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Department of Italian and Italian Studies
Bryn Mawr College
101 North Merion Avenue
Bryn Mawr, PA 19010-2899

Phone: (610) 526-5198
FAX: (610) 526-7479
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Courses

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2016

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ITAL B001-001 Elementary Italian Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWF Thomas Hall 111 Monserrati,M., Troncelliti,G.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTH Thomas Hall 111
ITAL B001-002 Elementary Italian Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWF Thomas Hall 111 Monserrati,M.
Lecture: 9:55 AM-10:45 AM TTH Thomas Hall 111
ITAL B101-001 Intermediate Italian Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Carpenter Library 15 Ricci,R.
ITAL B211-001 Primo Levi, the Holocaust, and Its Aftermath Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Thomas Hall 111 Patruno,N.
ITAL B307-001 Insiders and Outsiders: Otherness in Italian Literature Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM T Carpenter Library 17 Ricci,R.
ITAL B398-001 Senior Seminar Semester / 1 Lecture: Date/Time TBA Dept. staff, TBA
ITAL B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
ITAL B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
CITY B360-001 Topics: Urban Culture and Society: City of Rome Semester / 1 LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TH Taylor Hall B Morton,T.
FREN B213-001 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities: Critic Approaches to the World Semester / 1 LEC: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Thomas Hall 223 Sanquer,M.

Spring 2017

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ITAL B002-001 Elementary Italian II Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWF Monserrati,M., Troncelliti,G.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTH
ITAL B002-002 Elementary Italian II Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWF Monserrati,M., Troncelliti,G.
Lecture: 9:55 AM-10:45 AM TTH
ITAL B102-001 Intermediate Italian Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Ricci,R.
ITAL B214-001 The Myth of Venice (1800-2000) Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Monserrati,M.
Lecture: Date/Time TBA
ITAL B320-001 Nationalism and Freedom: The Italian Risorgimento in Foscolo, Manzoni, Leopardi Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM T Ricci,R.
ITAL B399-001 Senior Conference Semester / 1 Lecture: Date/Time TBA Dept. staff, TBA
ITAL B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
ITAL B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA

Fall 2017

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2016-17 Catalog Data

ITAL B001 Elementary Italian Fall 2016 The course is for students with no previous knowledge of Italian. It aims at giving the students a complete foundation in the Italian language, with particular attention to oral and written communication. The course will be conducted in Italian and will involve the study of all the basic structures of the language--phonological, grammatical, syntactical--with practice in conversation, reading, composition. Readings are chosen from a wide range of texts, while use of the language is encouraged through role-play, debates, songs, and creative composition. Course does not meet an Approach

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ITAL B002 Elementary Italian II Spring 2017 This course is the continuation of ITAL B001 and is intended for students who have started studying Italian the semester before. It aims at giving the students a complete foundation in the Italian language, with particular attention to oral and written communication. The course will be conducted in Italian and will involve the study of all the basic structures of the language--phonological, grammatical, syntactical--with practice in conversation, reading, composition. Readings are chosen from a wide range of texts, while use of the language is encouraged through role-play, debates, songs, and creative composition. Prerequisite: ITAL B001 or placement. Course does not meet an Approach

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ITAL B101 Intermediate Italian Fall 2016 This course provides students with a broader basis for learning to communicate effectively and accurately in Italian. While the principal aspect of the course is to further develop language abilities, the course also imparts a foundation for the understanding of modern and contemporary Italy. Students will gain an appreciation for Italian culture and be able to communicate orally and in writing in a wide variety of topics. We will read newspaper and magazine articles to analyze aspects on modern and contemporary Italy. We will also view and discuss Italian films and internet materials. Course does not meet an Approach

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ITAL B102 Intermediate Italian Spring 2017 This course provides students with a broader basis for learning to communicate effectively and accurately in Italian. While the principal aspect of the course is to further develop language abilities, the course also imparts a foundation for the understanding of modern and contemporary Italy. Students will gain an appreciation for Italian culture and be able to communicate orally and in writing in a wide variety of topics. We will read a novel to analyze aspects on modern and contemporary Italy. We will also view and discuss Italian films and internet materials. Prerequisite: ITAL B101 or placement. Course does not meet an Approach

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ITAL B207 Dante in Translation Not offered 2016-17 A reading of the Vita Nuova (Poems of Youth) and The Divine Comedy: Hell, Purgatory and Paradise in order to discover the subtle nuances of meaning in the text and to introduce students to Dante's tripartite vision of the afterlife. Dante's masterpiece lends itself to study from various perspectives: theological, philosophical, political, allegorical, historical, cultural, and literary. Personal journey, civic responsibilities, love, genre, governmental accountability, church-state relations, the tenuous balance between freedom of expression and censorship--these are some of the themes that will frame the discussions. Course taught in English; One additional hour for students who want Italian credit (ITAL 301). Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ITAL B211 Primo Levi, the Holocaust, and Its Aftermath Fall 2016 A consideration, through analysis and appreciation of his major works, of how the horrific experience of the Holocaust awakened in Primo Levi a growing awareness of his Jewish heritage and led him to become one of the dominant voices of that tragic historical event, as well as one of the most original new literary figures of post-World War II Italy. Always in relation to Levi and his works, attention will also be given to Italian women writers whose works are also connected with the Holocaust. Course is taught in English. An extra hour will be scheduled for those students taking the course for Italian or Romance Languages credit. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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ITAL B212 Italy Today: New Voices, New Writers, New Literature Not offered 2016-17 This course, taught in English, will focus primarily on the works of the so-called "migrant writers" who, having adopted the Italian language, have become a significant part of the new voice of Italy. In addition to the aesthetic appreciation of these works, this course will also take into consideration the social, cultural, and political factors surrounding them. The course will focus on works by writers who are now integral to Italian canon - among them: Cristina Ali-Farah, Igiaba Scego, Ghermandi Gabriella, Amara Lakhous. As part of the course, movies concerned with various aspects of Italian Migrant literature will be screened and analyzed. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B214 The Myth of Venice (1800-2000) Spring 2017 The Republic of Venice existed for over a millennium. This course begins in the year 1797 at the end of the Republic and the emerging of an extensive body of literature centered on Venice and its mythical facets. Readings will include the Romantic views of Venice (excerpts from Lord Byron, Fredrick Schiller, Wolfang von Goethe, Ugo Foscolo, Alessandro Manzoni) and the 20th century reshaping of the literary myth (readings from Thomas Mann, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Gabriele D'Annunzio, Henry James, and others). A journey into this fascinating tradition will shed light on how the literary and visual representation of Venice, rather than focusing on a nostalgic evocation of the death of the Republic, became a territory of exploration for literary modernity. The course is offered in English; all texts are provided in translation. One additional hour for the students who are taking the course for Italian credit. Suggested Preparation: At least two 200-level literature courses. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B215 The City of Naples Not offered 2016-17 The city of Naples emerged during the Later Middle Ages as the capital of a Kingdom and one of the most influential cities in the Mediterranean region. What led to the city's rise, and what effect did the city as a cultural, political, and economic force have on the rest of the region and beyond? This course will familiarize students with the art, architecture, culture, and institutions that made the city one of the most influential in Europe and the Mediterranean region during the Late Middle Ages. Topics include court painters in service to the crown, female monastic spaces and patronage, and the revival of dynastic tomb sculpture. Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ITAL B219 Multiculturalism in Medieval Italy Not offered 2016-17 This course examines cross-cultural interactions in medieval Italy played out through the patronage, production, and reception of works of art and architecture. Sites of patronage and production include the cities of Venice, Palermo, and Pisa. Media examined include buildings, mosaics, ivories, and textiles. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ITAL B229 Food in Italian Literature, Culture, and Cinema Not offered 2016-17 Taught in English. A profile of Italian literature/culture/cinema obtained through an analysis of gastronomic documents, films, literary texts, and magazines. We will also include a discussion of the Slow Food Revolution, a movement initiated in Italy in 1980 and now with a world-wide following, and its social, economic, ecological, aesthetic, and cultural impact to counteract fast food and to promote local food traditions. Course taught in English. One additional hour for students who want Italian credit . Prerequisite: ITAL 102 Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B235 Italian Women's Movement and National Identity: Heroines In and Out of the Canon Not offered 2016-17 Emphasis will be put on Italian women writers and film directors, who are often left out of syllabi adhering to traditional canons. Particular attention will be paid to: a) women writers who have found their voices (through writing) as a means of psychological survival in a patriarchal world; b) women engaged in the women's movement of the 70's and who continue to look at, and rewrite, women's stories of empowerment and solidarity; c) "divaism", fame, via beauty and sex with a particular emphasis on the '60s (i.e. Gina Lollobrigida, Sofia Loren, Claudia Cardinale). Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ITAL B255 Uomini d'onore in Sicilia: Italian Mafia in Literature and Cinema Not offered 2016-17 This course aims to explore representations of Mafia figures in Italian literature and cinema, with reference also to Italian-American films, starting from the 'classical' example of Sicily. The course will introduce students to both Italian Studies from an interdisciplinary prospective and also to narrative fiction, using Italian literature written by 19th, 20th, and 21st Italian Sicilian authors. Course is taught in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL B102 or permission of the instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B301 Dante Not offered 2016-17 A reading of the Vita Nuova (Poems of Youth) and The Divine Comedy: Hell, Purgatory and Paradise in order to discover the subtle nuances of meaning in the text and to introduce students to Dante's tripartite vision of the afterlife. Dante's masterpiece lends itself to study from various perspectives: theological, philosophical, political, allegorical, historical, cultural, and literary. Personal journey, civic responsibilities, love, genre, governmental accountability, church-state relations, the tenuous balance between freedom of expression and censorship--these are some of the themes that will frame the discussions. Prerequisite: At least two 200-level literature courses.

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ITAL B307 Insiders and Outsiders: Otherness in Italian Literature Fall 2016 This course will introduce students to the most representative works in Italian literature of all genres --poetry, novels, scientific prose, theater, diaries, narrative, epistolary-- with special emphasis on topics such as marginalization, exile, political persecution, national identity, memory, violence, and otherness. We will bring works of literature to the attention of students who are interested in the key role played by Italian culture in the development of a European civilization, including the international debate on modernity and post-modernity. Readings and lectures will move from 14th century writers (Dante, Boccaccio) to Humanistic Thought (Florentine political revolution) and the Renaissance (Machiavelli); from the Enlightenment (Foscolo, Leopardi, Manzoni) to modernity (Pirandello, Svevo) and post-modernism (Italo Calvino).

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ITAL B310 Detective Fiction Not offered 2016-17 In English. Why is detective fiction so popular? What explains the continuing multiplication of detective texts despite the seemingly finite number of available plots? This course will explore the worldwide fascination with this genre beginning with European writers before turning to the more distant mystery stories from around the world. The international scope of the readings will highlight how authors in different countries have developed their own national detective typologies while simultaneously responding to international influence of the British-American model. Italian majors taking this course for Italian credit will be required to meet for an additional hour with the instructor and to do the readings and writing in Italian. Suggested Preparation: One literature course at the 200 level. Writing Intensive Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B320 Nationalism and Freedom: The Italian Risorgimento in Foscolo, Manzoni, Leopardi Spring 2017 This course deals with 19th century Italian poetry and literary movement for Italian unification inspired by the realities of the new economic and political forces at work after 1815. As a manifestation of the nationalism sweeping over Europe during the nineteenth century, the Risorgimento aimed to unite Italy under one flag and one government. For many Italians, however, Risorgimento meant more than political unity. It described a movement for the renewal of Italian society and people beyond purely political aims. Among Italian patriots the common denominator was a desire for freedom from foreign control, liberalism, and constitutionalism. The course will discuss issues such as Enlightenment, Romanticism, Nationalism, and the complex relationship between history and literature in Foscolo, Manzoni, and Leopardi. This course is taught in Italian. Prerequisite: one 200 level Italian course.

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ITAL B330 Architecture and Identity in Italy: Renaissance to the Present Not offered 2016-17 How is architecture used to shape our understanding of past and current identities? This course looks at the ways in which architecture has been understood to represent, and used to shape regional, national, ethnic, and gender identities in Italy from the Renaissance to the present. The class focuses on Italy's classical traditions, and looks at the ways in which architects and theorists have accepted or rejected the peninsula's classical roots. Subjects studied include Baroque Architecture, the Risorgimento, Futurism, Fascism, and colonialism. Course readings include Vitruvius, Leon Battista Alberti, Giorgio Vasari, Jacob Burckhardt, and Alois Riegl, among others.

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ITAL B340 The Art of Italian Unification Not offered 2016-17 Following Italian unification (1815-1871), the statesman, novelist, and painter Massimo d'Azeglio remarked, "Italy has been made; now it remains to make Italians." This course examines the art and architectural movements of the roughly 100 years between the uprisings of 1848 and the beginning of the Second World War, a critical period for defining Italiantà. Subjects include the paintings of the Macchiaioli, reactionaries to the 1848 uprisings and the Italian Independence Wars, the politics of nineteenth-century architectural restoration in Italy, the re-urbanization of Italy's new capital Rome, Fascist architecture and urbanism, and the architecture of Italy's African colonies. Writing Intensive

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ITAL B380 Modernity and Psychoanalysis: Crossing National Boundaries in 20th c. Italy and Europe Not offered 2016-17 Designed as an in-depth interdisciplinary exploration of Italy's intellectual life, the course is organized around major literary and cultural trends in 20th century Europe, including philosophical ideas and cinema. We investigate Italian fiction in the global and international perspective, from modernity to Freud and Psychoanalysis, going beyond national boundaries and proposing ethical models across historical times. Prerequisite: One 200-Level course in Italian

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ITAL B398 Senior Seminar This course is open only to seniors in Italian and in Romance Languages. Under the direction of the instructor, each student prepares a senior thesis on an author or a theme that the student has chosen. By the end of the fall semester, students must have completed an abstract and a critical annotated bibliography to be presented to the department. See Thesis description.

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ITAL B399 Senior Conference Under the direction of the instructor, each student prepares a senior thesis on an author or a theme that the student has chosen. In April there will be an oral defense with members and majors of the Italian Department. See Thesis description. Prerequisite: This course is open only to seniors in Italian Studies and Romance Languages.

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ITAL B403 Supervised Work Offered with approval of the Department.

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ITAL B403 Supervised Work Offered with approval of the Department.

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CITY B360 Topics: Urban Culture and Society
Section 001 (Fall 2015): Architecture of the Eternal City
Section 001 (Fall 2016): City of Rome
Section 001 (Spring 2016): Digital Rome Fall 2016 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: In this seminar we will study the city of Rome through time and space and will start with the city's mythical founding and work our way through contemporary Rome. Focal points will include: the Roman Empire, the urban planning of the Baroque popes, Mussolini's 'Third Rome,' and the contemporary city of Renzo Piano, Richard Meier, and Zaha Hadid. Throughout this discussion-based course we will examine innumerable issues, such as the use and abuse of the past throughout the city's long history.

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FREN B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2016): Critic Approaches to the World
Section 001 (Fall 2015): Critical Theories Fall 2016 An examination in English of leading theories of interpretation from Classical Tradition to Modern and Post-Modern Time. This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: FREN 102 or 105.
Current topic description: This course will be taught in English and focus on works of French feminist, postcolonial and post-structuralist theory. While our primary critical texts will draw from a particular linguistic tradition (namely French), and more or less distinctly circumscribed fields, we will also look at the broader transcultural and translinguistic influences that brought these "schools" into being and, most importantly, what fields of thinking they have subsequently inspired across language traditions.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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HART B630 Topics in Renaissance and Baroque Art
Section 001 (Fall 2015): Mannerism Not offered 2016-17 This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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HIST B238 From Bordellos to Cybersex History of Sexuality in Modern Europe Not offered 2016-17 This course is a detailed examination of the changing nature and definition of sexuality in Europe from the late nineteenth century to the present. Throughout the semester we critically examine how understandings of sexuality changed--from how it was discussed and how authorities tried to control it to how the practice of sexuality evolved. Focusing on both discourses and lived experiences, the class will explore sexuality in the context of the following themes; prostitution and sex trafficking, the rise of medicine with a particular attention to sexology, psychiatry and psychoanalysis; the birth of the homo/hetero/bisexual divide; the rise of the "New Woman"; abortion and contraception; the "sexual revolution" of the 60s; pornography and consumerism; LGBTQ activism; concluding with considering sexuality in the age of cyber as well as genetic technology. In examining these issues we will question the role and influence of different political systems and war on sexuality. By paying special attention to the rise of modern nation-states, forces of nationalism, and the impacts of imperialism we will interrogate the nature of regulation and experiences of sexuality in different locations in Europe from the late nineteenth century to the present. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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