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GENDER JUSTICE AND DEVELOPMENT:
LOCAL  AND GLOBAL

Ninth International Conference of the
International Development Ethics Association

Bryn Mawr College
Bryn Mawr,
Pennsylvania, U.S.
June 9-11, 2011
 
 
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Contact Information:
Christine Koggel
email: ckoggel@brynmawr.edu









 

 
 
   
IDEA CONFERENCE

Organized by
THE INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ETHICS ASSOCIATION (IDEA)
with
Centre on Values and Ethics (COVE) at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, and Center for International Studies (CIS), and Department of Philosophy at Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA

 
Plenary Speaker

Naila Kabeer, Professor of Development Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies, London University

Plenary Panels


“CARE AND JUSTICE: THINKING RELATIONALLY"                          


  • Joan Tronto, Department of Political Science, University of Minnesota, U.S.
  • Jennifer Llewellyn, Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University, Canada

 

“GENDER AND CLIMATE CHANGE"                                                    

  • Carolyn Sachs, Department of Women’s Studies, Pennsylvania State University, U.S.
  • Petra Tschakert, Department of Geography and the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute (EESI), Pennsylvania State University, U.S.

 

"EMPOWERMENT: LOCAL AND GLOBAL"                                         

  • Barbara Simon, School of Social Work, Columbia University, U.S.
  • Patti Petesch, Independent Consultant, International Poverty and Gender Research

 

The past several decades have brought world-wide agendas about rights and justice to the forefront of international policy debates. Throughout the 1990s, international United Nations conferences opened space for debate on the environment, human rights, population, and women. While it can be said that the economic and political crises of the new millennium have slowed the pace of commitments to the pursuit of equality for all, debates about how best to promote equality and justice in and through the development process continue. Many organizations at the local, national, and global levels now understand gender to be a central factor in policies for alleviating poverty or promoting economic growth. The changes wrought by measures such as improving health care for women and children and increasing women’s access to education, property, and work show the key role that women can play in development processes. Moreover, these processes help to remove discrimination on the basis of gender and to alleviate the inequalities and injustices that discriminatory practices and traditions produce.