "National Hotel." At 1/4 of 4 a.m. arrived at Loudenville, quite a pretty little village. This place is 22 miles from Mount Vernon, and 20 from Wooster. Arrived at Wooster at 1/4 past 7 a.m. rather fatigued from last night's ride, though we all slept pretty well as we were not much crowded. This is a place of considerable importance and contains about 3000 inhabitants. The streets are wide and well laid out, and they have a number of fine houses.

Changed stages and horses and took breakfast at the "American House" in this place. The breakfast pretty good. Wooster is 52 miles from Cleveland. From Wooster I rode on the box of the stage, and accidentally dropped my umbrella off, and in getting down to pick it up caught my finger in a piece of iron and cut a gash into the bone across the knuckle. At first thought it was broken and suffered considerably, but by application of laudanum(25) the pain ceased.

Passed through Jackson. Arrived at Medina 28 miles from Cleveland at 1/2 past 12 a.m. This is a town of considerable size and is quite a pretty place. It is the regular town to dine, but the passengers being more anxious to get into Cleveland than to lose an hour and a half in preparing a dinner, concluded to go on. Drove through small towns called Brooklin, Albion, and Brunswick, then Ohio City, on the opposite side of the river from Cleveland at 6 p.m. Arrived at the hotel in Cleveland at 1/2 past 6, completely worn out and dirty from the effects of the stage ride. Stopped at the "Franklin House," apparently a very good Hotel, certainly fine chambers and beds and a polite and accommodating land lord.

After taking a wash took supper. About 1/2 past 8 were informed that the boat had arrived, and accordingly got ready to start down. Got our baggage on the cart, but found it was a false alarm. About 1/2 past 9 p.m. went to bed with an assurance from the land lord that if the boat arrived we should be roused in time to get on board.

9 August 1846. Was aroused this morning at about 1/2 past 4, with the notice that the Steamer Niagara had arrived. Immediately got up after a good night's sleep much refreshed, though having slept with my clothes on.

Left Cleveland for Buffalo on the splendid steamer Niagara. This boat is considered the finest on the Lakes, and as far as I can judge, I think so too. Her cabins are fitted up in beautiful style, with all state rooms. The furniture is of the latest and most costly style. Her table is also excellent. The ladies' drawing room and saloon is covered with Brussels carpet, has conversation chairs, lounges & sofas of the latest style covered with the most expensive material. Just after leaving Cleveland had a very heavy shower of rain, with sharp lightning and heavy thunder but not much of a blow. Mr. & Mrs. William H. Smith of Philadelphia, a very pleasant and polite couple, also came on board the boat with us. They have traveled with us from Columbus.

The dinner on board this boat was superior to anything I have met with since I left Philadelphia. It had four courses and very attentive servants.

The Niagara is 245 feet long, 33 1/2 feet breadth of beam, 14 feet deep of hold, cylinder 65 inches, 10 foot stroke, & 30 foot diameter wheel.

Our party, as well as the rest of the passengers on board the boat, were much amused by the ludicrous actions of a party on board who tried to assume, or act as, the aristocracy from New Orleans. They were the laughing stock of the whole boat, and had all their meals separate from the other passengers though they certainly did not fare as well as they took the leavings. I must say they showed a very small degree of sense, and should think they had not traveled much if any. I found out some of their names, they are as follows: Colonel Walton and daughter, Mr. Judson & lady, Mr. G. A. Botts, Mr. Smith, Mr. Waterman.

Arrived at Buffalo at 1/2 past 7 and went up immediately and engaged rooms at the "American House" as there was a great crowd.

10 August 1846. Clear, cool and pleasant all day and during the evening. It was just such a day as would be suitable for taking a stroll about the Falls. Got up this morning about 1/2 past 6 o'clock. After breakfast attended to some little matters and at 9 a.m. we started for Niagara Falls, by rail road. The ride was delightful and cool, the greater part of the way along the bank of the river Niagara.

Arrived at Niagara at about 1/2 past 10 a.m. I went immediately up to the Hotel and engaged rooms for our party at the "Cataract House" and then returned to attend to the baggage while Mr. Smith waited upon the ladies to the Hotel. After some little delay, all started out to have a view of the falls. Proceeded down through a small woods, and took the first view of the mighty cataract from a bridge run over the precipice about 15 feet on the American side. After satisfying ourselves with the view of the great wonder of nature, went up to the pagoda garden and ferry house and then returned to the hotel to dress for dinner.

The dinner at the "Cataract" was a sumptuous affair, and the servants very attentive. Was much amused with the movements of the waiters. When bringing in the dessert they all came in, in couples like a company of soldiers, filed off, took their respective positions, and, at a sign from the head waiter, the plates were all put on at once with a sound resembling the muskets of well drilled soldiers. The same order was observed in placing the knives, forks, spoons, &c.

After dinner, Ma, Lydia and myself went down to the ferry to visit the Canada side. After some little persuasion prevailed upon Ma and sister to ride down the inclined plane(26) to the edge of the water. The distance is 360 feet and the perpendicular descent is 175 feet. The rail road is on an angle of about 40¡ and we are let down in cars and by water power. After arriving at the water's edge had some difficulty again in getting them to cross the river but finally succeeded and got over safely.

Hired a carriage and rode out to Lundy's Lane Battle Ground. This Battle was fought between the Americans and the British on the 28th of July 1814, but neither party gained the victory, both retired from the contested point. Ascended to the top of the Observatory which is 80 feet high, and is erected on the Battle Ground, and near where the dead were buried the day after the action. From the top of this Observatory you have a fine view of the Rapids, Grand and Navy Islands, Lake Erie, Lake Ontario, Brock's Monument, and many other delightful views and woodland scenery. Mr. James Secord, who fought in the action, acted as guide, and showed us the different positions the armies occupied, together with their maneuvers.

Just before arriving at the battle grounds passed through a very pretty little town called Drummondville. After leaving this place drove out to the Burning Spring. This is a very singular affair. They have the place where the spring bubbles up boarded around. Immediately upon touching a light to it the water or, more properly speaking, the gas escaping from it takes fire, and burns fiercely, throwing out great heat. The attendant has a kind of covering with a tube in the top, some 3/4 of an inch in diameter which he places over the spring, and by applying a match to the top, it immediately takes fire and burns to the height of several feet, like the common gas. The water from the spring has no peculiar taste, but the smell of the gas is very offensive.

From this point we had a fine view of the upper rapids which is a grand sight. After leaving the spring rode down to table rock from which we also have a grand view of all the falls. Also descended to the foot of the precipice. On my way stopped at the "Clifton House" to see my friend Mr. John Dixon but did not find him, however met him at table rock.

After leaving table rock we returned to the ferry, crossed, ascended the inclined plain in the cars, and returned to the Hotel. After supper went up into the parlor, where I found a great number of ladies. About 8 o'clock Mr. & Mrs. Smith, Ma, Lydia and I went over to the "Old Curiosity Shop" to examine some of the curiosities there, after which returned to the Hotel and went up to the Ball room, danced a while. When feeling fatigued went to bed, which was about 1/2 past 10.

11 August 1846. Directly after breakfast Mr. Smith and his Lady, Ma, Lydia and myself took a carriage and started out to visit the wonders of Niagara. The first place visited was the Bellvue Springs. They are situated near the banks of the Niagara River about 2 miles below the falls. After partaking of some of the water which was very unpleasant, tasting very much like rotten eggs smell, went down to the brink of the river, where there is a precipice of 250 feet. We stood on the bank of this and watched the wild roaring waters of the Niagara as they dashed through the narrow chasm beneath. The waves are from 15 feet to 20 feet in height as they dash wildly over the rocks below us.

We visited the far famed Whirlpool. After registering our names, drove down to the brink of the precipice, from which we had a magnificent view of the whirlpool and the raging rapids as they came dashing down the river. Noticed large logs, whirled in this whirlpool like chips, each dancing and performing its own part in the great churn of waters. At the Whirlpool the water of the Niagara turns at right angles, and rushes down through a narrow chasm, between precipices 250 feet high.

After satisfying ourselves with a view of the river from the banks, descended by a circuitous route to the brink of the river where we had a much closer view of the whirlpool dashing about in all its fury. The brink of the river is 250 feet below the top of the precipice. The descent is very fatiguing but the ascent is considerably more so.

After leaving the whirlpool we continued our ride about a mile further to what is called the "Devil's Hole." This is an immense chasm some 250 feet deep, and marks the place where, in 1759, a number of English were driven off by the French and Indians, and all but two, I believe, perished in the descent. There is a brook running into this hole, now called Bloody Run, on account of its having run with blood during the massacre of the English by the Indians in the year 1759. Did not descend into the hole being so much fatigued by our descent at the whirlpool.

After leaving the "Devil's Hole" returned to the Falls, and rode over the bridge on to Bath Island, where we registered our names and rode over onto Iris Island. In the Curiosity Shop at Bath Island we very unexpectedly met with Mr. C. A. Robinson, Lady & child, and Mr. D. Robinson, Lady and child of Philadelphia. On the Island visited "Hog Back," "Biddle's Stair Case," "Prospect Tower," Terrapin Rocks," &c. all of which I have given a description of in a previous part of my journal.

After our ride over the Island returned to the Hotel and soon afterwards took dinner. At half past 2 p.m. left Niagara for Lewiston by the cars which is 9 miles. Had a great many passengers, rode the greater part of the distance by steam, the balance of distance by horse power.

Shortly after leaving Niagara had a fine view of the falls in the back ground, and the rapids of the Niagara dashing and foaming some 200 feet beneath. The scenery is also very fine. Before arriving at Lewiston, as you gradually descend a hill, the scene in the valley is beautiful indeed, being a continuance of rich cultivated fields, all beautifully fenced, and dotted with numerous cottages, while in the background are beautiful woods adding materially to the beauty of the scene. Lewiston was a town of some note in the last war. It was named in 1805 after Governor Lewis of the State of New York. It was burned in 1813 and in 1815 the inhabitants returned & it is now a thriving place.

At about 1/4 past 4 p.m. left Lewiston and proceeded down the Niagara River, at 10 m. of 5 p.m. passed on to Lake Ontario, on the Canada side. Just at the entrance is the village of Niagara, with Fort George directly in its front. On the opposite side is the American Fort, called Fort Niagara. The distance from Lewiston to the Lake is 7 miles. Found it very cool and pleasant on the Lake & the Lake quite calm. Had considerable difficulty in procuring state rooms, but succeeded in getting one for Mr. & Mrs. Smith, Ma and Lydia. Had pretty good supper, and a very attentive and polite captain. This boat the Niagara is not quite so large as I expected, but still a very comfortable and fast boat. Had a very beautiful view of a sunset on the Lakes this evening.

12 August 1846. Much more motion on the lake than yesterday, and many of the Ladies complaining of sickness. Went up the Genesee River last evening to the Rochester Landing; did not get off. Arrived at Oswego, New York this morning at about 1/2 past 5, and laid at the wharf until 8 o'clock, affording us ample time to take a walk through the Town. Ma and I took a walk up into the town and walked through a number of the Streets. Noticed many fine residences beautifully situated, and also a very fine enclosed market house. This town is beautifully situated on the Lake on both sides of the Oswego River with wide streets crossing each other at right angles. The population is about 7000.

Mr. & Mrs. Smith left us at Oswego this morning to proceed to Syracuse. Arrived at Sacket's Harbor, 45 miles from Oswego, at 1/4 of 12 a.m. This town is beautifully situated directly on the Lake, and from appearances from the Lake is a place of considerable importance. Did not land.

It shortly became quite rough and many of the ladies got quite sick. The passengers, generally speaking, went down to dinner but the table was soon deserted, and well filled plates were left untouched, and the ladies generally speaking made a "hasty" disappearance. I met Mr. S. V. Reed of Philadelphia who was in company with Messrs. Price, Hart & Phillips, also of Philadelphia. Today at dinner, among those who were obliged to leave the table were Mr. Price and Mr. Phillips. After dinner found them in their berths. Was much amused at Mr. Reed getting them a piece of very fat meat & some onions. They were so much provoked that they threw it out of the window and we enjoyed a hearty laugh.

Arrived at the beautiful town of Kingston, Canada at about 3 p.m. As you approach the town it presents a very beautiful appearance with its numerous spires and domes glittering in the sun. The situation of the town is high and commanding. It is well fortified having a large Fort directly opposite called Fort Henry. Directly in front of the town they are erecting a large stone tower as a fortification. I noticed there are two others in course of erection, one near Fort Henry and the other on an Island close by.

The market at this place fronts directly on the river and is the most splendid building of the kind I ever saw. It is built of stone with pillars in front and is surmounted both on the front and back parts with lofty domes. It is so constructed that it can be turned into a fortification, as can the wharf directly in front. Noticed a large Catholic cathedral in course of erection on a high and commanding situation as we were coming up to the city. The scenery along the St. Lawrence after leaving Kingston was beautiful indeed. From about 1/2 past 3 until after dark we passed that part of the River called "The Thousand Islands." For miles and miles these beautiful Islands dot the surface of the beautiful St. Lawrence, each one clothed throughout the year in beautiful verdure. They vary in size considerably, some are very small and others a mile long. I should think they were not susceptible of cultivation as they are generally of rock with but a small portion of soil, covered with pines and cedars.

Arrived at a small town built in the midst of large rocks called French Creek at about 5 o'clock, cannot say much for the beauty of the place, it is on the American side. Stopped to wood at a small place called Alexander Bay. Arrived at Brockville. It appears to be a place of considerable size, but could not see much as it was nearly dark, it is on the Canada side. Two miles from Brockville passed a small place in Canada called Morristown. At about 9 p.m. arrived at Ogdensburg, N.Y., shall lay here until morning when we shall take a boat for Montreal.

13 August 1846. Ma, Lydia and I got up early this morning, and took a walk through the town of Ogdensburg. It is 308 miles from Niagara, 66 from Kingston, and 139 miles from Montreal, and it is quite a pretty place, but not so handsome as Oswego. The streets are wide, and noticed a number of pretty residences, also a large hotel. It does not appear to be a place of much business. Remained at Ogdensburg until 9 o'clock a.m., took breakfast on board of the Niagara, at which time left on board of the British Steam British Queen for Montreal.

Upon leaving Ogdensburg passed directly across the river to a very pretty little place called Prescot, on the Canada side, remained there long enough to wood and then started down the river. About a mile and a half below Prescot noticed the large "wind mill" in which the "rebels" took refuge during the insubordination and troubles in 1838. The mill appears to be in a dilapidated condition as well as a number of stone houses in the vicinity which were burned at the same time.

Some 7 miles below this passed over the first rapids called "Galop Rapids." The water runs very swiftly, and is quite rough presenting a very beautiful appearance as you approach, with the beautiful white capped waves dashing over the rocks causing the rapids.

The company on board of the boat is very pleasant and there are quite a large number of ladies, many of them young, and with some of whom I have become acquainted. There are several quite pretty. About 11 a.m. passed over what is known as "Long Sault Rapids" that extend for several miles. Next comes the Coteau du Lac Rapids, which extend 2 miles. Seven miles below these commences the Cedar Rapids which extend about 3 miles, then commence the Cascades Rapids which terminate at the head of Lake St. Louis.

The grandeur of the scenery of these rapids cannot be conceived without witnessing. The water of the St. Lawrence falls between Kingston and Quebec the distance of 300 feet, and on the two last named rapids, 80 feet. It really seems very perilous to cross the rapids as the waves lash each other with fury, and many of them run from 5 to 10 feet high. To gaze upon them in the distance is indeed a beautiful sight to see the white capped waves dancing in wild confusion as if in celebration of some gala day.

Arrived at Canwall and Coteau du Lac. At about 20 m. of 7 p.m. arrived at Ladine, quite a town on Montreal Island. It is 9 miles from Montreal. Here we took stages, after having our baggage inspected by the Customhouse officer. Started for Montreal and arrived at about 1/4 past 8, after a very pleasant ride over a fine turnpike road. The road from Ladine to Montreal is lined with houses built in a singular manner: but one story with high peaked roofs, and many with verandas in front. These houses are generally occupied by the lower class. What little I saw of the country in coming up to the City appeared to be quite poor and unproductive. It seemed to me while riding up that I was in another world. The houses, people and everything else seemed to be strange and on the English order.

Upon our arrival at Montreal put up at "Donagana's Hotel," a magnificent building, furnished in the most costly and magnificent style. The parlor of this hotel is by far the handsomest I have visited since leaving home. It is furnished in magnificent style, and the decorations of the rooms are very beautiful. The bed rooms given us are large, clean and airy. The Hotel is situated on Notre Dame Street.

14 August 1846. The streets of Montreal are generally very narrow and paved of wood. The buildings are all built of granite or a stone closely resembling it, and have a dark, dingy and gloomy appearance. There are many very magnificent buildings in the town among which are the New Market, now in course of erection, the Court House, the Cathedral, the two Nunneries, many of the Churches, &c. Took a walk down Notre Dame Street as far as the great French Cathedral, went in and found them engaged at Mass. After which returned and got breakfast.

About 1/2 past 8 a.m. started out in a cab in company with Ma, Lydia, and a Mr. Whiteman of Charleston, South Carolina, to see the beauties and wonders of Montreal. First took a ride around Montreal Mount in cab. The distance is 6 miles over a most beautiful macadamized road. The scenery on many portions of it is beautiful indeed. The country appears to be very fertile, and easily susceptible of cultivation. Upon approaching Montreal from Mount you have a most beautiful view of the town with its many spires and domes glistening like burnished silver in the light of the sun. Many of the houses are covered with tin or some bright substance which give a most magnificent appearance when exposed to rays of the sun. You also have, in approaching from the Mount, a beautiful view of the river and harbor of Montreal.

The first place visited on our return to the City was the Gray Nunnery. This is a large stone building surmounted by a steeple, in which the poor and orphaned are supported by the nuns. They were very polite in showing us through the different apartments and dormitories, together with the hospitals, &c.

The nuns wear a large cap and kind of drab colored dress, and appeared to be very kind in their attendance to the poor miserable beings under their charge. The dormitories are neat and clean, and over each bed is hung a cross and cup of holy water, also a picture of one of the Saints. We were also shown into the chapel, which is a spacious affair. The altar is beautifully decorated. There are also a number of very beautiful paintings.

Our next visit was to the Black Nunnery, a large stone building surmounted with a steeple similar to the Gray nunnery. We were shown into a number of the rooms where there were a number of poor beings, both men and women, supported entirely by the labor of the Nuns. The dormitories were neat and clean and each bed is marked with the name of some Saint who the occupant prefers to confess to or worship. Each bed is also provided with a cross and cup of holy water. In the foundling apartment there were a number of children varying from 10 months to 10 years old.

During our visit in both nunneries the inmates in care were taking their breakfast. The children were fed by one of the nuns a la "Mrs. Squeers" in Nicholas Nickelby. In this nunnery they only permitted us to look through a window into the chapel. As far as could be seen, I found it very beautiful, the altar particularly so. The dress of the Black Nun is rather singular, they wear a black dress looped up behind, with a black cap fitting tight to the head, and a cape attached extending to the waist. They wear a white bandage bound tight around the head, extending just above the eyes. Around their neck is worn a large collar, extending nearly down to the waist, it is perfectly plain.

Upon leaving the Black Nunnery visited the great French Cathedral. This is the largest Cathedral in North America, and is built of stone. It is in the Gothic style of a dark stone, and is surmounted by two gothic towers each 220 feet high. The length of the building is 255 feet and its height is 134 feet. It can seat 10,000 persons with comfort, there being 12,444 pews, 5 aisles, and two tiers of galleries rising one above another. On three sides of the church are arranged 30 boxes for the priests, there being that number connected with the church. In these boxes they make confession of their sins, according to the language they speak. Each Priest speaks 12 languages. The altar in this church is very beautiful.

After leaving the Cathedral visited the Assembly and Council Chambers which form what is called the Parliament. The Council Chamber or "Senate" is the handsomest. I took a seat in the Governor's chair, "The Earl of Cathgait." Also saw the mace, a large and massive crown mounted on a kind of wand made of solid gold and silver. Without it lying on the table Parliament cannot sit. I suppose it represents the Queen. On either side of the Governor's chair are full length likenesses of George the 3rd and 4th, both exquisite paintings.

After leaving the Assembly rooms took a ride along the quay, the most beautiful it is said, in the world, Liverpool or London not excepted. Then went up to the Hotel again to take lunch, it being about 1/2 past 12. The usual hour for dinner is 6 p.m. but we shall dine today at 4 p.m. as we leave for Quebec at 6.

Among my notices I have forgotten to mention any account of the streets. They are, with but few exceptions, narrow, some paved with wood and others macadamized. Notre Dame Street, I believe, is the principal thoroughfare of business. It certainly has the most beautiful stores.

About 1/2 past 2 p.m. Ma, Lydia, Mr. Reed and myself took a walk down Notre Dame Street to make some few purchases. In our walk noticed a magnificent building in course of erection for the "Bank of Montreal" and also the parade ground which is as level as the floor and quite large. I should like very much to see a parade on it. At 4 p.m. took dinner after which prepared to start for Quebec. At 6 p.m. left the quay in the steamer Quebec for the City of Quebec. The steamer Montreal left at the same time.

Shortly after leaving noticed a cross of a bright material, erected by the Catholics on the top of a very high hill called Mount Belisle. The sun shining on this cross makes it loom very beautifully, and it can be seen at a great distance. Passed a very pretty little village, Loyale, shortly after leaving. Also passed a pretty little site called Busheville before dark, nearly burned a short time since.

The steamers Montreal and Quebec are rival and opposition boats. The Montreal started ahead of us. We had traveled some 25 miles before we caught her. The boats kept side and side for the distance of some 25 or 30 miles, each one trying its utmost to get ahead, but without avail until the Montreal stopped at a port. We went ahead and she did not catch us again.

There was considerable excitement on board and all the ladies very much frightened, when on our arrival at Quebec we were informed that the ladies on the other boat were much more frightened than those on ours. They were crying and carrying on at a great rate. This system of racing ought certainly to be condemned, as it is certainly very unsafe and risks the lives of all the passengers. I shall never patronize either of these boats again if I could help it, but will be forced to tomorrow evening.

After leaving the other boat the ladies became much more quiet, though we were running just as fast, and the fire burning at least 5 feet above the top of the chimneys.

15 August 1846. Arrived at Quebec this morning about 1/2 past 4, safe, without accident, and at about 1/2 past 5 went up to the Hotel the "Albion House" which I found to be miserable and dirty. The proprietor is one that takes the opportunity of imposing on every stranger that visits. There is more imposition practiced at this house than any other I have ever visited, and I would not recommend anyone to go there.

After our arrival at the Hotel, Mr. Phillips and myself took a walk around to see the wonders of the place. We first visited the great French Cathedral, a very large and magnificent building. The interior decorations are beautiful and those in the vicinity of the altar very grand. There are three different altars and that in the center is the most beautiful. Hanging directly over it is an immense canopy made of massive carved gilt, on which is a representation of Jesus Christ. The paintings surrounding the church are magnificent as well as everything connected with it. These Cathedrals are open at all hours of the day, and worship held in them continually.

The body of the Church is in a measure spoiled in appearance by immense arches which support a portion of the upper work and make the church look smaller than it really is. The main ceiling must be at least 80 or 100 feet high. There are three rows of galleries, and I suppose the church would at least accommodate 10,000 people.

After leaving the church visited what is called the "Grand Battery." It may be well to give a description of the situation of Quebec here, so as to show more clearly the position of the "Grand Battery." Quebec is divided into three parts, viz., Upper Quebec lying on the top of the hill 150 feet above the level of river, around which there is an immense stone wall; Lower Quebec lying between the foot of the hill and the river; and St. John's suburbs, which lay beyond St. John's gate though on the top of the hill. Upper Quebec is the most important part of the town, and as I said before is surrounded by a heavy wall. That part of the wall fronting the river, and overlooking Lower Quebec is called the "Grand Battery" in which there are mounted 27 32-pound cannon. They have a number of mortars and smaller guns, and in the walls are loopholes out of which the soldiers can fire small guns entirely protected from the enemy.

On this battery there is always a guard. The 93rd regiment of Highlanders are now stationed here, and a portion of them were on guard. There are between 600 and 700 of them, all ranging between 5 foot 10 and 6 foot 2 or 3 inches. Their dress is very fine. Their cap is a band of plaid, surmounted by beautiful waving ostrich feathers. They wear plaid stockings extending just up below the knee, with shoes and buckles. Their coat is red, and instead of pants, a green plaid frock is worn, extending within about 3 or 4 inches of their knees, leaving a considerable portion of the leg bare. Found them to be a very civil set of men.

Below the "Grand Battery" is "St. Charles Battery," on a much smaller scale. This extends down to what is called Palace gate. There are 5 gates leading to the city, viz., St. Johns, St. Lewis, Palace, Prescot and, I think, Hope gate. Upon our arrival at Palace gate, which is at the foot of Palace Street on which our Hotel is situated, walked up to it for breakfast. The ascent from the lower to the upper town is very steep, and the streets have to wind partially around the hill before you can gain the top.

After breakfast hired a carriage and Messrs. Whiteman, Phillips, Ma, Lydia, and myself started out to see the Falls of Montmorence, a distance 9 miles from Quebec. Passed out of Palace gate, and then through a greater portion of the district where near 3000 houses were burned some year or 15 months ago. The ride down was delightful. Passed through one or two very pretty French villages, and in fact the road for the whole distance was lined with neat cottages. At the doors of many there were children, who as the carriage passed, would make a polite curtsy with the expectation of receiving a sou. Others would run after the carriage for some distance calling "sou, sou, sou," until someone would throw one, when they would pick it up, make a curtsy or bow and run back as fast as possible. One little fellow in particular chased the carriage for a full half mile, calling "sou, sou, sou," but unfortunately we had none, and he had to give up the chase, evidently much displeased. Many of these children, particularly the girls, are quite pretty.

On our arrival at the Falls (Montmorency) we were beset by a number of French Canadians, none of whom could we understand, who wanted to show us about the Falls. We first visited a point where we had a side view of the falls but were first obliged to descend some 50 feet on the rocks (too steep for ladies) before we could obtain a view. These falls fall a greater distance than those of Niagara, being 250 feet perpendicular. The body of water that goes over is but trifling with that of Niagara, though the scenery in the vicinity is very grand. On either side of the river below the falls are immense precipices 250 feet high of nearly perpendicular rock, without a shrub or flower to adorn them. The bed of the river below the falls is of rock and very shallow, and the falls are but about 100 yards above where the river empties into the St. Lawrence.

Had a fine front view of the falls some distance below, and a look at the falls and the chasm formed by the rocks. It was indeed grand and picturesque. Met a number of parties at the falls whom we had met before. Had a delightful though rather warm ride back, and arrived at the Hotel at 1/2 past 12 p.m. when we took a lunch. On our way noticed the Asylum for the Insane, a large and spacious building. They dine at 6 in this place as well as in Montreal.

After lunch, again took our carriage and proceeded out St. John's gate into what is called St. John's suburbs, and then out to the "Plains of Abraham" on which General Wolfe fell in one of the actions on these Plains. The site is marked by a small granite monument surrounded by a small iron railing. The monument is in a dilapidated condition being nearly broken to pieces by persons visiting it to obtain a piece. The plains themselves are a beautiful rolling piece of ground in full view of the river, some 150 feet above its level. They are left as common. We then rode through St. Louis gate and from there into the great Citadel, having procured a pass from the Town Mayor.

Upon entering the gates you present your pass, and then are conducted by one of the 93rd Regiment through the grounds and are shown the works. This fortification is, I suppose, the strongest in the world, and I do not see how it ever could be taken. The outer wall is 12 feet thick, and besides there are two other walls nearly of the same thickness. The offices have magnificent apartments built of granite within the inner walls which must have cost an immense amount of money. The main battery commanding a full view of the river for ten miles either way is 250 or 300 feet above the level of the river, and the wall must be at least 15 feet thick. This battery is 32-pound cannons. This Citadel is certainly the most magnificent piece of masonry I ever witnessed.

After leaving the Citadel visited Lord Durham's Terrace from which you have a fine view of the lower town and harbor of Quebec. Also saw the ruins of the Theater burned some two months since, in which 47 lives were lost.

After leaving the Terrace visited the French Cathedral and Grand Battery mentioned before and then returned to the Hotel.

Strangers are not permitted to visit either of the Nunneries in this place. I forgot to mention above we visited the Governor's Garden, the Earl of Cathgait. In this garden is erected a very beautiful monument of granite in memory of General Wolfe and General Montcalm.

At 5 p.m. left Quebec on board the Steamer Quebec for Montreal. There were quite a large number of passengers on board. The scene after leaving Quebec is beautiful indeed. You first have a fine view of the Citadel with its cannon frowning upon you, and then for some 30 miles on either side of you precipices some 200 feet high, some covered with verdure, and others quite barren, while every now and then a beautiful little town will come to view with its spires glittering in the sunshine. Much to the comfort of the ladies our boat started first and got considerably ahead, so that we avoided another race. The company on board was very pleasant. We had some good playing on the piano by the ladies. The Quebec is a very swift boat and quite large. She made 18 miles an hour last night including her stoppages. Her time is about 20 miles an hour. Turned in at about 1/2 past 8 p.m.

16 August 1846. Cloudy during the morning and at about 12 N. commenced raining but cleared off about 3 p.m. Arrived at Montreal this morning at about 1/2 past 5 o'clock. Slept pretty well last night though there was a party on board who made considerable noise all night and disturbed the passengers very much.

Ma was taken quite sick last night, and upon going up to the Hotel she went to bed. Took lodging again at Donagana's Hotel. Did not go out until about 11 a.m. when Lydia and I took a walk down to the Bishop's Church but it was so full we were not able to get inside the door. Persons were kneeling all around the doors, and some even on top of the railing outside. The interior of the church was large and beautiful. We could see but little of the ceremony so we left. Then went down to the Episcopal Church, went in remained about an hour, when Lydia thinking Ma might want us, left. It was raining very hard. Got a cab and rode to the Hotel. About 1/4 past 3 p.m. took a walk down to the French Cathedral to attend Vespers.

Shortly after entering the Priests formed a grand procession numbering in all 64 and walked down one aisle and up another singing as they walked. The procession was in the following order, viz., first a priest bearing a cross, he was followed by a number of boys with black dresses, and a kind of surplice thrown over it, then following a number of men in the same dress, then a number of boys and men dressed in scarlet robes, with a white thin one thrown over, then followed 5 priests dressed in magnificent dresses of gold, the two foremost bearing what is called the host, one with his hands upon it, directly behind and in the center of the other four. The other two supported a beautiful canopy over the three other priests and host, then followed a number of the laity bearing candles. A great portion of the people through the church also had long candles lit in their hands. Directly before the five priests and the host, two men walked backward with censors throwing incense upon the priests and host. These priests make a very singular appearance in the Street. They wear a tight black dress with small black buttons down in front with a black sash around their waist, their dress is also looped up behind. Around their neck they wear an affair similar to that of an Episcopal Clergyman but of black instead of white, with a white binding around the edge.

After leaving the Church walked down to the quay. This is one of the finest pieces of mason work I suppose in the world. Also took a walk down to the new market, which is now in course of erection. It is to be very large and of granite, and when finished will be a magnificent building. I think it will be superior to the Kingston market. Then went up into Darby's Hotel, it is nothing to compare with Donagana's.

I forgot to note in my mention of the Citadel at Quebec that there are four stone towers connected with it, and situated at the distance of some 1/4 or 3/4 of a mile from it. These towers have subterranean passages connected with the Citadel and are to be used as lookout points for and to communicate with the Citadel. These towers are built very strong on all sides with the exception of that towards the Citadel, with the intention that in case the towers were ever taken by the enemy in front that when they got possession they could batter them down with ease with cannon from the Citadel.

17 August 1846. After breakfast this morning took a cab and rode down to the "Bishop's Church." This is a magnificent structure though not so large as the Cathedral. The altars are very beautiful and directly over the center one is raised some 30 feet above it a very large and beautiful crown, gilded in such a manner as to make its appearance almost like gold. There are a large number of very beautiful and fine paintings in this Church.

After leaving the Church rode up into the upper part of Montreal, where we found a great number of magnificent dwellings. They are all built of granite and are but two stories high. Most of them are built singly with magnificent gardens, though there are a number of very fine rows of houses, these are called "Terraces."

While in the upper part of the town visited Mr. Dorrance, and Mr. Donagana's gardens, both very beautiful with magnificent dwellings in the center of them. After leaving the gardens rode down into the town around through the principal Streets, to see the public buildings. Noticed more fine Churches in this City than any other I have ever seen of its size; they are principally of Gothic architecture, and built of granite.

Upon getting onto Notre Dame Street got the cabman to put us down near the Cathedral where I left Ma and Lydia to look at the stores and I went to visit one of the towers of the Cathedral.

After entering my name on the books and paying 1 s. 3 d. for admittance, started on the ascent which I found very tiresome.

This Cathedral is the Parish Church of Montreal, and is served by 25 Priests, of the order of St. Sulpice of Paris (France) submitting to a Superior of the same order. They are, however, under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of Montreal. As regards spiritual matters, they can speak different languages. The outside length of the Cathedral including towers is 260 feet, without towers 230 feet; inside length 215 feet, width including towers 133 feet, width in center 130 feet, width inside 117 ft. The portico is 115 feet high. The towers are 215 feet high. The outside width of towers are outside 30 feet, inside 17 ft. The grand window in the rear of the altar with apostles represented is 60 feet high by 33 feet wide. The number of pews in the lower part and two galleries are 1363, and the Church can contain 15,000 people. The building is of hewn stone, erected at a cost of £80,000 currency. It was commenced in 1823 and finished in 1829, and the towers finished in 1842. The buildings finished cost £150,000. The windows of the Church are 30 feet by 10 feet, doors are 17 feet by 10 ft.

I ascended the Temperance tower, at the right of the Church. The summit is gained by 25 stair cases forming 285 steps. From the top you have a most magnificent view for 15 or 20 miles around. On one side you have a beautiful view of Montreal mountain, on the other the beautiful St. Lawrence with the isle of St. Helen. In the distance is the town of La Prairie and beautiful country. All around below lies the beautiful town of Montreal with its numerous public buildings in view, and the busy throng of inhabitants threading its narrow Streets. Directly below the tower is a full view of the Bishop's garden beautifully laid out. He has several plots on which are beautifully traced in box wood the letters "I. H. L." surrounded by a wreath, and above and below traced in the same manner are baskets, filled and overflowing with beautiful flowers.

After leaving the Tower and on my way to the Hotel accidentally saw the Governor of Canada, the Earl of Cathgait, riding in his carriage accompanied by one of his aides. He is a man of about 60, and quite a fine looking old gentleman. He was dressed in a uniform resembling that of an American officer.

At 1/2 past 12 p.m. left Montreal in the Steamer Prince Albert for La Prairie, distance 9 miles. Arrived there at about 1/2 past 1, after rather a difficult passage as the river is very rapid at this point and we had a large number of passengers. La Prairie is a small town and of but little importance. The town now presents a desolate appearance, and is in ruins caused by a fire some two weeks since. Nothing remains but bare walls and high chimneys standing above, looking like ghosts stalking among the ruins.

Left La Prairie at 2 p.m. for St. Johns at the head of Lake Champlain, distance 15 miles. The country between La Prairie and St. Johns is poor and uninteresting. Left St. Johns at 3 1/4 p.m. for Whitehall on board the Steamer Whitehall. This is certainly the finest boat I have been on since I left. Every thing is neat and clean and in order.

After leaving St. Johns passed down the River before entering the Lake. The scenery was not very interesting up to the time night closed the scene, with the exception that we had a view of the Green Mountains in Vermont on one side and the Adirondacks on the other side in New York. Stopped at a number of small places, including Plattsburgh. At about 8 p.m. the lake became very rough and continued so nearly all night, you could not walk straight on deck.

18 August 1846. The scenery as you approach Whitehall is wild, grand and Magnificent. Whitehall is but a small place, though quite romantic, surrounded on all sides by high and towering rocks and hills giving the whole scene a wild and romantic appearance. Went up to the "Phoenix House" where they gave us a fine breakfast. It is kept by a Dr. Harrington, Dentist, late of Philadelphia. It appears to be a new, clean and well kept house.

Left Whitehall on board the same boat. The scenery after leaving Whitehall is too grand to be described. It is one succession of beautiful hills, or more properly mountains, up to your arrival at Ticonderoga. They range from 500 to 1500 feet in height. Lake Champlain is very narrow all that distance.

Arrived at Fort Ticonderoga. Immediately went up to the Hotel, the "Pavilion," which appears to be a well kept House, and beautifully situated.

After leaving Ma & Lydia there, Mr. Wightman and myself went out to take a stroll to see the ruins of old Fort Ticonderoga. First visited what is called Grandee Battery. This was connected with Mount Independence on the opposite side of the Lake by a floating bridge 80 rods long by 12 feet wide. We then visited the ruins of the old Fort which was burned by the Americans and evacuated on account of the British having taken possession of Mount Defiance, which gave them full power to destroy the American Fort, since they are on an elevation of some 800 feet above the Americans. At the old Fort went through the ruins, and down into what is said to be their magazine, a large arched hole some distance underground.

After leaving the ruins returned to the Hotel and got a very good dinner. Directly afterward started in a stage for the village of Ticonderoga at the foot of Lake George, distance some 6 miles. Ticonderoga is but a very small place. At the foot of the Lake took a small boat called the William Caldwell for a small place at the head of the Lake. Lake George is 36 miles long, and from 2 to 3 miles wide, and is elevated 243 feet above the tide water of the Hudson. The scenery on this lake is beautiful in the extreme. It is dotted with numerous beautiful Islands, while on either side vast mountains rise to the heavens in majestic grandeur. Black Mountain on this Lake is 2220 feet high, and of a black color. The principal portion of mountains which line the shores of this Lake are over 2000 feet high.

Arrived at Caldwell at the head of the Lake at about 1/2 past 6. It is a small but very beautifully situated town, wild & romantic. The hotel, the "Lake House," has a very beautiful situation and appears to be well kept, though not a very polite or obliging land lord. So much for their being no other House.

After supper Mr. Whiteman and myself took a walk across the head of the Lake to try and find Fort George but were unsuccessful as night came on too soon.

19 August 1846. Got up at 1/2 past 5 a.m. and after dressing took a stroll around the house. The scenery in this vicinity is too grand, too magnificent for me to attempt to describe. On every side you are surrounded by high and breathtaking mountains, and directly before you the beautiful Lake. I did not like the land lord at this place as he is both unaccommodating and I think dishonest from the fact that he received the amount of the bill of two gentlemen knowingly, when one had paid.

Left Caldwell for Saratoga Springs at about 1/2 past 7 o'clock, a distance of 27 miles through a most beautiful country and connected with many incidents in the war. The greater part of the distance had a fine view of the Green Mountains in Vermont. The road leads toward a valley with immense towering mountains on either side. The highest is French Mountain some 2300 or 3000 feet. In passing along the road was shown the "Bloody Pond." It is near the place of action of Colonel Williams and General Dieskau in 1755. The bodies of those killed in battle, about 1000, were thrown into the pond. Thence its name. Also saw the rock where Colonel Williams was shot.

Arrived at Glens Falls, 9 miles from Caldwell and 18 from Saratoga, at 11 o'clock. It is quite a large thriving and a pretty village. There the Hudson River falls some 50 feet, from which the town derives its name. The falls are quite handsome and the scenery around it quite romantic and stately. The stage stopped long enough to visit the falls and take a ramble over the rocks.

Visited the cave in which Cooper and Cacy preserved the lives of two ladies from the Indians. Also visited another cave of some interest. There appears to be a number of petrifactions at this place among which was a wild cat distinctly visible on the rocks. I procured several butterfly heads petrified. These falls must be very beautiful when the water is high, at present the water is low, however the falls are beautiful.

Did not arrive at Saratoga until 1/2 past 2 p.m. though the distance is but 27 miles. The road is very heavy and sandy, consequently tedious, though the scenery repays you for all fatigue. Stopped at the United States Hotel at Saratoga, a large, beautiful and well kept House. At 1/2 past 3 p.m. left in the cars for Troy, where we arrived at 1/2 past 5 p.m. On this route we passed Ballston Springs, Borough, and Waterford. The last named town is a very beautiful place. Upon our arrival at Troy put up at the "Troy House." After supper went up to see Percival Roberts but found he was out of town, then returned and took a walk around town with Ma & Lydia.

20 August 1846. Got up this morning at 1/2 past 4, having been informed that the New York boat started at 1/2 past 5, but after dressing and getting on board by that time, she did not start until her usual hour. We took a small boat called Mason at Troy and went to Albany 6 miles where we took a large and swift boat called the Niagara. Had a strong head wind and tide nearly all the way down and the scenery looked about as beautiful as ever though quite insignificant, after the beautiful and Magnificent scenery we have lived among for the last week or ten days. The scenery of the Hudson is nothing to compare with that on Lake George and the lower part of Lake Champlain.

Upon approaching New York met quite a number of steamboats going up, a much larger number than I ever met with before. Also met a very large number of vessels throughout the day going up, having a fair wind at times, on the approach they would present a beautiful sight. Arrived in New York at about 1/2 past 4 p.m. and went up to the "Astor House" and entered my name for the purpose of taking rooms, but as they appeared to be so unaccommodating and not disposed to give me pleasant rooms, left and went over to the "American House" where we got rather pleasant rooms, but very high up.

In the evening Lydia and I went up to "Niblos Garden." The House was very full. The first piece played was one I saw when last here, viz., La Fete Champetre, a poor piece, though parts are laughable. The rope dancing is pretty good. The last piece, Giselle of the Wells, is very good for those who like dancing. Mlle. Blaugy danced beautifully as Giselle. Mme. Leon Javelli as Martha Queen of the Wells danced beautifully as well as Mr. Henri as Duke Albert of Silesia. Out about 1/2 past 10, took an omnibus and went immediately to the Hotel.

21 August 1846. Got up this morning about 7 o'clock, and after breakfast went out and attended to some little matters, returned to the Hotel about 9 o'clock and went up to my room where I was employed writing until about 11 o'clock, then went down in the parlor with the expectation of meeting Ma and Lydia but found they had gone down to the "Trinity Church" with a company of ladies and gentlemen. I immediately went down to the Church where I met them in company with two Misses Wilson of Wilmington, Delaware and a lady from Springfield, Massachusetts besides some gentlemen. The youngest Miss W. is pretty and quite agreeable.

Upon our return to the Hotel did not go out again it being so disagreeable. Remained in the parlor part of the time in conversation with Miss Wilson Jr. At 3 p.m. went into dinner, and by 4 they had not put out the dessert, so we had to leave with about half a dinner as the cars for Philadelphia started at 1/2 past 4. I was not at all pleased with this House, the attention at the table very poor, and the breakfast and tea miserable. Started for Philadelphia at 1/2 past 4 and after a pleasant trip arrived there at about 1/2 of 10 o'clock. Met Mr. Welch at the wharf.

22 August 1846. At the office during the morning with the exception of about an hour and a half occupied in going around to see some of my friends. At about 1/2 past 1 p.m. Mr. Welch, William and myself went down to the Navy Yard to see the launch of the Sloop of war Germantown.(27) There was an immense concourse of people congregated to see the event. At 10 m. past 2 p.m. precisely, I saw the ways cut, and she glided beautifully into the water, amid the plaudits of thousands, and the roar of cannon.

After dinner, at the office until about 5 o'clock then went up to General Patterson's to see my old friend Washington M. Smith of Louisiana. Found him quite unwell, having been confined to his room for several days. He was, however, recovering fast. I cannot express the pleasure I experienced in once more seeing my friend Mr. Smith. I was very fearful that I should miss him in coming in but fortune favored us. After which waited upon Ma and Lydia up to Mrs. Hooks & back home.

23 August 1846. After breakfast went over to the office for a short time, and then according to engagement, went up to see W.M. Smith at General Patterson's. The day being so very unpleasant, and he not having been well, remained in and spent the morning with him. Was introduced to Frank Patterson who was with us during the greater part of the time. About 1/2 past 11 a.m. walked down to St. Phillip's Church. When it was out met the Misses Mary and Elizabeth Conrad and walked home with them, after which went up to see Miss Arethusa Leeds to deliver a message from Mr. Leeds whom I met in New York on Friday last.

24 August 1846. At the office during the greater part of the day, but no business as yet doing. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa Clarke, found her quite well, and also her mother. Met Mr. Dayton and Mr. Stille there. Remained until about 1/2 past 10 p.m. Wrote a letter to Aunt Harrison today.

25 August 1846. At the office all day and in the evening Mr. W.M. Smith and myself went down to see the Misses Stevenson, Wash having taken tea with me. Found the Misses S. home, remained a short time when Wash and Becky went out to see Miss Snyder. A short time afterwards Jenny and myself went to see some persons by the name of Stevenson in 6th Street below Lombard.

26 August 1846. At the office all day, and in the evening Mr. Welch and myself called up to see Miss Susan Estlack, found her in, and also her sister Louisa.

27 August 1846. Went over to the office after breakfast, where I was sitting talking to Mr. Jordan when much to my surprise, Mr. Kirby of Cincinnati came in and handed me his daughter's card informing me she was at the United States Hotel. As soon as Mr. J. was gone I went over and told Ma, when she and I both went over to the Hotel, where we found Miss Kirby looking as well as ever. In a short time it was proposed to visit Laurel Hill and Fair Mount. I got a carriage and we visited both places, and rode through the City. On our return at about 1/2 past 1 p.m. stopped at Mrs. Burns, where Miss Kirby saw my sister. She remained there until about 2 o'clock, when I walked around to the United States Hotel again. I left her promising to meet again on board the New York boat. Then returned to the office, remained until dinner time, went over, dined, and then went down to the New York boat, where I met Mr. and Miss Kirby again. Went up as far as Bristol with them, then over to Burlington.

28 August 1846. At the office during the day and in the evening called to see the Misses Harriet and Mary Carter.

29 August 1846. At the office all day with the exception of short intervals out on business.

30 August 1846. At St. Phillip's Church in the morning with Ma and Lydia, heard an excellent sermon by Mr. Neville. Also there in the afternoon alone. Mr. Neville preached. After church took a walk with Mr. Seal and another gentleman.

31 August 1846. At the office during the day, until about 6 p.m. then took a little walk on Chestnut Street for exercise, met a large number of ladies on the promenade. After tea or about 8 o'clock called up to see Mr. and Mrs. Ware, Ma and Lydia having gone up to tea by invitation. This was my first visit to spend an evening, their house is furnished in a very neat style.

SEPTEMBER

1 September 1846. At the office during the morning, and at 2 p.m. left for Burlington on board the Trenton where we arrived at about 1/2 past 3 p.m. The trip up was excessively warm. After arriving at Burlington walked up as far as the Post office where I met Jim Sterling, remained talking to him until the Steamer Sun came up, expecting Mr. Leland on her. Finding he did not arrive, went up to Mrs. Buckman's where I found Ma. Was there the greater part of the afternoon, part of the time attending to some of Ma's furniture that she intends taking down tomorrow.

2 September 1846. At the office from 11 a.m. to until about 1/2 past 6 p.m. when Mr. Welch and I took a walk up Chestnut Street after which went over to the boarding house. My mother and sister were in the parlor, and also a Miss Sergeant who has recently come to board at our house. I was introduced to her by Lydia. She is quite pretty and found her for the few minutes I conversed quite agreeable.

I forgot to mention that I left Burlington this morning at 1/2 past 7, and arrived in the City about 9 1/2, brought down Ma's furniture with us, and was employed until about 11 o'clock in having it brought up and put in her room at Mrs. Grier's.

3 September 1846. After tea went up to Mrs. Stoddard's with Ma and Lydia and remained about an hour.

4 September 1846. Clear and excessively warm all day. Evening clear, warm and moonlit. At the office during the day, and in the evening Mr. Welch and myself called up to see Miss A. Leeds but found her out, then called at the Misses Harbet, found Miss Martha in, spent the rest of the evening, left about 1/2 past 9, on our way down stopped in and got some ice cream.

6 September 1846. Never do I remember more excessive hot weather this season of the year than we have had today and for the last week. It seems as if it could hardly be born, and if we do not soon have a change no doubt will cause much sickness.

At St. Phillip's Church in the morning, heard an excellent sermon. After church went home where I remained until after 4 p.m. when Mr. Welch and I took a walk up to "Jones Hotel" to see Wash Smith. He arrived here again last evening. Found him, his brother-in-law, Mr. Bethel, and Mr. Frank Patterson all up in Mr. Smith's room together.

Before Church this morning was surprised by a visit from Smith, when he and I went up to the "Jones Hotel" where we met his brother-in-law Mr. Bethel, when all three went over to the "Washington House" & then up in the parlor, where we saw his wife. Remained there until about 10 o'clock and then went to church. Mr. Welch and I remained a short time with Smith, Bethel and Patterson, and then walked out to see the corner stone of the new Cathedral, to be called the Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul. Found a large concourse of people out there, but we were too late for the ceremonies.

7 September 1846. After tea walked down to the Exchange to attend a Sheriff's sale, I having read a notice connected with the sale of a property.

9 September 1846. The unseasonable and oppressive weather, which for several days past had been a torment to those who are not stoical enough to bear an annoyance calmly, took leave of us today. A cool and blustering wind from the North East succeeded, and during the day it was difficult to say whether the departed heat was not more endurable than the clouds of dust tossed up by the strong wind, to the detriment of people's eyes, and to the abatement of their comfort in walking.

At the office through the morning. At about 3 p.m. Mr. Welch and myself went up to "Jones Hotel" to dine with Mr. W.M. Smith of Louisiana, having had an invitation from him this morning. After dinner, which was about 4 p.m., Smith, Welch and myself returned to the office where we remained until about 5 p.m. when Smith and I went over to my boarding house, he wishing to bid my mother and sister farewell as he leaves tomorrow morning. About 1/2 past 5 Ma and I went out together leaving Mr. Smith with Lydia, returned about 1/2 past 6, after attending to some little business.

In the evening went up to Colonel Tucker's room with Lydia.

10 September 1846. At the office all day and in the evening went up to a little party given by the Misses Carter. Spent a very pleasant evening in dancing, &c.

11 September 1846. At the office all day and the evening spent at home sitting in the parlor conversing with Miss Elizabeth Ludlow. She has recently returned to our house, and is a very pretty, pleasant & agreeable young lady.

13 September 1846. Spent the evening at home talking with Miss Sergeant.

14 September 1846. At the office during the day, and in the evening at home, conversing with Miss Elizabeth Ludlow until about 1/2 past 8 p.m. when Jim Welch and myself went down to see Miss Caroline Snyder.

15 September 1846. At the office all day, and also during the evening until 10 o'clock.

16 September 1846. At the office all day. At 6 p.m. Welch and I went up to the new "Odd Fellows' Hall" at the corner of 6th and Haines Street, could not get in. It is to be dedicated tomorrow, and the Odd Fellows are to have a grand procession.

In the evening went to the Horticultural exhibition with sister. Miss Ludlow was to have accompanied me, but for some unknown reason she accompanied Mr. Squires, which I took as a great insult, and unless some apology and explanation is made, it will prevent me speaking further than is requisite as a gentleman. I regret the circumstances as I always heretofore held Miss L. in high estimation as a lady. I hope the matter may be explained.

17 September 1846. The weather today was clear and beautiful, and could not have been more favorable for the grand celebration of the Odd Fellows. They turned out in great strength and made a grand display.

At the office the greater part of the day. Saw part of the procession at Chestnut Street and 5th and the balance of it around at the boarding house.

In the evening waited upon Miss Elizabeth Ludlow to the Horticultural Exhibition, ample apology having been made by Mrs. & Miss Ludlow of the unpleasant occurrence of last evening, which I am heartily glad of, as I hold Miss L. in the highest esteem. Mr. Robert Ludlow with my sister, and Mr. Maginnis with Miss Kate Sergeant, accompanied us. The exhibition was very much crowded, the decoration of the rooms elegant as was the display of fruits, &c. After the exhibition went round to Wood's and got some ice cream then returned home.

18 September 1846. At the office all day and in the evening called upon Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in and spent a very pleasant evening. Also saw her mother. Left about 1/2 past 10, went up to Hammonds, and got some oysters and then went home.

19 September 1846. At the office during the day, until 5 1/2 p.m. when Welch and I took a walk in Chestnut Street, found large number of persons on the promenade.

20 September 1846. Went up St. Luke's Church with Ma and Lydia in the morning. I was not pleased with the sermon of Mr. Howe, the new minister. His delivery was very poor. After dinner Mr. Welch, Dick Christiani and myself took a walk up town, and came down by Grace Church, went in and heard an excellent sermon by Mr. Luddards who has just returned from England.

21 September 1846. In the evening called up to see Miss Arethusa Leeds.

22 September 1846. At the office until 4 1/4 p.m. when Mr. Welch and I took a walk out to the "Girard College"(28) to see the statue of Girard(29) which has been recently placed for the inspection of visitors. As far as I could judge, I think it is a beautiful specimen of sculpture. Also went on top of the building from which we had a magnificent view of the City and surrounding country. Met a large number of gentlemen and ladies out at the college.

In the evening after tea sat talking with Miss Ludlow in the parlor until 1/2 past 8.

25 September 1846. At the office until 4 1/2 p.m. when Mr. Welch and I went down to see a gentleman at the S.W. corner of Front and Lombard Streets on some business. Not being able to see him, continued on down to the Navy Yard to see the U.S. Brig Washington.(30) She has recently arrived demasted having met with a severe gale on the 8th inst, which completely disabled her and washed overboard all of her crew with the exception of 4. The captain and 10 men were drowned. After leaving her went on board the U.S. ship Germantown recently launched. She is a fine craft and will, in a short time, be ready for sea. On our way down stopped in for Dick Christiani, he went with us.

26 September 1846. At the office until about 1/2 past 5 p.m. when Welch and I took a walk up to 2nd & Green Street to see our shoemaker. In the evening Welch and I went up to the Philadelphia Museum. The pieces performed were very amusing, viz., Its All Very Well and The Golden Farmer. Sefton played in both pieces.

27 September 1846. At Mr. Neville's Church in the morning with Ma and Lydia. He gave us an excellent sermon. We took possession of our seats for the first time today. After church waited upon Miss Louisa M. Clarke home, and then returned to the Church for Ma and Lydia, who had remained for communion, and waited upon them home. In the afternoon went up to St. Andrew's Church.

28 September 1846. Clear, cool and pleasant weather, reminding one that Fall is with us. In the evening after tea, Miss Ludlow, my sister, Mr. Welch & myself were sitting in the parlor conversing when I proposed a game of whist, which was acceded to, and we adjourned to Miss Ludlow's sitting room. We played until about 11 o'clock.

OCTOBER

1 October 1846. In the evening called down to see Miss Caroline Snyder a short time, and then went around with her to see the Misses Stevenson. Found them in and stayed about a half or three quarters of an hour, when I returned with Miss Snyder to take her home. Remained about 15 minutes and then went down to the boat to meet Ma and Lydia. They went to Burlington in the early boat this morning.

2 October 1846. Clear and cloudy at intervals until about 4 p.m. when it clouded over heavily and we had a tremendous shower of rain accompanied by thunder and lightning. I understood considerable hail fell in some parts of the City, though I did not see anything of it. At the office until 12 N then went to see Mr. Keen who lives about half a mile over the Market Street Bridge.

3 October 1846. At the office during the morning, and at 2 p.m. started in company with Jim Welch on board the Steamer Trenton for Burlington. Mr. Welch, his brother Aikman and I took a walk around town and then up to Thomas Dugdale's new mills. Went through the different rooms, and after satisfying our curiosity, went up on top of the water works from which we have a fine view of Burlington.

4 October 1846. At the Baptist church in the morning, heard rather a scolding kind of sermon from the pastor Mr. Dickinson, though it was very good. After dinner at about 1/2 past 1, Jim Welch and I got a carriage and drove out to Mount Holly. Stopped to see Miss Ellen Beatty, found her in and remained about 15 minutes, then called on Miss Mary Anna Clark, but she was not at home. We then called over to see Miss Becky Wills, quite a pretty and pleasant girl, remained some half an hour, then drove over to see Miss Caroline Horner, but found she was quite sick so that we could not see her. Saw her sister Lydia Ann and met Morgan Lippincott there. From Horners went over to see Miss Charlotte Woolman. Found her in and looking as pretty as ever. We took tea there, and at about 1/2 past 7 made preparations to leave, but found it raining so hard concluded to remain all night, as we were very kindly treated.

5 October 1846. Got up this morning at 1/2 past 5, and about 1/2 past 5 left Miss Woolman's for Burlington via Mount Holly. Frank Woolman rode over as far as Mount Holly with us. We arrived in Burlington about 7 o'clock. The ride was pleasant though cool. We took breakfast at Mr. Welch's, and at 8 o'clock started in the Steamer Trenton for Philadelphia, where we arrived by 20 minutes past 9. At the office during the day. In the evening Mr. Welch and myself called up to see the Misses Leeds, but not finding them in returned home by 1/4 of 9 o'clock, spent the rest of the evening in parlor. Several of the boarders were dancing cotillions. I did not participate.

7 October 1846. In the evening at home in the parlor with Ma until 1/2 past 8, then went up for my sister at Miss Seal's and met Miss Myers and Mr. Neff. Had a little dance & left at 10.

8 October 1846. In the evening called down to see Miss L.M. Clarke. On my way home stopped to get some oysters in an oyster cellar.

9 October 1846. Clear and oppressively warm weather for this season of the year. At the office during the morning. After dinner, or about 1/2 past 4, went out in a chaise with Colonel Tucker to look at some property.

The vane, ball and cap were removed from the State House steeple this morning for regilding, after which the American flag was run up to the top of the rod. The vane is 9 feet long by 3 feet 7 inches broad; ball 8 feet in circumference, and cap l6 inches high.

10 October 1846. In the evening at home, with the exception of about 15 minutes, I was over at a Whig meeting held in the State House yard.

11 October 1846. At St. Phillip's Church in the morning with Ma and sister. In the afternoon at the same church above. Mr. Neville preached both times excellent sermons. After church in the afternoon walked home with Miss Louisa Clarke. After tea called around for Miss Clarke and accompanied her to Grace Church. As usual found her company very agreeable, and I only wish that I could always have it.

13 October 1846. It rained very hard all day, accompanied with a tremendous heavy blow from the S.E. which tore up trees, blew down houses and did considerable other damage. It was certainly a very unfavorable day for the election. I spent a very pleasant evening dancing. All the ladies were in the parlor.

14 October 1846. The storm of yesterday, I see by the papers, has done great damage. The highest tide known for 20 years was last night about 9 o'clock. Small boats were paddled with ease along Delaware Avenue, many of the wharves being a foot under water. Nearly every acre of lowland between Philadelphia and the capes was inundated. Immense damage was done to embankments of meadow ground along the river. Some of these have withstood all the high tides of the Delaware since the September gale of 1820. The storm seems to have prevailed all over the country in New York, Baltimore and Washington. We hear of great destruction in the blow down of houses, steeples, upsetting of vessels &c.

15 October 1846. Have had fire in the office for several days. In the evening at Miss Clarke's, as usual spent my time very agreeably in her company. Met there Mr. Ross.

16 October 1846. In the evening called up to see Miss Arethusa Leeds, found her in, and alone. Spent a very pleasant evening and left at about 1/2 past 10. Sarah Elizabeth has not yet returned from Boston. She has been gone 8 weeks today. On my way home stopped and got some oysters.

17 October 1846. At the office during the day until about 5 p.m. when Mr. Welch, Mr. Harbet and myself took a walk in Chestnut Street. Met a large number of ladies on the promenade. Spent the evening up in Miss Ludlow's room with my sister and several others playing whist in the early part of the evening. Toward the latter part had a very exciting game called "Everlasting" which all joined in, and spent a merry time until 11 o'clock.

18 October 1846. In the evening accompanied Ma around to St. Paul's Church. Mr. Maginnis waited upon sister there. A minister from the Jewish mission in New York preached.

19 October 1846. Clear and quite cold weather, an overcoat was quite comfortable, cloaks and overcoats quite plenty in the streets. After tea went down to a Sheriff's sale.

20 October 1846. Spent the evening pleasantly with Miss Louisa M. Clarke, as usual found her very agreeable and pleasant to me.

21 October 1846. In the evening took my sister and Miss Elizabeth Ludlow to the museum. We were much pleased. The pieces played were The Bashful Irishman and The Irish Lion. Barry Wilson sustained the principal character in each. After the performance was over took a walk through the museum.

22 October 1846. In the evening I called up to see Mr. William H. Smith and lady at No. 71 Vine Street below 3rd. They are the gentleman and lady we met last summer in Ohio and traveled some distance with. Left about 10 o'clock and went over to an oyster cellar at the corner of 3rd and Vine. While there a torch light procession of Native Americans came along which was a very fine affair. They conducted themselves with much propriety and order. It was in celebration of their victory in electing the sheriff(31) of the county. Many houses were illuminated on their route, the windows of which were filled with ladies waving their handkerchiefs to the passing crowd. Many fine transparencies were carried.

23 October 1846. At the office all day, and in the evening went around to the Arch Street Theater to see the Ravels. They performed in two pieces, viz., Jocks or the Brazilian Ape and Godluski or the Skates at Wilma, besides dancing on the tight rope. Both pieces were very amusing, particularly the skating scene in the last piece. The performers had on their feet a kind of skate which runs on wheels,(32) and gave them the advantage of moving as when employed in skating. In the course of the scene one of them was so unfortunate as to get in an air hole, which created much mirth. There was also a piece performed called Of Age Tomorrow which was very amusing and well sustained.

25 October 1846. At St. Phillip's Church both in the morning and evening. In the afternoon Messrs. E.J. Maginnis, J.C. Welch, L. Ludlow, Bebee of New York, and myself took a walk up Walnut to 11th, up 11th to Coats, and out Coats to Fairmount, and then home via Callowhill, Schuylkill 3rd & 3rd to Walnut. Met a large number of ladies on Walnut Street this being the fashionable promenade of Sunday afternoon after Church. Chestnut Street is almost deserted.

26 October 1846. In the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater with James C. Welch to see Edwin Forrest as Damon in the play Damon and Pithias. He performed his character admirably and was sustained by Mr. Jamison and Miss Fisher. The farce of Lend me 5 $ was pretty good.

27 October 1846. In the evening Miss Elizabeth Ludlow and I went up to the exhibition at the Franklin Institute. I do not think the arrangement of the articles in the saloon was so fine as last year, & the company was not nearly so select.

28 October 1846. In the evening called on the Misses Carter, not finding them in called on Miss Ellen Hinman and found her at home. Met there Mr. Carrington. Spent a pleasant evening and left about 10 o'clock, on my way home stopped and got some oysters for Ma, sat in Ma's room talking until near 11.

The workmen again placed the cap, vane & ball on the State House steeple yesterday after regilding.

31 October 1846. After tea went into the parlor with Miss E. Ludlow, Miss J.C. Farell, and sister, also Mr. Maginnis and Mr. Squires. We sat down to converse, but an unpleasant conversation commenced between Messrs. Maginnis and Squires entirely unbecoming gentlemen, when I left and went up to my mother's room & spent the rest of the evening there.

NOVEMBER

1 November 1846. Poured rain incessantly all day, and throughout the evening, but few persons could be seen on the streets, so inclement was the weather. I did not go out all day.

2 November 1846. Cloudy, rainy and unpleasant weather though quite warm. At the office all day and in the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater with Mr. Prout, it being the 1st opera of the season, and the first evening of the engagement of the Seguins. The opera performed was the Bohemian Girl. I was much better pleased this evening than when I heard it at the Chestnut Street Theater. The chorus was much fuller and better. Mrs. Seguin as usual performed and sang her part admirably. Her I dreamt I dwelled in Marble Halls was admirable. Mr. Frazier as Thaddeus and Mr. F. Myer as Count Arnheim sustained their characters admirably and sang delightfully. The after piece, A Man without a Head, was not much though it occasionally drew a smile.

3 November 1846. After tea went up into Ma's room where I sat for a while when Colonel Tucker sent in for me to write a letter for him which I did. Then went in to see Miss Elizabeth Ludlow, where I played whist in her company, her sister Anna and brother Samuel, and Mr. Maginnis. Frank Gibbens spent this evening with Ma and sister.

5 November 1846. At the office all day, and in the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke. I have not been there since last Tuesday, two weeks on account of a little affront. Whether it was intentional or not I could not tell until this evening when the matter was cleared up much to my satisfaction and pleasure. I shall resume my visits with pleasure.

Miss Clarke, as usual, looked pretty and was pleasing in her manners. Went home. Upon going up the steps met Mr. Maginnis just going in with Miss O'Farrell from a concert. He asked me to take some oysters with him, went together up to Guys, in 7th above Chestnut to get them.

4 November 1846. In the evening up at the 1st of a series of sociable parties to be given by some 8 or 10 ladies. It was held at Dr. Huston's at the N.W. corner of Girard and 11th Streets. Spent a very pleasant evening. On going up to Mr. Huston's I stopped around for Miss Carter, but found she had gone before tea.

8 November 1846. Cloudy, rainy and unpleasant weather. Went up to St. Phillip's Church in the morning, Mr. Neville preached. Very few persons there.

10 November 1846. In the evening went to the Walnut Street Theater to hear the new opera of Maritana. This was the 2nd night of its performance in this country. This opera generally speaking is very fine, there are many beautiful songs in it. The after piece, The Wandering Minstrel, was very amusing. Mr. Maginnis, with my sister, was also there.

11 November 1846. Cloudy and damp during the day, and a copious shower of rain, accompanied with vivid lightning and loud thunder, usual at this season. Commenced about 1/2 past 7 and continued without cessation up to 10 o'clock. It is to be hoped that this storm is the forerunner of fair weather; a change is anxiously looked for. At the office all day, and in the evening dressed to go to a small company at Miss H. A. Myers for my sister but it rained so hard remained at home.

12 November 1846. After tea or about 8 o'clock Mr. Welch and I called up for the Misses Leeds to wait upon them to a wedding party at Mr. Stockton's on Vine Street, North side below Broad. Mr. Charles B. Vogels had been married to Miss Ellen M. Stockton early in the evening and received their calls between 8 and 11. We entered the room about 9 o'clock and were introduced to the bride and groom. The parlors were crowded to excess. I met a number of my acquaintances. There was no dancing, but plenty of wine and cake.

14 November 1846. At the office all day and in the evening Mr. Welch and I went up to the Circus and Theater on Chestnut Street below 9th. The riding, clown, &c., were about as usual. The after piece, a new equestrian operatic spectacle in three acts, entitled Camp in the Wilderness or The Old Man of the Mountain, was a grand affair and was full of stirring incidents. The scenery, dresses, &c., were beautiful indeed, in a word the whole piece was well got up.

16 November 1846. After over two weeks of rain, the sun looked out pleasantly today, & thawed the coldness which has been upon us so long. It was a goodly sight to see the blue sky once more, and to feel the cheerful warmth of the direct rays of the sun, to note the absence of puddles, and to have the pleasant consciousness that a brief walk might be taken without a thorough saturation. As the darkest hour is the hour before day, so the most disagreeable portion of the prolonged rain occurred on Sunday evening. It was a well defined shower, mingled with a blending mist, driven about by a strong and cold wind, and so utterly cheerless in its general aspect, that it was a wonder people were hardy enough to go forth and endure it. We are grateful for the return of the fair weather, and the sick and aged will welcome it with thankfulness. But while it has been a sore trial to many in the crowded cities, it must be remembered that abroad, over the country, it has been a blessing and a promise of abundance, and the watered fields and replenished streams have rejoiced the farmer and rewarded his hopes.

In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in and spent a very pleasant evening. Met there Mr. Cornell, Mr. Dayton and Mr. Sulger. After leaving Miss Clarke's walked as far as 7th and Arch with Mr. Sulger. I there left him, & went down 7th to an oyster saloon just above Chestnut Street, got some oysters and then went home.

17 November 1846. The clear and pleasant weather still continues though the wind is from the N.E. The ladies seem to be much pleased from the change, by the number who enjoy a promenade on Chestnut Street.

18 November 1846. The atmosphere was like that of a day in spring, the ladies seemed to take advantage of the pleasant weather as many were on the promenade.

In the evening went up to the museum with Mr. Maginnis to see a piece called Nature's. It was pretty much of a humbug, though full of laughable incidents. The songs by the Orphean Family were excellent and brought down considerable applause. They were encored in every appearance, and in one instance they were twice encored. The performance on the violin by the Masters Jobst, though very good for the age of the youth, did not appear to be liked or appreciated by the audience, and at one time there was an attempt to hiss them off the stage. The last piece, a farce called Bamboozling, was very amusing, full of fun, and passed in the midst of applause & laughter.

After the museum was out, went up to Mrs. Wood's in Arch Street below 9th to see where my sister had gone to attend a sociable, which I had neglected to ask her before her going. Found it was at a Mr. Taylor's in Schuylkill 7th Street near Arch. On my way up met her coming down Arch Street in company with Miss H.A. Myers, Miss Belangee, and others. Turned about and went home with her.

19 November 1846. During the night it blew a tremendous heavy gale which I have no doubt has done much injury.

20 November 1846. In the evening about 1/4 past 8 called on Miss Louisa M. Clarke remained until about 1/2 past 9, as I met Mr. Dayton there. After leaving went up home, and sat in Ma's room with her until about 10 o'clock, then went down stairs and went out with Mr. Maginnis to get some oysters at a house in 7th above Chestnut.

21 November 1846. Spent the evening at home in my mother's room. Colonel Tucker, Mrs. O'Farrell & daughter Janett, Miss Pricilla Nicholson and Mr. Maginnis spent the greater part of the evening. We had a very pleasant evening. About 10 o'clock Maginnis and I went up and got some oysters.

22 November 1846. Left Philadelphia this morning in the Steamer Trenton for Burlington. Had a considerable chat with Mr. Hewett, the music teacher at St. Mary's Hall on my way up. Met Mr. Welch on the wharf, and he and I went up to the Baptist Church.

After Church Mr. Welch and I walked down to see the Episcopal Church out, but he becoming tired of waiting, left me. After church was out walked home with Miss Emma Parker, then went to the Temperance House and got my dinner. Called down for Welch and we then went down as far as St. Mary's Hall, returned by way of Pearl Street. Met the young ladies of the school, many quite pretty, and had some sly glances with some. Then went up to church and started for Philadelphia.

23 November 1846. Today was decidedly the coldest day of the season, though it cannot be compared with the same day of the month last year, the cold then having been severe enough to form ice along the shores of the Delaware. The wind blew furiously from the N.W. during most of the day, carrying the dust in eddies, causing much annoyance to those who were exposed to its fury. What with screening their eyes from the dust, and holding on to cloak and hat, people have much to do to make headway against it.

Was at the office during the day, and in the evening up at the 2nd sociable at which I met the Misses Harriet and Mary Carter this evening. We had a very pleasant time in dancing, chatting &c.

24 November 1846. Went up to see the Misses Leeds. Just before arriving at the door of our boardinghouse in going home, met Messrs. Maginnis & Prout. Mr. Maginnis invited us to take some oysters with them. All went up to the new oyster saloon at the N.E. corner of Delaware 6th, 4 Chestnut Street. It is a splendid affair and has been open but a few days. We had some very nice stewed oysters, porter, &c.

25 November 1846. At about 1/2 past 6 a violent snow storm commenced which continued until about 1/2 past 9. It covered the house tops and some of the pavements, which reminded us that winter was upon us. The storm came with a tremendous gale. I have no doubt but it has done considerable damage.

At the office all day, and in the evening about 8 o'clock started to go up to Miss Belangee's in Green Street below 5th for my sister. I was almost blown away in going up. It was certainly one of the most disagreeable walks I have had for a long time.

26 November 1846. It has pleased the Governor of this Commonwealth to dedicate this day, by proclamation, to public thanksgiving to Almighty God, for the benefits which He has been pleased to pour out upon the Citizens of this Commonwealth; and it will please a majority of those Citizens undoubtedly to unite in some public manifestation of respect for the recommendation of the Chief Magistrate, and of recognition of a supernatural power, whose kindness has been extended to us all this year past, in health and general prosperity, and whose mercy is over all His works. There are those who deny the propriety of any such public designation of general thanksgiving and as such sustain their opinions with themselves, and insure respect for it in others, by the daily recognition of God's goodness, displayed in their deportment. They are safe from censure on account of their opinion, and have additional cause for thanksgiving, that they live where they may entertain and express their views, however opposed to those in power.

The festival has been usually proclaimed at this season of the year, that it may stand in close connection with the in gathered harvest, and the closing and benefits of those labors of mind or body, that are appointed unto man.

Positively, we have an abundant cause of thanksgiving in the produce of the fields. The earth hath yielded the abundance of her increase, and the garners are swelled with the grain, that is the life of man.

Comparatively, the cause for thanksgiving is yet more forceful. While plenty marks the whole extent of our country, other nations are groaning in want. The miserable produce of a northern soil has been stunted, and the voice of the famishing goeth up to Him who hath withheld the fruits of the earth, and calleth aloud for the bread that the sweat of the brow can no longer earn.

The observance of today as a day of thanksgiving to the author of all good for the many blessings He has conferred upon this country was general: all the churches in the City celebrated Divine service, and in the morning there was almost a universal suspension of business. Stores throughout the city were closed, as were all the public offices, and the principal thoroughfares presented something of a gay holiday appearance, being enlivened by the ladies of our City to a considerable extent. The weather was rather favorable for promenades, being cold and clear for the most part, though somewhat blustering. The day was properly kept, and but for an occasional open store, and the gay and lively appearances of the streets, one would have supposed it to have been the sabbath. The places of amusement were open in the evening and I understand thronged. On the whole, the observance of thanksgiving was such as might have been expected from a moral, thoughtful and cheerful people.

The Streets this morning were covered with sleet and ice, which was the first ice of this season. The weather was excessively cold throughout the day, there being a change of some 25 or 30 degrees from the same hour of yesterday. Went up to St. Phillip's Church where I heard an excellent and affecting sermon from Mr. Neville. He spoke in a beautiful and eloquent style regarding our present difficulties with Mexico and of the distress which has been brought by our present war with that nation. He also spoke of the present prosperous condition of our country, and how thankful we ought to be for the present fruitfulness of our land while other countries are starving for want of the necessaries of life. In a word it was an eloquent and well delivered discourse.

27 November 1846. I understand that it was so cold last night that the ponds in the vicinity of the City were frozen strong enough for the boys to skate upon them this morning.

At the office all day, and in the evening in the parlor at home, sitting looking at Messrs. Welch and Maginnis playing backgammon. The Jackson family who are now boarding at our house, had quite a gathering in the parlor this evening, so much so as to exclude the other boarders. Was much amused with the singing of a Mr. Bellows. It was really like the name of the singer - "Windy." Dr. Grayson sang several very good songs. There was a Mrs. Vicent there, who together with the Jackson family, are trying to make up a match between the eldest Miss Jackson, a beautiful young lady of about 19, and the said Mr. Bellows, a reported rich bachelor of from 45 to 50. I think it shameful. Left the parlor about 1/2 past 8 & went to my mother's room.

28 November 1846. At the office all day, and spent the evening at home in mother's room. Miss J. O'Farrell and Mr. S. Ludlow, together with my sister, amused ourselves playing whist until 10 o'clock. I then went out as far as 7th and Chestnut Streets to get some oysters.

29 November 1846. In the evening I called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in looking as pretty and quite as agreeable as ever. Spent a pleasant evening.

30 November 1846. We had glorious weather today, clear, calm, mild and sunny, as if the weather was on its good behavior, and trying to smile itself to forgiveness for its unruly pranks of the few past days. Perhaps it was not well satisfied, for as evening came on the air grew snappish and quite cold.

In the evening went to the Arch Street Theater. The first piece called La Tour de Nesle, or the Chamber of Death was full of interest and very exciting. Herr Ryninger accomplished rather a hazardous task, that of walking on a single wire from the back of the stage to the front of the gallery in the third tier of boxes. I dreaded having him perform the feat, but he accomplished it without accident. The last piece was a Pantomime entitled Magic Pills or the Cenguiras Gift and was full of fun and incidents. The present mode of preparing quack nostrums was much ridiculed.

DECEMBER

2 December 1846. The ground was covered with snow this morning and the walking bad.

3 December 1846. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in and spent a pleasant evening. Met there two: Mr. Brewster & Mr. Dayton.

4 December 1846. At about 1/4 of 7 p.m. called up at Mr. Huestons at the N.W. corner of Girard and 11th Streets to meet him with some other gentlemen to go out to Miss Hoopes' to meet the sociable which was held there this week. Five of us went out in the omnibus. Met the ladies all there. I spent rather a dull evening. We left at about 11 o'clock and had a delightful walk home with Miss Eliz. Hueston. Miss Hoopes lives in West Philadelphia at the corner of the Darby Road & Market Street.

5 December 1846. There were large numbers of ladies and gentlemen on the promenade. The street was actually crowded.

6 December 1846. After church in the afternoon walked home with Miss Louisa M. Clarke. In the evening attended St. Andrew's Church with Miss L.M. Clarke. Mr. Clarke gave us a very excellent sermon, the church was very much crowded.

7 December 1846. White capped roofs met the waking eye this morning. The snow continued falling very fast until about 12 N. when it turned to rain and made awful walking.

A portion of the volunteers for Mexico departed this morning. For a few days past the city has had abundant evidence of the preparation for the movement, and its unusual character tended to create a strong interest in the minds of many who were not in the least disposed to join with the volunteers. A public committee was, and still is, in session to secure the means of provision against want for wives and children left behind and abroad. On the public streets, the modest blue uniform has drawn general attention, because the wearer was soon to be in peril of life in a distant country. The remaining portion of the volunteers depart on Wednesday next.

At the office the greater part of the day. Spent the evening playing whist.

9 December 1846. In the evening about 8 o'clock went up with Mr. Robert McK. Ludlow to Miss Myers to attend one of the sociables. Spent a pleasant evening dancing, &c. Met there Miss L[ouisa] Wood, Miss Dunlap, Miss Belangee and several other ladies and a number of gentlemen, among whom was the illustrious Joseph Merrifield, who accidentally stopped in and had the impudence to remain through the evening without invitation. Several hints were given to him by Miss Myers that his company was not wanted, but he was fool enough not to be able to see them.

The remaining company of volunteers for Mexico left this City this morning, and with their departure there was a recurrence of the scenes of Monday morning last. There was the same motley gathering of people of both sexes, some to gratify feelings of friendship by the interchange of parting salutations; some drawn hither by military feelings, and a kind of envy, perhaps, of those who were of the chosen and appointed number. Others look upon it as a novelty that would momentarily please; and others again who were there because the strong impulse of the heart could not be resisted because affection was too powerful, and the parting so painful that it needed all the reviewed farewells to accustom it to the sudden change. The Pennsylvania Line will not be found wanting, we know. Where there is service to be done and if danger is to be invoked for the general good, we feel confident that more gallant hearts, more effective soldiers, cannot be found to do battle in the plains and in the passes of Mexico. Their course and actions will be watched with deep interest, and since they are in the war, we shall feel a pride in their well doing so far as that is comprised in the duties of the officers and soldiers.

10 December 1846. Old Flora Pancost, our old cook, spent this evening with Ma. We were all glad to see her as it reminded us of old times.

12 December 1846. At the office all day, and in the evening called up to see Roberts [family] in 9th Street. They were all in with the exception of Sarah who was over at Miss C. Langstreths. She returned in a short time with Miss Langstreth, and I had trouble conversing since Miss Langstreth engrossed the conversation the rest of the evening, which I cannot say I was pleased with.

14 December 1846. In the evening about 8 o'clock went down with Mr. Welch to spend the evening with Mr. & Mrs. Frank Miller after receiving an invitation to be there for some little company. Spent the evening principally playing whist. I was playing the greater part of the evening with a Miss Bird as my partner.

16 December 1846. Spent the evening with Miss L.M. Clarke, found as usual Mr. James Dayton there.

17 December 1846. It commenced snowing this morning about 8 o'clock and continued without intermission until about 3. The wind blew a perfect gale from the N.E. through the day, and caused the snow to drift very much. There were a few sleighs out this afternoon, though the sleighing was anything but good. These were the first sleighs out this season.

Out attending to business nearly all the morning notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather.

18 December 1846. The streets are in an awful condition for walking. The snow is disappearing rapidly as the weather is quite mild again. At the office all day, and in the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater to see the new opera of Luli or the Switzers Bride. I did not like the songs generally but the some of choruses were very good, particularly the boat song. The music is all very fast. The chorus was very strong. Chapman as Jeru Baggs in the Wandering Minstrel, was very amusing and caused considerable applause.

19 December 1846. A large number on the promenade. In the evening went to the Museum with Lydia. The first piece played was the Lady of Lyons, Mr. Gallagher as Claude Melnotte and a Miss Frances A. Emery as Pauline. Parts of the piece were played very well, and other parts turned completely into a farce. In the garden scene, where Melnotte describes his home to Pauline, they were a complete failure. This is the most beautiful part of the piece when well played, the language is beautiful but they murdered it. The last piece entitled Peter Snails or The Armistice, was very amusing and went off in the midst of laughter. There were also two curiosities there in the shape of two fat boys one 7 and the other 9 years of age. The two, it is said, weigh 500 pounds. They are the fattest children of their age that I have yet seen.

20 December 1846. At St. Phillip's Church both in the morning and afternoon. Mr. Neville preached in the morning, and a gentleman in the afternoon preached a sermon entirely in the French language. If others did not understand more of it than I did it could not have done much good. In the evening went down to Trinity Church in Catherine Street below 2nd. Mr. Coleman gave us a very good sermon. The church has been much enlarged and improved in appearance since I was down last.

21 December 1846. At the office the greater part of the day. Took a stroll on Chestnut Street for about half an hour, found a large number on the promenade.

23 December 1846. At the office during the morning and in the afternoon at the recorder's office making an examination of title. In the evening went up to hear the Hutchinson family with Ma. They gave a concert in the Musical Fund Hall. This was the first time I heard them and I was much pleased with their singing. They introduced some abolition songs during the course of the evening which were not favorably received & I have no doubt will do them much injury in their profession if continued. The room was crowded. After the concert was over went home with Ma, and then went over to the office & wrote a mortgage. After leaving the office went up to "Guys" in 7th above Chestnut Street and got some oysters.

24 December 1846. At the recorder's office during the morning making examinations of title. Afternoon at the office. After tea went out to take a stroll around town. I first went over to Mr. Pepper's and got some head pins(33) to show Lydia, after which went up to Mr. Harbachers. Bought a black cake and sent it down to Ma anonymously. In going down Chestnut Street met Sam Mitchell and Mr. Carrington. We all strolled around town having our own fun, and then went to an oyster cellar in Market below 8th Street, and had an oyster supper. When we came out, which was about 1/4 of 10 o'clock, found it was raining. We concluded to all go home, as there was not much pleasure in walking around in the rain.

There was an immense concourse of people out on the streets this evening. At times on Chestnut Street it was almost impossible to get along. Generally speaking the streets were pretty quiet, though occasionally you would meet with a drunken party.

25 December 1846. Today is Christmas, the anniversary of the birthday of our Savior, and all around us the merry bells announce the joyful advent, and connect the glad some time with sacred associations. The weather today was gloomy and unpleasant, it rained during the greater part of the afternoon which prevented many a one from taking a ramble through the town. However the streets were very much crowded throughout the day. It cleared off beautifully about 5 p.m. and was clear and moonlit throughout the evening. The churches, I believe, were all full, and the places of public amusement too. I spent my day rather gloomily. In the morning, until 10 o'clock at the office, then went to St. Phillip's Church with Ma and Lydia and heard a very good sermon by Mr. Neville. After church walked home with sister (leaving Ma to commune) then went to the office remained there until about 1 when it came on to rain. I went up to church again for Ma with an umbrella, but found she had gone. Returned home again, found her there, and then went over to the office and wrote until 3 p.m. Then went over and got dinner at my boarding house. After that Bob Ludlow and myself started out to take a walk, but finding a heavy shower coming up went to the office and drank some wine. About 1/4 of 5 the weather cleared, so we again went out for a walk, but found the pavements wet. I soon returned to the office and wrote until after 6 p.m. Ludlow also went to his office. Spent the evening up at Mr. Edward Roberts. The family were all assembled there and we spent a very pleasant evening.

26 December 1846. There was a large crowd out, at times you could hardly get along. They seemed to be making up for yesterday.

29 December 1846. At the office all day, and in the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke. She looked prettier tonight than I ever saw her. Mr. Dayton came in a short time after I came into the parlor but soon left.

30 December 1846. Warm and spring like. In the evening went up to the Menagerie with James C. Welch. There were quite a number of people there. They have got it fitted up very handsomely.

31 December 1846. In the evening at home at a small party given by Miss Crim and Miss Nicholson. A large number of the boarders, and some invited guests, were present.

We spent a pleasant evening and all seemed to enjoy themselves in dancing, which they kept up until 1 a.m. or one hour into 1847.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Notes:

(1) Congress granted Samuel F.B. Morse $30,000 to build the first long distance telegraph line between Washington and Baltimore in 1843.

(2) Chaise: A two wheeled carriage for one or two persons with a calash (folding) top and the

body hung on leather straps, usually drawn by one horse, or a similar four wheel vehicle. Light carriage or pleasure cart. Webster's Collegiate Dictionary.

(3) Lewis Sharpe Ware (1817-1853).

(4) Watson does not list the Lombardy Poplar in his notes on Aboriginal Trees. Annals of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania, by John F. Watson, published by the author, Philadelphia 1844. Volume II, p. 491.

(5) Mrs. George Rex Graham, wife of the editor of Graham's Magazine, FJD

(6) The Arch Street Theater, at 6th and Arch Streets, designed by William Strickland, John Haviland, Architect, opened October 1, 1828. When it was razed in 1936, it was the second oldest playhouse in the country. It should not be confused with The Trocadero Theater (Trock) at 10th and Arch Streets, originally known as the Arch Street Opera House which opened in 1870 and is a theater to this date. Philadelphia Theaters, pp. xv and xvii. Se also Scarf and Westcott, p. 979.

(7) "The sloop Yorktown, launched 1839, ranged up and down the west coast of Africa as she labored to curtail the slave trade. She captured the slave ships Pons, Panther, and the Patcxent." Fighting Ships, Vol. VIII, p. 530.

(8) U.S. Naval Home, 24th and Gray's Ferry Avenue, for veterans, was designed by William Strickland and opened in 1833. 1972 Bulletin Almanac, The Bulletin Co., Philadelphia, 1972. p. 366.

(9) The John Stevens, side wheel passenger boat with an iron hull, built in Hoboken, NJ in 1845. Steam Navigation, p. 186.

(10) Silas Wright (1795-1847), governor of New York 1845-1847. Webster's Biographical Dictionary.

(11) Niagara, steamboat on the Hudson River, from New York to Albany, 1846. Steam Navigation, p. 82.

(12) The John Mason was one of the steamboats on the North River Line in New York in the 1840's. Steam Navigation, p. 63.

(13) Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, founded 1824. Comparative Guide to American Colleges.

(14) "The era of false teeth for the masses began [in Britain] in the 1850's with the American invention of sulpher-hardened rubber, that is vulcanite, for mounting the bases." The Strange Story of False Teeth, by John Woodforde, Universe Books, New York, 1970. p. 87. The United States was ahead of Europe in distributing dentures. Warner Erwin makes several references to selling them, but gives no explanation of his involvement.

(15) Edwin P. Christy (1815-1862). American actor and singer, founder and interlocutor of a well known black face minstrel troupe, The Christy Minstrels, organized in Buffalo, NY in 1842.

(16) Drinking bout.

(17) Cornelian, also Carnelian: a hard tough chalcedony (precious stone) that has a reddish color and is used in jewelry. Webster's Third International Dictionary.

(18) Joseph Smith (1805-1844), founder of Mormon community, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, moved the congregation from Palmyra, New York to Kirtland, Ohio, and thence to the town they renamed Nauvoo, Illinois on the East bank of the Mississippi in 1831. Opposition to polygamy in 1843 led to a schism and the murder of Smith by a mob in 1844 and the moving of the sect to The Great Salt Lake, Utah in 1846. Warner Erwin visited Nauvoo shortly before these happenings. Webster's Biographical Dictionary

(19) Marion City, Illionis, also called Green's Landing, no longer exists. It was probably absorbed by Quincey, Illinois. Quincey Public Library, 1994.

(20) Dr. Ezra Ely raised upward to $60,000 for the Grand Lodge [of Philadelphia] to found a college free of Sectanaryism and free to all poor orphans of Masons and children of poor Masons in Marion County about 9 miles from Marion City. The First Rosalie of Philadelphia, the diary of Charles McKaraher (1843-1845), by Rosalie Esmond Blizard, Heritage Books, Bowie, MD, 1994, pp. 23-24.

(21) North Bend, Ohio, Tomb of William Henry Harrison (1773-1841), ninth president of the United States.

(22) John P. Harrison, M.D. and his wife Mary Thomas Warner Harrison (1798- ), sister of Rebecca Ashton Warner (Mrs. Henry Erwin), the mother of J. Warner Erwin.

(23) Farmers College, established by Freeman Grant Cary, 1846. From an unpublished letter from The Cincinnati Historical Society, 1994.

(24) Mercantile Library, established 1835, located at 313 Walnut Street, Cincinnati, OH. ibid.

(25) Laudanum: a tincture of opium.

(26) Dr. Ezra Ely raised upward to $60,000 for the Grand Lodge [of Philadelphia] to found a college free of Sectanaryism and free to all poor orphans of Masons and children of poor Masons in Marion County about 9 miles from Marion City. The First Rosalie of Philadelphia, the diary of Charles McKaraher (1843-1845), by Rosalie Esmond Blizard, Heritage Books, Bowie, MD, 1994, pp. 23-24.

(27) The Germantown, a sloop of war, 939 tons, sponsored by Lavinia Fanning Watson, was launched at the Philadelphia Navy Yard on 22 August 1843. During the Civil War she was scuttled as Union forces evacuated Norfolk, VA, raised by the Confederates then sunk as an obstruction in the Elizabeth River. The hulk was sold at auction in 1864. Fighting Ships, Vol. III, p. 91.

(28) Girard College, a school for "poor white male orphans," provided for in the will of Stephen Girard (1750-1831). The general design is that of a Greek Temple. Construction was started in 1833. It opened on January 1, 1848. Scarf and Westcott, pp. 1946-1949.

(29) Sarcophagus and statue in the vestibule of the principal building of Girard College. Erected by the City of Philadelphia in memory of Stephen Girard and dedicated upon the removal of the statue of Mr. Girard from Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church, July 30, 1850. Scarf and Westcott, p.1877.

(30) "The sixth Washington, a revenue cutter, served the U.S. Navy from 1837 searching for slave ships. Whilein the coastal survey, stationed in the Chesapeake Bay in 1846, the Washington was demasted in a severe gale. Eleven men were lost overboard, including Lt. George M. Blake, theship's commanding officer." Fighting Ships, Vol. VIII, p. 125.

(31) Native American, Henry Lelar, was elected sheriff in 1846 and served to 1849. Philadelphia, A 300 Year History, Weigley, Wainwright and Wolf, W.W. Norton Co., New York 1982, p. 358.

(32) "Wheeled skates were used on the roads of Holland as far back as the 18th century, but it was the invention of the four wheeled skate, working on rubber springs, by J.L Plimpton of New York, in 1863, that made this amusement popular." Encyclopedia Britannica Eleventh Edition, New York 1911, Volume Vol.21, p.467. It is no wonder that Warner Erwin noted the "skates on wheels" 20 years before they were in vogue.

(33) Possibly hat pins.


1847

JANUARY

1 January 1847. The portals of another year have been opened, and we have our feet placed upon the dim and mysterious threshold. Within its brief cycle we may find the greatest amount of earthly blessings, good health, high hope, prosperous business and an unbroken series of social enjoyments; it may also be fraught with evils sufficient to crush the proudest spirit, and bow the heart in bitterness and anguish down to the dust. Every brief revolution of time presents diversities like these; every year has its pangs, its sorrows, its hopes, it fears, its anticipations, its regrets. Hope, the steadfast friend of man, naturally, however, springs up in his breast at such a season as this, and presents to him visions of coming joys, which, whether realized or not, contribute for the time by their illusions to his enjoyments, and impart a foretaste of the good thing that he anticipates. Happiness is the wish of all, the aim and motive of all our actions, and though the circumstances which diffuse it around our lives are not always completely within our control, yet much remains in our power, and good or evil is often the legitimate effect of one's own acts more than many are willing to believe.

The beginning of a new year seems to be an appropriate time to take a review of the past, for the better guidance of the future, and from the errors that have been committed to pluck the experience and knowledge which shall direct our steps wisely through that portion of the path of life we have yet to travel. In thus reverting to the past we shall find individually many duties omitted, the fulfillment of which would impart, at this time, additional satisfaction to our minds - many things done which have been a source of annoyance and regret. Let us endeavor, in the year upon which we have just entered, to avoid both causes of error, to resolve to act justly upon all occasions, to do what is right, no matter what the motive of interest, a passion which may tempt to the contrary. Those who act upon this rule will find themselves sustained in their misfortunes with the proud consciousness of rectitude, and in their prosperity receive additional gratification from the thought that it is the reward of their virtue and integrity. Gratitude for the good which we enjoy, and an endeavor to spread blessings among all classes of our fellow beings, will contribute to that internal satisfaction and serenity of spirit which makes every year of a good man's life a happy one.

The celebration of the first of the year, today, seemed to be universal, and the compliments of the season very freely passed around. A more beautiful New Year's Day never dawned in the latitude of forty. The weather seemed to be on its best behavior, and put on its brightest aspect. The atmosphere was mild and clear as a morning in May. Winter cast off its icy fetters, and indulged us with a foretaste of Spring. The effect was the most delightful and inspiring upon the feelings, and everyone seemed to feel its influence and to be inspired with generous warmth. The streets were crowded with gaily dressed and smiling faced ladies, and the beaux naturally reflected the same looks and smiles too. The usual wish of a happy New Year seemed to be no vain compliment, for everyone seemed as if he was really happy, and made up his mind to remain so. We trust that so pleasant a day may be a harbinger and prognostic of the whole year.

I was at the office with but little exception until 3 p.m., then went over to dinner, and at about 4 p.m returned to the office. A short time after Messrs. Welch, Maginnis & myself took a walk. The night was as light as day, and quite warm. I met Mr. Phillips on the steps, and we stood talking for about an hour, when I went up to Mr. & Mrs. Ware in Broad below Walnut having an invitation to spend the evening there where Ma & sister had been up spending the day. All the Roberts family were there and we spent quite a pleasant evening. Had a very nice oyster supper.

2 January 1847. In the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater with Messrs. Welch, Prout and Maginnis. Besides us four from Mrs. Crim's, there were eight others. The piece performed was an excellent one entitledThe Robbers, it has not been performed for ten years. Mr. Anderson sustained the principal character. The after piece was Did You Ever Send Your Wife to Burlington?, rather amusing.

3 January 1847. At St. Phillip's Church in the morning, Mr. Clark preached. Also went up there in the afternoon but found the body of the Church filled with Sunday school children, then left and went up to Grace Church, also found a Sunday school celebration going on there. In the evening about 1/2 past 6 called down for Miss Clarke to accompany her to Church, but found she was in Trenton. Went in however and sat conversing until about 1/2 past 8 with Mr. & Mrs. Clarke. Ma and sister went to Wilmington yesterday to be gone a week or two.

4 January 1847. In the evening Messrs. Samuel & Alexander Ludlow, Welch and myself had a game of whist.

5 January 1847. Clear, delightful and spring like weather, overcoats & cloaks have been unnecessary for several days with the exception of yesterday. In the evening Maginnis, Welch and myself went up to the Walnut Street Theater to see Forrest play Richelieu. He performed his character admirably, indeed it was one of the best pieces of acting I ever witnessed. He has a fine conception of the character and appears to be the result of great study. Mr. Forrest was well sustained this evening. The last piece, a farce entitled Highways and Byways, was very amusing and full of interest. The House was well filled. As usual our boarding house was well represented there being 10 there.

6 January 1847. In the evening went up to see a little company given by Mr. & Mrs. William. H. Smith in Vine Street below 3rd. I spent a delightful evening, and made the acquaintance of several pretty ladies. We spent the evening dancing, and had some very pretty singing and playing.

7 January 1847. Rained hard all day. About 1/2 past 2 p.m I never saw it rain harder, and it blew a perfect hurricane. Was out in the midst of the rain during the greater part of the morning attending to business. In the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater to see Forrest play Macbeth, King of Scotland. I cannot say I was much pleased, the cast was not good. Mrs. A. R. Blake played Lady Macbeth for the first time this evening.

The after piece was very amusing and well played, the name of it was The Happiest Day of My Life.

8 January 1847. The weather today was exceedingly cold, and contrasted greatly with the mildness and warmth of the several past weeks. The difference between the range of the thermometer and the two days immediately preceding was about 38¡. On Tuesday and Wednesday last farmers were plowing, but if this weather should continue a day or two, dealers in ice would be busy getting in their supply of the greatest luxuries of the summer season.

The weather of yesterday was so mild that the mercury ran up to 54¡, but a sudden change took place in the evening, and the cold increased so fast, as to sink the mercury 38¡ by this morning at sunrise when the mercury rested at 16¡ above zero, which is 16¡ below the freezing point.

At the office all day, and in the evening Mr. Welch and myself went up to a celebration of a Society in the Franklin Hall in 6th below Arch. Remained there but a short time and then called up to see the Misses Leeds. Found them both in and met Mr. Jenks there. I spent rather a dull evening and left a little before 10. On our way home stopped at Guys in 7th below Chestnut to get some oysters, met Bob McKinley there.

9 January 1847. At the office all day with the exception of about an hour in the afternoon occupied in taking a stroll in Chestnut Street. There were many ladies out, and many of them very pretty. Among them was one who attracted my attention for some time. I met her a number of times, when she looked and smiled as if acquainted. I afterwards succeeded in finding out her name, which was Miss Kirk.(1) She lives at No. 2 Colonnade Row, and I think I shall make strong endeavors to make her acquaintance, as she is remarkably pretty. I noticed her for the first time on the street a few days since.

10 January 1847. About 10 a.m. commenced sprinkling snow which continued at intervals until about 1 p.m. when it commenced in real earnest. The flakes seemed, however, to come down lazily and settle quietly, as if they intended to make a stay with us, & the accumulated mass, which covered the earth this evening at bed time, gave fair promise of good sleighing, a luxury which for some years past has been rarely enjoyed in this meridian.

Went up to St. Luke's Church this morning with Mr. Maginnis. Sat in Mr. Burroughs' pew, and heard a very good sermon from Mr. Howe. After Church went home and did not go out again. After dinner went up to Mr. Sentnay's room & smoked a cigar with Mr. Maginnis then went down into the parlor about 4. Was very much amused with people falling, &c.

11 January 1847. Cloudy and the snow continued falling slowly until about 12 N, but towards evening it cleared up. The snow is about 8 inches deep and the sleighing excellent, being the first we have had this season.

At the office all day, and in the evening Messrs. Lloyd, Prout, Maginnis and myself hired a sleigh and pair of horses and drove out to the falls of Schuylkill. On our way out stopped at a tavern in which we found a pretty hard party, among whom were an uncertain class of females dancing a straight forward with a number of rough fellows. They had for music a tambourine violin. We remained there long enough to get warm and then drove on to the falls and stopped at Boly Evans. Found a large number of persons there. Met Mr. Sentnay and Parry Wood and with them the youngest Miss Shankland and her cousin. After getting some whiskey punch, &c. drove in as far as the "Moss Cottage" where we met Sentnay and his party again. We had considerable sport here in dancing, &c.

12 January 1847. I had quite an adventure today at about 1 o'clock. The circumstances of the case were these. Last summer in New York I met a very pretty young lady by the name of Miss Wilson from Wilmington, Delaware. Last Saturday afternoon I met on the Street a young lady whose face was quite familiar, but I could not tell where to place her. I met her a number of times, and every time she looked as if she recognized me. I met Mr. Toppan who informed me she was a Miss Kirk, but this turned out to be a mistake, as the lady she was with was of that name, and not the lady in question. On Sunday evening in a casual conversation with Mr. Alexander Ludlow about young ladies in Wilmington, Delaware, he asked me if I knew a Miss Williamson of that place. I at once associated her name with that of Miss Wilson who I met last Summer in New York, and concluded the young lady that I had met so often on Chestnut Street must be the Miss Wilson. At once resolved to make a call on her, so I took the address and this morning called on her. I was much surprised on the lady's coming into the parlor to find that I did not know her at all, and that I had been led into a mistake. The worst of it was that I could not explain myself, for I did not know until after my return home, & upon reference to my journal, that the lady I wanted to see was Miss Wilson instead of Miss Williamson. After some little explanation and considerable embarrassment on the part of the lady, I returned heartily glad to get out of so unpleasant a situation. The young lady was very pretty, and the best of the joke was, that she gave me an invitation to call again. In a few words the whole difficulty arose thus:

About four years ago when I was in Wilmington I was introduced into the family of the Misses Williamson, and when introduced to Miss Wilson last summer, I associated her name with that of the Misses Williamson and supposed they were one and the same family, and not having seen each other for a long while had been forgotten on both sides. When Mr. Ludlow mentioned the Misses Williamson were in town I at once supposed they were the ladies I had met last summer. I think I must call again as she was very pretty & polite and gave me an invitation.

In the evening I went up to Miss Kirk's at No. 2 Colonnade Row to try and find the Miss Wilson I am in search of. The windows being open, I saw there was a room full of company, among whom I did not see the lady I was in search of so I concluded to make a day call, and if she was stopping there could see her alone. On my way home stopped and got some oysters.

13 January 1847. The merry sound of sleigh bells still continued today. There was much ice in the river today, and the ferry boats had great difficulty in crossing. At the office all day, and in the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater with Silas George and J.C. Welch to see Forrest in The Broker of Bogota. I was much pleased with the piece; it was full of interest and excitement and many parts affecting. Between the pieces Miss Walters gave us an exhibition of some very pretty dancing. In the after piece, entitled The House Dog, she was full of fun and frolic and drew down much applause and many a hearty laugh. Chapman, as Dust, the House Dog, was the most amusing, though we will not except Mrs. Thayer as Betty Buncle. This piece is something on the same order as the mummery.

14 January 1847. Cloudy all day and the weather moderated very much which soon did away with the snow and sleighing. The walking was very bad throughout the day.

15 January 1847. About 2 p.m called up to see Miss Wilson from Wilmington, Delaware. She is staying at Miss Kirk's, No. 2 Colonnade Row. She looked very pretty today. She is the lady that I have met so often on the street lately, and have not known where to place her though her face was quite familiar.

In the evening about 8 1/4 o'clock went around to the Sociable which met at Miss Hinman's, met the Misses Carter, the Misses Hueston, and the other members generally. I only remained about an hour and a half, then went out and got some oysters & then home, found the boarders in the parlor dancing, I danced once with the eldest Miss Jackson.

16 January 1847. I left Philadelphia this morning in the 8 o'clock Baltimore train of cars for Wilmington. Arrived at about 10 o'clock without accident or incident. Our car ran into a coal yard on Broad Street below Walnut much to our surprise, caused by the switch being out of place.

After attending to my business, walked out through mud about 2 inches deep (certainly not very pleasant) to Dr. Gibbons where I found mother and sister quite well and glad to see me. The Gibbons family were also all well. Remained for dinner, after which Edward Gibbons and I went into the office and smoked a cigar. About 4 o'clock went down into town again, called to see Miss Wilson, sister to the one now in town, but did not find her in. However, I went in, sat a while and saw her mother and father.

In the evening all went over to see Mr. & Mrs. O.J. Adams and daughter. We had considerable difficulty getting through the mud. Spent a delightful evening dancing, &c. Met there Miss Caroline Bowne of Ohio. She is a very beautiful looking girl, with a fine noble figure. She is also very agreeable. The eldest Miss Adams (Isabella) is not very pretty but very ladylike and agreeable in her manners. The next daughter is quite pretty though as yet quite young. The youngest is one who will be, and is now, very pretty. She is quite a child. We left about 11 o'clock and had very little difficulty in getting home as the road was frozen.

17 January 1847. Ice made plentifully again last night. Got up this morning about 20 m. of 8, breakfasted at 1/2 past 9, and at about 1/4 past 10 called over at Mr. Adams to wait upon Miss Bowne and Isabella Adams to Episcopal Church.(2) Mr. Cullough preached. After Church we stopped at Miss Adams on King Street where we waited until the carriage sent in for us. We all got in and I drove out to Mr. Adams and went in. Upon my attempting to leave, both Mrs. Adams and the young ladies requested me to dine and stay with them which I consented with pleasure to do. We had a very fine dinner, and I remained until about 3 o'clock.

I found Miss Isabella Adams to be a very agreeable and pleasant young lady. I was much more pleased with her when I became better acquainted. She improves very much on acquaintance. Miss Bowne is also very agreeable and looks much prettier by daylight than at night. She is also a very agreeable lady in her Manners.

18 January 1847. I got up this morning at about 1/2 past 6, and at 7 got breakfast. After bidding the family farewell, I started for the cars on foot with Rodmond and James Gibbons. Ma and Lydia rode down. At 8 o'clock left Wilmington, and after a rather tedious ride of 2 1/2 hours arrived at Philadelphia without accident or incident.

At the office from 11 until 6 1/4 p.m. and in the evening went to see the "Kean's" in Ion. I was not as much pleased with this piece as I expected. It is very tame, and very little interest throughout. Mrs. Kean as Ion played admirably, but Mr. Kean's acting, I thought, quite poor, certainly not as good as some of the stock actors. Miss Crocker as Clemathe played very well. Miss Walters danced a very pretty dance, called Pas Tambourine from the ballet Urielle. The after piece was full of fun and interest, name Deaf as a Post.

19 January 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening called up to see Miss Anne Wilson of Wilmington, Delaware at Miss Kirk's in Chestnut Street, 2nd door above Schuylkill 8th Street. I found her in and also Miss Kirk, met a Mr. Ridgway there. Miss Wilson looked very pretty and fascinating, and I spent a very pleasant evening in her company. She is a lady full of fun and life, and one with whom you could not help but enjoy yourself.

21 January 1847. Clear and very cold all day and throughout the evening. Ice made throughout the day. At the office all day, and in the evening went down to a small party given by Mr. and Mrs. F.A. Godwin. They live in Pine Street, South side above 5th. Mr. J.C. Welch was with me. I spent rather a pleasant evening dancing, &c. About 1/2 past 11 had a very fine oyster supper for the benefit of the inward man. To take the company all together there was not a pretty girl among them, though several fine looking.

22 January 1847. Ice made in my room last night. The Schuylkill River is frozen over and hundreds people on it today skating. The Delaware River is frozen over at Burlington, and was fast this morning opposite the City. At the office all day, and in the evening went down to a small company at Edward P. Border's. Among the ladies met Miss Levinia Williamson, sister to the lady that I had the adventure with in calling upon her some days since. She is quite pretty and agreeable in her manners.

23 January 1847. At the office during the morning, and during the afternoon about 2 o'clock J.C. Welch & myself went on the Schuylkill above the dam to skate. There were a large number of persons on the ice, and the skating very fine. Left at about 1/2 past 4, went down to Harding's, got some porter, and then started for the other side of the river. In crossing the bridge met the younger Mr. Feltz. We all three took the omnibus and rode into town. Spent the evening until about 9 o'clock in playing whist.

24 January 1847. Cloudy all day with the appearance of rain or snow. It rained for a short time about 3 p.m. Attended Grace Church in the morning with Lydia, heard a very excellent sermon from Mr. Suddards. In the afternoon attended St. Andrew's Church. Mr. Clark delivered a very beautiful and affecting discourse.

After tea called up at Miss Kirk's for Miss Wilson to accompany her to St. Phillip's Church according to engagement. The Misses Kirk wished to go to Mr. Parker's Church at the corner of Clinton and 10th Streets. We concluded to go too. Mr. Parker preached a sermon on Temperance which was very good but rather long. He advanced some arguments which I never heard mentioned before in that cause. After Church waited upon Miss Wilson home.

25 January 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening went up to a party given by the Misses Leeds. J.C. Welch went up with me. Spent a very pleasant evening and left at about 1 a.m. I was much amused with an Englishman (who accompanied Miss Graves) in his peculiar mode of dancing, and also for the peculiarity of a certain pair of whiskers & moustache.

26 January 1847. In the evening in Mr. Ludlow's room until about 1/2 past 8 playing whist. Afterwards went into Ma's room and played whist until 1/4 past 10.

27 January 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening about 8 o'clock went in to see Miss Lizzy Ludlow, being my first visit since her return from New York. Spent the evening pleasantly playing speculation with cards.

28 January 1847. In the evening at 1/4 of 8 went up to the "Odd Fellows" oyster saloon to see Mr. Samuel Bonnell with whom I had an engagement to call upon Miss Kate Smith,(3) who lives in 8th Street above Green. She is a young lady who formerly was at St. Mary's boarding school. This was my first visit. I spent a very pleasant evening. Met a cousin of Miss K. Smith's, a Miss Mary Ann Smith from Reading. She is a very pretty and agreeable young lady.

We amused ourselves through the greater part of the evening playing whist. After becoming tired of that game I proposed a little trick with cards viz. to place ten cards in a row and to place them in 5 parcels of two each by jumping over two each time. We all tried for about one hour but could not succeed, and finally Mr. Leibert bet me a 12 pound black cake that it could not be done, which I took up. I am to prove that it can be done next Wednesday night. We had quite an animated discussion about it and a great deal of fun. Mr. Leibert being confident of winning the bet wanted to bet more, but I thought I had "stuck" him enough.

29 January 1847. A cloudy, raw damp and rainy day. Rained very hard during the evening. At the office all day. Spent the evening at home in my mother's room playing whist until about 1/2 past 10, then went down in the dining room with Maginnis & smoked a cigar.

30 January 1847. Very unpleasant out on account of a high wind that prevailed throughout the day and evening. At the office during the morning and in the afternoon until about 5 o'clock, then went out to take a little walk. I joined Miss Anne Wilson of Wilmington, Delaware on Chestnut Street just above 5th and walked out with her to Miss Kirk's in Chestnut above Schuylkill 8th Street.

31 January 1847. Started this morning in the 9 o'clock line for Burlington, where we arrived after a pleasant ride at about 1/4 past 10. Were obliged to go around the Island. Found considerable floating ice in the river. Went to St. Mary's Church in the morning and heard the Bishop both this morning and this afternoon. I noticed a very pretty young lady among the scholars of St. Mary's Hall, she appeared to be full of fun and life & rather disposed to flirt a little. I found (through Miss Lippincott) her name to be Miss Anna Redfield. 8 o'clock started for Philadelphia.

FEBRUARY

1 February 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening Mr. J.G. Welch and myself went up to spend the evening with the Misses Leeds. Just as we entered the house we found them ready with their cloaks and bonnets on to go out, as we supposed to spend the evening sociably. They invited us to accompany them, and they went down to Mr. John Anspach, No. 345 N. 6th opposite Spring Garden Street.

Upon entering the house Mr. Welch and I were very much surprised that there was to be some company there, as neither of us were prepared in our dress to attend a party, particularly myself, as I had an old pair of pants and coat, and not at all dressed for a company. But as we were in for it were obliged to go in. I spent a very pleasant evening, was introduced to Miss Amanda Wanner, a very pretty girl, stepdaughter of Mr. Anspach. She was very agreeable and interesting in her manners as well as pretty. I had met her before but was never introduced. Mr. Anspach's house is furnished in a most beautiful manner. I never saw more taste displayed in my life. Everything seemed to be in harmony and good keeping. The furniture, glasses &c. were of the most superb order. The parlors opened into a beautiful conservatory which was lit with gas. He has something like 50 different rarities of japonicas besides numerous other flowers. Left at about 1/2 past 11, waited upon the Misses Leeds home, and then went home ourselves, stopping in at "Guys" in 7th below Chestnut to get some oysters, &c.

2 February 1847. In the evening at about 1/2 past 7 Mr. Chambers called for me to go up to see Miss Wilson at Miss Kirk's. We sat for a short time in our room and then went up, found Miss Kirk and Miss Wilson both in. Spent a pleasant evening and left at about 10 o'clock. I then went up to the Roberts' in 9th Street for Ma. She had gone to bed. I returned home, went to the parlor, sat for a short time & then went out with Maginnis & got some oysters.

3 February 1847. Poured rain until about 2 1/2 p.m., and the wind blew a perfect hurricane all day and night, blowing down and unroofing houses, tearing up trees, blowing down awnings, turning umbrellas inside out &c., &c. I have no doubt but we will hear of some fearful accidents both on sea and land in the course of a day or two. It did not rain much after 3 p.m. About 5 p.m. the wind shifted and for a time wore the appearance of clearing. About 12 p.m. had a slight fall of snow and it became quite cold.

I was out during the greater part of the morning attending to business. About 1 p.m. called to see Miss Sally Roberts to offer my services to wait upon her to Miss Mitchell's this evening. At the office during the afternoon. After tea dressed myself, and about 1/4 of 8 my chaise called which took me up to Miss Mary C. Smith's (or Kate Smith as she is commonly called) to decide the bet I made last Thursday with Mr. Leibert in reference to the placing of 10 cards in 5 parcels each time jumping over two.

Leibert did not make his appearance. I suppose being afraid of hearing too much sport made of him; he however acted the part of a gentleman and sent the bet, viz., two six pound cakes, one black and the other pound cake. He also sent two quarts of ice cream and other cakes. I remained but about 20 minutes having to wait upon Miss Sally Roberts & sister to a party given by Mr. & Mrs. Mitchell & daughter. We are, however, to meet tomorrow at Miss Smith's to cut the cake and have a little frolic. After leaving Miss Smith's drove down for Sally Roberts, took her in and then drove down home for Lydia.

Entered the room about 9 o'clock with Sally and sister. The first lady that met my eye was Miss Louisa M. Clarke. I have not been to see her for the last 5 weeks, for the simple reason that I have been trying to forget her. I thought that I had weaned my love from her, but with this meeting it returned two fold. I could not keep myself away from her, she looked more interesting, more lively, more charming than ever. I shall resume my visits, I cannot help it, and I will gain her if I can. I never saw one I loved so well before. She is one that has won my love, and I cannot give her up. I never loved, as I do her. She, I regret to say, looked very unwell this evening. I hope she may soon recover. I spent the greater part of the evening in her company, danced with her twice. I spent a very agreeable evening and left at about 1/2 past 12. Miss Clarke left before I did, but it seemed as soon as she had gone, all that had attracted me had fled, and I felt no further desire to remain. I left in a very few minutes afterwards though they wanted us to stay and dance another cotillion.

4 February 1847. In the evening about 1/4 of 8 went up to the Odd Fellows Oyster Saloon, where I met Mr. Samuel Bonnell. We started up to see Miss Mary C. Smith as per engagement, as this was the evening appointed to cut the cake won by me. Met a Miss Reeves there. Mr. Leibert did not make an appearance, nor has he since the bet was lost. We spent a very merry time in drinking egg nog & eating cake, &c., &c.

5 February 1847. In the evening went down at Miss L.M. Clarke's. As usual she looked pretty and interesting. I spent a very pleasant evening, as I always do in her company. I have not been there for about 5 weeks until this evening on account of certain occurrences which I do not think necessary to place on these pages. But I hope what has prevented me from visiting her will not hereafter. Met there a Mr. Gibbons and a Mr. Sulger.

6 February 1847. I was very unwell throughout the day. I had a very bad cold and a headache.

7 February 1847. At about 1/2 past 7 or 1/4 of 8 it commenced snowing & hailing and continued during the evening. Not feeling very well this morning did not go out. However, in the afternoon feeling much better walked up as far as St. Phillip's Church. Did not go in, but returned as far as St. James. Went in and remained during the service. Heard rather a dull sermon. About 1/4 past 6 called down for Miss Clarke to accompany her to Church. We started at about 1/2 past 6 having to go very early as the Church is always very much crowded. On my way to Church had a very interesting conversation with Miss Clarke in which I had some explications very satisfactory to me. We had an excellent sermon from the Reverend Mr. Clark from the text of "The summer is past, and the harvest is over, and we are not saved." I never heard a more beautiful sermon than that preached this evening.

When Church was out found it snowing very fast and the walking very wet. I was rather in a quandary how to get my lady home, but as good luck would have it I succeeded in getting a chaise, and we got home without difficulty, much to my gratification as I feared Miss Clarke would take cold in so long a walk. I went in and remained about 1/2 an hour, and then went home through the snow, which did not certainly do my cold any good.

8 February 1847. Clear and quite mild all day, the snow of last night disappeared rapidly, making very bad walking.

9 February 1847. In the evening about 1/2 past 8 went up to a party given by Miss Mary C. Smith. There were from 60 to 70 others and among the ladies some very pretty ones. From some cause or other, I know not what, I spent a very dull evening. It was not the fault either of the Misses Mary C. or Mary Anne Smith, because they did everything in their power to make the evening pass agreeably. The other portion of the company appeared to enjoy themselves. I danced several times. They had very good hired music. Did not go in to the supper room, not feeling any desire to eat. Met this evening Mr. Leibert the first time since the bet. He did not seemed disposed to say anything about it, which I soon discovered, and did not mention it to him.

10 February 1847. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, and as usual when in her company spent a very pleasant evening. She looked remarkably pretty. Left at about 1/2 past 10 p.m. On my way home stopped in at "Our House" and took a whiskey punch. While there Mr. Harry Adams came in and he drank with me.

11 February 1847. At the office all day and in the evening attended a party given by Miss Emma Mulford at her boarding house, Mrs. Carr's(4) at No. 131 South 3rd Street. I accompanied Lydia and we entered the room about 1/4 past 9. I spent a delightful evening in dancing, &c. We had very good music for dancing, a violin, violoncello, & flagellate. The supper was served at about 1/2 past 12 in good taste and plenty, but no liquors. I was a great deal in the company of the Misses Smith this evening, and admire them more, the more I see of them. I was introduced to two ladies this evening. I do not remember their names, nor does it matter much as they were neither agreeable nor pleasant to me.

12 February 1847. In the evening went down to meet the Sociable which met at the Misses Carter's this evening. Nearly all the company were present. We had a very pleasant time. In the course of the evening we had a number of tableaus(5) which were well gotten up and quite pretty.

13 February 1847. In the evening at home in my mother's room until about 10 o'clock, then went down into the parlor where I remained for some 15 minutes when a party of us went up into Samuel Ludlow's room, having an invitation to an oyster supper given by him. On account of some mistake did not get our oysters until 1/2 past 11. We had a merry time and the drinking and toasting ran high among some until about 1/2 past 1 a.m.

Mr. Prout became very unruly, in fact deranged, so that it exerted all the force of Mr. J.C. Welch and myself to make him go upstairs to bed. And when we got him up he insisted it was not his room, and he broke loose and ran downstairs. I remained with him until 1/2 past 2, and Robert Ludlow & J.C. Welch until 1/4 of 5, as it was not safe to leave him alone. Every 5 or 10 minutes he would jump up and start for the door, uttering some wild expressions. I never saw anybody act so singularly. The whole house was in an uproar, and believe half the ladies frightened half to death.

14 February 1847. Never do I remember a more delightful day. It was neither too cool nor too warm, just such a one as was suitable for walking. At St. Phillip's Church in the morning. Mr. Neville gave us an excellent sermon. After Church walked home with Miss L.M. Clarke, as usual pleasant and agreeable.

Mr. James of Rising Sun, Indiana went to Church today with sister & Ma, and dined with us in the "Schuylkill House," the last house on Chestnut Street before coming to the Schuylkill. Found him as usual, remained about 20 minutes, and then continued our walk over the Market Street Bridge, up as far as Hardings, crossed the Wire Bridge,(6) walked around Fair Mount, up the steps to the basins, and finally home.

15 February 1847. At the office until 12 N, then took a walk as far as 2nd and Green with James C. Welch to see our bootmaker. From there called up to make my party call on Miss Kate Smith in 8th Street above Green. Spent about 20 m. with her and her cousin Mary Ann Smith, very pleasantly. After leaving there returned to the office, stopping one or two places on my road. Remained at the office but a few minutes, then called over at our house for Lydia to make a party call on Miss Emma Mulford.

16 February 1847. There was considerable snow on the ground this morning, which, with the rain that commenced to fall in the afternoon, made miserable walking. The rain continued through the evening. Spent the evening at home in my mother's room. We first had two games of whist, Messrs. J.C. Welch, Samuel Ludlow, my sister and self. Miss Anna Ludlow and Mr. Maginnis coming in we gave up whist and played "Speculation" so as we could all join in. Spent a very pleasant evening. Ma met with a misfortune in attempting to lift a five gallon demijohn of wine. It fell and broke, and lost all of the wine which was a very superior article. We lost about 3 gallons, with $4 per gallon.

17 February 1847. In the evening called down to see Miss L. M. Clarke, but found she had left for Washington this morning. I regretted exceedingly not having seen her before she started. I suppose she will remain until the end of the session.

18 February 1847. In the evening Ma, sister and myself went over to Mr. & Mrs. Ludlow's room per engagement. Her family were all there. We spent the evening very pleasantly playing Speculation, &c. until about 12 past 10, when we all went over to Samuel and Robert Ludlow's room, where we had a very nice oyster supper, after which ice cream, wine, cake, &c.

19 February 1847. In the evening about 8 p.m. called down to see Frank & Rodmond Gibbons at their brother Henry's house. Frank was not in, and found Rodmond had changed his residence. I then went to find it but did not succeed. Being in the neighborhood of 4th and Spruce called upon Miss Caroline Snyder.

20 February 1847. In the evening called down to see Frank Gibbons, went in & saw Mrs. Gibbons but Frank was not at home.

21 February 1847. At St. Andrew's Church in the morning. The day being so disagreeable did not go out after returning home.

22 February 1847. Today was rather an unpleasant one for the celebration of Washington's birthday. In the morning the pavements were covered with sleet. Afterwards commenced hailing, and finally commenced snowing, which continued until late in the night. There were some military companies out celebrating the day, but I think soldiering was but poor fun. St. Peter's and Christ Church bells rung out a merry peal in celebration of the day.

At the office all day, and in the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater to see the "Keans" in Richard the 3rd. Mr. Charles Kean as Richard performed his part admirably, he appeared to have the right conception of the character, and one that suited me exactly. Mr. Leman played Henry the 6th with much feeling. The pageantry, dresses, &c., &c. were beautiful in the extreme. I never saw a play got up in better taste. The after piece entitled Spring Gardens was, as most farces, amusing in its way, and brought down some applause. Theater out about 1/2 past 11.

23 February 1847. After tea called down to see Mrs. Clarke, and to enquire about her daughter who is now in Washington. Found her at home and as agreeable as ever. She showed me Louisa's Valentines among which I saw mine, but of course could say nothing. Left about 8 o'clock and went up to the oyster saloon of the Odd fellows Hall, where I was to meet Welch. We then went up to see the Misses Leeds.

25 February 1847. It commenced snowing this morning before daylight, and continued in regular old-fashioned style until about 12 N when the snow ceased falling and it cleared up. There was some 5 inches of snow on the ground, which made fine sleighing. The sun, however, made it through rapidly.

We had quite a disturbance this evening in the house, about tea time. It appears that a Mr. Bellows from New York now stopping at our house had, during the afternoon, in the presence of ladies, insulted Aikman Welch. As soon as the ladies left the parlors, Welch mounted and knocked him down, and was giving it to him roundly when the boarders separated them. In coming out from tea Welch knocked him down again, and got his knee on his breast. He would, no doubt, have injured Bellows very much had they not been separated. In the melee Bellows lost his wig which mortified him very much. He was rather intoxicated. The ladies as well as the boarders generally approved of Welch, of course, as they all admitted he had been insulted. Bellows is a presuming character, and I have no doubt but what his pride will now be lessened. I think he had better "be taken with a leaving."

26 February 1847. At the office in the morning until about 1/4 past 10, when Mr. Augustus Sentnay called to take me sleighing. We rode all over the City and then out to the "Moss Cottage." He has a splendid animal, the fastest I ever rode behind, he would trot his mile in 2 minutes 40 seconds. We passed everything on the road. In the evening went up to Guy's and got some oysters.

27 February 1847. In the evening after tea in the parlor until about 8 o'clock. There were a number of young men in the parlor, the elder Mr. Felters got his violin, and we had a regular dance and a great deal of sport.

28 February 1847. At Grace Church in the morning with Ma & Lydia, after which went up to Algernon S. Roberts to dine. Found the family all well. After dinner went up to the sitting room with Cuthert(7) & Sydney and smoked cigars until about 3 o'clock. Then took a walk out to Fairmount with Sidney to see the freshet occasioned by the late heavy rains and melting of the snow. The water was very high on the dam.

After leaving Fairmount crossed the Bridge to "Handings Hotel." The walking was very muddy. In the evening went up to St. Phillip's Church and took a seat in Mr. Clarke's pew. None of his family were there. Some officious fellow with "specks" on kept throwing my pew door open for persons coming in. He finally threw me out of my seat entirely and I had to leave the church. This was Confirmation evening.

MARCH

1 March 1847. Clear, cold and blustering. Evening clear and moonlight. To use an old expression, March "came in like a lion."

3 March 1847. After tea went over to the office with J.C. Welch, and made some whiskey punch, which we drank and found very fine.

4 March 1847. At the office all day until 5 p.m. when J.C. Welch and I took a walk out to see Colonel Tucker on Chestnut Street near the Schuylkill River. In the evening Welch and I want up to the Circus to see the Merchant Steed of Syracuse, in other words, Damon & Pythias - cut up and murdered in some parts. The pageantry was beautiful indeed and the piece was gotten up well so far as the scenery. The ponies, "Romeo & Juliet," were well trained and performed well. The Pony races were full of fun and very amusing.

5 March 1847. In the evening about 1/4 of 8 went up to the oyster saloon of the "Odd Fellows Hall" where I had an engagement to meet Samuel Bonnell to go up to see Miss Mary C. (Kate) Smith. Both the Misses Smith were as agreeable as ever, and their amiable brother as disagreeable as ever during the short time he was in the parlor.

6 March 1847. Got up this morning about 1/4 of 7, got breakfast about 20 m. of 8 and then went over to the office, remained but a few minutes and then went up to the Reading cars at the corner of Broad and Vine Streets to see Miss Mary Ann Smith of Reading off. She leaves today for home. Met Mr. Samuel Bonnell at the depot. A few minutes after I got up there Miss Smith came up in a chaise with her cousin Henry Smith, who this morning was disagreeable and behaved as ungentlemanly as ever. After Mr. Smith left, Bonnell and I went into the cars, and had quite a pleasant chat of about half an hour with Miss Smith. We rode up as far as Broad and Willow, when we bade her farewell and left the cars. Spent the evening at home, part of the time in my mother's room and the balance in the parlor. Lydia has been quite sick today and yesterday. She appears to have some fever.

7 March 1847. At St. Phillip's Church in the morning, sat in Mr. Clarke's pew. Mr. Neville preached a very beautiful discourse on the sufferings of the poor from famine in Europe. A collection was taken up. After Church, walked home with Miss Louisa Clarke. She returned from Washington last Thursday. In the afternoon walked up to Port Richmond with Henry Felters of Woodville, Mississippi. I had never been up there before today and was astonished at the vast improvement. Before we had much time to look around it commenced raining & we were obliged to walk home in it without umbrellas.

8 March 1847. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa Clarke. Found her in and spent a pleasant evening of course. Mr. Clarke was also in the parlor. Mr. James Dayton came in about 1/4 past 8 and stayed until 10.

9 March 1847. Spent the evening in Mr. Ludlow's parlor, playing whist and other games of cards with Miss Elizabeth Ludlow, Samuel and Robert Ludlow and my sister.

10 March 1847. Poured rain very hard very early in the morning and we had some thunder and lightning, the 1st of the season. About 1/4 of 6 took a walk up Chestnut Street as far as Broad with J.C. Welch. Met a large number of ladies on the promenade. In the evening Welch and I called down to see the Misses Carter. It was his first visit. There was some company there and we spent a very pleasant evening dancing. Left at about 11 o'clock. Welch and I went down to see the fire which we heard was at 2nd and Pine. It was out by the time we got there.

11 March 1847. In the evening went down to Miss Ellen Henman's to attend one of the sociable parties, given by the Misses Carter and others. I spent a very delightful evening dancing, &c. Was introduced to Miss Keen this evening who I found to be a very agreeable, and intelligent lady. I was much pleased with her.

This evening the gentlemen were each presented with rosettes to be worn on the left breast of the coat for the remainder of the parties. On the back was inscribed the name, and remarks as regards his regular attendance. The rosettes also differed as to color. Those that were "tried and found true" wore blue rosettes, others red, white and stone color. On the back of the stone colored rosettes were a pair of scales, with the words "Found wanting" underneath. I was one of that order not having attended very regularly.

12 March 1847. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke. Found her in and well. Mr. Dayton came in a few minutes after I came in, and I left early, say 1/2 past 9. Mr. Graham also came in while I was there. After leaving Miss Clarke, went up to Guy's and got some oysters for Ma and Lydia, and took them home.

13 March 1847. There was a fall of snow to the depth of about an inch last night, and the City wore again the appearance of winter this morning. It cleared off about 10 o'clock, and the snow soon disappeared under the melting influence of the sun.

14 March 1847. At St. Phillip's Church in the morning. After church walked home with Miss Louisa M. Clarke. As usual she was agreeable. Invited her to go to Mr. Luddards in Grace Church this evening. In the afternoon went up to St. Luke's Church with Anna Roberts. After tea called down for Miss Clarke.

15 March 1847. About 1/2 Past 8 it clouded over and we had a snow squall, it lasted but a few minutes.

16 March 1847. Today was a succession of sunshine and snow storms. We had several of the greatest snow storms I ever witnessed. In a few minutes the ground was covered. They were, however, of but short duration. At the office all day and in the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in.

18 March 1847. In the evening called down with sister to see Miss Emma Mulford. Found her in and spent rather a pleasant evening.

19 March 1847. At the office all day and in the evening until about 8 o'clock, writing. After which I went home, dressed, and called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke. Found her in and spent, as I usually do when in her company, a very pleasant evening. Her mother was in the parlor. Left about 1/4 past 10 and went around to the office again for the purpose of writing, but could not get in. Met Mr. Kelly as I was coming off the steps and walked up with him to Guy's and got some oysters.

20 March 1847. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. started for Burlington on board the Steamer John Stevens with mysister and James C. Welch. We had a very pleasant and quick trip up. Upon landing, walked up to Mr. James H. Sterling's with sister where she intends spending her time while in Burlington.

We then took a stroll down to St. Mary's Hall, not seeing any of the young ladies, went up home with Mr. Welch. Took a walk up to Dugdale's Mill, and through the upper part of Burlington to see the improvements, which are quite numerous. I forgot to mention while down at the Hall, I went into the Chapel of the "Holy Innocents" connected with the school. It is a neat structure in the Gothic style, and is capable of accommodating about 320. It has a neat organ, the windows are of stained glass, and withal it has quite an antique appearance. It is to be consecrated next Thursday, in which occasion the young ladies are to have their biennial rehearsal.

21 March 1847. Got up this morning about 7 o'clock after a night of uneasiness, occasioned by a severe tooth ache. After breakfast took a walk in the neighborhood of the Hall, but could see nothing so returned home. Went to the Episcopal Church in the morning. Was obliged to go out when the service was about half over on account of a severe tooth ache. Went down to Billy Allison's, got it relieved and then returned to Church. After dinner got a horse and wagon and drove over to "Franklin Park" to see about engaging board for Ma and Lydia for next summer. It appears to be quite a pleasant place and healthy. We concluded to go down to the City this evening. Was much amused at the conversation of two drunken men while waiting for the cars.

22 March 1847. The vernal equinox has been extraordinarily prompt in its visitation this season, and since yesterday morning has been deluging us with rain, and blown us about at a great rate by gales from all points.

At the office all day, and in the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke. Found her in as well as her mother. Spent quite a pleasant evening. Mrs. Williamson next door still continues with her tiresome "ding dong" tunes on the piano. She has been practicing some 5 to 6 hours every day for the last six months or more. Quite disagreeable to neighbors. Mrs. Clarke still persists in a desire to read this journal. I am of opinion she would see something to astonish her in it. I am afraid I cannot satisfy her.

23 March 1847. About 4 p.m. it commenced raining and continued without intermission through the remainder of the afternoon and through the evening. Went out to see Mr. Carver(8) at 9th and Filbert Streets and from there out to see Colonel Tucker at the corner of Broad & Chestnut Streets. Not finding him in waited a while until he returned. I did not remain but a few minutes, as I had a chance of going down to the office in a chaise, which I did not like to lose as it was very unpleasant walking and raining quite hard.

In the evening about 8 o'clock a chaise called, which conveyed me up to Miss Belangee's, having an invitation to a tableau party. There were a large number there, with many of whom I was acquainted. The first series of tableaux were scenes taken from Claude Melnotte and were well gotten up. The dresses were very fine having been procured from the theaters expressly for the occasion. Mr. Heiskell figured as Claude Melnotte, Miss H.A. Myers as Pauline, Miss Louisa Wood as the mother of Pauline, Miss Taylor as the widow Melnotte, and I as Colonel Dumas. There were a number of other tableaux, representing Turkish scenes, which were admirable. The best tableaux, however, was The Game of Draught in which one of the players seems to be in a deep study, having been beaten, while his opponent is exulting by laying back and pointing at the board. This was well received. Miss Myers, Miss Wood, Miss Taylor, and Mr. Heiskell were the principal performers. My sister appeared in one piece as a Turkish lady in a reclining position, with a page in the act of handing her oranges. They all passed off well and in good taste.

24 March 1847. The gentleness of Spring is upon us, and the scowl of the Equinox has faded before the glance of as bright and lovable a day as ever blessed the earth. The rain, indeed, seemed to have been sent only to rid us of impurities which the storms of winter had left behind and prepare everything to reflect the purity and brightness of the skies that were, today, in the full glory of unclouded blue. Chestnut Street, and every other street, in fact had more than the unusual throng, but the great thoroughfare of fashion, especially, was made brilliant by the crowds of ladies who pressed along it. Youth and beauty found their fitting opportunity for display in the gentleness of the day, the aged a pleasure in the exercise which its free and pure air permitted them to take - and the invalid a glad relief from the close room, in the warm sunshine & the gentle and invigorating breeze. His heart must have been cold indeed that did not feel the gentler sympathies stirring around it under the cheerful influences of the day - and flinty beyond compare if there was not an entertained sense of thankfulness for the boon of sunshine.

In the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater to see the far-famed and much talked of Viennoises Danseuses, being 48 in number composed entirely of children. The first dance, viz., "Pas Des Fleurs" was certainly the most beautiful spectacle I ever witnessed. The grouping of the dances were indeed superb. It would be impossible to describe the various movements made by them, and with such accuracy as was really surprising among those so young. The second dance Pas Horrois was a very beautiful thing, it was performed by only 24, one half of which were dressed in male attire. The last dance, entitled the Grand Pas Oriental was superb. The groupings in this piece were beautiful indeed, and the rapid changes through which they passed with the white and red scarfs was astonishing. In this piece one half of the dancers are dressed as Moors. These dances are surely worth seeing by everyone. There were two farces played besides, viz., Our Mary Anne and Weak Points, both very good in their way.

25 March 1847. In the evening about 1/2 past 8 by invitation went down to Miss Louisa M. Clarke's to meet the three Misses Patrullo who are quite agreeable in their manners and are quite pretty (that is the one with curls). The elder Miss Patrullo is quite a pretty looking lady but I had no conversation with her. We danced one cotillion. My partner was Miss Anna Patrullo. Miss Clarke as usual looked pretty and interesting this evening. There were several gentlemen there, viz. Messrs. Fry, Robert Ross, James Dayton, and Stille. Waited upon Mrs. Petrullo and some other elderly ladies home.

26 March 1847. The anticipations of Spring, gentle breezes and bright sunshine were woefully clouded and dampened to day, by a persevering rain, which shortly after sunset, turned into a regular and dense snow storm. We might have imagined the rain to be but a Spring shower, but the unexpected snow was a matter of fact argument which put Spring to the rout at once. The wind, too, had a rollicking time of it, and blew as steadily as if it had come out on purpose to wage a ruinous war against those special defenses from rain - the unoffending umbrellas. The snow continued with unabated fury throughout the night and by about 10 o'clock the slush was some three inches deep. Never do I remember a more dreadful night. The wind blew a perfect hurricane, and I have no doubt but we will hear of many sad disasters on our coast.

In the evening about 1/4 of 7, went up to Mr. Hueston's at N.W. corner of 11th and Girard Streets notwithstanding the storm to accompany him out to Miss McIlvaine's to attend the sociable, which meets there this evening. The ladies had all gone out in the afternoon in an omnibus. We succeeded in getting into an omnibus at 11th and Market. The driver complained bitterly of the weather, and I did not wonder at it. Shortly after crossing the bridge he said he could stand it no longer, and he had to get another driver, who conveyed us to Miss McIlvain's house, some three or four squares over the bridge. We found the ladies all there, and some of the West Philadelphia men. They were rather surprised to see us. Mr. Byrd came out after us. We spent a pleasant evening, and left at about 11 o'clock, in an omnibus chartered for the occasion. We got the ladies all home very well. I left the omnibus at 9th and Walnut and walked down through the slush. I had a good pair of gum shoes on therefore secure from wet feet, though never do I remember such walking.

27 March 1847. The walking was miserable during the morning, but as the day advanced, the pavements were cleared and the walking became possible. The City wore quite the appearance of winter again. Spent the evening at home in Ma's room playing whist.

28 March 1847. The wind & storm of yesterday & day before has done great damage. Nearly all the telegraph poles between this City and New York were blown down & many between this City & Baltimore. Two large trees were blown down in the Independence Square.

About 20 m. past 6 called around at Mr. Clarke's to take Miss Louisa to Church, but I regret to say that she was sick, and confined to her bed since yesterday morning. I remained about half an hour and then returned home again, not wishing to go to Church without her.

About 1/2 past 8 the state house bell(9) struck for fire in an eastern direction, went down as far as 3rd and Dock & then returned not being able to find anything like fire.

29 March 1847. After tea went up to the "Odd Fellow's Oyster Saloon" where I met Mr. Samuel Bonnell according to engagement. We then went up to Miss Reeve's in Delaware 8th above Green. Met Miss Kate Smith and Miss L. Snyder there. Spent a pleasant evening playing whist.

30 March 1847. About 10 o'clock commenced hailing. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in, and spent a pleasant evening. She has partially recovered from her indisposition. Mr. James Dayton came in shortly after me. He appeared to be quite dull and left about 12 past 9. I left a few minutes after.

31 March 1847. At the office during the day until 4 1/2 p.m. when Henry Felters and I went out to look at some property in McDuffe Street west of Schuylkill 3rd. After making our examination, continued our walk down to Gray's Ferry, crossed the bridge, and went around up through Maglandville & by the Almshouse & Woodland Cemetery. We found the walking very good until we got opposite the Cemetery wall, when I got in the mud over shoe top & had considerable difficulty in getting through much to the amusement of Mr. Felters, who was more successful than I. In my difficulties one of my overshoes came off and got so full of mud that I had to carry it some distance until we could find water to wash it out. Went down through the Almshouse grounds & up to Market Street bridge where we crossed and made for home.

In the evening called up to see the Misses Leeds. Left a few minutes after 10 & on our way down stopped in the Odd Fellow's Saloon & got some brandy punch.

APRIL

1 April 1847. Clear and quite cold until towards evening when it clouded over and became quite raw and unpleasant. At the office all day with the exception of about 3/4 of an hour between 4 & 5 o'clock p.m. occupied in going out to see the military escort and procession on the occasion of the burial of Lieutenant Blake who was killed in Mexico last May. The military display, & in fact the whole escort, was very imposing. Returned to the office a few minutes before 5, and a short time afterwards was much surprised by a visit from the Misses Arethusa & Sarah E. Leeds. They remained about half an hour and were very lively and full of fun.

2 April 1847. At the office all day and in the evening accompanied Miss Elizabeth Ellis of Freehold and my sister to the Walnut Street Theater to see Les Danseuses Viennoises. The dances performed by them this evening were Polka Paysanne, Pas Des Fleurs and the Grand Pas Oriental. The first named dance was rather a singular affair, but quite amusing. I did not like it as well as the others. The last named two are the same as I saw on the 24th of March last, one of which, the "flower dance" I could look at all night. It is impossible to describe it, it must be seen to be appreciated. The farces Did You Ever Send Your Wife to Burlington? and The Lottery Ticket were quite amusing. The boxes were very much crowded, but pit quite slim. Miss Kate [Smith] and her father and mother sat in the seats before us, she looked quite pretty.

3 April 1847. At the office during the morning until about 1/2 past 11, when I went up to the "Commencement of the University." Found that the room ("The Musical Fund") was crowded to excess, but by waiting until the graduates came in procession we succeeded in getting in with them, and obtained an excellent seat. The Hall was crowded with the beauty and fashion of the City. The address by Dr. Chapman, I have no doubt was very good, but I could not understand him, he having a very indistinct voice. The greater part of the audience were laboring under the same difficulty, making his address very uninteresting. I was acquainted with several of the graduates among whom were Robert D. Ross of Cherokee Nation, Franklin Gaunt, NJ, and J. Luddars of Philadelphia. After the exercises I walked home with Miss Anna Patrullo, quite a pretty and interesting young lady.

4 April 1847. Walked up to Grace Church with Ma in the morning. Left her there and went up to Mr. Nevill's, sat in Dr. Irwin's pew. Mr. Neville gave us an excellent sermon. After Church went up to Grace Church for Ma but found them at communion. In the afternoon went up to St. Phillip's Church, a stranger preached. Sat in Mr. Clarke's pew. The Misses Anna and Meta Patrullo were also in the pew. Walked home with Miss Clarke, went in and sat for about 20 minutes.

5 April 1847. In the evening went up to the Chestnut Street Theater to see the opera of Norma performed by the Seguins. This was the first night of the opening of the theater this spring. The audience was large and fashionable. They have a new and very pleasant arrangement. It is the turning of the pit into a parquet, with an entrance from the boxes. The opera was pretty well performed, though the chorus was too light. The orchestra was not much.

6 April 1847. Cloudy, rainy, damp and unpleasant all day, and during the evening. At the office during the greater part of the day, and in the evening went up to Miss Hannah Ann Myers by invitation, as there was to be some little company there. Lydia was to have gone with me but as she was not very well and the weather so unpleasant she did not. Met there Miss Louisa Wood & her brother James, Mr. Shuff and Mr. Heiskell. There were to have been some others there but on account, I suppose, of the inclemency of the weather did not come. Miss Ford, from the country, who is now staying with Miss Myers, was also there. She is a very pretty girl, and pleasing in her manners. I took a great fancy to her. This was my first visit to Miss Myers since their residence in the new house. It is a magnificent affair, and is furnished in beautiful style.

7 April 1847. Today was a charming one, clear and mild. The streets, generally, were crowded with pedestrians and Chestnut Street, in particular, shone with the bright eyes of the ladies. The greatest display of the season was made of rich and costly apparel. In the evening went up to the Museum with Miss Ellen Ludlow and my sister. The pieces performed were quite amusing and full of fun, viz., The Fair One With Golden Locks and Boots of the Swan. They were of but little interest to me, as I have seen so many of the same kind of pieces. The ladies, however, were pleased, and that was sufficient to please me. Mr. Heiskell and Miss Hannah Ann Myers were there, accompanied by Miss Ford, who as usual looked quite pretty this evening.

8 April 1847. In the evening at about 1/2 past 8 my chaise called for me and I went up to Miss Annie Roberts, to wait upon her to a wedding party given by Mr. & Mrs. Williamson for the late Miss Gaul, married this evening. We entered the room about 1/2 past 9, There was a very large number present, say 200 or 250. The parlors were crowded, though not very many pretty ladies. The evening was quite stiff on account of no dancing, and the company all left by or before 12. The supper was a beautiful affair, and got up with much taste and elegance. The pyramid of flowers in the center of the table was beautiful indeed, it was some 4 feet high composed of japonicas and other beautiful flowers. It was so arranged that it separated into different bouquets which were distributed among the ladies. The company were principally strangers to me. The bride and groom looked very well, the bride I think rather pretty. There were four bridesmaids and groomsmen.

9 April 1847. Clear and delightful throughout the day and evening, and quite warm. At the office during the morning. About 1/4 past 7 called up for the Messrs. Hueston to accompany us to Miss Keen's in West Philadelphia where our sociable is to meet this evening. The Doctor only accompanied me, his brother not being quite ready. It was some time before we could meet with an omnibus, having to walk nearly to 8th Street before coming across one, we however got out safely and pleasantly. Found all the ladies there with the exception of the Misses Whitner. We spent a delightful evening in dancing, &c. Several of the gentlemen played on violins, & we had good music. The company left shortly after 11, and we had a very pleasant walk home. I believe this is the last meeting for this season, though there is talk of meeting once more at the Misses Carter's.

10 April 1847. There was a great excitement in the City today, occasioned by the news of the taking of the castle of San Juan de Ulloa. If there had been a tremendous coal fire - something like a volcano - burning under the City today, or if a vertical sun had been shedding its rays down upon it unceasingly for a week, it could hardly have equaled the severe heat of excitement which raged and boiled & effervesced in our City today. Due warning had been given. Over their cups in the morning the citizens had been informed, by the well informed newspapers, that the news was coming, and they had all day before them to get up the excitement. It spread like the cholera or some other contagion, & though many people started to go brief distances, we did not hear that anybody arrived anywhere, because of the universal stopping of friends and acquaintances in the street, the discussion of the news, double thumbing of extras, wise suppositions as to the probability of its not having been taken, and theoretic disquisitions on the line of propriety which General Scott(10) should pursue in case the proud banner of Mexico should have been sailed before him.

Mingling with these uprisings of excitement there was a deeper feeling which in many sunk to the depression of anxiety. Could they tell who carelessly read the extra and carried the consequences of the capture solely as regarded the national glory or the prospect of ending the war. Could they, whose hearts had no tie to draw them to the place of battle by the presence there of relative or friend, realize all the feelings with which many eagerly seized upon and devoured the outline of information which the extra afforded. How many wild hopes - how many depressing fears fluttered the heart of woman, and moved the sterner sympathies of men - how many cast the paper down in unsatisfied anxiety, to wait the slow coming of other news to inform them whether father, husband or brother were safe, were wounded, or with the silent dead. Amid the rejoicings which swelled in the universal voice, amid the triumph which beamed from every eye, there must have been other words than those of rejoicing; and other looks than those of triumphs, and while we rejoice that the act has been completed, it is with a mingling of sorrow for those who are fallen, and a deep thankfulness that so few felt the scourge of war.

This evening there were several illuminations that were very pretty, one in Market Street and another in front of the Chestnut Street Theater. The North American Office was also beautifully illuminated together with beautiful transparencies. The Council of the City have approximately $500 for the illumination of the public buildings, and the Mayor has issued a request that the Citizens generally participate in a general illumination in honor of our victories at Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma, Monterey, Buena Vista & Vera Cruz. The illumination is to come off on Monday evening a week, the 19th inst.

Flags were stirring across the Streets during the day, the shipping was dressed in bunting, & our enthusiastic neighbors in Camden made a resolve that on Monday morning at sunrise they would fire a salute of 100 guns.

At the office during the greater part of the day. In the evening went up to the Circus to see the new piece Jadda or the Black Enchanter now in course of performance. The scenery throughout was beautiful indeed, & some of the acting rather ludicrous. The scene is laid in China, and the dresses, pageantry & processions are very elegant. The number engaged in the performance is very large, say from 150 to 200 people. The house was crowded, though with an inferior class of people.

11 April 1847. In the morning went up to Grace Church with Ma and Lydia. In the afternoon went up to St. Phillip's Church, sat in Mr. Clarke's pew, Mr. Neville preached. After Church walked home with Miss Louisa. She looked remarkably pretty this afternoon. After accompanying her home went in and sat for 1/2 or 3/4 of an hour, in agreeable conversation with Mrs. Clarke and Louisa. I left at about 6 o'clock, though not without first having a kind invitation to remain & take tea, by Mrs. Clarke. In the evening went up to Grace Church with Ma.

12 April 1847. In the evening had several showers of rain, accompanied with considerable thunder and lightning. Went into Miss Lizzie Ludlow's room with Lydia as she was to have some of the boarders there for the purpose of having a dance. I danced once and then left as it was rather stiff & not very agreeable to me.

13 April 1847. At the office all day until about 20 minutes past 4 p.m. when Henry Felters and I took a walk up to Richmond. After looking around about the works, got on board the steamer George Washington which was just about leaving the wharf and came down to the City where we arrived at about 10 minutes of 6, making the trip in 20 minutes. Then went up to the office, then went over to the barber's & from there to tea. In the evening called down to see Miss L.M. Clarke, found her at home looking as pleasant and being as agreeable as ever. Mrs. Clarke was in the room, who as usual was pleasant and agreeable. Mr. Dayton was there as usual.

14 April 1847. At the office all day until 6 p.m. when Mr. Welch and I went up to Market above 11th Street to get some candle holders for the illumination next Monday night. From there went up in Callowhill Street below 12th to see Mr. Robert Jarden on some business, but on approaching the door noticed crepe on the bell knob, & upon enquiry found that his wife had died this afternoon & we of course did not go in. She has been an invalid for some time.

15 April 1847. The season is certainly very backward, none of the trees are yet out in blossom. The farmers say they do not remember of so backward a season for many years. Long before this time last year the trees were all in bloom. In the evening called down to see Miss L.M. Clarke, found her at home and spent a pleasant evening. Met there again Mr. Dayton. Surely I wish I could not meet him so often, it is very disagreeable. Mrs. Clarke was in the room during the whole evening & her son Graham during the latter part.

16 April 1847. About 7 o'clock my chaise called for me, took sister and drove around to Miss Clarke's in Arch above 3rd for her to accompany us to the opera. Found her all ready and we drove up to the Theater (Chestnut Street) by 1/2 past 7, but found we were unusually early. Though they advertise to commence at 1/4 of 8, did not commence until some time after. The opera performed this evening was Maritana which, according to my idea, is a very beautiful affair. I have heard it before but am still pleased. The singers appeared to be all in good voice and everything passed off well. The orchestra and chorus have much improved since I last heard them out. Miss Clarke looked very pretty this evening. The House was but poorly filled. Mr. Welch was with us in the same box.

17 April 1847. In the evening at home part of the time, in the parlor and the remainder of the time in Ma's room. Our parlors at Mrs. Crim's are once more in order but much improved; the carpets are elegant and every thing looks very pretty.

18 April 1847. Clear, cold and blustering. I believe there is ice made early this morning. In the afternoon about 1/2 past 3 went down to the Walnut Street wharf with J.C. Welch and crossed to Camden, then went up to Hollingshead's Hotel with him to see Mr. B. Wollison. Not finding him in, and it being too dusty, cold and unpleasant to take a walk, returned to the City by the Market Street ferry. In the evening about 1/4 of 8 called on Miss Louisa M. Clarke. Found her in and as usual very agreeable.

19 April 1847. At the office during the morning until about 12 o'clock, then called up for Miss Anna Roberts to make our party call on Mr. & Mrs. Williamson, late Miss Gaul, at her father's residence in Arch above 12th Street. Found the bride at home and her sister.

At the office in the afternoon until about 1/2 past 5 when I went down with J.C. Welch to see Mr. Godwin at his store on the wharf below Spruce Street about places for ladies to see the fireworks to be set off on the Island this evening.

After tea I took Ma & Miss Lizzy Ludlow, & Mr. Alexander Ludlow took my sister and together we sallied out to see the illumination which was all that the most sanguine could have anticipated. While there was a richness and variety of display, there was also the propriety of conduct on the part of those who thronged the streets which put an additional pleasure to the rejoicing.(11) The merry peal of bells in the steeples of Christ Church and St. Peter's ushered in the day, in unison with the roar of cannon, and during the day while the bells continued to peal forth pleasant strains - the frequent and heavy reports of artillery proved that the other noisy demonstrations of rejoicing had not been forgotten. The streets were thronged with persons throughout the afternoon and evening.

The City rejoiced not only because victory had attended our army in Mexico, but for the pleasant prospect of coming peace, which those victories have opened up to the nation. The blazing lights, the showy transparencies, brilliant fireworks, thundering cannon, waving flags and pretty mottoes were the outward expressions of a heart-felt joy that through the blood and turmoil of hard fought battles - with sacrifice of death, the pain of wounds and the desolation of firesides, the nation is brought again to a point whence it may look for the calm tranquility which shall hood over the sorrowing as well as the rejoicing for these battles and these victories. It was a rejoicing for glorious manifestations of prowess by our Army and Navy - for martial courage in its most elevated point of view, and for the exercises of humanity by which the horrors of war were lessened and the glory of the nation enhanced.

The whole of the public buildings on Independence Square blazed with light, and over the principal entrance was a transparency representing General Washington. It was a happy thought in the committee thus to set in view, near the place where the Declaration of Independence was signed, the figure of the Father of his country. It was better, too, to bring the patriot to the highest place of honor, that there might be no feeling of party - no taint of politics about the demonstration, so far as the City itself was concerned, and best of all, that all men could be reminded that in the fullness of present joy for present victories, there should be remembrance of him who gained greater victories in past days, and who has himself passed away.

At the Eastern wing of the State House a handsome banner hung from the old balcony, and beneath it rested a large golden star edged with light. The Custom House was set forth in very neat style. Gas pipes were led out into the portico and arches thrown from pillar to pillar, midway up. On the crown of each arch was a large star lit with gas, and the effect was very simple and beautiful. The Arch Street Theater was gorgeously illuminated. A large transparency was placed on the balcony, and along the front of the building and the entablature, the names of the battle fields of Mexico, flamed forth in variegated hues of light. The American flag floated over all, and added to the general and imposing effect.

The Chestnut Street Theater displayed a beautiful transparency representing the American fleet saluting their stars and stripes floating over the castle of San Juan de Ulloa. On each side of this were tents, outlined with double rows of lights. These, with nearly all the public buildings in the City and Districts, together with a large number of the private residences were illuminated in beautiful style from the lower stories to the garret. Many of the Houses had beautiful bouquets and flowers arranged in the windows. The display around the several squares was very imposing. The streets were thronged until a late hour, and the whole affair passed off quietly. At 11 o'clock the lights were generally extinguished, though the enthusiasm of some led them to protract the illumination.

The Exchange was lit on all sides, and the portico especially presented a beautiful appearance. On the western front were placed two handsome transparencies & these aided the general effect very much. A large number of persons were disappointed by the fireworks not going off as they were announced for 9 o'clock from the Island opposite the City. Thousands congregated on the wharf & these waited some two hours but were disappointed. We (that is Ma, Lydia, Miss Ludlow & her brother Alexander & myself) all went down to Mr. Godwin's store, but as with the others were disappointed. A number of rockets were sent up & one or two reels set off but nothing further. We returned home about 11 o'clock much fatigued. Mr. Welch and I did our share, or as much as we could, towards the illumination, that is we illuminated our office by placing a candle to each pane of glass and lighting all four burners of our gas. Upon the whole it was a brilliant affair and likely to be remembered and talked of for many years hence. There has not been an illumination in this City of a general character since September 1824.

20 April 1847. In the evening went to the Chestnut Street Theater to see the Seguins in the Bohemian Girl.

21 April 1847. The warmest day we have had this season. In the evening called down to see Miss Clarke, as usual spent the evening pleasantly.

22 April 1847. Complaints of cold weather have ceased for the present for we have leaped suddenly into a temperature fit for mid summer, and the sudden change is a wonderful provocative of listlessness and "the spring fever." Vegetation has made almost its first advances within the last few days. The trees are all now putting out finely, and the grass in the square opposite assumes a luxuriant appearance. The first trees are also beginning to bloom, though very late.

At the office all day. In the evening it was clear, warm, delightful and moonlight. I called up to see Miss Kate Smith. Our conversation this evening was principally concerning Miss Mary Anderson of Charleston, South Carolina.

23 April 1847. In the morning it was quite warm, but before night there was a great change. It became quite cold.

In the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater with J.C. Welch to see Booth in Venice Preserved or the Plot Discovered. He played Pierre very well, but he is not the actor he was some years ago. He is much broken. There were two farces performed besides, viz. the Stage Struck Yankee in which Dan Marble played Diggory, bringing down much laughter, and turning tragedy into farce, and Mayor of Garratt in which Mr. Booth played Jerry Sneak. He created considerable fun and laughter & played his part admirably. I hardly thought that he, so eminent a tragedian, would play such low comedy.

25 April 1847. In the morning walked up to Grace Church with Ma & Lydia. I then left them and went down to St. Phillip's Church, heard an excellent sermon delivered by a stranger. After Church walked home with Miss Louisa Clarke, did not go in.

I concluded to go up to Mr. Algernon Roberts to dinner. The family had just sat down as I got up there. Went in & dined with them. Found that Sydney & Percival were going out to Isaac Roberts'(12) this afternoon, & they invited me to go out with them. Started at about 2 o'clock and got out there a little after 3, having a very pleasant ride. Found Mr. & Mrs. I. Roberts (13) at home & also the rest of the family. All are well. Went in and sat conversing until about 1/2 past 4, when we, accompanied by Algernon Roberts (son of Isaac), took a walk over to George Roberts place. It is much altered since I last saw it, it is very much out of repair. Went back to the House about 1/2 past 5 and had a very excellent supper, after which sat conversing until about 1/4 past 7, and then started for town.

26 April 1847. Clear and warm, but quite blustering and dusty. At the office during the morning and in the afternoon until about 4 o'clock when Henry Felters, of Mississippi, and I started out to take a walk. Went out to Market Street Bridge, crossed & went up the tow path on the other side of the Schuylkill to the Reading Rail Road bridge at the falls. We stopped at a Hotel there and got some porter, then crossed the bridge, and walked down the Ridge Road to town. Got home about 1/2 past 7. We walked from the Falls to 5th and Walnut in one hour and 10 minutes. In the evening called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, found her in and well. Her mother was in the parlor. Met Mr. Dayton there. I do not think I shall go there very soon again for certain reasons best known to myself.

27 April 1847. There has not been any rain for some days, and the dust is at full liberty. The wind got rather high today, and provoked the dust to a most unseemly revel. It drove through every street and into every place, filled many eyes with tears, and caused serious necessity for dusting many garments. The wind played pranks with the dresses of the ladies, and fluttered and disarranged ribbons and shawls, if not with coolness, at least with considerable impetuosity. The sun smiled down upon the sport as if it enjoyed it, but retired at the approach of a dark looking cloud that seemed as if it came on purpose to settle the vagarious dust, if not the wind. His solar Majesty looked out furtively now and then, to see how affairs were coming on, and took courage to shine out again when the cloud had passed off. The dust spoiled many a pleasure trip, for the roads had whirls in abundance, and the fresh verdure of the country had the appearance of good clothes after the soils of a hard day's journey. There was an expectation of rain in the course of the afternoon, and the sky warranted the belief that there would be a downpour. But the wind being too high, kept the clouds too high, and both being considerable elevated, could not condescend to permit the earth to enjoy its needed refreshment and purification.

In the evening called up to see the Misses Leeds, found that they were in but were unable to see them on account of the severe illness of a younger sister. We were invited into the parlor where we found Mr. Jenks, who after being called out, gave us the above information. He appeared to be quite at home.

28 April 1847. Got up this morning at 1/4 past 6, dressed, and on going down stairs met Ma and Lydia about starting out to take a walk, I accompanied them. At the office during the greater part of the day, and between 6 & 7 p.m. walked up Chestnut Street as far as 12th, but did not meet many on the promenade. In the evening went up to the oyster saloon at the "Odd Fellow's Hall" to meet Mr. Samuel Bonnell, Jr. to go up to see Miss Kate Smith. He came in a few minutes, and according to engagement went up together. Found Miss Kate at home, well and as agreeable as ever.

On our way down stopped and got some ice cream, also stopped in under the Odd Fellow's Hall and got some oysters, &c. & then went home. Got to bed at 10 m. past 12 but was awakened again at about 25 of 1 by the State House bell striking in rapid succession. Seeing a reflection of the fire, Mr. Welch and I concluded to go out to see where it was. Found it to be a large building in Hudson alley above Harmony Court, it burned with great fury, but the firemen confined it to the one building.

29 April 1847. Got up this morning at 1/4 past 5, dressed and by 6 o'clock called up for Miss Kate Smith, according to appointment made last evening, to take a walk. She lives in 8th Street above Green. Found her up & waiting for me. We walked up to the house they have lately purchased and are about to occupy, in Washington Street above 11th. I went through the House with her which appears to be a very convenient one, got some flowers out of the garden, which, with a rose, she presented to me. Returned home with her by about 7 o'clock, and then went down home to breakfast, though not without having an invitation from her to breakfast.

At the office all day. In the evening my sister and self were unexpectedly invited to join Miss Ludlow and party to go to the circus. The party was composed of 9. We had a private box, & spent quite a pleasant evening though the entertainment was not very refined. In the course of the evening a foolish fellow attempted to drink 3 gallons of water, he drank 15 tumblers and gave out. It was well he did.

The piece played on the stage this evening was entitled Victory on Victory, a representation of several of our late battles in Mexico. Some parts of it quite amusing.

30 April 1847. In the evening went up to the Chestnut Street Theater with Frank Taylor and Harry Adams to see the opera of Masaniello or the Dumb Girl of Portici. I was very much pleased with this opera. The music in many parts is beautiful, with a number of beautiful songs. Behold! How Brightly Breaks the Morning is beautiful indeed, and sung with great effect by Mr. Frazier. The scenery in many parts very fine.

MAY

1 May 1847. We might hold a pleasant discourse how May came in upon us.

With sky and sunshine & with breeze and balms and dilate with unction upon the young flowers and green rolls of grass with which nature decked herself in honor of the fair and gentle May morning. There could be, too, a world of commentary of the enjoyment which found a changing but always fascinating expression in the faces of a bevy of youngsters who I saw laden with the triumphs of the season and of their explorations. It would be easy to do all this, and we should do right in so doing. But then it was only a May morning not a May day; and that defection from entire perfection must clip the words of praise and stunt the utterance of joyous feeling. The morning was gentle and sunny, with the balmy breath that comes laden with fragrance of swelling buds and tender leaves that venture timidly in their unfoldings into light and air - the afternoon was chilly enough to send us back in feeling a month or two, and cause serious thought of the blessing of the genial warmth of fire. But it was a blessing to have sunshine and a gentle breeze, that blessing did not depart when the ruder wind blew, and the clouds stretched upward from the horizon. All knew that a storm impended, and there was a general spirit of thankfulness for the promised boon. The farmer was gladdened in the prospect of his refreshed fields, and the citizen longed to feel the ground and the hard bricks beneath his feet made cool, the dust upon the streets subdued, and the parched aspect of the trees removed by the gentle influence of descended rain. The blessing was varied, but it was equally acceptable.

After tea, about 8 o'clock called up to see Mr. & Mrs. William H. Smith in Vine Street, below 3rd. Saw Mr. S. but not his lady. Smoked a cigar with him & left at about 1/2 past 9, went over to the oyster cellar at the corner of 3rd and Vine.

2 May 1847. We had a steady fall of rain until towards 4 p.m., which I have no doubt will do the country great benefit, as we have had no rain for nearly a month. I was at home during the morning & afternoon until about 3. I then called around to see Colonel Tucker and spent about an hour and a half with him. In the evening went to St. Andrew's Church.

3 May 1847. In the evening went up to the Museum with Lydia. This was the first night of its reopening. It has been closed for some time making preparations to play a new piece called the Crock of Gold. It is pretty good, rather on the tragic order. The farce played was The Loan of a Lover, very laughable.

4 May 1847. In the evening after tea took a walk and then returned to the House, went into the parlor and conversed with Mrs. Ludlow & daughter Anna. I found Anna to be much disappointed at not being able to go to the Museum. A short time after went up stairs with Welch to dress, to call upon the Misses Carter. When I mentioned Anne's disappointment to him and proposed taking her and her sister Elizabeth with my sister, he went down and invited them & they consented to go, got up there in good time. The house was not so much crowded as last night. The pieces announced were the Rock of Gold and the Omnibus. The former could not be played on account of the sudden illness of Mr. Johnson. The latter went off well, amid much laughter. The piece played in the stead of the Golden Crock was The Two Friends which was full of interest and admirably played.

5 May 1847. J.C. Welch moved his desk and took down his signs from the office today.

6 May 1847. Large numbers on the promenade. In the evening, according to engagement, met Samuel Bonnell, Jr. at the oyster saloon at the Odd Fellow's Hall. We went together to see Miss Kate Smith, called at the old house in 8th above Green but found they had partially moved and she with Miss Snyder were up at the new house in Washington Street above 11th to which place we wended our way. We had two tables of whist and a very pleasant time. About 9 o'clock Mr. Bonnell and I went down and ordered two quarts of ice cream to be sent up. This was the first night of the Smiths in the new House.

7 May 1847. In the evening called to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke, who looked as pretty and was as agreeable as ever, but my visits I fear must be limited there. I am not the favored one.

8 May 1847. At 2 p.m. left Philadelphia on board the Steamer Trenton for Burlington. Met Mr. J.C. Welch on the wharf with whom I am to remain until Monday. We wended our way down the bank as far as the Hall, but were unable to see any of the young ladies. We felt a desire to go in and see the beautiful painted window which has lately been placed in the newly erected chapel connected with St. Mary's Hall. George Doane, son of the Bishop, came along just as we were expressing our desire to each other, and we asked of him to obtain the consent of his father to let us go in, which he very politely did. We obtained consent and then admission through the school, and met a number of the young ladies in the passages among whom was Miss Lizzie Davis. We were shown into the Chapel by Miss Lane, who was very polite, and exhibited to us the power and beauty of the organ by playing several pieces on it. The whole interior arrangement of the chapel is simple and neat in its appearance in the old English style of architecture. The window over the chancel is beautiful indeed. It has various emblems beautifully painted, with the words "Behold the Handmaid of the Lord" traced on a scroll extending over the window. The window was the gift of a single lady. After leaving the Chapel walked up into town. After tea Mr. Welch and I got a sail boat & sailed across the River & down by the Hall.

9 May 1847. Remained about the house until near 10, when J.C. Welch and I got a horse and vehicle and started out to see some of Welch's friends previous to his going to the West.

10 May 1847. 8 o'clock left Burlington on board the Steamer Trenton for Philadelphia.

11 May 1847. After tea went up to see Mad'lle Blaugy and Mr. Bouxany in the beautiful Ballet of La Sylphide. Mad'lle Vallee also performed in the ballet. The dancing was beautiful indeed, particularly that of Mad'lles Blaugy and Vallee. Dan Noddy's Secret was played, quite an amusing comedy. The last dance, a new Pas de Trois called Les Viennoise was a very beautiful affair and was greatly applauded & encored.

13 May 1847. At Chestnut and 9th Streets, at about 1 o'clock I saw quite a curiosity in the shape of a miniature carriage, belonging to "Tom Thumb," a dwarf now exhibiting in our City. It was the smallest thing of the kind I ever saw and complete in every respect. There were a pair of horses not over two and a half feet high. On the box a coachman, and behind a footman dressed in full livery, with white wigs, &c. It was presented to him, I believe, by the Queen of England.

In the evening went over to see Auber's celebrated Ballet opera, entitled Maid of Cachmere or Le Dieu et la Bayadere with Miss Elizabeth Ludlow & my sister. It was performed admirably to a large and fashionable house. The closing scene, where Zelica ascends with Brahma to the Indian heaven, was too beautiful for me to pretend to describe. The music throughout is elegant.

14 May 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening at 8 p.m. met Samuel Bonnell at the oyster Saloon at the Odd Fellow's Hall according to agreement and then went up to see Miss Kate Smith, who has now moved in Washington Street above 11th. We spent a very pleasant evening playing whist.

15 May 1847. I was turned out of my office the greater part of the morning on account of cleaning which I had not done until it was thoroughly wanted. About 1/2 past 6 went down to Thomas Auction store, to get the proceeds of sale of some goods. In the evening went up to the opera at the Chestnut Street Theater to see the Maid of Cachmere. It was well performed with the same cast as the night before. The dances were performed beautifully, though I thought they might have occasioned some blushes on the faces of some of the fair ones present. I was very unwell throughout the day, but feel much better this evening.

16 May 1847. In the morning before breakfast went over to the barbers. Got shaved. Went up to Grace Church with Ma & Lydia and Miss Ludlow. We concluded to call up and see Miss Hannah Burton who lives in Delaware 7th Street, 3 or 4 doors below Spring Garden. Found her at home looking quite pretty. This is only the 2nd time I have been in this lady's company, and have become very much pleased with her, she is gay and pleasing in her manners and quite pretty in her appearance. There is an openness & frankness in her manners that I like exceedingly. She has eyes that would charm anyone.

The Streets were crowded out as far as Schuylkill 4th Street. It was the fashionable promenade of a Sunday afternoon after church. About 8 o'clock went up to Mr. Edward Roberts'. Found the family all home but rather drowsy. Mr. Roberts slept nearly all evening (a great compliment to my company). Mrs. Roberts yawned, and when Anna was in the midst of a tremendous gap, I got up and left quite abruptly.

17 May 1847. Went up to Roberts' in 9th Street & spent the evening there until 10 o'clock, found them all at home. On my way home stopped in at Mrs. Harbacher's and got some ice cream & candy for Ma.

18 May 1847. In the evening about 12 past 8 called down to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke found her in and as agreeable as ever. She was not very well. Mr. Clarke was in the room the whole evening. Just as I was about leaving the Misses Patrullo's name was mentioned, when I remarked to Mrs. Clarke that I had met one of them on the Street a few days since when she "cut me dead" and asked whether she knew the cause of it. It appears that some mean person has been telling them some falsehoods of assertions that I had made about them. They were these that, at the Commencement a month or two since when I walked home with one of the Misses Petrullo, they had called me over to them, and some others of a like nature, which I asserted were all false, and informed Mrs. Clarke to tell them so. I know of nothing so mean as to circulate a false report of this kind. I should like very much to find out who started it.

19 May 1847. After tea went up to Odd Fellows' Oyster saloon where I met Mr. S. Bonnell, Jr. according to engagement to go up to Miss Kate Smith's to partake of an oyster supper with others given by Mr. Bonnell & myself, on a bet we lost with Mr. Redmund Cooper a week or two since. Mr. Bonnell and I furnished the oysters, viz., 4 doz. fried & 6 dozen stewed, and Miss Smith the trimmings - being some very fine coffee and flour cakes, bread & butter, pickles, &c. &c. Never do I remember sitting down to a finer supper. Left at about 1/2 past 11, and I waited upon Miss Burton, who, as I have before said, is very pretty & agreeable. I become more pleased with her every time we meet. We came across a serenading party (full band) in an alley running South from Vine below 6th, stood and heard them discourse some elegant music.

21 May 1847. In the evening went out with Lydia to spend the evening with Miss Mary Belangee in Green Street below 5th. Found her at home, and also her brother, spent the evening very pleasantly playing whist.

23 May 1847. During the evening had several very heavy showers of rain, one in particular about 1/2 past 9. This rain will do the country immense service, as it is now almost parched up, and vegetation is suffering much. In the morning went around to St. Mary's (Catholic) Church with Henry J. Felters. The music was very fine, they had the full orchestra of the Musical Fund Society. It being so exceedingly warm did not remain until it was out. Upon leaving the Church went home for a while and then walked up to St. Phillip's Church to see the people come out. Among them I saw Miss Clarke who as usual looked quite pretty. After which returned home where I remained until about 4 p.m. then went up to St. Andrew's Church & heard a very good sermon from a stranger. Noticed a few pews behind me a very pretty young lady I should like very much to know who she is. After Church returned home and in the evening went up to St. Phillip's Church with H. J. Felters. Mr. Neville gave us a delightful sermon. We sat in the pew before Miss Clarke's. I was much surprised at seeing her there on so unfavorable an evening, she had to walk home in the midst of the rain, I fear she will take cold. After Church had some little conversation with her, while waiting for the shower to subside.

24 May 1847. We had a glorious rain and plenty of it today, and through last night. The earth has drunk its fill, and the overplus has gone to replenish streams that had dwindled within their banks. Grass and trees revived and strengthened, look green and fresh again, and the air is balmy with the fragrance of flowers - pure too, for the dust has settled, and grateful, in its coolness to the senses. We think everyone should illuminate in honor of the rain. It is certainly most worthy of it. The blessing that cometh in the descending shower is inappreciable, and conquest and victories are as nothing to the gentle minister that sustains to maturity the means of life. The golden shower of Danae would be valueless in comparison to the storm we had today, and while I write I have a faint imagining of what a happy, contented set of beings the farmers must now be; and when they are happy and contented it means that the earth is giving or realizing promises of fruitfulness and abundance. The clouds have been lowering for several days in their gloomy appearance, not improperly a type of the gloomy anticipations which the drought has occasioned.

It grew lighter while the rain was descending, even as men's hearts rose in thankfulness for the blessing. When rain and storm clouds had passed off to their office elsewhere, and the earth was replenished, the sun burst forth over the City like the smile of the Creator rejoicing for the changed and glorious aspect of what lay beneath its diffused rays. From the darkness of the storm to the refulgence of the sun, it seemed like the transition from despair to hope, and men felt that they experienced some such change while the day was journeying its round. The evening was clear, warm, moonlight & delightful, being in sweet harmony with the latter part of the day.

At the office through the greater part of the day. About 6 p.m. called up to see the Misses Leeds, with J.C. Welch, he wishing to make his farewell call previous to leaving for the West. Found them both at home, also their mother. It is the first time I have seen them since the loss of their sister Josephine. Mrs. Leeds as well as the daughters appeared to be much depressed on account of their loss. In the evening at about 1/2 past 8 called up with Mr. Hays to see the Misses Atlee(14) at No. 8 Colonnade Row. I am to wait upon one of them as bridesmaid for Miss Caroline Davis, who Mr. Hays is to marry on the 8th of next month. As the rooms were rather dark I cannot remark as to the beauty of the Misses Atlee, though I can say they were very agreeable in their manners. Left at about 1/4 of 11, walked down as far as Guys & took some oysters & a cherry cobbler.

25 May 1847. In the evening met Mr. S. Bonnell at our usual meeting place, the Odd Fellow's Hall, at 8 o'clock. Then called up to see the Misses Leeds and found them at home and well. Left at 9 o'clock and called up to see Miss Kate Smith.

26 May 1847. About 25 m. of 9 called to see Miss Louisa M. Clarke. She was well but appeared to be very dull this evening, and had very little to say. Mr. Clarke was in the parlor during the time I was there. Met Mr. Dayton there and consequently I left quite early. It was about 25 minutes past 9.

27 May 1847. Went up to Mr. & Mrs. Ware's. Was invited up stairs into the front chamber, where I saw, for the first time, Mrs. Ware's 1st child, Mary Ware. They seem to think a great deal of it, & that there is none other like it.

29 May 1847. At the office through the greater part of the day until about 1/4 past 4 p.m. Then went down to the steamer John Stevens with J.C. Welch and at 1/2 past 4 started for Burlington. I took a walk down on the bank as far as Bishop Doane's, I wishing to see him on some business. He not being in, returned up the bank and called at J. Hunter Sterling to see Ma and sister who have been there since Thursday last. Remained about half an hour and then went down to see the Bishop again, leaving Mr. Welch to take a walk with my sister. Found the Bishop in, settled my business, and then went on up the bank.

30 May 1847. The change in the thermometer from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. was 25¡, being 85¡ at the former and 60¡ at the latter named hour. A fire was quite comfortable at 1 p.m. White pants at 8 a.m.

31 May 1847. A cloudy, raw, damp, cold and disagreeable day, though I have no doubt this weather is hailed with pleasure by the farmer, as there has been so much dry weather of late that there was apprehension of scarcity of crops. The country from the effects of the late rains is now looking beautiful, and we may look for excellent crops during the ensuing season. Strawberries are now abundant in market, and have been for sale for the last week or 10 days though scarce. Green peas and other vegetables are Making their appearance.

At the office during the greater part of the day. After tea Mr. E.J. Maginnis and I went up with the Messrs. Felters to their room to play whist. Henry J. Felters and I were partners. We beat them two out of three games. After which we got to singing, while W.J. Felters played the violin, and kicking up a devil of a fuss until Miss Crim sent up word for us to be quiet. In a short time we adjourned. Bed at 10 1/4 p.m.

JUNE

1 June 1847. At the office all day, and in the evening about 1/2 past 7 called up to see Miss Atlee at No. 8 Colonnade Row. She is the lady I am to wait upon as bridesmaid, at Mr. Hays' wedding on this day week. I found her to be quite a pleasant, pretty and agreeable young lady, and spent a very social evening.

2 June 1847. A clear and delightful day, just such a one as was suitable for our picnic which came off to day. Yesterday we had serious apprehensions of unfavorable weather, but in the night it cleared off beautifully, and if we had our choice of all the days in the year, we could not have selected one more favorable. Different portions of the company were to meet at different points, ours was to meet at Dr. Huston's(15) at the corner of 11th and Girard.

After breakfast or about 8 o'clock Mr. E.J. Maginnis and I went up to Miss Huston's, where we found a number of ladies assembled in the parlor with some gentlemen. I introduced Mr. Maginnis to the ladies, and learned some of their arrangements. Then he and I went down to the steamer Trenton to meet my sister who was to accompany us on the picnic, and who we expected last night. We found her and Ma on board, and immediately went up home.

I left her there to change her dress &c., and Mr. Maginnis to wait upon her up to Miss Huston's. I went up first to detain the omnibus in case they had not gone, but was too late as they had left some 15 minutes before. When Mr. Maginnis and my sister came up, we thought it would be too late to overtake the omnibus, so took a chaise and drove directly out to the place where the picnic was to be held viz. "Eaglesfield"(16) about a mile from the wire bridge, above the dam. We arrived there nearly as soon as the omnibus.

The situation of the place is charming. It is very high and overlooks the Schuylkill for some distance both up and down. There are many shady walks which we did not fail to enjoy. The party was composed of between 50 and 60 ladies and gentlemen, being made up of two sociable parties who met last winter, and a number of invited guests. In the early part of the day I feared the day was not to be an agreeable one as the ladies had divided themselves into two parties, and seemed destined to remain so until the committee got up a dance. They gradually became more sociable, until they all seemed to become acquainted, and enjoyed themselves. The first thing after the ladies had made their toilet, after our arrival, was to take a ramble over the place. Then we returned to the House and danced until about 1, when dinner was announced. After that, the ladies retired for a while, then we again had dancing until about 6, when we had strawberries and cream, cakes, &c. in the greatest abundance. We then took a stroll down to the river. I had Miss Potts. Upon our return to the House had supper of coffee &c., then dancing, then ice creams, strawberries, &c., then a royal dance in which we had much fun until 10 o'clock.

I had several strolls in the course of the day, one with Miss Ellen Wilcox, which created some remarks. She and I went out and sat under a tree alone, in sight of the house. We remained there about half an hour, when we were joined by Mr. Maginnis, and afterwards by some other ladies and gentlemen when we all left and took a walk down towards the river. I left Mr. Maginnis in company with Miss Wilcox, and went up to the House, where we had some delightful flute and guitar music by Messrs. L. & Y.C. Huston and Whitmer on the flutes and Miss S. Whitmer on the guitar. Miss Penn-Gaskell,(17) I met some few years ago, but of late have not spoken to, towards the close of the day I spoke to and found her quite pleasant and agreeable. I think her quite pretty & very fine looking in her person. I danced twice with her, had a very delightful stroll on the porch, and sat next to her going home. I shall not forget the ride for a long while. I took a great fancy to her. She gave me a very polite invitation to call, which I shall certainly do.

The party left about 1/2 past 10, in 3 six horse omnibuses, after all having apparently spent a very delightful day. We got home about 1/2 past 11. Mr. Maginnis and I then went into a new house just opened last Saturday evening next door but one to our boarding house, in the house formerly owned and occupied by Kenderton Smith, & got two cherry cobblers & some cigars.

3 June 1847. At the office all day until about 6 p.m. when I went to my wash woman's at Schuylkill 8th and Race Streets.

4 June 1847. In the evening went up to the Walnut Street Theater with Samuel Bonnell, Jr. and Henry J. Felters to see the Viennoises Danseuses. The entertainment commenced with the dance called "L'Allemande" which was a very chaste and beautiful affair. This was followed by the farce called Loan of a Lover, quite amusing and laughable. I have seen it several times before, thence the dance called Les Sauvages et le Minoir. This was the most beautiful and most astonishing dance I ever witnessed. It is performed in the following manner: A large piece of white gauze or crepe is placed on the stage in a frame so as to represent an immense looking glass. A part of the dancers perform on the front of the stage, while another party perform behind the gauze or crepe in complete harmony with those in front as to make the illusion complete. I never saw anything more beautiful. How they can have everything so completely arranged is impossible for me to comprehend. If one is standing by the edge of the glass, and places even her arm out it is reflected by one on the other side, the same as if before a real glass. The moving of every dancer before the glass is represented in every particular so that the illusion is complete. It is certainly well worth seeing. This dance was followed by the farce of the Two Thompsons quite an amusing and laughable affair, which was followed by the dance called La Tyolienne by 24 dancers which was, as were their other dances, quite beautiful. Next was the farce of a Pleasant Neighbor and the evening concluded with the beautiful dance called Le Gallop Des Drapeaux or the Great National Flag Dance in which the whole 48 dancers performed. One half were dressed in red, and the remainder in white each one bearing an American flag. Their maneuvers were beautiful indeed, and drew down much applause. In the last part there was a beautiful tableaux composed by the whole troop of dancers and flags, illuminated with blue & red lights, with the words America Victorious & Honor to the Brave.

5 June 1847. At the office during the morning and at 2 p.m. left for Burlington on board the Steamer Trenton to accompany Miss Atlee to Burlington and thence to Mr. Bullock's near Recklesstown about 15 minutes from Burlington. I am to wait upon her as a bridesmaid on Tuesday next. Arrived at Burlington about 1/2 past 3, met Mr. Hays on the wharf, and went up to the hotel where we remained about an hour. I was to have taken Miss Atlee out alone, but as I was not very well acquainted with the road, Mr. Hays concluded to go with us. After a pleasant ride of 2 hours and a half arrived at Mr. Bullock's.

6 June 1847. After breakfast took a walk with the ladies, Mr. Hays (of course) with Miss C. Davis and I with Miss Atlee. We had a delightful walk up over the hill back of the house and through the woods. We returned about 9 o'clock. From the top of the hill you have a beautiful view of the surrounding country, and of the whole of Mr. Bullock's Place which contains about 300 acres, and is one of the most beautifully located farms I ever met with.

I am very much pleased with Miss Atlee, as I find her to be a lady of much intelligence and of sound sense, and withal quite pretty and pleasing in her manners. We left Mr. Bullock's about 10 o'clock & drove down to Mr. Hay's father's place about 3 miles from Burlington by about 12 N. We had a delightful ride as the day was so clear, cool and pleasant. At Mr. Hays' saw his father & mother, 3 of his sisters, 3 other ladies & a gentleman whose names I do not remember.

At about 1/4 past 4 started for Philadelphia on board the steamer Sun. I cannot say we had the most select party in the world on board. We were two hours and a half before we were landed at the Chestnut Street wharf. I expected to have got in town by 1/2 past 6 or 1/4 of 7.

Upon my arrival went up home, got a little supper and then went up to Mr. Jones' in Chestnut above 8th to deliver a couple of letters, then down in Pine Street below 8th to call upon Miss Louisa M. Clarke, but found the family had not yet moved there. I then went around to the old house in Arch below 3rd. Found her in looking as pretty as ever, and spent a very pleasant evening.

7 June 1847. At the office during the greater part of the day until 1/2 past 4 p.m. when I left Philadelphia on board the John Stevens for Burlington where we arrived after a stoppage at Bristol, and pleasant trip at about 6 p.m. Met on board a Mr. Whitman on his way to Trenton, and Mr. Theodore Hart. Upon my arrival at the wharf met Mr. William Hays, whom I am to wait upon as groomsman tomorrow. He had a pair of horses and carriage in waiting and we drove out to his father's place first stopping at James H. Sterling's for me to leave a package for Mr. Sterling.

Employed myself during the greater part of the evening attending to some little matters for Mr. Hays. Up 20 m. of 6 a.m. and went over to the office, and was employed until breakfast time preparing cards to be sent out after Mr. Hays' wedding.

8 June 1847. Clear cool and pleasant all day and during the evening. Got up this morning at 1/4 of 7, dressed, and went down to breakfast. At about 1/2 past 8 Mr. Hays and I started in a two horse carriage, driven by a black driver, for Mr. William W. Bullock's about 2 miles from Recklesstown, where we arrived at about 1/2 past 10, after attending to several different matters. Went up into the dressing room to prepare the groom & myself in the way of dressing, for the anticipated nuptials.

About 1/2 past 11 Bishop G.W. Doane of Burlington arrived to perform the ceremony. I went down, received & introduced him, & then finished my toilet. At 12 o'clock, the company being in the parlor, together with the Bishop, the bridal party came down in the following order, viz., Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin W. Jones (who were married this day a week ago, his wife being the twin sister of the lady to be married today), Miss Eliza Atlee, and myself. Then came Mr. William H. Hays and Miss Caroline Davis, the pair to be united.

The ceremony was gone through in a very solemn manner, and both Mr. Hays and Miss Davis got through admirably. As soon as the congratulations were over, cake and wine were handed and at about 1 o'clock the company passed into an adjoining room where was placed a table well filled with all the delicacies of the season, including oysters fried & stewed, cold meats & fowls, chicken salad, champagne, wines, &c. Everyone seemed to do justice to the vittles, and the mirth and hilarity of the company ran high. Bishop Doane was very lively and seemed not to mind any jokes. He added much to the mirth of the company. A short time after the entertainment, I cut the bride's cake and had it handed around.

About 1/2 past 2, the ladies left the parlor to change their dresses and prepare for leaving. Mr. & Mrs. Hays and Mr. & Mrs. B.W. Jones are to leave for Niagara, Montreal, Quebec, &c. this afternoon. At about 1/4 past 4 the bridal party, that is Mr. & Mrs. Hays and Miss Eliza Atlee & I in one carriage, Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin W. Jones in another, followed by their bridesmaid driven by Mr. W. Bullock, their groomsman, with Mr. Henniss in our carriage, drove over to Bordentown and stopped at Kesters Hotel. At 1/4 of 6 left Bordentown for Trenton in the cars, where we arrived in about 15 minutes. In a short time the cars for Philadelphia came along, & the two brides and grooms left us to proceed on their journey. They go as far as Newark tonight. I hope they may have a pleasant trip, and a long life of pleasure.

After the cars started we took a walk down along by the cottages & returned in time to take the cars for Philadelphia which passed along about 1/4 past 7.

9 June 1847. In the evening at 8 p.m. met Mr. S. Bonnell, Jr. according to engagement at the "Odd Fellows' Hall." We then called up to see Miss Kate Smith in Washington Street above 11th but found she had gone to Reading on Monday last to spend the summer.

10 June 1847. At the office all day. In the evening about 8 o'clock called up to see Miss Eliza Atlee at No. 8 Colonnade Row. Found her with her bonnet on just about to go down to the Academy of Fine Arts with her father. Found her quite well and remained but a few minutes. Then called up to see Miss Elizabeth Penn-Gaskell in Schuylkill 5th Street West side, a few doors above Arch. I found her in looking quite pretty and fascinating. She was very agreeable and entertaining. She favored us with some beautiful songs, with guitar accompaniment, and some favorite airs on the piano, with singing. I think her a charming girl, and I do not remember when I spent an evening more agreeably. This was my first visit at the house, though I may say that I have known her for the last 3 years, though we have not spoken for the last year (for no particular cause) until we met at the picnic. I have taken a great fancy to her, and I think if my visits hereafter shall be as favorably received as that of to night, they will be more often.

I left about 1/4 past l0 though not without first having made an engagement to go to the Academy of Fine Arts tomorrow. On my way home met Mr. J. VanSciver at the corner of 9th & Chestnut. I stopped and talked with him some 15 minutes when Samuel Bonnell came along when he invited us to go up to Brooks in 8th above Cherry to take some ice cream.

11 June 1847. At the office all day and in the evening about 8 o'clock called up for Miss Elizabeth Penn-Gaskell to accompany her to the Academy of Fine Arts as per the engagement made last evening. On our way down we stopped at Miss Addie BrincklZ, Miss Penn-Gaskell wishing to see her. It was proposed by Miss Penn-Gaskell that Miss BrincklZ accompany us which after some little hesitation she consented to do. We did not get down to the Exhibition until after 9 o'clock. The display of paintings was very fine. It is said the finest that has ever been exhibited in the United States. The arrangements are beautiful.

Miss BrincklZ remained with us but very little after entering the room as she met there the gentleman to whom she is engaged to be married, a Mr. Jonathan Bunker. He did not appear to be pleased with the idea of her being with me and so accompanied her home. I was not sorry as I preferred the exclusive company of Miss Penn-Gaskell. When we were about leaving found it raining but in a short time it stopped when Miss Penn-Gaskell and I went over to an Ice Cream store in Chestnut above 11th and got some ice cream.

Upon leaving the store we had scarcely got to 12th and Chestnut when it commenced raining and we were obliged to stop in the drug store at the corner. After it ceased, we returned to Addie BrincklZ's to get an umbrella but it seemed they had retired as the only summons we got to ringing of the bell was to have someone poke their head out of the windows without saying a word. Upon noticing the stars were out we started home where we arrived safe without a ducking. Bed at 1/4 of 12 p.m.

12 June 1847. In the evening went up to the Academy of Fine Arts with Edward J. Maginnis and Henry J. Felters. There were but few persons there this evening.

13 June 1847. At St Phillip's Church in the morning with H.J. Felters. Sat in Dr. William Irwin's pew. Mr. Neville preached. After church took a walk. After dinner went to my room, took a nap until about 1/4 of 4, then got up & walked up as far as St. Phillip's Church, remained but a few minutes.a

14 June 1847. The weather t